For the hot headlight, we know voltage and current, so we can use
P=IV
to find the power. For the cold headlight, we know the voltage and
resistance, so we can use
P=V
2
/R
to find the power.
Solution for (a)
Entering the known values of current and voltage for the hot headlight, we obtain
(20.31)
P=IV=(2.50 A)(12.0 V)=30.0 W.
The cold resistance was
0.350 Ω
, and so the power it uses when first switched on is
(20.32)
P=
V
2
R
=
(12.0 V)
2
0.350 Ω
=411 W.
Discussion for (a)
The 30 W dissipated by the hot headlight is typical. But the 411 W when cold is surprisingly higher. The initial power quickly decreases as the
bulb’s temperature increases and its resistance increases.
Strategy and Solution for (b)
The current when the bulb is cold can be found several different ways. We rearrange one of the power equations,
P=I
2
R
, and enter known
values, obtaining
(20.33)
I=
P
R
=
411 W
0.350 Ω
=34.3 A.
Discussion for (b)
The cold current is remarkably higher than the steady-state value of 2.50 A, but the current will quickly decline to that value as the bulb’s
temperature increases. Most fuses and circuit breakers (used to limit the current in a circuit) are designed to tolerate very high currents briefly as
a device comes on. In some cases, such as with electric motors, the current remains high for several seconds, necessitating special “slow blow”
fuses.
The Cost of Electricity
The more electric appliances you use and the longer they are left on, the higher your electric bill. This familiar fact is based on the relationship
between energy and power. You pay for the energy used. Since
P=E/t
, we see that
(20.34)
E=Pt
is the energy used by a device using power
P
for a time interval
t
. For example, the more lightbulbs burning, the greater
P
used; the longer they
are on, the greater
t
is. The energy unit on electric bills is the kilowatt-hour (
kW⋅h
), consistent with the relationship
E=Pt
. It is easy to
estimate the cost of operating electric appliances if you have some idea of their power consumption rate in watts or kilowatts, the time they are on in
hours, and the cost per kilowatt-hour for your electric utility. Kilowatt-hours, like all other specialized energy units such as food calories, can be
converted to joules. You can prove to yourself that
1 kW⋅h = 3.6×10
6
J
.
The electrical energy (
E
) used can be reduced either by reducing the time of use or by reducing the power consumption of that appliance or fixture.
This will not only reduce the cost, but it will also result in a reduced impact on the environment. Improvements to lighting are some of the fastest ways
to reduce the electrical energy used in a home or business. About 20% of a home’s use of energy goes to lighting, while the number for commercial
establishments is closer to 40%. Fluorescent lights are about four times more efficient than incandescent lights—this is true for both the long tubes
and the compact fluorescent lights (CFL). (SeeFigure 20.15(b).) Thus, a 60-W incandescent bulb can be replaced by a 15-W CFL, which has the
same brightness and color. CFLs have a bent tube inside a globe or a spiral-shaped tube, all connected to a standard screw-in base that fits standard
incandescent light sockets. (Original problems with color, flicker, shape, and high initial investment for CFLs have been addressed in recent years.)
The heat transfer from these CFLs is less, and they last up to 10 times longer. The significance of an investment in such bulbs is addressed in the
next example. New white LED lights (which are clusters of small LED bulbs) are even more efficient (twice that of CFLs) and last 5 times longer than
CFLs. However, their cost is still high.
Making Connections: Energy, Power, and Time
The relationship
E=Pt
is one that you will find useful in many different contexts. The energy your body uses in exercise is related to the power
level and duration of your activity, for example. The amount of heating by a power source is related to the power level and time it is applied. Even
the radiation dose of an X-ray image is related to the power and time of exposure.
Example 20.8Calculating the Cost Effectiveness of Compact Fluorescent Lights (CFL)
If the cost of electricity in your area is 12 cents per kWh, what is the total cost (capital plus operation) of using a 60-W incandescent bulb for 1000
hours (the lifetime of that bulb) if the bulb cost 25 cents? (b) If we replace this bulb with a compact fluorescent light that provides the same light
output, but at one-quarter the wattage, and which costs $1.50 but lasts 10 times longer (10,000 hours), what will that total cost be?
Strategy
To find the operating cost, we first find the energy used in kilowatt-hours and then multiply by the cost per kilowatt-hour.
CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
709
Pdf insert page break - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
can't select text in pdf file; pdf split file
Pdf insert page break - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
pdf file specification; c# print pdf to specific printer
Solution for (a)
The energy used in kilowatt-hours is found by entering the power and time into the expression for energy:
(20.35)
E=Pt=(60 W)(1000 h)=60,000 W⋅h.
In kilowatt-hours, this is
(20.36)
E=60.0 kW⋅h.
Now the electricity cost is
(20.37)
cost=(60.0 kW⋅h)($0.12/kW⋅h)=$7.20.
The total cost will be $7.20 for 1000 hours (about one-half year at 5 hours per day).
Solution for (b)
Since the CFL uses only 15 W and not 60 W, the electricity cost will be $7.20/4 = $1.80. The CFL will last 10 times longer than the incandescent,
so that the investment cost will be 1/10 of the bulb cost for that time period of use, or 0.1($1.50) = $0.15. Therefore, the total cost will be $1.95
for 1000 hours.
Discussion
Therefore, it is much cheaper to use the CFLs, even though the initial investment is higher. The increased cost of labor that a business must
include for replacing the incandescent bulbs more often has not been figured in here.
Making Connections: Take-Home Experiment—Electrical Energy Use Inventory
1) Make a list of the power ratings on a range of appliances in your home or room. Explain why something like a toaster has a higher rating than
a digital clock. Estimate the energy consumed by these appliances in an average day (by estimating their time of use). Some appliances might
only state the operating current. If the household voltage is 120 V, then use
P=IV
. 2) Check out the total wattage used in the rest rooms of
your school’s floor or building. (You might need to assume the long fluorescent lights in use are rated at 32 W.) Suppose that the building was
closed all weekend and that these lights were left on from 6 p.m. Friday until 8 a.m. Monday. What would this oversight cost? How about for an
entire year of weekends?
20.5Alternating Current versus Direct Current
Alternating Current
Most of the examples dealt with so far, and particularly those utilizing batteries, have constant voltage sources. Once the current is established, it is
thus also a constant.Direct current(DC) is the flow of electric charge in only one direction. It is the steady state of a constant-voltage circuit. Most
well-known applications, however, use a time-varying voltage source.Alternating current(AC) is the flow of electric charge that periodically
reverses direction. If the source varies periodically, particularly sinusoidally, the circuit is known as an alternating current circuit. Examples include the
commercial and residential power that serves so many of our needs.Figure 20.16shows graphs of voltage and current versus time for typical DC
and AC power. The AC voltages and frequencies commonly used in homes and businesses vary around the world.
Figure 20.16(a) DC voltage and current are constant in time, once the current is established. (b) A graph of voltage and current versus time for 60-Hz AC power. The voltage
and current are sinusoidal and are in phase for a simple resistance circuit. The frequencies and peak voltages of AC sources differ greatly.
710 CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Offer PDF page break inserting function. This demo will help you to insert a PDF page to a PDFDocument object at specified position in VB.NET program.
pdf rotate single page; break pdf password online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Offer PDF page break inserting function. NET PDF document editor library control, RasterEdge XDoc.PDF, offers easy APIs for developers to add & insert an (empty
break a pdf into parts; cannot print pdf no pages selected
Figure 20.17The potential difference
V
between the terminals of an AC voltage source fluctuates as shown. The mathematical expression for
V
is given by
V=V
0
sin2πft
.
Figure 20.17shows a schematic of a simple circuit with an AC voltage source. The voltage between the terminals fluctuates as shown, with theAC
voltagegiven by
(20.38)
V=V
0
sin2πft,
where
V
is the voltage at time
t
,
V
0
is the peak voltage, and
f
is the frequency in hertz. For this simple resistance circuit,
I=V/R
, and so the
AC currentis
(20.39)
I=I
0
sin 2πft,
where
I
is the current at time
t
, and
I
0
=V
0
/R
is the peak current. For this example, the voltage and current are said to be in phase, as seen in
Figure 20.16(b).
Current in the resistor alternates back and forth just like the driving voltage, since
I=V/R
. If the resistor is a fluorescent light bulb, for example, it
brightens and dims 120 times per second as the current repeatedly goes through zero. A 120-Hz flicker is too rapid for your eyes to detect, but if you
wave your hand back and forth between your face and a fluorescent light, you will see a stroboscopic effect evidencing AC. The fact that the light
output fluctuates means that the power is fluctuating. The power supplied is
P=IV
. Using the expressions for
I
and
V
above, we see that the
time dependence of power is
P=I
0
V
0
sin
2
2πft
, as shown inFigure 20.18.
Making Connections: Take-Home Experiment—AC/DC Lights
Wave your hand back and forth between your face and a fluorescent light bulb. Do you observe the same thing with the headlights on your car?
Explain what you observe.Warning: Do not look directly at very bright light.
Figure 20.18AC power as a function of time. Since the voltage and current are in phase here, their product is non-negative and fluctuates between zero and
I
0
V
0
. Average
power is
(1/2)I
0
V
0.
We are most often concerned with average power rather than its fluctuations—that 60-W light bulb in your desk lamp has an average power
consumption of 60 W, for example. As illustrated inFigure 20.18, the average power
P
ave
is
(20.40)
P
ave
=
1
2
I
0
V
0
.
This is evident from the graph, since the areas above and below the
(1/2)I
0
V
0
line are equal, but it can also be proven using trigonometric
identities. Similarly, we define an average orrms current
I
rms
and average orrms voltage
V
rms
to be, respectively,
CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
711
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
acrobat split pdf pages; pdf split pages in half
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. is not a document"); default: Console.WriteLine("Fail: unknown error"); break; }. This demo code just convert first word page to Png
cannot select text in pdf; break a pdf password
(20.41)
I
rms
=
I
0
2
and
(20.42)
V
rms
=
V
0
2
.
where rms stands for root mean square, a particular kind of average. In general, to obtain a root mean square, the particular quantity is squared, its
mean (or average) is found, and the square root is taken. This is useful for AC, since the average value is zero. Now,
(20.43)
P
ave
=I
rms
V
rms
,
which gives
(20.44)
P
ave
=
I
0
2
V
0
2
=
1
2
I
0
V
0
,
as stated above. It is standard practice to quote
I
rms
,
V
rms
, and
P
ave
rather than the peak values. For example, most household electricity is 120
V AC, which means that
V
rms
is 120 V. The common 10-A circuit breaker will interrupt a sustained
I
rms
greater than 10 A. Your 1.0-kW microwave
oven consumes
P
ave
=1.0 kW
, and so on. You can think of these rms and average values as the equivalent DC values for a simple resistive
circuit.
To summarize, when dealing with AC, Ohm’s law and the equations for power are completely analogous to those for DC, but rms and average values
are used for AC. Thus, for AC, Ohm’s law is written
(20.45)
I
rms
=
V
rms
R
.
The various expressions for AC power
P
ave
are
(20.46)
P
ave
=I
rms
V
rms
,
(20.47)
P
ave
=
V
rms
2
R
,
and
(20.48)
P
ave
=I
rms
2
R.
Example 20.9Peak Voltage and Power for AC
(a) What is the value of the peak voltage for 120-V AC power? (b) What is the peak power consumption rate of a 60.0-W AC light bulb?
Strategy
We are told that
V
rms
is 120 V and
P
ave
is 60.0 W. We can use
V
rms
=
V
0
2
to find the peak voltage, and we can manipulate the definition of
power to find the peak power from the given average power.
Solution for (a)
Solving the equation
V
rms
=
V
0
2
for the peak voltage
V
0
and substituting the known value for
V
rms
gives
(20.49)
V
0
= 2
V
rms
=1.414(120 V)=170 V.
Discussion for (a)
This means that the AC voltage swings from 170 V to
–170 V
and back 60 times every second. An equivalent DC voltage is a constant 120 V.
Solution for (b)
Peak power is peak current times peak voltage. Thus,
(20.50)
P
0
=I
0
V
0
=2
1
2
I
0
V
0
=2P
ave
.
We know the average power is 60.0 W, and so
(20.51)
P
0
=2(60.0 W)=120 W.
Discussion
So the power swings from zero to 120 W one hundred twenty times per second (twice each cycle), and the power averages 60 W.
712 CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's not supported tell stop.
pdf link to specific page; acrobat separate pdf pages
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
are three parts on this page, including system RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device. TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE
pdf split pages; break pdf into smaller files
Why Use AC for Power Distribution?
Most large power-distribution systems are AC. Moreover, the power is transmitted at much higher voltages than the 120-V AC (240 V in most parts of
the world) we use in homes and on the job. Economies of scale make it cheaper to build a few very large electric power-generation plants than to
build numerous small ones. This necessitates sending power long distances, and it is obviously important that energy losses en route be minimized.
High voltages can be transmitted with much smaller power losses than low voltages, as we shall see. (SeeFigure 20.19.) For safety reasons, the
voltage at the user is reduced to familiar values. The crucial factor is that it is much easier to increase and decrease AC voltages than DC, so AC is
used in most large power distribution systems.
Figure 20.19Power is distributed over large distances at high voltage to reduce power loss in the transmission lines. The voltages generated at the power plant are stepped
up by passive devices called transformers (seeTransformers) to 330,000 volts (or more in some places worldwide). At the point of use, the transformers reduce the voltage
transmitted for safe residential and commercial use. (Credit: GeorgHH, Wikimedia Commons)
Example 20.10Power Losses Are Less for High-Voltage Transmission
(a) What current is needed to transmit 100 MW of power at 200 kV? (b) What is the power dissipated by the transmission lines if they have a
resistance of
1.00 Ω
? (c) What percentage of the power is lost in the transmission lines?
Strategy
We are given
P
ave
=100 MW
,
V
rms
=200 kV
, and the resistance of the lines is
R=1.00 Ω
. Using these givens, we can find the
current flowing (from
P=IV
) and then the power dissipated in the lines (
P=I
2
R
), and we take the ratio to the total power transmitted.
Solution
To find the current, we rearrange the relationship
P
ave
=I
rms
V
rms
and substitute known values. This gives
(20.52)
I
rms
=
P
ave
V
rms
=
100×10
6
W
200×10
3
V
=500 A.
Solution
Knowing the current and given the resistance of the lines, the power dissipated in them is found from
P
ave
=I
rms
2
R
. Substituting the known
values gives
(20.53)
P
ave
=I
rms
2
R=(500 A)
2
(1.00 Ω)=250 kW.
Solution
The percent loss is the ratio of this lost power to the total or input power, multiplied by 100:
(20.54)
% loss=
250 kW
100 MW
×100=0.250 %.
Discussion
One-fourth of a percent is an acceptable loss. Note that if 100 MW of power had been transmitted at 25 kV, then a current of 4000 A would have
been needed. This would result in a power loss in the lines of 16.0 MW, or 16.0% rather than 0.250%. The lower the voltage, the more current is
needed, and the greater the power loss in the fixed-resistance transmission lines. Of course, lower-resistance lines can be built, but this requires
larger and more expensive wires. If superconducting lines could be economically produced, there would be no loss in the transmission lines at
all. But, as we shall see in a later chapter, there is a limit to current in superconductors, too. In short, high voltages are more economical for
transmitting power, and AC voltage is much easier to raise and lower, so that AC is used in most large-scale power distribution systems.
It is widely recognized that high voltages pose greater hazards than low voltages. But, in fact, some high voltages, such as those associated with
common static electricity, can be harmless. So it is not voltage alone that determines a hazard. It is not so widely recognized that AC shocks are often
more harmful than similar DC shocks. Thomas Edison thought that AC shocks were more harmful and set up a DC power-distribution system in New
York City in the late 1800s. There were bitter fights, in particular between Edison and George Westinghouse and Nikola Tesla, who were advocating
the use of AC in early power-distribution systems. AC has prevailed largely due to transformers and lower power losses with high-voltage
transmission.
CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
713
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
connection can be found at this tutorial page of how in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
break a pdf; cannot print pdf file no pages selected
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. if (device.Compression != TwainCompressionMode.Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
break pdf; break a pdf file into parts
PhET Explorations: Generator
Generate electricity with a bar magnet! Discover the physics behind the phenomena by exploring magnets and how you can use them to make a
bulb light.
Figure 20.20Generator (http://cnx.org/content/m42348/1.4/generator_en.jar)
20.6Electric Hazards and the Human Body
There are two known hazards of electricity—thermal and shock. Athermal hazardis one where excessive electric power causes undesired thermal
effects, such as starting a fire in the wall of a house. Ashock hazardoccurs when electric current passes through a person. Shocks range in severity
from painful, but otherwise harmless, to heart-stopping lethality. This section considers these hazards and the various factors affecting them in a
quantitative manner.Electrical Safety: Systems and Deviceswill consider systems and devices for preventing electrical hazards.
Thermal Hazards
Electric power causes undesired heating effects whenever electric energy is converted to thermal energy at a rate faster than it can be safely
dissipated. A classic example of this is theshort circuit, a low-resistance path between terminals of a voltage source. An example of a short circuit is
shown inFigure 20.21. Insulation on wires leading to an appliance has worn through, allowing the two wires to come into contact. Such an undesired
contact with a high voltage is called ashort. Since the resistance of the short,
r
, is very small, the power dissipated in the short,
P=V
2
/r
, is very
large. For example, if
V
is 120 V and
r
is
0.100 Ω
, then the power is 144 kW,muchgreater than that used by a typical household appliance.
Thermal energy delivered at this rate will very quickly raise the temperature of surrounding materials, melting or perhaps igniting them.
Figure 20.21A short circuit is an undesired low-resistance path across a voltage source. (a) Worn insulation on the wires of a toaster allow them to come into contact with a
low resistance
r
. Since
P=V
2
/r
, thermal power is created so rapidly that the cord melts or burns. (b) A schematic of the short circuit.
One particularly insidious aspect of a short circuit is that its resistance may actually be decreased due to the increase in temperature. This can
happen if the short creates ionization. These charged atoms and molecules are free to move and, thus, lower the resistance
r
. Since
P=V
2
/r
,
the power dissipated in the short rises, possibly causing more ionization, more power, and so on. High voltages, such as the 480-V AC used in some
industrial applications, lend themselves to this hazard, because higher voltages create higher initial power production in a short.
Another serious, but less dramatic, thermal hazard occurs when wires supplying power to a user are overloaded with too great a current. As
discussed in the previous section, the power dissipated in the supply wires is
P=I
2
R
w
, where
R
w
is the resistance of the wires and
I
the
current flowing through them. If either
I
or
R
w
is too large, the wires overheat. For example, a worn appliance cord (with some of its braided wires
broken) may have
R
w
=2.00 Ω
rather than the
0.100 Ω
it should be. If 10.0 A of current passes through the cord, then
P=I
2
R
w
=200 W
is dissipated in the cord—much more than is safe. Similarly, if a wire with a
0.100- Ω
resistance is meant to carry a few
amps, but is instead carrying 100 A, it will severely overheat. The power dissipated in the wire will in that case be
P=1000 W
. Fuses and circuit
breakers are used to limit excessive currents. (SeeFigure 20.22andFigure 20.23.) Each device opens the circuit automatically when a sustained
current exceeds safe limits.
714 CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 20.22(a) A fuse has a metal strip with a low melting point that, when overheated by an excessive current, permanently breaks the connection of a circuit to a voltage
source. (b) A circuit breaker is an automatic but restorable electric switch. The one shown here has a bimetallic strip that bends to the right and into the notch if overheated.
The spring then forces the metal strip downward, breaking the electrical connection at the points.
Figure 20.23Schematic of a circuit with a fuse or circuit breaker in it. Fuses and circuit breakers act like automatic switches that open when sustained current exceeds desired
limits.
Fuses and circuit breakers for typical household voltages and currents are relatively simple to produce, but those for large voltages and currents
experience special problems. For example, when a circuit breaker tries to interrupt the flow of high-voltage electricity, a spark can jump across its
points that ionizes the air in the gap and allows the current to continue flowing. Large circuit breakers found in power-distribution systems employ
insulating gas and even use jets of gas to blow out such sparks. Here AC is safer than DC, since AC current goes through zero 120 times per
second, giving a quick opportunity to extinguish these arcs.
Shock Hazards
Electrical currents through people produce tremendously varied effects. An electrical current can be used to block back pain. The possibility of using
electrical current to stimulate muscle action in paralyzed limbs, perhaps allowing paraplegics to walk, is under study. TV dramatizations in which
electrical shocks are used to bring a heart attack victim out of ventricular fibrillation (a massively irregular, often fatal, beating of the heart) are more
than common. Yet most electrical shock fatalities occur because a current put the heart into fibrillation. A pacemaker uses electrical shocks to
stimulate the heart to beat properly. Some fatal shocks do not produce burns, but warts can be safely burned off with electric current (though freezing
using liquid nitrogen is now more common). Of course, there are consistent explanations for these disparate effects. The major factors upon which
the effects of electrical shock depend are
1. The amount of current
I
2. The path taken by the current
3. The duration of the shock
4. The frequency
f
of the current (
f=0
for DC)
Table 20.3gives the effects of electrical shocks as a function of current for a typical accidental shock. The effects are for a shock that passes through
the trunk of the body, has a duration of 1 s, and is caused by 60-Hz power.
CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
715
Figure 20.24An electric current can cause muscular contractions with varying effects. (a) The victim is “thrown” backward by involuntary muscle contractions that extend the
legs and torso. (b) The victim can’t let go of the wire that is stimulating all the muscles in the hand. Those that close the fingers are stronger than those that open them.
Table 20.3Effects of Electrical Shock as a Function of Current
[3]
Current
(mA)
Effect
1
Threshold of sensation
5
Maximum harmless current
10–20
Onset of sustained muscular contraction; cannot let go for duration of shock; contraction of chest muscles may stop breathing during
shock
50
Onset of pain
100–300+
Ventricular fibrillation possible; often fatal
300
Onset of burns depending on concentration of current
6000 (6 A)
Onset of sustained ventricular contraction and respiratory paralysis; both cease when shock ends; heartbeat may return to normal;
used to defibrillate the heart
Our bodies are relatively good conductors due to the water in our bodies. Given that larger currents will flow through sections with lower resistance
(to be further discussed in the next chapter), electric currents preferentially flow through paths in the human body that have a minimum resistance in
a direct path to earth. The earth is a natural electron sink. Wearing insulating shoes, a requirement in many professions, prohibits a pathway for
electrons by providing a large resistance in that path. Whenever working with high-power tools (drills), or in risky situations, ensure that you do not
provide a pathway for current flow (especially through the heart).
Very small currents pass harmlessly and unfelt through the body. This happens to you regularly without your knowledge. The threshold of sensation is
only 1 mA and, although unpleasant, shocks are apparently harmless for currents less than 5 mA. A great number of safety rules take the 5-mA value
for the maximum allowed shock. At 10 to 20 mA and above, the current can stimulate sustained muscular contractions much as regular nerve
impulses do. People sometimes say they were knocked across the room by a shock, but what really happened was that certain muscles contracted,
propelling them in a manner not of their own choosing. (SeeFigure 20.24(a).) More frightening, and potentially more dangerous, is the “can’t let go”
effect illustrated inFigure 20.24(b). The muscles that close the fingers are stronger than those that open them, so the hand closes involuntarily on
the wire shocking it. This can prolong the shock indefinitely. It can also be a danger to a person trying to rescue the victim, because the rescuer’s
hand may close about the victim’s wrist. Usually the best way to help the victim is to give the fist a hard knock/blow/jar with an insulator or to throw an
insulator at the fist. Modern electric fences, used in animal enclosures, are now pulsed on and off to allow people who touch them to get free,
rendering them less lethal than in the past.
Greater currents may affect the heart. Its electrical patterns can be disrupted, so that it beats irregularly and ineffectively in a condition called
“ventricular fibrillation.” This condition often lingers after the shock and is fatal due to a lack of blood circulation. The threshold for ventricular
fibrillation is between 100 and 300 mA. At about 300 mA and above, the shock can cause burns, depending on the concentration of current—the
more concentrated, the greater the likelihood of burns.
Very large currents cause the heart and diaphragm to contract for the duration of the shock. Both the heart and breathing stop. Interestingly, both
often return to normal following the shock. The electrical patterns on the heart are completely erased in a manner that the heart can start afresh with
normal beating, as opposed to the permanent disruption caused by smaller currents that can put the heart into ventricular fibrillation. The latter is
something like scribbling on a blackboard, whereas the former completely erases it. TV dramatizations of electric shock used to bring a heart attack
victim out of ventricular fibrillation also show large paddles. These are used to spread out current passed through the victim to reduce the likelihood of
burns.
Current is the major factor determining shock severity (given that other conditions such as path, duration, and frequency are fixed, such as in the
table and preceding discussion). A larger voltage is more hazardous, but since
I=V/R
, the severity of the shock depends on the combination of
voltage and resistance. For example, a person with dry skin has a resistance of about
200kΩ
. If he comes into contact with 120-V AC, a current
I=(120 V)/(200 kΩ)= 0.6 mA
passes harmlessly through him. The same person soaking wet may have a resistance of
10.0kΩ
and the
same 120 V will produce a current of 12 mA—above the “can’t let go” threshold and potentially dangerous.
Most of the body’s resistance is in its dry skin. When wet, salts go into ion form, lowering the resistance significantly. The interior of the body has a
much lower resistance than dry skin because of all the ionic solutions and fluids it contains. If skin resistance is bypassed, such as by an intravenous
3. For an average male shocked through trunk of body for 1 s by 60-Hz AC. Values for females are 60–80% of those listed.
716 CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
infusion, a catheter, or exposed pacemaker leads, a person is renderedmicroshock sensitive. In this condition, currents about 1/1000 those listed
inTable 20.3produce similar effects. During open-heart surgery, currents as small as
20 μA
can be used to still the heart. Stringent electrical safety
requirements in hospitals, particularly in surgery and intensive care, are related to the doubly disadvantaged microshock-sensitive patient. The break
in the skin has reduced his resistance, and so the same voltage causes a greater current, and a much smaller current has a greater effect.
Figure 20.25Graph of average values for the threshold of sensation and the “can’t let go” current as a function of frequency. The lower the value, the more sensitive the body
is at that frequency.
Factors other than current that affect the severity of a shock are its path, duration, and AC frequency. Path has obvious consequences. For example,
the heart is unaffected by an electric shock through the brain, such as may be used to treat manic depression. And it is a general truth that the longer
the duration of a shock, the greater its effects.Figure 20.25presents a graph that illustrates the effects of frequency on a shock. The curves show
the minimum current for two different effects, as a function of frequency. The lower the current needed, the more sensitive the body is at that
frequency. Ironically, the body is most sensitive to frequencies near the 50- or 60-Hz frequencies in common use. The body is slightly less sensitive
for DC (
f=0
), mildly confirming Edison’s claims that AC presents a greater hazard. At higher and higher frequencies, the body becomes
progressively less sensitive to any effects that involve nerves. This is related to the maximum rates at which nerves can fire or be stimulated. At very
high frequencies, electrical current travels only on the surface of a person. Thus a wart can be burned off with very high frequency current without
causing the heart to stop. (Do not try this at home with 60-Hz AC!) Some of the spectacular demonstrations of electricity, in which high-voltage arcs
are passed through the air and over people’s bodies, employ high frequencies and low currents. (SeeFigure 20.26.) Electrical safety devices and
techniques are discussed in detail inElectrical Safety: Systems and Devices.
Figure 20.26Is this electric arc dangerous? The answer depends on the AC frequency and the power involved. (credit: Khimich Alex, Wikimedia Commons)
20.7Nerve Conduction–Electrocardiograms
Nerve Conduction
Electric currents in the vastly complex system of billions of nerves in our body allow us to sense the world, control parts of our body, and think. These
are representative of the three major functions of nerves. First, nerves carry messages from our sensory organs and others to the central nervous
system, consisting of the brain and spinal cord. Second, nerves carry messages from the central nervous system to muscles and other organs. Third,
nerves transmit and process signals within the central nervous system. The sheer number of nerve cells and the incredibly greater number of
connections between them makes this system the subtle wonder that it is.Nerve conductionis a general term for electrical signals carried by nerve
cells. It is one aspect ofbioelectricity, or electrical effects in and created by biological systems.
Nerve cells, properly calledneurons, look different from other cells—they have tendrils, some of them many centimeters long, connecting them with
other cells. (SeeFigure 20.27.) Signals arrive at the cell body acrosssynapsesor throughdendrites, stimulating the neuron to generate its own
signal, sent along its longaxonto other nerve or muscle cells. Signals may arrive from many other locations and be transmitted to yet others,
conditioning the synapses by use, giving the system its complexity and its ability to learn.
CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
717
Figure 20.27A neuron with its dendrites and long axon. Signals in the form of electric currents reach the cell body through dendrites and across synapses, stimulating the
neuron to generate its own signal sent down the axon. The number of interconnections can be far greater than shown here.
The method by which these electric currents are generated and transmitted is more complex than the simple movement of free charges in a
conductor, but it can be understood with principles already discussed in this text. The most important of these are the Coulomb force and diffusion.
Figure 20.28illustrates how a voltage (potential difference) is created across the cell membrane of a neuron in its resting state. This thin membrane
separates electrically neutral fluids having differing concentrations of ions, the most important varieties being
Na
+
,
K
+
, and
Cl
-
(these are
sodium, potassium, and chlorine ions with single plus or minus charges as indicated). As discussed inMolecular Transport Phenomena: Diffusion,
Osmosis, and Related Processes, free ions will diffuse from a region of high concentration to one of low concentration. But the cell membrane is
semipermeable, meaning that some ions may cross it while others cannot. In its resting state, the cell membrane is permeable to
K
+
and
Cl
-
,
and impermeable to
Na
+
. Diffusion of
K
+
and
Cl
-
thus creates the layers of positive and negative charge on the outside and inside of the
membrane. The Coulomb force prevents the ions from diffusing across in their entirety. Once the charge layer has built up, the repulsion of like
charges prevents more from moving across, and the attraction of unlike charges prevents more from leaving either side. The result is two layers of
charge right on the membrane, with diffusion being balanced by the Coulomb force. A tiny fraction of the charges move across and the fluids remain
neutral (other ions are present), while a separation of charge and a voltage have been created across the membrane.
Figure 20.28The semipermeable membrane of a cell has different concentrations of ions inside and out. Diffusion moves the
K
+
and
Cl
-
ions in the direction shown, until
the Coulomb force halts further transfer. This results in a layer of positive charge on the outside, a layer of negative charge on the inside, and thus a voltage across the cell
membrane. The membrane is normally impermeable to
Na
+
.
718 CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested