asp net pdf viewer user control c# : C# split pdf application SDK utility html wpf .net visual studio PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics78-part1833

Figure 22.9Instrument for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The device uses a superconducting cylindrical coil for the main magnetic field. The patient goes into this
“tunnel” on the gurney. (credit: Bill McChesney, Flickr)
Figure 22.10shows that the response of iron filings to a current-carrying coil and to a permanent bar magnet. The patterns are similar. In fact,
electromagnets and ferromagnets have the same basic characteristics—for example, they have north and south poles that cannot be separated and
for which like poles repel and unlike poles attract.
Figure 22.10Iron filings near (a) a current-carrying coil and (b) a magnet act like tiny compass needles, showing the shape of their fields. Their response to a current-carrying
coil and a permanent magnet is seen to be very similar, especially near the ends of the coil and the magnet.
Combining a ferromagnet with an electromagnet can produce particularly strong magnetic effects. (SeeFigure 22.11.) Whenever strong magnetic
effects are needed, such as lifting scrap metal, or in particle accelerators, electromagnets are enhanced by ferromagnetic materials. Limits to how
strong the magnets can be made are imposed by coil resistance (it will overheat and melt at sufficiently high current), and so superconducting
magnets may be employed. These are still limited, because superconducting properties are destroyed by too great a magnetic field.
Figure 22.11An electromagnet with a ferromagnetic core can produce very strong magnetic effects. Alignment of domains in the core produces a magnet, the poles of which
are aligned with the electromagnet.
Figure 22.12shows a few uses of combinations of electromagnets and ferromagnets. Ferromagnetic materials can act as memory devices, because
the orientation of the magnetic fields of small domains can be reversed or erased. Magnetic information storage on videotapes and computer hard
drives are among the most common applications. This property is vital in our digital world.
CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
779
C# split pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf split; pdf no pages selected to print
C# split pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
acrobat split pdf; break a pdf file into parts
Figure 22.12An electromagnet induces regions of permanent magnetism on a floppy disk coated with a ferromagnetic material. The information stored here is digital (a region
is either magnetic or not); in other applications, it can be analog (with a varying strength), such as on audiotapes.
Current: The Source of All Magnetism
An electromagnet creates magnetism with an electric current. In later sections we explore this more quantitatively, finding the strength and direction
of magnetic fields created by various currents. But what about ferromagnets?Figure 22.13shows models of how electric currents create magnetism
at the submicroscopic level. (Note that we cannot directly observe the paths of individual electrons about atoms, and so a model or visual image,
consistent with all direct observations, is made. We can directly observe the electron’s orbital angular momentum, its spin momentum, and
subsequent magnetic moments, all of which are explained with electric-current-creating subatomic magnetism.) Currents, including those associated
with other submicroscopic particles like protons, allow us to explain ferromagnetism and all other magnetic effects. Ferromagnetism, for example,
results from an internal cooperative alignment of electron spins, possible in some materials but not in others.
Crucial to the statement that electric current is the source of all magnetism is the fact that it is impossible to separate north and south magnetic poles.
(This is far different from the case of positive and negative charges, which are easily separated.) A current loop always produces a magnetic
dipole—that is, a magnetic field that acts like a north pole and south pole pair. Since isolated north and south magnetic poles, calledmagnetic
monopoles, are not observed, currents are used to explain all magnetic effects. If magnetic monopoles did exist, then we would have to modify this
underlying connection that all magnetism is due to electrical current. There is no known reason that magnetic monopoles should not exist—they are
simply never observed—and so searches at the subnuclear level continue. If they donotexist, we would like to find out why not. If theydoexist, we
would like to see evidence of them.
Electric Currents and Magnetism
Electric current is the source of all magnetism.
Figure 22.13(a) In the planetary model of the atom, an electron orbits a nucleus, forming a closed-current loop and producing a magnetic field with a north pole and a south
pole. (b) Electrons have spin and can be crudely pictured as rotating charge, forming a current that produces a magnetic field with a north pole and a south pole. Neither the
planetary model nor the image of a spinning electron is completely consistent with modern physics. However, they do provide a useful way of understanding phenomena.
780 CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
break apart a pdf in reader; break up pdf file
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
break pdf into separate pages; pdf link to specific page
PhET Explorations: Magnets and Electromagnets
Explore the interactions between a compass and bar magnet. Discover how you can use a battery and wire to make a magnet! Can you make it
a stronger magnet? Can you make the magnetic field reverse?
Figure 22.14Magnets and Electromagnets (http://cnx.org/content/m42368/1.4/magnets-and-electromagnets_en.jar)
22.3Magnetic Fields and Magnetic Field Lines
Einstein is said to have been fascinated by a compass as a child, perhaps musing on how the needle felt a force without direct physical contact. His
ability to think deeply and clearly about action at a distance, particularly for gravitational, electric, and magnetic forces, later enabled him to create his
revolutionary theory of relativity. Since magnetic forces act at a distance, we define amagnetic fieldto represent magnetic forces. The pictorial
representation ofmagnetic field linesis very useful in visualizing the strength and direction of the magnetic field. As shown inFigure 22.15, the
direction of magnetic field linesis defined to be the direction in which the north end of a compass needle points. The magnetic field is traditionally
called theB-field.
Figure 22.15Magnetic field lines are defined to have the direction that a small compass points when placed at a location. (a) If small compasses are used to map the
magnetic field around a bar magnet, they will point in the directions shown: away from the north pole of the magnet, toward the south pole of the magnet. (Recall that the
Earth’s north magnetic pole is really a south pole in terms of definitions of poles on a bar magnet.) (b) Connecting the arrows gives continuous magnetic field lines. The
strength of the field is proportional to the closeness (or density) of the lines. (c) If the interior of the magnet could be probed, the field lines would be found to form continuous
closed loops.
Small compasses used to test a magnetic field will not disturb it. (This is analogous to the way we tested electric fields with a small test charge. In
both cases, the fields represent only the object creating them and not the probe testing them.)Figure 22.16shows how the magnetic field appears
for a current loop and a long straight wire, as could be explored with small compasses. A small compass placed in these fields will align itself parallel
to the field line at its location, with its north pole pointing in the direction ofB. Note the symbols used for field into and out of the paper.
Figure 22.16Small compasses could be used to map the fields shown here. (a) The magnetic field of a circular current loop is similar to that of a bar magnet. (b) A long and
straight wire creates a field with magnetic field lines forming circular loops. (c) When the wire is in the plane of the paper, the field is perpendicular to the paper. Note that the
symbols used for the field pointing inward (like the tail of an arrow) and the field pointing outward (like the tip of an arrow).
Making Connections: Concept of a Field
A field is a way of mapping forces surrounding any object that can act on another object at a distance without apparent physical connection. The
field represents the object generating it. Gravitational fields map gravitational forces, electric fields map electrical forces, and magnetic fields map
magnetic forces.
Extensive exploration of magnetic fields has revealed a number of hard-and-fast rules. We use magnetic field lines to represent the field (the lines are
a pictorial tool, not a physical entity in and of themselves). The properties of magnetic field lines can be summarized by these rules:
1. The direction of the magnetic field is tangent to the field line at any point in space. A small compass will point in the direction of the field line.
CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
781
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Convert PDF to HTML. C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to HTML in C#.NET. How to Use C# .NET XDoc.PDF
cannot select text in pdf file; split pdf files
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. A powerful C#.NET PDF control compatible with windows operating system and built on .NET framework.
break pdf password; break apart pdf pages
2. The strength of the field is proportional to the closeness of the lines. It is exactly proportional to the number of lines per unit area perpendicular
to the lines (called the areal density).
3. Magnetic field lines can never cross, meaning that the field is unique at any point in space.
4. Magnetic field lines are continuous, forming closed loops without beginning or end. They go from the north pole to the south pole.
The last property is related to the fact that the north and south poles cannot be separated. It is a distinct difference from electric field lines, which
begin and end on the positive and negative charges. If magnetic monopoles existed, then magnetic field lines would begin and end on them.
22.4Magnetic Field Strength: Force on a Moving Charge in a Magnetic Field
What is the mechanism by which one magnet exerts a force on another? The answer is related to the fact that all magnetism is caused by current,
the flow of charge.Magnetic fields exert forces on moving charges, and so they exert forces on other magnets, all of which have moving charges.
Right Hand Rule 1
The magnetic force on a moving charge is one of the most fundamental known. Magnetic force is as important as the electrostatic or Coulomb force.
Yet the magnetic force is more complex, in both the number of factors that affects it and in its direction, than the relatively simple Coulomb force. The
magnitude of themagnetic force
F
on a charge
q
moving at a speed
v
in a magnetic field of strength
B
is given by
(22.1)
F=qvBsinθ,
where
θ
is the angle between the directions of
v
and
B.
This force is often called theLorentz force. In fact, this is how we define the magnetic
field strength
B
—in terms of the force on a charged particle moving in a magnetic field. The SI unit for magnetic field strength
B
is called thetesla
(T) after the eccentric but brilliant inventor Nikola Tesla (1856–1943). To determine how the tesla relates to other SI units, we solve
F=qvBsinθ
for
B
.
(22.2)
B=
F
qvsinθ
Because
sinθ
is unitless, the tesla is
(22.3)
1 T=
1 N
C⋅m/s
=
1 N
A⋅m
(note that C/s = A).
Another smaller unit, called thegauss(G), where
1 G=10
−4
T
, is sometimes used. The strongest permanent magnets have fields near 2 T;
superconducting electromagnets may attain 10 T or more. The Earth’s magnetic field on its surface is only about
5×10
−5
T
, or 0.5 G.
Thedirectionof the magnetic force
F
is perpendicular to the plane formed by
v
and
B
, as determined by theright hand rule 1(or RHR-1), which
is illustrated inFigure 22.17. RHR-1 states that, to determine the direction of the magnetic force on a positive moving charge, you point the thumb of
the right hand in the direction of
v
, the fingers in the direction of
B
, and a perpendicular to the palm points in the direction of
F
. One way to
remember this is that there is one velocity, and so the thumb represents it. There are many field lines, and so the fingers represent them. The force is
in the direction you would push with your palm. The force on a negative charge is in exactly the opposite direction to that on a positive charge.
Figure 22.17Magnetic fields exert forces on moving charges. This force is one of the most basic known. The direction of the magnetic force on a moving charge is
perpendicular to the plane formed by
v
and
B
and follows right hand rule–1 (RHR-1) as shown. The magnitude of the force is proportional to
q
,
v
,
B
, and the sine of
the angle between
v
and
B
.
782 CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
›› C# PDF: Convert PDF to Jpeg. C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET.
a pdf page cut; break a pdf apart
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Tell C# users how to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy and
pdf no pages selected to print; break up pdf file
Making Connections: Charges and Magnets
There is no magnetic force on static charges. However, there is a magnetic force on moving charges. When charges are stationary, their electric
fields do not affect magnets. But, when charges move, they produce magnetic fields that exert forces on other magnets. When there is relative
motion, a connection between electric and magnetic fields emerges—each affects the other.
Example 22.1Calculating Magnetic Force: Earth’s Magnetic Field on a Charged Glass Rod
With the exception of compasses, you seldom see or personally experience forces due to the Earth’s small magnetic field. To illustrate this,
suppose that in a physics lab you rub a glass rod with silk, placing a 20-nC positive charge on it. Calculate the force on the rod due to the Earth’s
magnetic field, if you throw it with a horizontal velocity of 10 m/s due west in a place where the Earth’s field is due north parallel to the ground.
(The direction of the force is determined with right hand rule 1 as shown inFigure 22.18.)
Figure 22.18A positively charged object moving due west in a region where the Earth’s magnetic field is due north experiences a force that is straight down as shown. A
negative charge moving in the same direction would feel a force straight up.
Strategy
We are given the charge, its velocity, and the magnetic field strength and direction. We can thus use the equation
F=qvBsinθ
to find the
force.
Solution
The magnetic force is
(22.4)
F=qvbsinθ.
We see that
sinθ=1
, since the angle between the velocity and the direction of the field is
90º
. Entering the other given quantities yields
(22.5)
=
20×10
–9
C
(
10 m/s
)
5×10
–5
T
= 1×10
–11
(C⋅m/s)
N
C⋅m/s
=1×10
–11
N.
Discussion
This force is completely negligible on any macroscopic object, consistent with experience. (It is calculated to only one digit, since the Earth’s field
varies with location and is given to only one digit.) The Earth’s magnetic field, however, does produce very important effects, particularly on
submicroscopic particles. Some of these are explored inForce on a Moving Charge in a Magnetic Field: Examples and Applications.
22.5Force on a Moving Charge in a Magnetic Field: Examples and Applications
Magnetic force can cause a charged particle to move in a circular or spiral path. Cosmic rays are energetic charged particles in outer space, some of
which approach the Earth. They can be forced into spiral paths by the Earth’s magnetic field. Protons in giant accelerators are kept in a circular path
by magnetic force. The bubble chamber photograph inFigure 22.19shows charged particles moving in such curved paths. The curved paths of
charged particles in magnetic fields are the basis of a number of phenomena and can even be used analytically, such as in a mass spectrometer.
CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
783
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
overview. It provides plentiful C# class demo codes and tutorials on How to Use XDoc.PDF in C# .NET Programming Project. Plenty
break a pdf; pdf split pages in half
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
overview. It provides plentiful C# class demo codes and tutorials on How to Use XDoc.PDF in C# .NET Programming Project. Plenty
break a pdf file; break pdf file into multiple files
Figure 22.19Trails of bubbles are produced by high-energy charged particles moving through the superheated liquid hydrogen in this artist’s rendition of a bubble chamber.
There is a strong magnetic field perpendicular to the page that causes the curved paths of the particles. The radius of the path can be used to find the mass, charge, and
energy of the particle.
So does the magnetic force cause circular motion? Magnetic force is always perpendicular to velocity, so that it does no work on the charged particle.
The particle’s kinetic energy and speed thus remain constant. The direction of motion is affected, but not the speed. This is typical of uniform circular
motion. The simplest case occurs when a charged particle moves perpendicular to a uniform
B
-field, such as shown inFigure 22.20. (If this takes
place in a vacuum, the magnetic field is the dominant factor determining the motion.) Here, the magnetic force supplies the centripetal force
F
c
=mv
2
/r
. Noting that
sinθ=1
, we see that
F=qvB
.
Figure 22.20A negatively charged particle moves in the plane of the page in a region where the magnetic field is perpendicular into the page (represented by the small circles
with x’s—like the tails of arrows). The magnetic force is perpendicular to the velocity, and so velocity changes in direction but not magnitude. Uniform circular motion results.
Because the magnetic force
F
supplies the centripetal force
F
c
, we have
(22.6)
qvB=
mv
2
r
.
Solving for
r
yields
(22.7)
r=
mv
qB
.
Here,
r
is the radius of curvature of the path of a charged particle with mass
m
and charge
q
, moving at a speed
v
perpendicular to a magnetic
field of strength
B
. If the velocity is not perpendicular to the magnetic field, then
v
is the component of the velocity perpendicular to the field. The
component of the velocity parallel to the field is unaffected, since the magnetic force is zero for motion parallel to the field. This produces a spiral
motion rather than a circular one.
784 CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Example 22.2Calculating the Curvature of the Path of an Electron Moving in a Magnetic Field: A Magnet on a TV
Screen
A magnet brought near an old-fashioned TV screen such as inFigure 22.21(TV sets with cathode ray tubes instead of LCD screens) severely
distorts its picture by altering the path of the electrons that make its phosphors glow.(Don’t try this at home, as it will permanently magnetize
and ruin the TV.)To illustrate this, calculate the radius of curvature of the path of an electron having a velocity of
6.00×10
7
m/s
(corresponding to the accelerating voltage of about 10.0 kV used in some TVs) perpendicular to a magnetic field of strength
B=0.500 T
(obtainable with permanent magnets).
Figure 22.21Side view showing what happens when a magnet comes in contact with a computer monitor or TV screen. Electrons moving toward the screen spiral about
magnetic field lines, maintaining the component of their velocity parallel to the field lines. This distorts the image on the screen.
Strategy
We can find the radius of curvature
r
directly from the equation
r=
mv
qB
, since all other quantities in it are given or known.
Solution
Using known values for the mass and charge of an electron, along with the given values of
v
and
B
gives us
(22.8)
r=
mv
qB
=
9.11×10
−31
kg
6.00×10
7
m/s
1.60×10
−19
C
(
0.500T
)
= 6.83×10
−4
m
or
(22.9)
r=0.683 mm.
Discussion
The small radius indicates a large effect. The electrons in the TV picture tube are made to move in very tight circles, greatly altering their paths
and distorting the image.
Figure 22.22shows how electrons not moving perpendicular to magnetic field lines follow the field lines. The component of velocity parallel to the
lines is unaffected, and so the charges spiral along the field lines. If field strength increases in the direction of motion, the field will exert a force to
slow the charges, forming a kind of magnetic mirror, as shown below.
Figure 22.22When a charged particle moves along a magnetic field line into a region where the field becomes stronger, the particle experiences a force that reduces the
component of velocity parallel to the field. This force slows the motion along the field line and here reverses it, forming a “magnetic mirror.”
CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
785
The properties of charged particles in magnetic fields are related to such different things as the Aurora Australis or Aurora Borealis and particle
accelerators.Charged particles approaching magnetic field lines may get trapped in spiral orbits about the lines rather than crossing them, as seen
above. Some cosmic rays, for example, follow the Earth’s magnetic field lines, entering the atmosphere near the magnetic poles and causing the
southern or northern lights through their ionization of molecules in the atmosphere. This glow of energized atoms and molecules is seen inFigure
22.1. Those particles that approach middle latitudes must cross magnetic field lines, and many are prevented from penetrating the atmosphere.
Cosmic rays are a component of background radiation; consequently, they give a higher radiation dose at the poles than at the equator.
Figure 22.23Energetic electrons and protons, components of cosmic rays, from the Sun and deep outer space often follow the Earth’s magnetic field lines rather than cross
them. (Recall that the Earth’s north magnetic pole is really a south pole in terms of a bar magnet.)
Some incoming charged particles become trapped in the Earth’s magnetic field, forming two belts above the atmosphere known as the Van Allen
radiation belts after the discoverer James A. Van Allen, an American astrophysicist. (SeeFigure 22.24.) Particles trapped in these belts form
radiation fields (similar to nuclear radiation) so intense that manned space flights avoid them and satellites with sensitive electronics are kept out of
them. In the few minutes it took lunar missions to cross the Van Allen radiation belts, astronauts received radiation doses more than twice the allowed
annual exposure for radiation workers. Other planets have similar belts, especially those having strong magnetic fields like Jupiter.
Figure 22.24The Van Allen radiation belts are two regions in which energetic charged particles are trapped in the Earth’s magnetic field. One belt lies about 300 km above the
Earth’s surface, the other about 16,000 km. Charged particles in these belts migrate along magnetic field lines and are partially reflected away from the poles by the stronger
fields there. The charged particles that enter the atmosphere are replenished by the Sun and sources in deep outer space.
Back on Earth, we have devices that employ magnetic fields to contain charged particles. Among them are the giant particle accelerators that have
been used to explore the substructure of matter. (SeeFigure 22.25.) Magnetic fields not only control the direction of the charged particles, they also
are used to focus particles into beams and overcome the repulsion of like charges in these beams.
786 CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 22.25The Fermilab facility in Illinois has a large particle accelerator (the most powerful in the world until 2008) that employs magnetic fields (magnets seen here in
orange) to contain and direct its beam. This and other accelerators have been in use for several decades and have allowed us to discover some of the laws underlying all
matter. (credit: ammcrim, Flickr)
Thermonuclear fusion (like that occurring in the Sun) is a hope for a future clean energy source. One of the most promising devices is thetokamak,
which uses magnetic fields to contain (or trap) and direct the reactive charged particles. (SeeFigure 22.26.) Less exotic, but more immediately
practical, amplifiers in microwave ovens use a magnetic field to contain oscillating electrons. These oscillating electrons generate the microwaves
sent into the oven.
Figure 22.26Tokamaks such as the one shown in the figure are being studied with the goal of economical production of energy by nuclear fusion. Magnetic fields in the
doughnut-shaped device contain and direct the reactive charged particles. (credit: David Mellis, Flickr)
Mass spectrometers have a variety of designs, and many use magnetic fields to measure mass. The curvature of a charged particle’s path in the field
is related to its mass and is measured to obtain mass information. (SeeMore Applications of Magnetism.) Historically, such techniques were
employed in the first direct observations of electron charge and mass. Today, mass spectrometers (sometimes coupled with gas chromatographs) are
used to determine the make-up and sequencing of large biological molecules.
22.6The Hall Effect
We have seen effects of a magnetic field on free-moving charges. The magnetic field also affects charges moving in a conductor. One result is the
Hall effect, which has important implications and applications.
Figure 22.27shows what happens to charges moving through a conductor in a magnetic field. The field is perpendicular to the electron drift velocity
and to the width of the conductor. Note that conventional current is to the right in both parts of the figure. In part (a), electrons carry the current and
move to the left. In part (b), positive charges carry the current and move to the right. Moving electrons feel a magnetic force toward one side of the
conductor, leaving a net positive charge on the other side. This separation of chargecreates a voltage
ε
, known as theHall emf,acrossthe
conductor. The creation of a voltageacrossa current-carrying conductor by a magnetic field is known as theHall effect, after Edwin Hall, the
American physicist who discovered it in 1879.
CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
787
Figure 22.27The Hall effect. (a) Electrons move to the left in this flat conductor (conventional current to the right). The magnetic field is directly out of the page, represented by
circled dots; it exerts a force on the moving charges, causing a voltage
ε
, the Hall emf, across the conductor. (b) Positive charges moving to the right (conventional current
also to the right) are moved to the side, producing a Hall emf of the opposite sign,
–ε
. Thus, if the direction of the field and current are known, the sign of the charge carriers
can be determined from the Hall effect.
One very important use of the Hall effect is to determine whether positive or negative charges carries the current. Note that inFigure 22.27(b), where
positive charges carry the current, the Hall emf has the sign opposite to when negative charges carry the current. Historically, the Hall effect was
used to show that electrons carry current in metals and it also shows that positive charges carry current in some semiconductors. The Hall effect is
used today as a research tool to probe the movement of charges, their drift velocities and densities, and so on, in materials. In 1980, it was
discovered that the Hall effect is quantized, an example of quantum behavior in a macroscopic object.
The Hall effect has other uses that range from the determination of blood flow rate to precision measurement of magnetic field strength. To examine
these quantitatively, we need an expression for the Hall emf,
ε
, across a conductor. Consider the balance of forces on a moving charge in a situation
where
B
,
v
, and
l
are mutually perpendicular, such as shown inFigure 22.28. Although the magnetic force moves negative charges to one side,
they cannot build up without limit. The electric field caused by their separation opposes the magnetic force,
F=qvB
, and the electric force,
F
e
=qE
, eventually grows to equal it. That is,
(22.10)
qE=qvB
or
(22.11)
E=vB.
Note that the electric field
E
is uniform across the conductor because the magnetic field
B
is uniform, as is the conductor. For a uniform electric
field, the relationship between electric field and voltage is
E=ε/l
, where
l
is the width of the conductor and
ε
is the Hall emf. Entering this into
the last expression gives
(22.12)
ε
l
=vB.
Solving this for the Hall emf yields
(22.13)
ε=Blv(B,v,andl,mutually perpendicular),
where
ε
is the Hall effect voltage across a conductor of width
l
through which charges move at a speed
v
.
788 CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested