Problems & Exercises
21.1Resistors in Series and Parallel
Note: Data taken from figures can be assumed to be accurate to
three significant digits.
1.(a) What is the resistance of ten
275-Ω
resistors connected in
series? (b) In parallel?
2.(a) What is the resistance of a
1.00×10
2
, a
2.50-kΩ
, and a
4.00-kΩ
resistor connected in series? (b) In parallel?
3.What are the largest and smallest resistances you can obtain by
connecting a
36.0-Ω
, a
50.0-Ω
, and a
700-Ω
resistor together?
4.An 1800-W toaster, a 1400-W electric frying pan, and a 75-W lamp
are plugged into the same outlet in a 15-A, 120-V circuit. (The three
devices are in parallel when plugged into the same socket.). (a) What
current is drawn by each device? (b) Will this combination blow the
15-A fuse?
5.Your car’s 30.0-W headlight and 2.40-kW starter are ordinarily
connected in parallel in a 12.0-V system. What power would one
headlight and the starter consume if connected in series to a 12.0-V
battery? (Neglect any other resistance in the circuit and any change in
resistance in the two devices.)
6.(a) Given a 48.0-V battery and
24.0-Ω
and
96.0-Ω
resistors, find
the current and power for each when connected in series. (b) Repeat
when the resistances are in parallel.
7.Referring to the example combining series and parallel circuits and
Figure 21.6, calculate
I
3
in the following two different ways: (a) from
the known values of
I
and
I
2
; (b) using Ohm’s law for
R
3
. In both
parts explicitly show how you follow the steps in theProblem-Solving
Strategies for Series and Parallel Resistors.
8.Referring toFigure 21.6: (a) Calculate
P
3
and note how it
compares with
P
3
found in the first two example problems in this
module. (b) Find the total power supplied by the source and compare it
with the sum of the powers dissipated by the resistors.
9.Refer toFigure 21.7and the discussion of lights dimming when a
heavy appliance comes on. (a) Given the voltage source is 120 V, the
wire resistance is
0.800 Ω
, and the bulb is nominally 75.0 W, what
power will the bulb dissipate if a total of 15.0 A passes through the
wires when the motor comes on? Assume negligible change in bulb
resistance. (b) What power is consumed by the motor?
10.A 240-kV power transmission line carrying
5.00×10
2
A
is hung
from grounded metal towers by ceramic insulators, each having a
1.00×10
9
resistance.Figure 21.51. (a) What is the resistance to
ground of 100 of these insulators? (b) Calculate the power dissipated
by 100 of them. (c) What fraction of the power carried by the line is
this? Explicitly show how you follow the steps in theProblem-Solving
Strategies for Series and Parallel Resistors.
Figure 21.51High-voltage (240-kV) transmission line carrying
5.00×10
2
A
is
hung from a grounded metal transmission tower. The row of ceramic insulators
provide
1.00×10
9
Ω
of resistance each.
11.Show that if two resistors
R
1
and
R
2
are combined and one is
much greater than the other (
R
1
>>R
2
): (a) Their series resistance is
very nearly equal to the greater resistance
R
1
. (b) Their parallel
resistance is very nearly equal to smaller resistance
R
2
.
12.Unreasonable Results
Two resistors, one having a resistance of
145 Ω
, are connected in
parallel to produce a total resistance of
150 Ω
. (a) What is the value
of the second resistance? (b) What is unreasonable about this result?
(c) Which assumptions are unreasonable or inconsistent?
13.Unreasonable Results
Two resistors, one having a resistance of
900 kΩ
, are connected in
series to produce a total resistance of
0.500 MΩ
. (a) What is the
value of the second resistance? (b) What is unreasonable about this
result? (c) Which assumptions are unreasonable or inconsistent?
21.2Electromotive Force: Terminal Voltage
14.Standard automobile batteries have six lead-acid cells in series,
creating a total emf of 12.0 V. What is the emf of an individual lead-acid
cell?
15.Carbon-zinc dry cells (sometimes referred to as non-alkaline cells)
have an emf of 1.54 V, and they are produced as single cells or in
various combinations to form other voltages. (a) How many 1.54-V cells
are needed to make the common 9-V battery used in many small
electronic devices? (b) What is the actual emf of the approximately 9-V
battery? (c) Discuss how internal resistance in the series connection of
cells will affect the terminal voltage of this approximately 9-V battery.
16.What is the output voltage of a 3.0000-V lithium cell in a digital
wristwatch that draws 0.300 mA, if the cell’s internal resistance is
2.00 Ω
?
17.(a) What is the terminal voltage of a large 1.54-V carbon-zinc dry
cell used in a physics lab to supply 2.00 A to a circuit, if the cell’s
internal resistance is
0.100 Ω
? (b) How much electrical power does
the cell produce? (c) What power goes to its load?
18.What is the internal resistance of an automobile battery that has an
emf of 12.0 V and a terminal voltage of 15.0 V while a current of 8.00 A
is charging it?
19.(a) Find the terminal voltage of a 12.0-V motorcycle battery having a
0.600-Ω
internal resistance, if it is being charged by a current of 10.0
A. (b) What is the output voltage of the battery charger?
20.A car battery with a 12-V emf and an internal resistance of
0.050Ω
is being charged with a current of 60 A. Note that in this
process the battery is being charged. (a) What is the potential
CHAPTER 21 | CIRCUITS, BIOELECTRICITY, AND DC INSTRUMENTS S 769
Pdf split - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
cannot select text in pdf; pdf no pages selected
Pdf split - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf file into parts; break pdf documents
difference across its terminals? (b) At what rate is thermal energy being
dissipated in the battery? (c) At what rate is electric energy being
converted to chemical energy? (d) What are the answers to (a) and (b)
when the battery is used to supply 60 A to the starter motor?
21.The hot resistance of a flashlight bulb is
2.30 Ω
, and it is run by a
1.58-V alkaline cell having a
0.100-Ω
internal resistance. (a) What
current flows? (b) Calculate the power supplied to the bulb using
I
2
R
bulb
. (c) Is this power the same as calculated using
V
2
R
bulb
?
22.The label on a portable radio recommends the use of rechargeable
nickel-cadmium cells (nicads), although they have a 1.25-V emf while
alkaline cells have a 1.58-V emf. The radio has a
3.20-Ω
resistance.
(a) Draw a circuit diagram of the radio and its batteries. Now, calculate
the power delivered to the radio. (b) When using Nicad cells each
having an internal resistance of
0.0400 Ω
. (c) When using alkaline
cells each having an internal resistance of
0.200 Ω
. (d) Does this
difference seem significant, considering that the radio’s effective
resistance is lowered when its volume is turned up?
23.An automobile starter motor has an equivalent resistance of
0.0500 Ω
and is supplied by a 12.0-V battery with a
0.0100-Ω
internal resistance. (a) What is the current to the motor? (b) What
voltage is applied to it? (c) What power is supplied to the motor? (d)
Repeat these calculations for when the battery connections are
corroded and add
0.0900Ω
to the circuit. (Significant problems are
caused by even small amounts of unwanted resistance in low-voltage,
high-current applications.)
24.A child’s electronic toy is supplied by three 1.58-V alkaline cells
having internal resistances of
0.0200Ω
in series with a 1.53-V
carbon-zinc dry cell having a
0.100-Ω
internal resistance. The load
resistance is
10.0Ω
. (a) Draw a circuit diagram of the toy and its
batteries. (b) What current flows? (c) How much power is supplied to
the load? (d) What is the internal resistance of the dry cell if it goes bad,
resulting in only 0.500 W being supplied to the load?
25.(a) What is the internal resistance of a voltage source if its terminal
voltage drops by 2.00 V when the current supplied increases by 5.00
A? (b) Can the emf of the voltage source be found with the information
supplied?
26.A person with body resistance between his hands of
10.0kΩ
accidentally grasps the terminals of a 20.0-kV power supply. (Do NOT
do this!) (a) Draw a circuit diagram to represent the situation. (b) If the
internal resistance of the power supply is
2000Ω
, what is the current
through his body? (c) What is the power dissipated in his body? (d) If
the power supply is to be made safe by increasing its internal
resistance, what should the internal resistance be for the maximum
current in this situation to be 1.00 mA or less? (e) Will this modification
compromise the effectiveness of the power supply for driving low-
resistance devices? Explain your reasoning.
27.Electric fish generate current with biological cells called
electroplaques, which are physiological emf devices. The
electroplaques in the South American eel are arranged in 140 rows,
each row stretching horizontally along the body and each containing
5000 electroplaques. Each electroplaque has an emf of 0.15 V and
internal resistance of
0.25Ω
. If the water surrounding the fish has
resistance of
800Ω
, how much current can the eel produce in water
from near its head to near its tail?
28.Integrated Concepts
A 12.0-V emf automobile battery has a terminal voltage of 16.0 V when
being charged by a current of 10.0 A. (a) What is the battery’s internal
resistance? (b) What power is dissipated inside the battery? (c) At what
rate (in
ºC/min
) will its temperature increase if its mass is 20.0 kg and
it has a specific heat of
0.300kcal/kg⋅ºC
, assuming no heat
escapes?
29.Unreasonable Results
A 1.58-V alkaline cell with a
0.200-Ω
internal resistance is supplying
8.50 A to a load. (a) What is its terminal voltage? (b) What is the value
of the load resistance? (c) What is unreasonable about these results?
(d) Which assumptions are unreasonable or inconsistent?
30.Unreasonable Results
(a) What is the internal resistance of a 1.54-V dry cell that supplies 1.00
W of power to a
15.0-Ω
bulb? (b) What is unreasonable about this
result? (c) Which assumptions are unreasonable or inconsistent?
21.3Kirchhoff’s Rules
31.Apply the loop rule to loop abcdefgha inFigure 21.25.
32.Apply the loop rule to loop aedcba inFigure 21.25.
33.Verify the second equation inExample 21.5by substituting the
values found for the currents
I
1
and
I
2
.
34.Verify the third equation inExample 21.5by substituting the values
found for the currents
I
1
and
I
3
.
35.Apply the junction rule at point a inFigure 21.52.
Figure 21.52
36.Apply the loop rule to loop abcdefghija inFigure 21.52.
37.Apply the loop rule to loop akledcba inFigure 21.52.
38.Find the currents flowing in the circuit inFigure 21.52. Explicitly
show how you follow the steps in theProblem-Solving Strategies for
Series and Parallel Resistors.
39.SolveExample 21.5, but use loop abcdefgha instead of loop
akledcba. Explicitly show how you follow the steps in theProblem-
Solving Strategies for Series and Parallel Resistors.
40.Find the currents flowing in the circuit inFigure 21.47.
41.Unreasonable Results
Consider the circuit inFigure 21.53, and suppose that the emfs are
unknown and the currents are given to be
I
1
=5.00 A
,
I
2
=3.0 A
,
and
I
3
=–2.00 A
. (a) Could you find the emfs? (b) What is wrong
with the assumptions?
770 CHAPTER 21 | CIRCUITS, BIOELECTRICITY, AND DC INSTRUMENTS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
Online Split PDF, Separate PDF file into Multiple ones. Download Free Trial. Split PDF file. Then set your PDF file split settings. The perfect split tool.
break pdf file into multiple files; pdf split and merge
C# Word - Split Word Document in C#.NET
C# Word - Split Word Document in C#.NET. Explain How to Split Word Document in Visual C#.NET Application. Overview. Split Word file into two files in C#.
pdf file specification; pdf will no pages selected
Figure 21.53
21.4DC Voltmeters and Ammeters
42.What is the sensitivity of the galvanometer (that is, what current
gives a full-scale deflection) inside a voltmeter that has a
1.00-MΩ
resistance on its 30.0-V scale?
43.What is the sensitivity of the galvanometer (that is, what current
gives a full-scale deflection) inside a voltmeter that has a
25.0-kΩ
resistance on its 100-V scale?
44.Find the resistance that must be placed in series with a
25.0-Ω
galvanometer having a
50.0-μA
sensitivity (the same as the one
discussed in the text) to allow it to be used as a voltmeter with a
0.100-V full-scale reading.
45.Find the resistance that must be placed in series with a
25.0-Ω
galvanometer having a
50.0-μA
sensitivity (the same as the one
discussed in the text) to allow it to be used as a voltmeter with a 3000-V
full-scale reading. Include a circuit diagram with your solution.
46.Find the resistance that must be placed in parallel with a
25.0-Ω
galvanometer having a
50.0-μA
sensitivity (the same as the one
discussed in the text) to allow it to be used as an ammeter with a
10.0-A full-scale reading. Include a circuit diagram with your solution.
47.Find the resistance that must be placed in parallel with a
25.0-Ω
galvanometer having a
50.0-μA
sensitivity (the same as the one
discussed in the text) to allow it to be used as an ammeter with a
300-mA full-scale reading.
48.Find the resistance that must be placed in series with a
10.0-Ω
galvanometer having a
100-μA
sensitivity to allow it to be used as a
voltmeter with: (a) a 300-V full-scale reading, and (b) a 0.300-V full-
scale reading.
49.Find the resistance that must be placed in parallel with a
10.0-Ω
galvanometer having a
100-μA
sensitivity to allow it to be used as an
ammeter with: (a) a 20.0-A full-scale reading, and (b) a 100-mA full-
scale reading.
50.Suppose you measure the terminal voltage of a 1.585-V alkaline
cell having an internal resistance of
0.100 Ω
by placing a
1.00-kΩ
voltmeter across its terminals. (SeeFigure 21.54.) (a)
What current flows? (b) Find the terminal voltage. (c) To see how close
the measured terminal voltage is to the emf, calculate their ratio.
Figure 21.54
51.Suppose you measure the terminal voltage of a 3.200-V lithium cell
having an internal resistance of
5.00 Ω
by placing a
1.00-kΩ
voltmeter across its terminals. (a) What current flows? (b) Find the
terminal voltage. (c) To see how close the measured terminal voltage is
to the emf, calculate their ratio.
52.A certain ammeter has a resistance of
5.00×10
−5
Ω
on its
3.00-A scale and contains a
10.0-Ω
galvanometer. What is the
sensitivity of the galvanometer?
53.A
1.00-MΩ
voltmeter is placed in parallel with a
75.0-kΩ
resistor in a circuit. (a) Draw a circuit diagram of the connection. (b)
What is the resistance of the combination? (c) If the voltage across the
combination is kept the same as it was across the
75.0-kΩ
resistor
alone, what is the percent increase in current? (d) If the current through
the combination is kept the same as it was through the
75.0-kΩ
resistor alone, what is the percentage decrease in voltage? (e) Are the
changes found in parts (c) and (d) significant? Discuss.
54.A
0.0200-Ω
ammeter is placed in series with a
10.00-Ω
resistor
in a circuit. (a) Draw a circuit diagram of the connection. (b) Calculate
the resistance of the combination. (c) If the voltage is kept the same
across the combination as it was through the
10.00-Ω
resistor alone,
what is the percent decrease in current? (d) If the current is kept the
same through the combination as it was through the
10.00-Ω
resistor
alone, what is the percent increase in voltage? (e) Are the changes
found in parts (c) and (d) significant? Discuss.
55.Unreasonable Results
Suppose you have a
40.0-Ω
galvanometer with a
25.0-μA
sensitivity. (a) What resistance would you put in series with it to allow it
to be used as a voltmeter that has a full-scale deflection for 0.500 mV?
(b) What is unreasonable about this result? (c) Which assumptions are
responsible?
56.Unreasonable Results
(a) What resistance would you put in parallel with a
40.0-Ω
galvanometer having a
25.0-μA
sensitivity to allow it to be used as an
ammeter that has a full-scale deflection for
10.0-μA
? (b) What is
unreasonable about this result? (c) Which assumptions are
responsible?
21.5Null Measurements
57.What is the
emf
x
of a cell being measured in a potentiometer, if
the standard cell’s emf is 12.0 V and the potentiometer balances for
R
x
=5.000Ω
and
R
s
=2.500Ω
?
58.Calculate the
emf
x
of a dry cell for which a potentiometer is
balanced when
R
x
=1.200 Ω
, while an alkaline standard cell with
an emf of 1.600 V requires
R
s
=1.247 Ω
to balance the
potentiometer.
59.When an unknown resistance
R
x
is placed in a Wheatstone
bridge, it is possible to balance the bridge by adjusting
R
3
to be
2500 Ω
. What is
R
x
if
R
2
R
1
=0.625
?
CHAPTER 21 | CIRCUITS, BIOELECTRICITY, AND DC INSTRUMENTS S 771
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Split Multipage TIFF File
XDoc.Tiff ›› C# Tiff: Split Tiff. C# TIFF - Split Multi-page TIFF File in C#.NET. C# Guide for How to Use TIFF Processing DLL to Split Multi-page TIFF File.
break apart a pdf; break pdf into single pages
C# PowerPoint - Split PowerPoint Document in C#.NET
C# PowerPoint - Split PowerPoint Document in C#.NET. Explain How to Split PowerPoint Document in Visual C#.NET Application. C# DLLs: Split PowerPoint Document.
break password on pdf; cannot print pdf file no pages selected
60.To what value must you adjust
R
3
to balance a Wheatstone
bridge, if the unknown resistance
R
x
is
100 Ω
,
R
1
is
50.0 Ω
,
and
R
2
is
175Ω
?
61.(a) What is the unknown
emf
x
in a potentiometer that balances
when
R
x
is
10.0Ω
, and balances when
R
s
is
15.0Ω
for a
standard 3.000-V emf? (b) The same
emf
x
is placed in the same
potentiometer, which now balances when
R
s
is
15.0Ω
for a
standard emf of 3.100 V. At what resistance
R
x
will the potentiometer
balance?
62.Suppose you want to measure resistances in the range from
10.0 Ω
to
10.0 kΩ
using a Wheatstone bridge that has
R
2
R
1
=2.000
. Over what range should
R
3
be adjustable?
21.6DC Circuits Containing Resistors and Capacitors
63.The timing device in an automobile’s intermittent wiper system is
based on an
RC
time constant and utilizes a
0.500-μF
capacitor and
a variable resistor. Over what range must
R
be made to vary to
achieve time constants from 2.00 to 15.0 s?
64.A heart pacemaker fires 72 times a minute, each time a 25.0-nF
capacitor is charged (by a battery in series with a resistor) to 0.632 of
its full voltage. What is the value of the resistance?
65.The duration of a photographic flash is related to an
RC
time
constant, which is
0.100 μs
for a certain camera. (a) If the resistance
of the flash lamp is
0.0400Ω
during discharge, what is the size of
the capacitor supplying its energy? (b) What is the time constant for
charging the capacitor, if the charging resistance is
800kΩ
?
66.A 2.00- and a
7.50-μF
capacitor can be connected in series or
parallel, as can a 25.0- and a
100-kΩ
resistor. Calculate the four
RC
time constants possible from connecting the resulting capacitance and
resistance in series.
67.After two time constants, what percentage of the final voltage, emf,
is on an initially uncharged capacitor
C
, charged through a resistance
R
?
68.A
500-Ω
resistor, an uncharged
1.50-μF
capacitor, and a 6.16-V
emf are connected in series. (a) What is the initial current? (b) What is
the
RC
time constant? (c) What is the current after one time constant?
(d) What is the voltage on the capacitor after one time constant?
69.A heart defibrillator being used on a patient has an
RC
time
constant of 10.0 ms due to the resistance of the patient and the
capacitance of the defibrillator. (a) If the defibrillator has an
8.00-μF
capacitance, what is the resistance of the path through the patient?
(You may neglect the capacitance of the patient and the resistance of
the defibrillator.) (b) If the initial voltage is 12.0 kV, how long does it take
to decline to
6.00×10
2
V
?
70.An ECG monitor must have an
RC
time constant less than
1.00×10
2
μs
to be able to measure variations in voltage over small
time intervals. (a) If the resistance of the circuit (due mostly to that of
the patient’s chest) is
1.00 kΩ
, what is the maximum capacitance of
the circuit? (b) Would it be difficult in practice to limit the capacitance to
less than the value found in (a)?
71.Figure 21.55shows how a bleeder resistor is used to discharge a
capacitor after an electronic device is shut off, allowing a person to
work on the electronics with less risk of shock. (a) What is the time
constant? (b) How long will it take to reduce the voltage on the
capacitor to 0.250% (5% of 5%) of its full value once discharge begins?
(c) If the capacitor is charged to a voltage
V
0
through a
100-Ω
resistance, calculate the time it takes to rise to
0.865V
0
(This is about
two time constants.)
Figure 21.55
72.Using the exact exponential treatment, find how much time is
required to discharge a
250-μF
capacitor through a
500-Ω
resistor
down to 1.00% of its original voltage.
73.Using the exact exponential treatment, find how much time is
required to charge an initially uncharged 100-pF capacitor through a
75.0-MΩ
resistor to 90.0% of its final voltage.
74.Integrated Concepts
If you wish to take a picture of a bullet traveling at 500 m/s, then a very
brief flash of light produced by an
RC
discharge through a flash tube
can limit blurring. Assuming 1.00 mm of motion during one
RC
constant is acceptable, and given that the flash is driven by a
600-μF
capacitor, what is the resistance in the flash tube?
75.Integrated Concepts
A flashing lamp in a Christmas earring is based on an
RC
discharge of
a capacitor through its resistance. The effective duration of the flash is
0.250 s, during which it produces an average 0.500 W from an average
3.00 V. (a) What energy does it dissipate? (b) How much charge moves
through the lamp? (c) Find the capacitance. (d) What is the resistance
of the lamp?
76.Integrated Concepts
A
160-μF
capacitor charged to 450 V is discharged through a
31.2-kΩ
resistor. (a) Find the time constant. (b) Calculate the
temperature increase of the resistor, given that its mass is 2.50 g and
its specific heat is
1.67
kJ
kg⋅ ºC
, noting that most of the thermal
energy is retained in the short time of the discharge. (c) Calculate the
new resistance, assuming it is pure carbon. (d) Does this change in
resistance seem significant?
77.Unreasonable Results
(a) Calculate the capacitance needed to get an
RC
time constant of
1.00×10
3
s
with a
0.100-Ω
resistor. (b) What is unreasonable
about this result? (c) Which assumptions are responsible?
78.Construct Your Own Problem
Consider a camera’s flash unit. Construct a problem in which you
calculate the size of the capacitor that stores energy for the flash lamp.
Among the things to be considered are the voltage applied to the
capacitor, the energy needed in the flash and the associated charge
needed on the capacitor, the resistance of the flash lamp during
discharge, and the desired
RC
time constant.
79.Construct Your Own Problem
Consider a rechargeable lithium cell that is to be used to power a
camcorder. Construct a problem in which you calculate the internal
resistance of the cell during normal operation. Also, calculate the
minimum voltage output of a battery charger to be used to recharge
your lithium cell. Among the things to be considered are the emf and
772 CHAPTER 21 | CIRCUITS, BIOELECTRICITY, AND DC INSTRUMENTS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
C# PDF - Merge or Split PDF File in C#.NET. C#.NET Q 2: The target PDF document that I need to split is password-protected. Can I
c# split pdf; split pdf into individual pages
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Tell VB.NET users how to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy
pdf rotate single page; break a pdf into separate pages
useful terminal voltage of a lithium cell and the current it should be able
to supply to a camcorder.
CHAPTER 21 | CIRCUITS, BIOELECTRICITY, AND DC INSTRUMENTS S 773
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Tell C# users how to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy and
a pdf page cut; break pdf into multiple files
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Jpeg. Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File and Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File
can't cut and paste from pdf; split pdf into multiple files
774 CHAPTER 21 | CIRCUITS, BIOELECTRICITY, AND DC INSTRUMENTS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
22
MAGNETISM
Figure 22.1The magnificent spectacle of the Aurora Borealis, or northern lights, glows in the northern sky above Bear Lake near Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Shaped by
the Earth’s magnetic field, this light is produced by radiation spewed from solar storms. (credit: Senior Airman Joshua Strang, via Flickr)
Learning Objectives
22.1.Magnets
• Describe the difference between the north and south poles of a magnet.
• Describe how magnetic poles interact with each other.
22.2.Ferromagnets and Electromagnets
• Define ferromagnet.
• Describe the role of magnetic domains in magnetization.
• Explain the significance of the Curie temperature.
• Describe the relationship between electricity and magnetism.
22.3.Magnetic Fields and Magnetic Field Lines
• Define magnetic field and describe the magnetic field lines of various magnetic fields.
22.4.Magnetic Field Strength: Force on a Moving Charge in a Magnetic Field
• Describe the effects of magnetic fields on moving charges.
• Use the right hand rule 1 to determine the velocity of a charge, the direction of the magnetic field, and the direction of the magnetic force
on a moving charge.
• Calculate the magnetic force on a moving charge.
22.5.Force on a Moving Charge in a Magnetic Field: Examples and Applications
• Describe the effects of a magnetic field on a moving charge.
• Calculate the radius of curvature of the path of a charge that is moving in a magnetic field.
22.6.The Hall Effect
• Describe the Hall effect.
• Calculate the Hall emf across a current-carrying conductor.
22.7.Magnetic Force on a Current-Carrying Conductor
• Describe the effects of a magnetic force on a current-carrying conductor.
• Calculate the magnetic force on a current-carrying conductor.
22.8.Torque on a Current Loop: Motors and Meters
• Describe how motors and meters work in terms of torque on a current loop.
• Calculate the torque on a current-carrying loop in a magnetic field.
22.9.Magnetic Fields Produced by Currents: Ampere’s Law
• Calculate current that produces a magnetic field.
• Use the right hand rule 2 to determine the direction of current or the direction of magnetic field loops.
22.10.Magnetic Force between Two Parallel Conductors
• Describe the effects of the magnetic force between two conductors.
• Calculate the force between two parallel conductors.
22.11.More Applications of Magnetism
• Describe some applications of magnetism.
CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
775
Introduction to Magnetism
One evening, an Alaskan sticks a note to his refrigerator with a small magnet. Through the kitchen window, the Aurora Borealis glows in the night sky.
This grand spectacle is shaped by the same force that holds the note to the refrigerator.
People have been aware of magnets and magnetism for thousands of years. The earliest records date to well before the time of Christ, particularly in
a region of Asia Minor called Magnesia (the name of this region is the source of words likemagnetic). Magnetic rocks found in Magnesia, which is
now part of western Turkey, stimulated interest during ancient times. A practical application for magnets was found later, when they were employed
as navigational compasses. The use of magnets in compasses resulted not only in improved long-distance sailing, but also in the names of “north”
and “south” being given to the two types of magnetic poles.
Today magnetism plays many important roles in our lives. Physicists’ understanding of magnetism has enabled the development of technologies that
affect our everyday lives. The iPod in your purse or backpack, for example, wouldn’t have been possible without the applications of magnetism and
electricity on a small scale.
The discovery that weak changes in a magnetic field in a thin film of iron and chromium could bring about much larger changes in electrical
resistance was one of the first large successes of nanotechnology. The 2007 Nobel Prize in Physics went to Albert Fert from France and Peter
Grunberg from Germany for this discovery ofgiant magnetoresistanceand its applications to computer memory.
All electric motors, with uses as diverse as powering refrigerators, starting cars, and moving elevators, contain magnets. Generators, whether
producing hydroelectric power or running bicycle lights, use magnetic fields. Recycling facilities employ magnets to separate iron from other refuse.
Hundreds of millions of dollars are spent annually on magnetic containment of fusion as a future energy source. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
has become an important diagnostic tool in the field of medicine, and the use of magnetism to explore brain activity is a subject of contemporary
research and development. The list of applications also includes computer hard drives, tape recording, detection of inhaled asbestos, and levitation of
high-speed trains. Magnetism is used to explain atomic energy levels, cosmic rays, and charged particles trapped in the Van Allen belts. Once again,
we will find all these disparate phenomena are linked by a small number of underlying physical principles.
Figure 22.2Engineering of technology like iPods would not be possible without a deep understanding magnetism. (credit: Jesse! S?, Flickr)
22.1Magnets
Figure 22.3Magnets come in various shapes, sizes, and strengths. All have both a north pole and a south pole. There is never an isolated pole (a monopole).
All magnets attract iron, such as that in a refrigerator door. However, magnets may attract or repel other magnets. Experimentation shows that all
magnets have two poles. If freely suspended, one pole will point toward the north. The two poles are thus named thenorth magnetic poleand the
south magnetic pole(or more properly, north-seeking and south-seeking poles, for the attractions in those directions).
Universal Characteristics of Magnets and Magnetic Poles
It is a universal characteristic of all magnets thatlike poles repel and unlike poles attract. (Note the similarity with electrostatics: unlike charges
attract and like charges repel.)
Further experimentation shows that it isimpossible to separate north and south polesin the manner that + and − charges can be separated.
776 CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 22.4One end of a bar magnet is suspended from a thread that points toward north. The magnet’s two poles are labeled N and S for north-seeking and south-seeking
poles, respectively.
Misconception Alert: Earth’s Geographic North Pole Hides an S
The Earth acts like a very large bar magnet with its south-seeking pole near the geographic North Pole. That is why the north pole of your
compass is attracted toward the geographic north pole of the Earth—because the magnetic pole that is near the geographic North Pole is
actually a south magnetic pole! Confusion arises because the geographic term “North Pole” has come to be used (incorrectly) for the magnetic
pole that is near the North Pole. Thus, “North magnetic pole” is actually a misnomer—it should be called the South magnetic pole.
Figure 22.5Unlike poles attract, whereas like poles repel.
Figure 22.6North and south poles always occur in pairs. Attempts to separate them result in more pairs of poles. If we continue to split the magnet, we will eventually get
down to an iron atom with a north pole and a south pole—these, too, cannot be separated.
CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
777
The fact that magnetic poles always occur in pairs of north and south is true from the very large scale—for example, sunspots always occur in pairs
that are north and south magnetic poles—all the way down to the very small scale. Magnetic atoms have both a north pole and a south pole, as do
many types of subatomic particles, such as electrons, protons, and neutrons.
Making Connections: Take-Home Experiment—Refrigerator Magnets
We know that like magnetic poles repel and unlike poles attract. See if you can show this for two refrigerator magnets. Will the magnets stick if
you turn them over? Why do they stick to the door anyway? What can you say about the magnetic properties of the door next to the magnet? Do
refrigerator magnets stick to metal or plastic spoons? Do they stick to all types of metal?
22.2Ferromagnets and Electromagnets
Ferromagnets
Only certain materials, such as iron, cobalt, nickel, and gadolinium, exhibit strong magnetic effects. Such materials are calledferromagnetic, after
the Latin word for iron,ferrum. A group of materials made from the alloys of the rare earth elements are also used as strong and permanent magnets;
a popular one is neodymium. Other materials exhibit weak magnetic effects, which are detectable only with sensitive instruments. Not only do
ferromagnetic materials respond strongly to magnets (the way iron is attracted to magnets), they can also bemagnetizedthemselves—that is, they
can be induced to be magnetic or made into permanent magnets.
Figure 22.7An unmagnetized piece of iron is placed between two magnets, heated, and then cooled, or simply tapped when cold. The iron becomes a permanent magnet with
the poles aligned as shown: its south pole is adjacent to the north pole of the original magnet, and its north pole is adjacent to the south pole of the original magnet. Note that
there are attractive forces between the magnets.
When a magnet is brought near a previously unmagnetized ferromagnetic material, it causes local magnetization of the material with unlike poles
closest, as inFigure 22.7. (This results in the attraction of the previously unmagnetized material to the magnet.) What happens on a microscopic
scale is illustrated inFigure 22.8. The regions within the material calleddomainsact like small bar magnets. Within domains, the poles of individual
atoms are aligned. Each atom acts like a tiny bar magnet. Domains are small and randomly oriented in an unmagnetized ferromagnetic object. In
response to an external magnetic field, the domains may grow to millimeter size, aligning themselves as shown inFigure 22.8(b). This induced
magnetization can be made permanent if the material is heated and then cooled, or simply tapped in the presence of other magnets.
Figure 22.8(a) An unmagnetized piece of iron (or other ferromagnetic material) has randomly oriented domains. (b) When magnetized by an external field, the domains show
greater alignment, and some grow at the expense of others. Individual atoms are aligned within domains; each atom acts like a tiny bar magnet.
Conversely, a permanent magnet can be demagnetized by hard blows or by heating it in the absence of another magnet. Increased thermal motion at
higher temperature can disrupt and randomize the orientation and the size of the domains. There is a well-defined temperature for ferromagnetic
materials, which is called theCurie temperature, above which they cannot be magnetized. The Curie temperature for iron is 1043 K
(770ºC)
,
which is well above room temperature. There are several elements and alloys that have Curie temperatures much lower than room temperature and
are ferromagnetic only below those temperatures.
Electromagnets
Early in the 19th century, it was discovered that electrical currents cause magnetic effects. The first significant observation was by the Danish
scientist Hans Christian Oersted (1777–1851), who found that a compass needle was deflected by a current-carrying wire. This was the first
significant evidence that the movement of charges had any connection with magnets.Electromagnetismis the use of electric current to make
magnets. These temporarily induced magnets are calledelectromagnets. Electromagnets are employed for everything from a wrecking yard crane
that lifts scrapped cars to controlling the beam of a 90-km-circumference particle accelerator to the magnets in medical imaging machines (See
Figure 22.9).
778 CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested