asp net pdf viewer user control c# : C# split pdf software control project winforms azure .net UWP PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics72-part1827

Figure 20.29An action potential is the pulse of voltage inside a nerve cell graphed here. It is caused by movements of ions across the cell membrane as shown.
Depolarization occurs when a stimulus makes the membrane permeable to
Na
+
ions. Repolarization follows as the membrane again becomes impermeable to
Na
+
,
and
K
+
moves from high to low concentration. In the long term, active transport slowly maintains the concentration differences, but the cell may fire hundreds of times in
rapid succession without seriously depleting them.
The separation of charge creates a potential difference of 70 to 90 mV across the cell membrane. While this is a small voltage, the resulting electric
field (
E=V/d
) across the only 8-nm-thick membrane is immense (on the order of 11 MV/m!) and has fundamental effects on its structure and
permeability. Now, if the exterior of a neuron is taken to be at 0 V, then the interior has aresting potentialof about –90 mV. Such voltages are created
across the membranes of almost all types of animal cells but are largest in nerve and muscle cells. In fact, fully 25% of the energy used by cells goes
toward creating and maintaining these potentials.
Electric currents along the cell membrane are created by any stimulus that changes the membrane’s permeability. The membrane thus temporarily
becomes permeable to
Na
+
, which then rushes in, driven both by diffusion and the Coulomb force. This inrush of
Na
+
first neutralizes the inside
membrane, ordepolarizesit, and then makes it slightly positive. The depolarization causes the membrane to again become impermeable to
Na
+
,
and the movement of
K
+
quickly returns the cell to its resting potential, orrepolarizesit. This sequence of events results in a voltage pulse, called
theaction potential. (SeeFigure 20.29.) Only small fractions of the ions move, so that the cell can fire many hundreds of times without depleting the
excess concentrations of
Na
+
and
K
+
. Eventually, the cell must replenish these ions to maintain the concentration differences that create
bioelectricity. This sodium-potassium pump is an example ofactive transport, wherein cell energy is used to move ions across membranes against
diffusion gradients and the Coulomb force.
The action potential is a voltage pulse at one location on a cell membrane. How does it get transmitted along the cell membrane, and in particular
down an axon, as a nerve impulse? The answer is that the changing voltage and electric fields affect the permeability of the adjacent cell membrane,
so that the same process takes place there. The adjacent membrane depolarizes, affecting the membrane further down, and so on, as illustrated in
Figure 20.30. Thus the action potential stimulated at one location triggers anerve impulsethat moves slowly (about 1 m/s) along the cell membrane.
CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
719
C# split pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf insert page break; break pdf password
C# split pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
acrobat split pdf bookmark; break apart a pdf in reader
Figure 20.30A nerve impulse is the propagation of an action potential along a cell membrane. A stimulus causes an action potential at one location, which changes the
permeability of the adjacent membrane, causing an action potential there. This in turn affects the membrane further down, so that the action potential moves slowly (in
electrical terms) along the cell membrane. Although the impulse is due to
Na
+
and
K
+
going across the membrane, it is equivalent to a wave of charge moving along the
outside and inside of the membrane.
Some axons, like that inFigure 20.27, are sheathed withmyelin, consisting of fat-containing cells.Figure 20.31shows an enlarged view of an axon
having myelin sheaths characteristically separated by unmyelinated gaps (called nodes of Ranvier). This arrangement gives the axon a number of
interesting properties. Since myelin is an insulator, it prevents signals from jumping between adjacent nerves (cross talk). Additionally, the myelinated
regions transmit electrical signals at a very high speed, as an ordinary conductor or resistor would. There is no action potential in the myelinated
regions, so that no cell energy is used in them. There is an
IR
signal loss in the myelin, but the signal is regenerated in the gaps, where the voltage
pulse triggers the action potential at full voltage. So a myelinated axon transmits a nerve impulse faster, with less energy consumption, and is better
protected from cross talk than an unmyelinated one. Not all axons are myelinated, so that cross talk and slow signal transmission are a characteristic
of the normal operation of these axons, another variable in the nervous system.
The degeneration or destruction of the myelin sheaths that surround the nerve fibers impairs signal transmission and can lead to numerous
neurological effects. One of the most prominent of these diseases comes from the body’s own immune system attacking the myelin in the central
nervous system—multiple sclerosis. MS symptoms include fatigue, vision problems, weakness of arms and legs, loss of balance, and tingling or
numbness in one’s extremities (neuropathy). It is more apt to strike younger adults, especially females. Causes might come from infection,
environmental or geographic affects, or genetics. At the moment there is no known cure for MS.
720 CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
split pdf files; pdf will no pages selected
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
acrobat split pdf into multiple files; break a pdf into multiple files
Most animal cells can fire or create their own action potential. Muscle cells contract when they fire and are often induced to do so by a nerve impulse.
In fact, nerve and muscle cells are physiologically similar, and there are even hybrid cells, such as in the heart, that have characteristics of both
nerves and muscles. Some animals, like the infamous electric eel (seeFigure 20.32), use muscles ganged so that their voltages add in order to
create a shock great enough to stun prey.
Figure 20.31Propagation of a nerve impulse down a myelinated axon, from left to right. The signal travels very fast and without energy input in the myelinated regions, but it
loses voltage. It is regenerated in the gaps. The signal moves faster than in unmyelinated axons and is insulated from signals in other nerves, limiting cross talk.
Figure 20.32An electric eel flexes its muscles to create a voltage that stuns prey. (credit: chrisbb, Flickr)
Electrocardiograms
Just as nerve impulses are transmitted by depolarization and repolarization of adjacent membrane, the depolarization that causes muscle contraction
can also stimulate adjacent muscle cells to depolarize (fire) and contract. Thus, a depolarization wave can be sent across the heart, coordinating its
rhythmic contractions and enabling it to perform its vital function of propelling blood through the circulatory system.Figure 20.33is a simplified
graphic of a depolarization wave spreading across the heart from thesinoarterial (SA) node,the heart’s natural pacemaker.
Figure 20.33The outer surface of the heart changes from positive to negative during depolarization. This wave of depolarization is spreading from the top of the heart and is
represented by a vector pointing in the direction of the wave. This vector is a voltage (potential difference) vector. Three electrodes, labeled RA, LA, and LL, are placed on the
patient. Each pair (called leads I, II, and III) measures a component of the depolarization vector and is graphed in an ECG.
Anelectrocardiogram (ECG)is a record of the voltages created by the wave of depolarization and subsequent repolarization in the heart. Voltages
between pairs of electrodes placed on the chest are vector components of the voltage wave on the heart. Standard ECGs have 12 or more
electrodes, but only three are shown inFigure 20.33for clarity. Decades ago, three-electrode ECGs were performed by placing electrodes on the left
and right arms and the left leg. The voltage between the right arm and the left leg is called thelead II potentialand is the most often graphed. We
shall examine the lead II potential as an indicator of heart-muscle function and see that it is coordinated with arterial blood pressure as well.
Heart function and its four-chamber action are explored inViscosity and Laminar Flow; Poiseuille’s Law. Basically, the right and left atria receive
blood from the body and lungs, respectively, and pump the blood into the ventricles. The right and left ventricles, in turn, pump blood through the
lungs and the rest of the body, respectively. Depolarization of the heart muscle causes it to contract. After contraction it is repolarized to ready it for
CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
721
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Convert PDF to HTML. C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to HTML in C#.NET. How to Use C# .NET XDoc.PDF
break pdf into multiple pages; break a pdf file into parts
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. A powerful C#.NET PDF control compatible with windows operating system and built on .NET framework.
pdf split pages; break apart a pdf
AC current:
AC voltage:
alternating current:
the next beat. The ECG measures components of depolarization and repolarization of the heart muscle and can yield significant information on the
functioning and malfunctioning of the heart.
Figure 20.34shows an ECG of the lead II potential and a graph of the corresponding arterial blood pressure. The major features are labeled P, Q, R,
S, and T. TheP waveis generated by the depolarization and contraction of the atria as they pump blood into the ventricles. TheQRS complexis
created by the depolarization of the ventricles as they pump blood to the lungs and body. Since the shape of the heart and the path of the
depolarization wave are not simple, the QRS complex has this typical shape and time span. The lead II QRS signal also masks the repolarization of
the atria, which occur at the same time. Finally, theT waveis generated by the repolarization of the ventricles and is followed by the next P wave in
the next heartbeat. Arterial blood pressure varies with each part of the heartbeat, with systolic (maximum) pressure occurring closely after the QRS
complex, which signals contraction of the ventricles.
Figure 20.34A lead II ECG with corresponding arterial blood pressure. The QRS complex is created by the depolarization and contraction of the ventricles and is followed
shortly by the maximum or systolic blood pressure. See text for further description.
Taken together, the 12 leads of a state-of-the-art ECG can yield a wealth of information about the heart. For example, regions of damaged heart
tissue, called infarcts, reflect electrical waves and are apparent in one or more lead potentials. Subtle changes due to slight or gradual damage to the
heart are most readily detected by comparing a recent ECG to an older one. This is particularly the case since individual heart shape, size, and
orientation can cause variations in ECGs from one individual to another. ECG technology has advanced to the point where a portable ECG monitor
with a liquid crystal instant display and a printer can be carried to patients' homes or used in emergency vehicles. SeeFigure 20.35.
Figure 20.35This NASA scientist and NEEMO 5 aquanaut’s heart rate and other vital signs are being recorded by a portable device while living in an underwater habitat.
(credit: NASA, Life Sciences Data Archive at Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas)
PhET Explorations: Neuron
Figure 20.36Neuron (http://cnx.org/content/m42352/1.3/neuron_en.jar)
Stimulate a neuron and monitor what happens. Pause, rewind, and move forward in time in order to observe the ions as they move across the
neuron membrane.
Glossary
current that fluctuates sinusoidally with time, expressed asI = I
0
sin 2πft, whereIis the current at timet, I
0
is the peak current, andf
is the frequency in hertz
voltage that fluctuates sinusoidally with time, expressed asV = V
0
sin 2πft, whereVis the voltage at timet, V
0
is the peak voltage,
andfis the frequency in hertz
(AC) the flow of electric charge that periodically reverses direction
722 CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
›› C# PDF: Convert PDF to Jpeg. C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET.
break pdf password online; break apart pdf pages
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Tell C# users how to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy and
break pdf; break apart a pdf in reader
ampere:
bioelectricity:
direct current:
drift velocity:
electric current:
electric power:
electrocardiogram (ECG):
microshock sensitive:
nerve conduction:
Ohm’s law:
ohmic:
ohm:
resistance:
resistivity:
rms current:
rms voltage:
semipermeable:
shock hazard:
short circuit:
simple circuit:
temperature coefficient of resistivity:
thermal hazard:
(amp) the SI unit for current; 1 A = 1 C/s
electrical effects in and created by biological systems
(DC) the flow of electric charge in only one direction
the average velocity at which free charges flow in response to an electric field
the rate at which charge flows,I= ΔQt
the rate at which electrical energy is supplied by a source or dissipated by a device; it is the product of current times voltage
usually abbreviated ECG, a record of voltages created by depolarization and repolarization, especially in the heart
a condition in which a person’s skin resistance is bypassed, possibly by a medical procedure, rendering the person
vulnerable to electrical shock at currents about 1/1000 the normally required level
the transport of electrical signals by nerve cells
an empirical relation stating that the currentIis proportional to the potential differenceV,∝ V; it is often written asI = V/R, whereRis
the resistance
a type of a material for which Ohm's law is valid
the unit of resistance, given by 1Ω = 1 V/A
the electric property that impedes current; for ohmic materials, it is the ratio of voltage to current,R = V/I
an intrinsic property of a material, independent of its shape or size, directly proportional to the resistance, denoted byρ
the root mean square of the current,
I
rms
=I
0
/ 2
, whereI
0
is the peak current, in an AC system
the root mean square of the voltage,
V
rms
=V
0
/ 2
, whereV
0
is the peak voltage, in an AC system
property of a membrane that allows only certain types of ions to cross it
when electric current passes through a person
also known as a “short,” a low-resistance path between terminals of a voltage source
a circuit with a single voltage source and a single resistor
an empirical quantity, denoted byα, which describes the change in resistance or resistivity of a material
with temperature
a hazard in which electric current causes undesired thermal effects
Section Summary
20.1Current
• Electric current
I
is the rate at which charge flows, given by
I=
ΔQ
Δt
,
where
ΔQ
is the amount of charge passing through an area in time
Δt
.
• The direction of conventional current is taken as the direction in which positive charge moves.
• The SI unit for current is the ampere (A), where
1 A=1 C/s.
• Current is the flow of free charges, such as electrons and ions.
• Drift velocity
v
d
is the average speed at which these charges move.
• Current
I
is proportional to drift velocity
v
d
, as expressed in the relationship
I=nqAv
d
. Here,
I
is the current through a wire of cross-
sectional area
A
. The wire’s material has a free-charge density
n
, and each carrier has charge
q
and a drift velocity
v
d
.
• Electrical signals travel at speeds about
10
12
times greater than the drift velocity of free electrons.
20.2Ohm’s Law: Resistance and Simple Circuits
• A simple circuitisone in which there is a single voltage source and a single resistance.
• One statement of Ohm’s law gives the relationship between current
I
, voltage
V
, and resistance
R
in a simple circuit to be
I=
V
R
.
• Resistance has units of ohms (
Ω
), related to volts and amperes by
1 Ω=1 V/A
.
• There is a voltage or
IR
drop across a resistor, caused by the current flowing through it, given by
V=IR
.
20.3Resistance and Resistivity
CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
723
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
overview. It provides plentiful C# class demo codes and tutorials on How to Use XDoc.PDF in C# .NET Programming Project. Plenty
acrobat split pdf pages; break a pdf into multiple files
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
overview. It provides plentiful C# class demo codes and tutorials on How to Use XDoc.PDF in C# .NET Programming Project. Plenty
pdf split and merge; break pdf file into parts
• The resistance
R
of a cylinder of length
L
and cross-sectional area
A
is
R=
ρL
A
, where
ρ
is the resistivity of the material.
• Values of
ρ
inTable 20.1show that materials fall into three groups—conductors, semiconductors, and insulators.
• Temperature affects resistivity; for relatively small temperature changes
ΔT
, resistivity is
ρ=ρ
0
(1+αΔT)
, where
ρ
0
is the original
resistivity and
α
is the temperature coefficient of resistivity.
• Table 20.2gives values for
α
, the temperature coefficient of resistivity.
• The resistance
R
of an object also varies with temperature:
R=R
0
(1+αΔT)
, where
R
0
is the original resistance, and
R
is the
resistance after the temperature change.
20.4Electric Power and Energy
• Electric power
P
is the rate (in watts) that energy is supplied by a source or dissipated by a device.
• Three expressions for electrical power are
P=IV,
P=
V
2
R
,
and
P=I
2
R.
• The energy used by a device with a power
P
over a time
t
is
E=Pt
.
20.5Alternating Current versus Direct Current
• Direct current (DC) is the flow of electric current in only one direction. It refers to systems where the source voltage is constant.
• The voltage source of an alternating current (AC) system puts out
V=V
0
sin 2πft
, where
V
is the voltage at time
t
,
V
0
is the peak
voltage, and
f
is the frequency in hertz.
• In a simple circuit,
I=V/R
and AC current is
I=I
0
sin 2πft
, where
I
is the current at time
t
, and
I
0
=V
0
/R
is the peak current.
• The average AC power is
P
ave
=
1
2
I
0
V
0
.
• Average (rms) current
I
rms
and average (rms) voltage
V
rms
are
I
rms
=
I
0
2
and
V
rms
=
V
0
2
, where rms stands for root mean square.
• Thus,
P
ave
=I
rms
V
rms
.
• Ohm’s law for AC is
I
rms
=
V
rms
R
.
• Expressions for the average power of an AC circuit are
P
ave
=I
rms
V
rms
,
P
ave
=
V
rms
2
R
, and
P
ave
=I
rms
2
R
, analogous to the expressions
for DC circuits.
20.6Electric Hazards and the Human Body
• The two types of electric hazards are thermal (excessive power) and shock (current through a person).
• Shock severity is determined by current, path, duration, and AC frequency.
• Table 20.3lists shock hazards as a function of current.
• Figure 20.25graphs the threshold current for two hazards as a function of frequency.
20.7Nerve Conduction–Electrocardiograms
• Electric potentials in neurons and other cells are created by ionic concentration differences across semipermeable membranes.
• Stimuli change the permeability and create action potentials that propagate along neurons.
• Myelin sheaths speed this process and reduce the needed energy input.
• This process in the heart can be measured with an electrocardiogram (ECG).
Conceptual Questions
20.1Current
1.Can a wire carry a current and still be neutral—that is, have a total charge of zero? Explain.
2.Car batteries are rated in ampere-hours (
A⋅h
). To what physical quantity do ampere-hours correspond (voltage, charge, . . .), and what
relationship do ampere-hours have to energy content?
3.If two different wires having identical cross-sectional areas carry the same current, will the drift velocity be higher or lower in the better conductor?
Explain in terms of the equation
v
d
=
I
nqA
, by considering how the density of charge carriers
n
relates to whether or not a material is a good
conductor.
4.Why are two conducting paths from a voltage source to an electrical device needed to operate the device?
5.In cars, one battery terminal is connected to the metal body. How does this allow a single wire to supply current to electrical devices rather than
two wires?
724 CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
6.Why isn’t a bird sitting on a high-voltage power line electrocuted? Contrast this with the situation in which a large bird hits two wires simultaneously
with its wings.
20.2Ohm’s Law: Resistance and Simple Circuits
7.The
IR
drop across a resistor means that there is a change in potential or voltage across the resistor. Is there any change in current as it passes
through a resistor? Explain.
8.How is the
IR
drop in a resistor similar to the pressure drop in a fluid flowing through a pipe?
20.3Resistance and Resistivity
9.In which of the three semiconducting materials listed inTable 20.1do impurities supply free charges? (Hint: Examine the range of resistivity for
each and determine whether the pure semiconductor has the higher or lower conductivity.)
10.Does the resistance of an object depend on the path current takes through it? Consider, for example, a rectangular bar—is its resistance the
same along its length as across its width? (SeeFigure 20.37.)
Figure 20.37Does current taking two different paths through the same object encounter different resistance?
11.If aluminum and copper wires of the same length have the same resistance, which has the larger diameter? Why?
12.Explain why
R=R
0
(1+αΔT)
for the temperature variation of the resistance
R
of an object is not as accurate as
ρ=ρ
0
(1+αΔT)
, which
gives the temperature variation of resistivity
ρ
.
20.4Electric Power and Energy
13.Why do incandescent lightbulbs grow dim late in their lives, particularly just before their filaments break?
14.The power dissipated in a resistor is given by
P=V
2
/R
, which means power decreases if resistance increases. Yet this power is also given by
P=I
2
R
, which means power increases if resistance increases. Explain why there is no contradiction here.
20.5Alternating Current versus Direct Current
15.Give an example of a use of AC power other than in the household. Similarly, give an example of a use of DC power other than that supplied by
batteries.
16.Why do voltage, current, and power go through zero 120 times per second for 60-Hz AC electricity?
17.You are riding in a train, gazing into the distance through its window. As close objects streak by, you notice that the nearby fluorescent lights make
dashedstreaks. Explain.
20.6Electric Hazards and the Human Body
18.Using an ohmmeter, a student measures the resistance between various points on his body. He finds that the resistance between two points on
the same finger is about the same as the resistance between two points on opposite hands—both are several hundred thousand ohms. Furthermore,
the resistance decreases when more skin is brought into contact with the probes of the ohmmeter. Finally, there is a dramatic drop in resistance (to a
few thousand ohms) when the skin is wet. Explain these observations and their implications regarding skin and internal resistance of the human
body.
19.What are the two major hazards of electricity?
20.Why isn’t a short circuit a shock hazard?
21.What determines the severity of a shock? Can you say that a certain voltage is hazardous without further information?
22.An electrified needle is used to burn off warts, with the circuit being completed by having the patient sit on a large butt plate. Why is this plate
large?
23.Some surgery is performed with high-voltage electricity passing from a metal scalpel through the tissue being cut. Considering the nature of
electric fields at the surface of conductors, why would you expect most of the current to flow from the sharp edge of the scalpel? Do you think high- or
low-frequency AC is used?
24.Some devices often used in bathrooms, such as hairdryers, often have safety messages saying “Do not use when the bathtub or basin is full of
water.” Why is this so?
25.We are often advised to not flick electric switches with wet hands, dry your hand first. We are also advised to never throw water on an electric fire.
Why is this so?
26.Before working on a power transmission line, linemen will touch the line with the back of the hand as a final check that the voltage is zero. Why
the back of the hand?
27.Why is the resistance of wet skin so much smaller than dry, and why do blood and other bodily fluids have low resistances?
CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
725
28.Could a person on intravenous infusion (an IV) be microshock sensitive?
29.In view of the small currents that cause shock hazards and the larger currents that circuit breakers and fuses interrupt, how do they play a role in
preventing shock hazards?
20.7Nerve Conduction–Electrocardiograms
30.Note that inFigure 20.28, both the concentration gradient and the Coulomb force tend to move
Na
+
ions into the cell. What prevents this?
31.Define depolarization, repolarization, and the action potential.
32.Explain the properties of myelinated nerves in terms of the insulating properties of myelin.
726 CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Problems & Exercises
20.1Current
1.What is the current in milliamperes produced by the solar cells of a
pocket calculator through which 4.00 C of charge passes in 4.00 h?
2.A total of 600 C of charge passes through a flashlight in 0.500 h.
What is the average current?
3.What is the current when a typical static charge of
0.250μC
moves
from your finger to a metal doorknob in
1.00μs
?
4.Find the current when 2.00 nC jumps between your comb and hair
over a
0.500 -μs
time interval.
5.A large lightning bolt had a 20,000-A current and moved 30.0 C of
charge. What was its duration?
6.The 200-A current through a spark plug moves 0.300 mC of charge.
How long does the spark last?
7.(a) A defibrillator sends a 6.00-A current through the chest of a
patient by applying a 10,000-V potential as in the figure below. What is
the resistance of the path? (b) The defibrillator paddles make contact
with the patient through a conducting gel that greatly reduces the path
resistance. Discuss the difficulties that would ensue if a larger voltage
were used to produce the same current through the patient, but with the
path having perhaps 50 times the resistance. (Hint: The current must be
about the same, so a higher voltage would imply greater power. Use
this equation for power:
P=I
2
R
.)
Figure 20.38The capacitor in a defibrillation unit drives a current through the heart
of a patient.
8.During open-heart surgery, a defibrillator can be used to bring a
patient out of cardiac arrest. The resistance of the path is
500 Ω
and
a 10.0-mA current is needed. What voltage should be applied?
9.(a) A defibrillator passes 12.0 A of current through the torso of a
person for 0.0100 s. How much charge moves? (b) How many
electrons pass through the wires connected to the patient? (See figure
two problems earlier.)
10.A clock battery wears out after moving 10,000 C of charge through
the clock at a rate of 0.500 mA. (a) How long did the clock run? (b) How
many electrons per second flowed?
11.The batteries of a submerged non-nuclear submarine supply 1000 A
at full speed ahead. How long does it take to move Avogadro’s number
(
6.02×10
23
) of electrons at this rate?
12.Electron guns are used in X-ray tubes. The electrons are
accelerated through a relatively large voltage and directed onto a metal
target, producing X-rays. (a) How many electrons per second strike the
target if the current is 0.500 mA? (b) What charge strikes the target in
0.750 s?
13.A large cyclotron directs a beam of
He
++
nuclei onto a target with
a beam current of 0.250 mA. (a) How many
He
++
nuclei per second
is this? (b) How long does it take for 1.00 C to strike the target? (c) How
long before 1.00 mol of
He
++
nuclei strike the target?
14.Repeat the above example onExample 20.3, but for a wire made
of silver and given there is one free electron per silver atom.
15.Using the results of the above example onExample 20.3, find the
drift velocity in a copper wire of twice the diameter and carrying 20.0 A.
16.A 14-gauge copper wire has a diameter of 1.628 mm. What
magnitude current flows when the drift velocity is 1.00 mm/s? (See
above example onExample 20.3for useful information.)
17.SPEAR, a storage ring about 72.0 m in diameter at the Stanford
Linear Accelerator (closed in 2009), has a 20.0-A circulating beam of
electrons that are moving at nearly the speed of light. (SeeFigure
20.39.) How many electrons are in the beam?
Figure 20.39Electrons circulating in the storage ring called SPEAR constitute a
20.0-A current. Because they travel close to the speed of light, each electron
completes many orbits in each second.
20.2Ohm’s Law: Resistance and Simple Circuits
18.What current flows through the bulb of a 3.00-V flashlight when its
hot resistance is
3.60 Ω
?
19.Calculate the effective resistance of a pocket calculator that has a
1.35-V battery and through which 0.200 mA flows.
20.What is the effective resistance of a car’s starter motor when 150 A
flows through it as the car battery applies 11.0 V to the motor?
21.How many volts are supplied to operate an indicator light on a DVD
player that has a resistance of
140 Ω
, given that 25.0 mA passes
through it?
22.(a) Find the voltage drop in an extension cord having a
0.0600-Ω
resistance and through which 5.00 A is flowing. (b) A
cheaper cord utilizes thinner wire and has a resistance of
0.300 Ω
.
What is the voltage drop in it when 5.00 A flows? (c) Why is the voltage
to whatever appliance is being used reduced by this amount? What is
the effect on the appliance?
23.A power transmission line is hung from metal towers with glass
insulators having a resistance of
1.00×10
9
Ω.
What current flows
through the insulator if the voltage is 200 kV? (Some high-voltage lines
are DC.)
20.3Resistance and Resistivity
24.What is the resistance of a 20.0-m-long piece of 12-gauge copper
wire having a 2.053-mm diameter?
25.The diameter of 0-gauge copper wire is 8.252 mm. Find the
resistance of a 1.00-km length of such wire used for power
transmission.
26.If the 0.100-mm diameter tungsten filament in a light bulb is to have
a resistance of
0.200 Ω
at
20.0ºC
, how long should it be?
27.Find the ratio of the diameter of aluminum to copper wire, if they
have the same resistance per unit length (as they might in household
wiring).
CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
727
28.What current flows through a 2.54-cm-diameter rod of pure silicon
that is 20.0 cm long, when
1.00 × 10
3
V
is applied to it? (Such a rod
may be used to make nuclear-particle detectors, for example.)
29.(a) To what temperature must you raise a copper wire, originally at
20.0ºC
, to double its resistance, neglecting any changes in
dimensions? (b) Does this happen in household wiring under ordinary
circumstances?
30.A resistor made of Nichrome wire is used in an application where its
resistance cannot change more than 1.00% from its value at
20.0ºC
.
Over what temperature range can it be used?
31.Of what material is a resistor made if its resistance is 40.0% greater
at
100ºC
than at
20.0ºC
?
32.An electronic device designed to operate at any temperature in the
range from
–10.0ºC to 55.0ºC
contains pure carbon resistors. By
what factor does their resistance increase over this range?
33.(a) Of what material is a wire made, if it is 25.0 m long with a 0.100
mm diameter and has a resistance of
77.7 Ω
at
20.0ºC
? (b) What
is its resistance at
150ºC
?
34.Assuming a constant temperature coefficient of resistivity, what is
the maximum percent decrease in the resistance of a constantan wire
starting at
20.0ºC
?
35.A wire is drawn through a die, stretching it to four times its original
length. By what factor does its resistance increase?
36.A copper wire has a resistance of
0.500 Ω
at
20.0ºC
, and an
iron wire has a resistance of
0.525 Ω
at the same temperature. At
what temperature are their resistances equal?
37.(a) Digital medical thermometers determine temperature by
measuring the resistance of a semiconductor device called a thermistor
(which has
α= –0.0600/ºC
) when it is at the same temperature as
the patient. What is a patient’s temperature if the thermistor’s resistance
at that temperature is 82.0% of its value at
37.0ºC
(normal body
temperature)? (b) The negative value for
α
may not be maintained for
very low temperatures. Discuss why and whether this is the case here.
(Hint: Resistance can’t become negative.)
38.Integrated Concepts
(a) RedoExercise 20.25taking into account the thermal expansion of
the tungsten filament. You may assume a thermal expansion coefficient
of
12×10
−6
/ºC
. (b) By what percentage does your answer differ
from that in the example?
39.Unreasonable Results
(a) To what temperature must you raise a resistor made of constantan
to double its resistance, assuming a constant temperature coefficient of
resistivity? (b) To cut it in half? (c) What is unreasonable about these
results? (d) Which assumptions are unreasonable, or which premises
are inconsistent?
20.4Electric Power and Energy
40.What is the power of a
1.00×10
2
MV
lightning bolt having a
current of
2.00 × 10
4
A
?
41.What power is supplied to the starter motor of a large truck that
draws 250 A of current from a 24.0-V battery hookup?
42.A charge of 4.00 C of charge passes through a pocket calculator’s
solar cells in 4.00 h. What is the power output, given the calculator’s
voltage output is 3.00 V? (SeeFigure 20.40.)
Figure 20.40The strip of solar cells just above the keys of this calculator convert
light to electricity to supply its energy needs. (credit: Evan-Amos, Wikimedia
Commons)
43.How many watts does a flashlight that has
6.00×10
2
C
pass
through it in 0.500 h use if its voltage is 3.00 V?
44.Find the power dissipated in each of these extension cords: (a) an
extension cord having a
0.0600- Ω
resistance and through which
5.00 A is flowing; (b) a cheaper cord utilizing thinner wire and with a
resistance of
0.300 Ω.
45.Verify that the units of a volt-ampere are watts, as implied by the
equation
P=IV
.
46.Show that the units
1V
2
/ Ω Ω =1W
, as implied by the equation
P=V
2
/R
.
47.Show that the units
1A
2
⋅ Ω Ω =1W
, as implied by the equation
P=I
2
R
.
48.Verify the energy unit equivalence that
1kW⋅h = 3.60×10
6
J
.
49.Electrons in an X-ray tube are accelerated through
1.00×10
2
kV
and directed toward a target to produce X-rays. Calculate the power of
the electron beam in this tube if it has a current of 15.0 mA.
50.An electric water heater consumes 5.00 kW for 2.00 h per day.
What is the cost of running it for one year if electricity costs
12.0 cents/kW⋅h
? SeeFigure 20.41.
Figure 20.41On-demand electric hot water heater. Heat is supplied to water only
when needed. (credit: aviddavid, Flickr)
51.With a 1200-W toaster, how much electrical energy is needed to
make a slice of toast (cooking time = 1 minute)? At
9.0 cents/kW · h
,
how much does this cost?
52.What would be the maximum cost of a CFL such that the total cost
(investment plus operating) would be the same for both CFL and
incandescent 60-W bulbs? Assume the cost of the incandescent bulb is
25 cents and that electricity costs
10 cents/kWh
. Calculate the cost
for 1000 hours, as in the cost effectiveness of CFL example.
53.Some makes of older cars have 6.00-V electrical systems. (a) What
is the hot resistance of a 30.0-W headlight in such a car? (b) What
current flows through it?
728 CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested