asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Add page break to pdf SDK Library API .net asp.net azure sharepoint PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics70-part1825

crowd of people with movement in different directions but a general trend to move forward. There are lots of collisions with atoms in the metal
wire and, of course, with other electrons.
Drift Velocity
Electrical signals are known to move very rapidly. Telephone conversations carried by currents in wires cover large distances without noticeable
delays. Lights come on as soon as a switch is flicked. Most electrical signals carried by currents travel at speeds on the order of
10
8
m/s
, a
significant fraction of the speed of light. Interestingly, the individual charges that make up the current movemuchmore slowly on average, typically
drifting at speeds on the order of
10
−4
m/s
. How do we reconcile these two speeds, and what does it tell us about standard conductors?
The high speed of electrical signals results from the fact that the force between charges acts rapidly at a distance. Thus, when a free charge is forced
into a wire, as inFigure 20.5, the incoming charge pushes other charges ahead of it, which in turn push on charges farther down the line. The density
of charge in a system cannot easily be increased, and so the signal is passed on rapidly. The resulting electrical shock wave moves through the
system at nearly the speed of light. To be precise, this rapidly moving signal or shock wave is a rapidly propagating change in electric field.
Figure 20.5When charged particles are forced into this volume of a conductor, an equal number are quickly forced to leave. The repulsion between like charges makes it
difficult to increase the number of charges in a volume. Thus, as one charge enters, another leaves almost immediately, carrying the signal rapidly forward.
Good conductors have large numbers of free charges in them. In metals, the free charges are free electrons.Figure 20.6shows how free electrons
move through an ordinary conductor. The distance that an individual electron can move between collisions with atoms or other electrons is quite
small. The electron paths thus appear nearly random, like the motion of atoms in a gas. But there is an electric field in the conductor that causes the
electrons to drift in the direction shown (opposite to the field, since they are negative). Thedrift velocity
v
d
is the average velocity of the free
charges. Drift velocity is quite small, since there are so many free charges. If we have an estimate of the density of free electrons in a conductor, we
can calculate the drift velocity for a given current. The larger the density, the lower the velocity required for a given current.
Figure 20.6Free electrons moving in a conductor make many collisions with other electrons and atoms. The path of one electron is shown. The average velocity of the free
charges is called the drift velocity,
v
d
, and it is in the direction opposite to the electric field for electrons. The collisions normally transfer energy to the conductor, requiring a
constant supply of energy to maintain a steady current.
Conduction of Electricity and Heat
Good electrical conductors are often good heat conductors, too. This is because large numbers of free electrons can carry electrical current and
can transport thermal energy.
The free-electron collisions transfer energy to the atoms of the conductor. The electric field does work in moving the electrons through a distance, but
that work does not increase the kinetic energy (nor speed, therefore) of the electrons. The work is transferred to the conductor’s atoms, possibly
increasing temperature. Thus a continuous power input is required to keep a current flowing. An exception, of course, is found in superconductors, for
reasons we shall explore in a later chapter. Superconductors can have a steady current without a continual supply of energy—a great energy
savings. In contrast, the supply of energy can be useful, such as in a lightbulb filament. The supply of energy is necessary to increase the
temperature of the tungsten filament, so that the filament glows.
Making Connections: Take-Home Investigation—Filament Observations
Find a lightbulb with a filament. Look carefully at the filament and describe its structure. To what points is the filament connected?
CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
699
Add page break to pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break apart a pdf file; a pdf page cut
Add page break to pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
split pdf into individual pages; pdf no pages selected
We can obtain an expression for the relationship between current and drift velocity by considering the number of free charges in a segment of wire,
as illustrated inFigure 20.7.The number of free charges per unit volumeis given the symbol
n
and depends on the material. The shaded segment
has a volume
Ax
, so that the number of free charges in it is
nAx
. The charge
ΔQ
in this segment is thus
qnAx
, where
q
is the amount of
charge on each carrier. (Recall that for electrons,
q
is
−1.60×10
−19
C
.) Current is charge moved per unit time; thus, if all the original charges
move out of this segment in time
Δt
, the current is
(20.7)
I=
ΔQ
Δt
=
qnAx
Δt
.
Note that
xt
is the magnitude of the drift velocity,
v
d
, since the charges move an average distance
x
in a time
Δt
. Rearranging terms gives
(20.8)
I=nqAv
d
,
where
I
is the current through a wire of cross-sectional area
A
made of a material with a free charge density
n
. The carriers of the current each
have charge
q
and move with a drift velocity of magnitude
v
d
.
Figure 20.7All the charges in the shaded volume of this wire move out in a time
t
, having a drift velocity of magnitude
v
d
=x/t
. See text for further discussion.
Note that simple drift velocity is not the entire story. The speed of an electron is much greater than its drift velocity. In addition, not all of the electrons
in a conductor can move freely, and those that do might move somewhat faster or slower than the drift velocity. So what do we mean by free
electrons? Atoms in a metallic conductor are packed in the form of a lattice structure. Some electrons are far enough away from the atomic nuclei that
they do not experience the attraction of the nuclei as much as the inner electrons do. These are the free electrons. They are not bound to a single
atom but can instead move freely among the atoms in a “sea” of electrons. These free electrons respond by accelerating when an electric field is
applied. Of course as they move they collide with the atoms in the lattice and other electrons, generating thermal energy, and the conductor gets
warmer. In an insulator, the organization of the atoms and the structure do not allow for such free electrons.
Example 20.3Calculating Drift Velocity in a Common Wire
Calculate the drift velocity of electrons in a 12-gauge copper wire (which has a diameter of 2.053 mm) carrying a 20.0-A current, given that there
is one free electron per copper atom. (Household wiring often contains 12-gauge copper wire, and the maximum current allowed in such wire is
usually 20 A.) The density of copper is
8.80×10
3
kg/m
3
.
Strategy
We can calculate the drift velocity using the equation
I=nqAv
d
. The current
I=20.0 A
is given, and
q= –1.60×10
–19
C
is the
charge of an electron. We can calculate the area of a cross-section of the wire using the formula
A=πr
2
,
where
r
is one-half the given
diameter, 2.053 mm. We are given the density of copper,
8.80×10
3
kg/m
3
,
and the periodic table shows that the atomic mass of copper is
63.54 g/mol. We can use these two quantities along with Avogadro’s number,
6.02×10
23
atoms/mol,
to determine
n,
the number of free
electrons per cubic meter.
Solution
First, calculate the density of free electrons in copper. There is one free electron per copper atom. Therefore, is the same as the number of
copper atoms per
m
3
. We can now find
n
as follows:
(20.9)
=
1e
atom
×
6.02×10
23
atoms
mol
×
1 mol
63.54 g
×
1000 g
kg
×
8.80×10
3
kg
1 m
3
= 8.342×10
28
e
/m
3
.
The cross-sectional area of the wire is
(20.10)
πr
2
π
2.053×10
−3
m
2
2
= 3.310×10
–6
m
2
.
700 CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Add necessary references to your C# project: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
split pdf into multiple files; break up pdf file
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
Add necessary references to your C# project: a document"); default: Console.WriteLine(" Fail: unknown error"); break; }. code just convert first word page to Png
split pdf by bookmark; break password pdf
Rearranging
I=nqAv
d
to isolate drift velocity gives
(20.11)
v
d
=
I
nqA
=
20.0 A
(8.342×10
28
/m
3
)(–1.60×10
–19
C)(3.310×10
–6
m
2
)
=–4.53×10
–4
m/s.
Discussion
The minus sign indicates that the negative charges are moving in the direction opposite to conventional current. The small value for drift velocity
(on the order of
10
−4
m/s
) confirms that the signal moves on the order of
10
12
times faster (about
10
8
m/s
) than the charges that carry it.
20.2Ohm’s Law: Resistance and Simple Circuits
What drives current? We can think of various devices—such as batteries, generators, wall outlets, and so on—which are necessary to maintain a
current. All such devices create a potential difference and are loosely referred to as voltage sources. When a voltage source is connected to a
conductor, it applies a potential difference
V
that creates an electric field. The electric field in turn exerts force on charges, causing current.
Ohm’s Law
The current that flows through most substances is directly proportional to the voltage
V
applied to it. The German physicist Georg Simon Ohm
(1787–1854) was the first to demonstrate experimentally that the current in a metal wire isdirectly proportional to the voltage applied:
(20.12)
IV.
This important relationship is known asOhm’s law. It can be viewed as a cause-and-effect relationship, with voltage the cause and current the effect.
This is an empirical law like that for friction—an experimentally observed phenomenon. Such a linear relationship doesn’t always occur.
Resistance and Simple Circuits
If voltage drives current, what impedes it? The electric property that impedes current (crudely similar to friction and air resistance) is called
resistance
R
. Collisions of moving charges with atoms and molecules in a substance transfer energy to the substance and limit current. Resistance
is defined as inversely proportional to current, or
(20.13)
I
1
R
.
Thus, for example, current is cut in half if resistance doubles. Combining the relationships of current to voltage and current to resistance gives
(20.14)
I=
V
R
.
This relationship is also called Ohm’s law. Ohm’s law in this form really defines resistance for certain materials. Ohm’s law (like Hooke’s law) is not
universally valid. The many substances for which Ohm’s law holds are calledohmic. These include good conductors like copper and aluminum, and
some poor conductors under certain circumstances. Ohmic materials have a resistance
R
that is independent of voltage
V
and current
I
. An
object that has simple resistance is called aresistor, even if its resistance is small. The unit for resistance is anohmand is given the symbol
Ω
(upper case Greek omega). Rearranging
I=V/R
gives
R=V/I
, and so the units of resistance are 1 ohm = 1 volt per ampere:
(20.15)
1 Ω=1
V
A
.
Figure 20.8shows the schematic for a simple circuit. Asimple circuithas a single voltage source and a single resistor. The wires connecting the
voltage source to the resistor can be assumed to have negligible resistance, or their resistance can be included in
R
.
Figure 20.8A simple electric circuit in which a closed path for current to flow is supplied by conductors (usually metal wires) connecting a load to the terminals of a battery,
represented by the red parallel lines. The zigzag symbol represents the single resistor and includes any resistance in the connections to the voltage source.
CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
701
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
pdf format specification; c# split pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function.
add page break to pdf; break apart pdf
Example 20.4Calculating Resistance: An Automobile Headlight
What is the resistance of an automobile headlight through which 2.50 A flows when 12.0 V is applied to it?
Strategy
We can rearrange Ohm’s law as stated by
I=V/R
and use it to find the resistance.
Solution
Rearranging
I=V/R
and substituting known values gives
(20.16)
R=
V
I
=
12.0 V
2.50 A
=4.80 Ω.
Discussion
This is a relatively small resistance, but it is larger than the cold resistance of the headlight. As we shall see inResistance and Resistivity,
resistance usually increases with temperature, and so the bulb has a lower resistance when it is first switched on and will draw considerably
more current during its brief warm-up period.
Resistances range over many orders of magnitude. Some ceramic insulators, such as those used to support power lines, have resistances of
10
12
Ω
or more. A dry person may have a hand-to-foot resistance of
10
5
Ω
, whereas the resistance of the human heart is about
10
3
Ω
. A
meter-long piece of large-diameter copper wire may have a resistance of
10
−5
Ω
, and superconductors have no resistance at all (they are non-
ohmic). Resistance is related to the shape of an object and the material of which it is composed, as will be seen inResistance and Resistivity.
Additional insight is gained by solving
I=V/R
for
V,
yielding
(20.17)
V=IR.
This expression for
V
can be interpreted as thevoltage drop across a resistor produced by the flow of current
I
. The phrase
IR
dropis often used
for this voltage. For instance, the headlight inExample 20.4has an
IR
drop of 12.0 V. If voltage is measured at various points in a circuit, it will be
seen to increase at the voltage source and decrease at the resistor. Voltage is similar to fluid pressure. The voltage source is like a pump, creating a
pressure difference, causing current—the flow of charge. The resistor is like a pipe that reduces pressure and limits flow because of its resistance.
Conservation of energy has important consequences here. The voltage source supplies energy (causing an electric field and a current), and the
resistor converts it to another form (such as thermal energy). In a simple circuit (one with a single simple resistor), the voltage supplied by the source
equals the voltage drop across the resistor, since
PE=qΔV
, and the same
q
flows through each. Thus the energy supplied by the voltage source
and the energy converted by the resistor are equal. (SeeFigure 20.9.)
Figure 20.9The voltage drop across a resistor in a simple circuit equals the voltage output of the battery.
Making Connections: Conservation of Energy
In a simple electrical circuit, the sole resistor converts energy supplied by the source into another form. Conservation of energy is evidenced here
by the fact that all of the energy supplied by the source is converted to another form by the resistor alone. We will find that conservation of
energy has other important applications in circuits and is a powerful tool in circuit analysis.
PhET Explorations: Ohm's Law
See how the equation form of Ohm's law relates to a simple circuit. Adjust the voltage and resistance, and see the current change according to
Ohm's law. The sizes of the symbols in the equation change to match the circuit diagram.
Figure 20.10Ohm's Law (http://cnx.org/content/m42344/1.4/ohms-law_en.jar)
702 CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
properties using C# TWAIN image acquiring library add-on step by device. TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE)
pdf print error no pages selected; break apart a pdf
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
are three parts on this page, including system Add the following C# demo code to device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod
pdf split; pdf no pages selected to print
20.3Resistance and Resistivity
Material and Shape Dependence of Resistance
The resistance of an object depends on its shape and the material of which it is composed. The cylindrical resistor inFigure 20.11is easy to analyze,
and, by so doing, we can gain insight into the resistance of more complicated shapes. As you might expect, the cylinder’s electric resistance
R
is
directly proportional to its length
L
, similar to the resistance of a pipe to fluid flow. The longer the cylinder, the more collisions charges will make with
its atoms. The greater the diameter of the cylinder, the more current it can carry (again similar to the flow of fluid through a pipe). In fact,
R
is
inversely proportional to the cylinder’s cross-sectional area
A
.
Figure 20.11A uniform cylinder of length
L
and cross-sectional area
A
. Its resistance to the flow of current is similar to the resistance posed by a pipe to fluid flow. The
longer the cylinder, the greater its resistance. The larger its cross-sectional area
A
, the smaller its resistance.
For a given shape, the resistance depends on the material of which the object is composed. Different materials offer different resistance to the flow of
charge. We define theresistivity
ρ
of a substance so that theresistance
R
of an object is directly proportional to
ρ
. Resistivity
ρ
is anintrinsic
property of a material, independent of its shape or size. The resistance
R
of a uniform cylinder of length
L
, of cross-sectional area
A
, and made of
a material with resistivity
ρ
, is
(20.18)
R=
ρL
A
.
Table 20.1gives representative values of
ρ
. The materials listed in the table are separated into categories of conductors, semiconductors, and
insulators, based on broad groupings of resistivities. Conductors have the smallest resistivities, and insulators have the largest; semiconductors have
intermediate resistivities. Conductors have varying but large free charge densities, whereas most charges in insulators are bound to atoms and are
not free to move. Semiconductors are intermediate, having far fewer free charges than conductors, but having properties that make the number of
free charges depend strongly on the type and amount of impurities in the semiconductor. These unique properties of semiconductors are put to use in
modern electronics, as will be explored in later chapters.
CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
703
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. acquire image to file using our C#.NET TWAIN Add-On Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
break apart pdf pages; break pdf into multiple pages
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
be found at this tutorial page of how TWAIN image scanning control add-on owns TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
can't cut and paste from pdf; break a pdf file
Table 20.1Resistivities
ρ
of Various materials at
20ºC
Material
Resistivity
ρ
(
Ω ⋅m
)
Conductors
Silver
1.59×10
−8
Copper
1.72×10
−8
Gold
2.44×10
−8
Aluminum
2.65×10
−8
Tungsten
5.6×10
−8
Iron
9.71×10
−8
Platinum
10.6×10
−8
Steel
20×10
−8
Lead
22×10
−8
Manganin (Cu, Mn, Ni alloy)
44×10
−8
Constantan (Cu, Ni alloy)
49×10
−8
Mercury
96×10
−8
Nichrome (Ni, Fe, Cr alloy) 100×10
−8
Semiconductors
[1]
Carbon (pure)
3.5×10
5
Carbon
(3.5−60)×10
5
Germanium (pure)
600×10
−3
Germanium
(1−600)×10
−3
Silicon (pure)
2300
Silicon
0.1–2300
Insulators
Amber
5×10
14
Glass
10
9
−10
14
Lucite
>10
13
Mica
10
11
−10
15
Quartz (fused)
75×10
16
Rubber (hard)
10
13
−10
16
Sulfur
10
15
Teflon
>10
13
Wood
10
8
−10
11
1. Values depend strongly on amounts and types of impurities
704 CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Example 20.5Calculating Resistor Diameter: A Headlight Filament
A car headlight filament is made of tungsten and has a cold resistance of
0.350 Ω
. If the filament is a cylinder 4.00 cm long (it may be coiled
to save space), what is its diameter?
Strategy
We can rearrange the equation
R=
ρL
A
to find the cross-sectional area
A
of the filament from the given information. Then its diameter can be
found by assuming it has a circular cross-section.
Solution
The cross-sectional area, found by rearranging the expression for the resistance of a cylinder given in
R=
ρL
A
, is
(20.19)
A=
ρL
R
.
Substituting the given values, and taking
ρ
fromTable 20.1, yields
(20.20)
=
(5.6×10
–8
Ω ⋅m)(4.00×10
–2
m)
1.350 Ω
= 6.40×10
–9
m
2
.
The area of a circle is related to its diameter
D
by
(20.21)
A=
πD
2
4
.
Solving for the diameter
D
, and substituting the value found for
A
, gives
(20.22)
= 2
A
p
1
2
=2
6.40×10
–9
m
2
3.14
1
2
= 9.0×10
–5
m.
Discussion
The diameter is just under a tenth of a millimeter. It is quoted to only two digits, because
ρ
is known to only two digits.
Temperature Variation of Resistance
The resistivity of all materials depends on temperature. Some even become superconductors (zero resistivity) at very low temperatures. (SeeFigure
20.12.) Conversely, the resistivity of conductors increases with increasing temperature. Since the atoms vibrate more rapidly and over larger
distances at higher temperatures, the electrons moving through a metal make more collisions, effectively making the resistivity higher. Over relatively
small temperature changes (about
100ºC
or less), resistivity
ρ
varies with temperature change
ΔT
as expressed in the following equation
(20.23)
ρ=ρ
0
(1+αΔT),
where
ρ
0
is the original resistivity and
α
is thetemperature coefficient of resistivity. (See the values of
α
inTable 20.2below.) For larger
temperature changes,
α
may vary or a nonlinear equation may be needed to find
ρ
. Note that
α
is positive for metals, meaning their resistivity
increases with temperature. Some alloys have been developed specifically to have a small temperature dependence. Manganin (which is made of
copper, manganese and nickel), for example, has
α
close to zero (to three digits on the scale inTable 20.2), and so its resistivity varies only slightly
with temperature. This is useful for making a temperature-independent resistance standard, for example.
CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
705
Figure 20.12The resistance of a sample of mercury is zero at very low temperatures—it is a superconductor up to about 4.2 K. Above that critical temperature, its resistance
makes a sudden jump and then increases nearly linearly with temperature.
Table 20.2Tempature Coefficients of Resistivity
α
Material
Coefficient
α
(1/°C)
[2]
Conductors
Silver
3.8×10
−3
Copper
3.9×10
−3
Gold
3.4×10
−3
Aluminum
3.9×10
−3
Tungsten
4.5×10
−3
Iron
5.0×10
−3
Platinum
3.93×10
−3
Lead
3.9×10
−3
Manganin (Cu, Mn, Ni alloy)
0.000×10
−3
Constantan (Cu, Ni alloy)
0.002×10
−3
Mercury
0.89×10
−3
Nichrome (Ni, Fe, Cr alloy)
0.4×10
−3
Semiconductors
Carbon (pure)
−0.5×10
−3
Germanium (pure)
−50×10
−3
Silicon (pure)
−70×10
−3
Note also that
α
is negative for the semiconductors listed inTable 20.2, meaning that their resistivity decreases with increasing temperature. They
become better conductors at higher temperature, because increased thermal agitation increases the number of free charges available to carry
current. This property of decreasing
ρ
with temperature is also related to the type and amount of impurities present in the semiconductors.
The resistance of an object also depends on temperature, since
R
0
is directly proportional to
ρ
. For a cylinder we know
R=ρL/A
, and so, if
L
and
A
do not change greatly with temperature,
R
will have the same temperature dependence as
ρ
. (Examination of the coefficients of linear
expansion shows them to be about two orders of magnitude less than typical temperature coefficients of resistivity, and so the effect of temperature
on
L
and
A
is about two orders of magnitude less than on
ρ
.) Thus,
(20.24)
R=R
0
(1+αΔT)
2. Values at 20°C.
706 CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
is the temperature dependence of the resistance of an object, where
R
0
is the original resistance and
R
is the resistance after a temperature
change
ΔT
. Numerous thermometers are based on the effect of temperature on resistance. (SeeFigure 20.13.) One of the most common is the
thermistor, a semiconductor crystal with a strong temperature dependence, the resistance of which is measured to obtain its temperature. The device
is small, so that it quickly comes into thermal equilibrium with the part of a person it touches.
Figure 20.13These familiar thermometers are based on the automated measurement of a thermistor’s temperature-dependent resistance. (credit: Biol, Wikimedia Commons)
Example 20.6Calculating Resistance: Hot-Filament Resistance
Although caution must be used in applying
ρ=ρ
0
(1+αΔT)
and
R=R
0
(1+αΔT)
for temperature changes greater than
100ºC
, for
tungsten the equations work reasonably well for very large temperature changes. What, then, is the resistance of the tungsten filament in the
previous example if its temperature is increased from room temperature (
20ºC
) to a typical operating temperature of
2850ºC
?
Strategy
This is a straightforward application of
R=R
0
(1+αΔT)
, since the original resistance of the filament was given to be
R
0
=0.350 Ω
, and
the temperature change is
ΔT=2830ºC
.
Solution
The hot resistance
R
is obtained by entering known values into the above equation:
(20.25)
R
0
(1+αΔT)
= (0.350 Ω)[1+(4.5×10
–3
/ºC)(2830ºC)]
= 4.8 Ω.
Discussion
This value is consistent with the headlight resistance example inOhm’s Law: Resistance and Simple Circuits.
PhET Explorations: Resistance in a Wire
Learn about the physics of resistance in a wire. Change its resistivity, length, and area to see how they affect the wire's resistance. The sizes of
the symbols in the equation change along with the diagram of a wire.
Figure 20.14Resistance in a Wire (http://cnx.org/content/m42346/1.5/resistance-in-a-wire_en.jar)
20.4Electric Power and Energy
Power in Electric Circuits
Power is associated by many people with electricity. Knowing that power is the rate of energy use or energy conversion, what is the expression for
electric power? Power transmission lines might come to mind. We also think of lightbulbs in terms of their power ratings in watts. Let us compare a
25-W bulb with a 60-W bulb. (SeeFigure 20.15(a).) Since both operate on the same voltage, the 60-W bulb must draw more current to have a
greater power rating. Thus the 60-W bulb’s resistance must be lower than that of a 25-W bulb. If we increase voltage, we also increase power. For
example, when a 25-W bulb that is designed to operate on 120 V is connected to 240 V, it briefly glows very brightly and then burns out. Precisely
how are voltage, current, and resistance related to electric power?
CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
707
Figure 20.15(a) Which of these lightbulbs, the 25-W bulb (upper left) or the 60-W bulb (upper right), has the higher resistance? Which draws more current? Which uses the
most energy? Can you tell from the color that the 25-W filament is cooler? Is the brighter bulb a different color and if so why? (credits: Dickbauch, Wikimedia Commons; Greg
Westfall, Flickr) (b) This compact fluorescent light (CFL) puts out the same intensity of light as the 60-W bulb, but at 1/4 to 1/10 the input power. (credit: dbgg1979, Flickr)
Electric energy depends on both the voltage involved and the charge moved. This is expressed most simply as
PE=qV
, where
q
is the charge
moved and
V
is the voltage (or more precisely, the potential difference the charge moves through). Power is the rate at which energy is moved, and
so electric power is
(20.26)
P=
PE
t
=
qV
t
.
Recognizing that current is
I=q/t
(note that
Δt=t
here), the expression for power becomes
(20.27)
P=IV.
Electric power (
P
) is simply the product of current times voltage. Power has familiar units of watts. Since the SI unit for potential energy (PE) is the
joule, power has units of joules per second, or watts. Thus,
1 A⋅V=1 W
. For example, cars often have one or more auxiliary power outlets with
which you can charge a cell phone or other electronic devices. These outlets may be rated at 20 A, so that the circuit can deliver a maximum power
P=IV=(20 A)(12 V)=240 W
. In some applications, electric power may be expressed as volt-amperes or even kilovolt-amperes (
1 kA⋅V=1 kW
).
To see the relationship of power to resistance, we combine Ohm’s law with
P=IV
. Substituting
I=V/R
gives
P=(V/R)V=V
2
/R
. Similarly,
substituting
V=IR
gives
P=I(IR)=I
2
R
. Three expressions for electric power are listed together here for convenience:
(20.28)
P=IV
(20.29)
P=
V
2
R
(20.30)
P=I
2
R.
Note that the first equation is always valid, whereas the other two can be used only for resistors. In a simple circuit, with one voltage source and a
single resistor, the power supplied by the voltage source and that dissipated by the resistor are identical. (In more complicated circuits,
P
can be the
power dissipated by a single device and not the total power in the circuit.)
Different insights can be gained from the three different expressions for electric power. For example,
P=V
2
/R
implies that the lower the
resistance connected to a given voltage source, the greater the power delivered. Furthermore, since voltage is squared in
P=V
2
/R
, the effect of
applying a higher voltage is perhaps greater than expected. Thus, when the voltage is doubled to a 25-W bulb, its power nearly quadruples to about
100 W, burning it out. If the bulb’s resistance remained constant, its power would be exactly 100 W, but at the higher temperature its resistance is
higher, too.
Example 20.7Calculating Power Dissipation and Current: Hot and Cold Power
(a) Consider the examples given inOhm’s Law: Resistance and Simple CircuitsandResistance and Resistivity. Then find the power
dissipated by the car headlight in these examples, both when it is hot and when it is cold. (b) What current does it draw when cold?
Strategy for (a)
708 CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested