Figure 22.28The Hall emf
ε
produces an electric force that balances the magnetic force on the moving charges. The magnetic force produces charge separation, which
builds up until it is balanced by the electric force, an equilibrium that is quickly reached.
One of the most common uses of the Hall effect is in the measurement of magnetic field strength
B
. Such devices, calledHall probes, can be made
very small, allowing fine position mapping. Hall probes can also be made very accurate, usually accomplished by careful calibration. Another
application of the Hall effect is to measure fluid flow in any fluid that has free charges (most do). (SeeFigure 22.29.) A magnetic field applied
perpendicular to the flow direction produces a Hall emf
ε
as shown. Note that the sign of
ε
depends not on the sign of the charges, but only on the
directions of
B
and
v
. The magnitude of the Hall emf is
ε=Blv
, where
l
is the pipe diameter, so that the average velocity
v
can be determined
from
ε
providing the other factors are known.
Figure 22.29The Hall effect can be used to measure fluid flow in any fluid having free charges, such as blood. The Hall emf
ε
is measured across the tube perpendicular to
the applied magnetic field and is proportional to the average velocity
v
.
Example 22.3Calculating the Hall emf: Hall Effect for Blood Flow
A Hall effect flow probe is placed on an artery, applying a 0.100-T magnetic field across it, in a setup similar to that inFigure 22.29. What is the
Hall emf, given the vessel’s inside diameter is 4.00 mm and the average blood velocity is 20.0 cm/s?
Strategy
Because
B
,
v
, and
l
are mutually perpendicular, the equation
ε=Blv
can be used to find
ε
.
Solution
Entering the given values for
B
,
v
, and
l
gives
(22.14)
ε Blv=(0.100 T)
4.00×10
−3
m
(0.200 m/s)
= 80.0 μV
Discussion
This is the average voltage output. Instantaneous voltage varies with pulsating blood flow. The voltage is small in this type of measurement.
ε
is
particularly difficult to measure, because there are voltages associated with heart action (ECG voltages) that are on the order of millivolts. In
CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
789
Pdf rotate single page - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
cannot print pdf no pages selected; pdf file specification
Pdf rotate single page - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break a pdf into multiple files; split pdf into multiple files
practice, this difficulty is overcome by applying an AC magnetic field, so that the Hall emf is AC with the same frequency. An amplifier can be
very selective in picking out only the appropriate frequency, eliminating signals and noise at other frequencies.
22.7Magnetic Force on a Current-Carrying Conductor
Because charges ordinarily cannot escape a conductor, the magnetic force on charges moving in a conductor is transmitted to the conductor itself.
Figure 22.30The magnetic field exerts a force on a current-carrying wire in a direction given by the right hand rule 1 (the same direction as that on the individual moving
charges). This force can easily be large enough to move the wire, since typical currents consist of very large numbers of moving charges.
We can derive an expression for the magnetic force on a current by taking a sum of the magnetic forces on individual charges. (The forces add
because they are in the same direction.) The force on an individual charge moving at the drift velocity
v
d
is given by
F=qv
d
Bsinθ
. Taking
B
to
be uniform over a length of wire
l
and zero elsewhere, the total magnetic force on the wire is then
F=(qv
d
Bsinθ)(N)
, where
N
is the number
of charge carriers in the section of wire of length
l
. Now,
N=nV
, where
n
is the number of charge carriers per unit volume and
V
is the volume
of wire in the field. Noting that
V=Al
, where
A
is the cross-sectional area of the wire, then the force on the wire is
F=(qv
d
Bsinθ)(nAl)
.
Gathering terms,
(22.15)
F=(nqAv
d
)lBsinθ.
Because
nqAv
d
=I
(seeCurrent),
(22.16)
F=IlBsinθ
is the equation formagnetic force on a length
l
of wire carrying a current
I
in a uniform magnetic field
B
, as shown inFigure 22.31. If we divide
both sides of this expression by
l
, we find that the magnetic force per unit length of wire in a uniform field is
F
l
=IBsinθ
. The direction of this
force is given by RHR-1, with the thumb in the direction of the current
I
. Then, with the fingers in the direction of
B
, a perpendicular to the palm
points in the direction of
F
, as inFigure 22.31.
Figure 22.31The force on a current-carrying wire in a magnetic field is
F=IlBsinθ
. Its direction is given by RHR-1.
790 CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
And C# users may choose to only rotate a single page of PDF file or all the pages. See C# programming demos below. DLLs for PDF Page Rotation in C#.NET Project.
reader split pdf; break apart a pdf in reader
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Able to remove a single page from adobe PDF document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge. XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
break pdf into multiple files; pdf splitter
Example 22.4Calculating Magnetic Force on a Current-Carrying Wire: A Strong Magnetic Field
Calculate the force on the wire shown inFigure 22.30, given
B=1.50 T
,
l=5.00 cm
, and
I=20.0A
.
Strategy
The force can be found with the given information by using
F=IlBsinθ
and noting that the angle
θ
between
I
and
B
is
90º
, so that
sinθ=1
.
Solution
Entering the given values into
F=IlBsinθ
yields
(22.17)
F=IlBsinθ=(20.0 A)(0.0500 m)(1.50 T)(1).
The units for tesla are
1 T=
N
A⋅m
; thus,
(22.18)
F=1.50 N.
Discussion
This large magnetic field creates a significant force on a small length of wire.
Magnetic force on current-carrying conductors is used to convert electric energy to work. (Motors are a prime example—they employ loops of wire
and are considered in the next section.) Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is the technical name given to a clever application where magnetic force
pumps fluids without moving mechanical parts. (SeeFigure 22.32.)
Figure 22.32Magnetohydrodynamics. The magnetic force on the current passed through this fluid can be used as a nonmechanical pump.
A strong magnetic field is applied across a tube and a current is passed through the fluid at right angles to the field, resulting in a force on the fluid
parallel to the tube axis as shown. The absence of moving parts makes this attractive for moving a hot, chemically active substance, such as the
liquid sodium employed in some nuclear reactors. Experimental artificial hearts are testing with this technique for pumping blood, perhaps
circumventing the adverse effects of mechanical pumps. (Cell membranes, however, are affected by the large fields needed in MHD, delaying its
practical application in humans.) MHD propulsion for nuclear submarines has been proposed, because it could be considerably quieter than
conventional propeller drives. The deterrent value of nuclear submarines is based on their ability to hide and survive a first or second nuclear strike.
As we slowly disassemble our nuclear weapons arsenals, the submarine branch will be the last to be decommissioned because of this ability (See
Figure 22.33.) Existing MHD drives are heavy and inefficient—much development work is needed.
Figure 22.33An MHD propulsion system in a nuclear submarine could produce significantly less turbulence than propellers and allow it to run more silently. The development
of a silent drive submarine was dramatized in the book and the filmThe Hunt for Red October.
CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
791
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How to
break pdf into multiple documents; break a pdf file into parts
VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.
anticlockwise in VB.NET. Rotate single specified page or entire pages permanently in PDF file in Visual Basic .NET. Batch change PDF page
pdf no pages selected; split pdf into individual pages
22.8Torque on a Current Loop: Motors and Meters
Motorsare the most common application of magnetic force on current-carrying wires. Motors have loops of wire in a magnetic field. When current is
passed through the loops, the magnetic field exerts torque on the loops, which rotates a shaft. Electrical energy is converted to mechanical work in
the process. (SeeFigure 22.34.)
Figure 22.34Torque on a current loop. A current-carrying loop of wire attached to a vertically rotating shaft feels magnetic forces that produce a clockwise torque as viewed
from above.
Let us examine the force on each segment of the loop inFigure 22.34to find the torques produced about the axis of the vertical shaft. (This will lead
to a useful equation for the torque on the loop.) We take the magnetic field to be uniform over the rectangular loop, which has width
w
and height
l
.
First, we note that the forces on the top and bottom segments are vertical and, therefore, parallel to the shaft, producing no torque. Those vertical
forces are equal in magnitude and opposite in direction, so that they also produce no net force on the loop.Figure 22.35shows views of the loop
from above. Torque is defined as
τ=rFsinθ
, where
F
is the force,
r
is the distance from the pivot that the force is applied, and
θ
is the angle
between
r
and
F
. As seen inFigure 22.35(a), right hand rule 1 gives the forces on the sides to be equal in magnitude and opposite in direction, so
that the net force is again zero. However, each force produces a clockwise torque. Since
r=w/2
, the torque on each vertical segment is
(w/2)Fsinθ
, and the two add to give a total torque.
(22.19)
τ=
w
2
Fsinθ+
w
2
Fsinθ=wFsinθ
792 CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
break a pdf into separate pages; break apart pdf
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C# Users can view PDF document in single page or continue
pdf separate pages; pdf link to specific page
Figure 22.35Top views of a current-carrying loop in a magnetic field. (a) The equation for torque is derived using this view. Note that the perpendicular to the loop makes an
angle
θ
with the field that is the same as the angle between
w/2
and
F
. (b) The maximum torque occurs when
θ
is a right angle and
sinθ=1
. (c) Zero (minimum)
torque occurs when
θ
is zero and
sinθ=0
. (d) The torque reverses once the loop rotates past
θ=0
.
Now, each vertical segment has a length
l
that is perpendicular to
B
, so that the force on each is
F=IlB
. Entering
F
into the expression for
torque yields
(22.20)
τ=wIlBsinθ.
If we have a multiple loop of
N
turns, we get
N
times the torque of one loop. Finally, note that the area of the loop is
A=wl
; the expression for
the torque becomes
(22.21)
τ=NIABsinθ.
This is the torque on a current-carrying loop in a uniform magnetic field. This equation can be shown to be valid for a loop of any shape. The loop
carries a current
I
, has
N
turns, each of area
A
, and the perpendicular to the loop makes an angle
θ
with the field
B
. The net force on the loop
is zero.
Example 22.5Calculating Torque on a Current-Carrying Loop in a Strong Magnetic Field
Find the maximum torque on a 100-turn square loop of a wire of 10.0 cm on a side that carries 15.0 A of current in a 2.00-T field.
Strategy
Torque on the loop can be found using
τ=NIABsinθ
. Maximum torque occurs when
θ=90º
and
sinθ=1
.
Solution
For
sinθ=1
, the maximum torque is
(22.22)
τ
max
=NIAB.
Entering known values yields
(22.23)
τ
max
= (100)(15.0 A)
0.100m
2
(2.00 T)
= 30.0 N⋅m.
CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
793
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Both single page and multipage tiff image files can be created from PDF. Supports tiff compression selection. Supports for changing image size.
pdf format specification; break pdf into smaller files
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
break a pdf into parts; c# split pdf
Discussion
This torque is large enough to be useful in a motor.
The torque found in the preceding example is the maximum. As the coil rotates, the torque decreases to zero at
θ=0
. The torque thenreversesits
direction once the coil rotates past
θ=0
. (SeeFigure 22.35(d).) This means that, unless we do something, the coil will oscillate back and forth
about equilibrium at
θ=0
. To get the coil to continue rotating in the same direction, we can reverse the current as it passes through
θ=0
with
automatic switches calledbrushes. (SeeFigure 22.36.)
Figure 22.36(a) As the angular momentum of the coil carries it through
θ=0
, the brushes reverse the current to keep the torque clockwise. (b) The coil will rotate
continuously in the clockwise direction, with the current reversing each half revolution to maintain the clockwise torque.
Meters, such as those in analog fuel gauges on a car, are another common application of magnetic torque on a current-carrying loop.Figure 22.37
shows that a meter is very similar in construction to a motor. The meter in the figure has its magnets shaped to limit the effect of
θ
by making
B
perpendicular to the loop over a large angular range. Thus the torque is proportional to
I
and not
θ
. A linear spring exerts a counter-torque that
balances the current-produced torque. This makes the needle deflection proportional to
I
. If an exact proportionality cannot be achieved, the gauge
reading can be calibrated. To produce a galvanometer for use in analog voltmeters and ammeters that have a low resistance and respond to small
currents, we use a large loop area
A
, high magnetic field
B
, and low-resistance coils.
Figure 22.37Meters are very similar to motors but only rotate through a part of a revolution. The magnetic poles of this meter are shaped to keep the component of
B
perpendicular to the loop constant, so that the torque does not depend on
θ
and the deflection against the return spring is proportional only to the current
I
.
22.9Magnetic Fields Produced by Currents: Ampere’s Law
How much current is needed to produce a significant magnetic field, perhaps as strong as the Earth’s field? Surveyors will tell you that overhead
electric power lines create magnetic fields that interfere with their compass readings. Indeed, when Oersted discovered in 1820 that a current in a
wire affected a compass needle, he was not dealing with extremely large currents. How does the shape of wires carrying current affect the shape of
the magnetic field created? We noted earlier that a current loop created a magnetic field similar to that of a bar magnet, but what about a straight wire
or a toroid (doughnut)? How is the direction of a current-created field related to the direction of the current? Answers to these questions are explored
in this section, together with a brief discussion of the law governing the fields created by currents.
794 CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
With VB.NET PDF SDK, PDF document page can be rotated to 90, 180, and 270 in clockwise. Both a single page and whole file pages can be rotated and saved as
acrobat split pdf; cannot select text in pdf
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
break apart a pdf; break pdf into pages
Magnetic Field Created by a Long Straight Current-Carrying Wire: Right Hand Rule 2
Magnetic fields have both direction and magnitude. As noted before, one way to explore the direction of a magnetic field is with compasses, as
shown for a long straight current-carrying wire inFigure 22.38. Hall probes can determine the magnitude of the field. The field around a long straight
wire is found to be in circular loops. Theright hand rule 2(RHR-2) emerges from this exploration and is valid for any current segment—point the
thumb in the direction of the current, and the fingers curl in the direction of the magnetic field loopscreated by it.
Figure 22.38(a) Compasses placed near a long straight current-carrying wire indicate that field lines form circular loops centered on the wire. (b) Right hand rule 2 states that,
if the right hand thumb points in the direction of the current, the fingers curl in the direction of the field. This rule is consistent with the field mapped for the long straight wire
and is valid for any current segment.
Themagnetic field strength (magnitude) produced by a long straight current-carrying wireis found by experiment to be
(22.24)
B=
μ
0
I
2πr
(long straight wire),
where
I
is the current,
r
is the shortest distance to the wire, and the constant
μ
0
=4π×10
−7
T⋅m/A
is thepermeability of free space.
(μ
0
is one of the basic constants in nature. We will see later that
μ
0
is related to the speed of light.) Since the wire is very long, the magnitude of the
field depends only on distance from the wire
r
, not on position along the wire.
Example 22.6Calculating Current that Produces a Magnetic Field
Find the current in a long straight wire that would produce a magnetic field twice the strength of the Earth’s at a distance of 5.0 cm from the wire.
Strategy
The Earth’s field is about
5.0×10
−5
T
, and so here
B
due to the wire is taken to be
1.0×10
−4
T
. The equation
B=
μ
0
I
2πr
can be used to
find
I
, since all other quantities are known.
Solution
Solving for
I
and entering known values gives
(22.25)
=
2πrB
μ
0
=
2π
5.0×10
−2
m
1.0×10
−4
T
4π×10
−7
T⋅m/A
= 25 A.
Discussion
So a moderately large current produces a significant magnetic field at a distance of 5.0 cm from a long straight wire. Note that the answer is
stated to only two digits, since the Earth’s field is specified to only two digits in this example.
CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
795
Ampere’s Law and Others
The magnetic field of a long straight wire has more implications than you might at first suspect.Each segment of current produces a magnetic field
like that of a long straight wire, and the total field of any shape current is the vector sum of the fields due to each segment.The formal statement of
the direction and magnitude of the field due to each segment is called theBiot-Savart law. Integral calculus is needed to sum the field for an
arbitrary shape current. This results in a more complete law, calledAmpere’s law, which relates magnetic field and current in a general way.
Ampere’s law in turn is a part ofMaxwell’s equations, which give a complete theory of all electromagnetic phenomena. Considerations of how
Maxwell’s equations appear to different observers led to the modern theory of relativity, and the realization that electric and magnetic fields are
different manifestations of the same thing. Most of this is beyond the scope of this text in both mathematical level, requiring calculus, and in the
amount of space that can be devoted to it. But for the interested student, and particularly for those who continue in physics, engineering, or similar
pursuits, delving into these matters further will reveal descriptions of nature that are elegant as well as profound. In this text, we shall keep the
general features in mind, such as RHR-2 and the rules for magnetic field lines listed inMagnetic Fields and Magnetic Field Lines, while
concentrating on the fields created in certain important situations.
Making Connections: Relativity
Hearing all we do about Einstein, we sometimes get the impression that he invented relativity out of nothing. On the contrary, one of Einstein’s
motivations was to solve difficulties in knowing how different observers see magnetic and electric fields.
Magnetic Field Produced by a Current-Carrying Circular Loop
The magnetic field near a current-carrying loop of wire is shown inFigure 22.39. Both the direction and the magnitude of the magnetic field produced
by a current-carrying loop are complex. RHR-2 can be used to give the direction of the field near the loop, but mapping with compasses and the rules
about field lines given inMagnetic Fields and Magnetic Field Linesare needed for more detail. There is a simple formula for themagnetic field
strength at the center of a circular loop. It is
(22.26)
B=
μ
0
I
2R
(at center of loop),
where
R
is the radius of the loop. This equation is very similar to that for a straight wire, but it is validonlyat the center of a circular loop of wire. The
similarity of the equations does indicate that similar field strength can be obtained at the center of a loop. One way to get a larger field is to have
N
loops; then, the field is
B=
0
I/(2R)
. Note that the larger the loop, the smaller the field at its center, because the current is farther away.
Figure 22.39(a) RHR-2 gives the direction of the magnetic field inside and outside a current-carrying loop. (b) More detailed mapping with compasses or with a Hall probe
completes the picture. The field is similar to that of a bar magnet.
Magnetic Field Produced by a Current-Carrying Solenoid
Asolenoidis a long coil of wire (with many turns or loops, as opposed to a flat loop). Because of its shape, the field inside a solenoid can be very
uniform, and also very strong. The field just outside the coils is nearly zero.Figure 22.40shows how the field looks and how its direction is given by
RHR-2.
796 CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 22.40(a) Because of its shape, the field inside a solenoid of length
l
is remarkably uniform in magnitude and direction, as indicated by the straight and uniformly
spaced field lines. The field outside the coils is nearly zero. (b) This cutaway shows the magnetic field generated by the current in the solenoid.
The magnetic field inside of a current-carrying solenoid is very uniform in direction and magnitude. Only near the ends does it begin to weaken and
change direction. The field outside has similar complexities to flat loops and bar magnets, but themagnetic field strength inside a solenoidis
simply
(22.27)
B=μ
0
nI (inside a solenoid),
where
n
is the number of loops per unit length of the solenoid
(n=N/l
, with
N
being the number of loops and
l
the length). Note that
B
is the
field strength anywhere in the uniform region of the interior and not just at the center. Large uniform fields spread over a large volume are possible
with solenoids, asExample 22.7implies.
Example 22.7Calculating Field Strength inside a Solenoid
What is the field inside a 2.00-m-long solenoid that has 2000 loops and carries a 1600-A current?
Strategy
To find the field strength inside a solenoid, we use
B=μ
0
nI
. First, we note the number of loops per unit length is
(22.28)
n
−1
=
N
l
=
2000
2.00 m
=1000m
−1
=10cm
−1
.
Solution
Substituting known values gives
(22.29)
μ
0
nI=
4π×10
−7
T⋅m/A
1000m
−1
(1600 A)
= 2.01 T.
Discussion
This is a large field strength that could be established over a large-diameter solenoid, such as in medical uses of magnetic resonance imaging
(MRI). The very large current is an indication that the fields of this strength are not easily achieved, however. Such a large current through 1000
loops squeezed into a meter’s length would produce significant heating. Higher currents can be achieved by using superconducting wires,
although this is expensive. There is an upper limit to the current, since the superconducting state is disrupted by very large magnetic fields.
There are interesting variations of the flat coil and solenoid. For example, the toroidal coil used to confine the reactive particles in tokamaks is much
like a solenoid bent into a circle. The field inside a toroid is very strong but circular. Charged particles travel in circles, following the field lines, and
collide with one another, perhaps inducing fusion. But the charged particles do not cross field lines and escape the toroid. A whole range of coil
shapes are used to produce all sorts of magnetic field shapes. Adding ferromagnetic materials produces greater field strengths and can have a
significant effect on the shape of the field. Ferromagnetic materials tend to trap magnetic fields (the field lines bend into the ferromagnetic material,
leaving weaker fields outside it) and are used as shields for devices that are adversely affected by magnetic fields, including the Earth’s magnetic
field.
PhET Explorations: Generator
Generate electricity with a bar magnet! Discover the physics behind the phenomena by exploring magnets and how you can use them to make a
bulb light.
CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
797
Figure 22.41Generator (http://cnx.org/content/m42382/1.2/generator_en.jar)
22.10Magnetic Force between Two Parallel Conductors
You might expect that there are significant forces between current-carrying wires, since ordinary currents produce significant magnetic fields and
these fields exert significant forces on ordinary currents. But you might not expect that the force between wires is used todefinethe ampere. It might
also surprise you to learn that this force has something to do with why large circuit breakers burn up when they attempt to interrupt large currents.
The force between two long straight and parallel conductors separated by a distance
r
can be found by applying what we have developed in
preceding sections.Figure 22.42shows the wires, their currents, the fields they create, and the subsequent forces they exert on one another. Let us
consider the field produced by wire 1 and the force it exerts on wire 2 (call the force
F
2
). The field due to
I
1
at a distance
r
is given to be
(22.30)
B
1
=
μ
0
I
1
2πr
.
Figure 22.42(a) The magnetic field produced by a long straight conductor is perpendicular to a parallel conductor, as indicated by RHR-2. (b) A view from above of the two
wires shown in (a), with one magnetic field line shown for each wire. RHR-1 shows that the force between the parallel conductors is attractive when the currents are in the
same direction. A similar analysis shows that the force is repulsive between currents in opposite directions.
This field is uniform along wire 2 and perpendicular to it, and so the force
F
2
it exerts on wire 2 is given by
F=IlBsinθ
with
sinθ=1
:
(22.31)
F
2
=I
2
lB
1
.
By Newton’s third law, the forces on the wires are equal in magnitude, and so we just write
F
for the magnitude of
F
2
. (Note that
F
1
=−F
2
.)
Since the wires are very long, it is convenient to think in terms of
F/l
, the force per unit length. Substituting the expression for
B
1
into the last
equation and rearranging terms gives
(22.32)
F
l
=
μ
0
I
1
I
2
2πr
.
F/l
is the force per unit length between two parallel currents
I
1
and
I
2
separated by a distance
r
. The force is attractive if the currents are in the
same direction and repulsive if they are in opposite directions.
This force is responsible for thepinch effectin electric arcs and plasmas. The force exists whether the currents are in wires or not. In an electric arc,
where currents are moving parallel to one another, there is an attraction that squeezes currents into a smaller tube. In large circuit breakers, like
those used in neighborhood power distribution systems, the pinch effect can concentrate an arc between plates of a switch trying to break a large
current, burn holes, and even ignite the equipment. Another example of the pinch effect is found in the solar plasma, where jets of ionized material,
such as solar flares, are shaped by magnetic forces.
Theoperational definition of the ampereis based on the force between current-carrying wires. Note that for parallel wires separated by 1 meter with
each carrying 1 ampere, the force per meter is
(22.33)
F
l
=
4π×10
−7
T⋅m/A
(1 A)
2
(2π)(1 m)
=2×10
−7
N/m.
Since
μ
0
is exactly
4π×10
−7
T⋅m/A
by definition, and because
1 T=1 N/(A⋅m)
, the force per meter is exactly
2×10
−7
N/m
. This is the
basis of the operational definition of the ampere.
798 CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested