asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Split pdf by bookmark SDK application service wpf html asp.net dnn PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics8-part1835

Figure 2.55
28.(a) Explain how you can determine the acceleration over time from a velocity versus time graph such as the one inFigure 2.56. (b) Based on the
graph, how does acceleration change over time?
Figure 2.56
29.(a) Sketch a graph of acceleration versus time corresponding to the graph of velocity versus time given inFigure 2.57. (b) Identify the time or
times (
t
a
,
t
b
,
t
c
, etc.) at which the acceleration is greatest. (c) At which times is it zero? (d) At which times is it negative?
Figure 2.57
30.Consider the velocity vs. time graph of a person in an elevator shown inFigure 2.58. Suppose the elevator is initially at rest. It then accelerates
for 3 seconds, maintains that velocity for 15 seconds, then decelerates for 5 seconds until it stops. The acceleration for the entire trip is not constant
so we cannot use the equations of motion fromMotion Equations for Constant Acceleration in One Dimensionfor the complete trip. (We could,
however, use them in the three individual sections where acceleration is a constant.) Sketch graphs of (a) position vs. time and (b) acceleration vs.
time for this trip.
CHAPTER 2 | KINEMATICS S 79
Split pdf by bookmark - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
can't select text in pdf file; break a pdf into smaller files
Split pdf by bookmark - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
acrobat split pdf bookmark; split pdf
Figure 2.58
31.A cylinder is given a push and then rolls up an inclined plane. If the origin is the starting point, sketch the position, velocity, and acceleration of the
cylinder vs. time as it goes up and then down the plane.
80 CHAPTER 2 | KINEMATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF bookmark Library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.
Ability to remove and delete bookmark and outline from PDF document. Merge and split PDF file with bookmark. Save PDF file with bookmark open.
break pdf password online; combine pages of pdf documents into one
VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in
to PDF bookmark. Merge and split PDF file with bookmark in VB.NET. Save PDF file with bookmark open in VB.NET project. PDF control
break pdf into multiple pages; pdf split and merge
Problems & Exercises
2.1Displacement
Figure 2.59
1.Find the following for path A inFigure 2.59: (a) The distance
traveled. (b) The magnitude of the displacement from start to finish. (c)
The displacement from start to finish.
2.Find the following for path B inFigure 2.59: (a) The distance
traveled. (b) The magnitude of the displacement from start to finish. (c)
The displacement from start to finish.
3.Find the following for path C inFigure 2.59: (a) The distance
traveled. (b) The magnitude of the displacement from start to finish. (c)
The displacement from start to finish.
4.Find the following for path D inFigure 2.59: (a) The distance
traveled. (b) The magnitude of the displacement from start to finish. (c)
The displacement from start to finish.
2.3Time, Velocity, and Speed
5.(a) Calculate Earth’s average speed relative to the Sun. (b) What is
its average velocity over a period of one year?
6.A helicopter blade spins at exactly 100 revolutions per minute. Its tip
is 5.00 m from the center of rotation. (a) Calculate the average speed of
the blade tip in the helicopter’s frame of reference. (b) What is its
average velocity over one revolution?
7.The North American and European continents are moving apart at a
rate of about 3 cm/y. At this rate how long will it take them to drift 500
km farther apart than they are at present?
8.Land west of the San Andreas fault in southern California is moving
at an average velocity of about 6 cm/y northwest relative to land east of
the fault. Los Angeles is west of the fault and may thus someday be at
the same latitude as San Francisco, which is east of the fault. How far
in the future will this occur if the displacement to be made is 590 km
northwest, assuming the motion remains constant?
9.On May 26, 1934, a streamlined, stainless steel diesel train called
the Zephyr set the world’s nonstop long-distance speed record for
trains. Its run from Denver to Chicago took 13 hours, 4 minutes, 58
seconds, and was witnessed by more than a million people along the
route. The total distance traveled was 1633.8 km. What was its average
speed in km/h and m/s?
10.Tidal friction is slowing the rotation of the Earth. As a result, the
orbit of the Moon is increasing in radius at a rate of approximately 4 cm/
year. Assuming this to be a constant rate, how many years will pass
before the radius of the Moon’s orbit increases by
3.84×10
6
m
(1%)?
11.A student drove to the university from her home and noted that the
odometer reading of her car increased by 12.0 km. The trip took 18.0
min. (a) What was her average speed? (b) If the straight-line distance
from her home to the university is 10.3 km in a direction
25.0º
south of
east, what was her average velocity? (c) If she returned home by the
same path 7 h 30 min after she left, what were her average speed and
velocity for the entire trip?
12.The speed of propagation of the action potential (an electrical
signal) in a nerve cell depends (inversely) on the diameter of the axon
(nerve fiber). If the nerve cell connecting the spinal cord to your feet is
1.1 m long, and the nerve impulse speed is 18 m/s, how long does it
take for the nerve signal to travel this distance?
13.Conversations with astronauts on the lunar surface were
characterized by a kind of echo in which the earthbound person’s voice
was so loud in the astronaut’s space helmet that it was picked up by the
astronaut’s microphone and transmitted back to Earth. It is reasonable
to assume that the echo time equals the time necessary for the radio
wave to travel from the Earth to the Moon and back (that is, neglecting
any time delays in the electronic equipment). Calculate the distance
from Earth to the Moon given that the echo time was 2.56 s and that
radio waves travel at the speed of light
(3.00×10
8
m/s)
.
14.A football quarterback runs 15.0 m straight down the playing field in
2.50 s. He is then hit and pushed 3.00 m straight backward in 1.75 s.
He breaks the tackle and runs straight forward another 21.0 m in 5.20 s.
Calculate his average velocity (a) for each of the three intervals and (b)
for the entire motion.
15.The planetary model of the atom pictures electrons orbiting the
atomic nucleus much as planets orbit the Sun. In this model you can
view hydrogen, the simplest atom, as having a single electron in a
circular orbit
1.06×10
−10
m
in diameter. (a) If the average speed of
the electron in this orbit is known to be
2.20×10
6
m/s
, calculate the
number of revolutions per second it makes about the nucleus. (b) What
is the electron’s average velocity?
2.4Acceleration
16.A cheetah can accelerate from rest to a speed of 30.0 m/s in 7.00 s.
What is its acceleration?
17.Professional Application
Dr. John Paul Stapp was U.S. Air Force officer who studied the effects
of extreme deceleration on the human body. On December 10, 1954,
Stapp rode a rocket sled, accelerating from rest to a top speed of 282
m/s (1015 km/h) in 5.00 s, and was brought jarringly back to rest in only
1.40 s! Calculate his (a) acceleration and (b) deceleration. Express
each in multiples of
(9.80 m/s
2
)
by taking its ratio to the
acceleration of gravity.
18.A commuter backs her car out of her garage with an acceleration of
1.40 m/s
2
. (a) How long does it take her to reach a speed of 2.00
m/s? (b) If she then brakes to a stop in 0.800 s, what is her
deceleration?
19.Assume that an intercontinental ballistic missile goes from rest to a
suborbital speed of 6.50 km/s in 60.0 s (the actual speed and time are
classified). What is its average acceleration in
m/s
2
and in multiples of
(9.80 m/s
2
)?
2.5Motion Equations for Constant Acceleration in One
Dimension
20.An Olympic-class sprinter starts a race with an acceleration of
4.50 m/s
2
. (a) What is her speed 2.40 s later? (b) Sketch a graph of
her position vs. time for this period.
21.A well-thrown ball is caught in a well-padded mitt. If the deceleration
of the ball is
2.10×10
4
m/s
2
, and 1.85 ms
(1 ms=10
−3
s)
elapses from the time the ball first touches the mitt until it stops, what
was the initial velocity of the ball?
22.A bullet in a gun is accelerated from the firing chamber to the end of
the barrel at an average rate of
6.20×10
5
m/s
2
for
8.10×10
−4
s
.
What is its muzzle velocity (that is, its final velocity)?
CHAPTER 2 | KINEMATICS S 81
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata:
pdf rotate single page; can't cut and paste from pdf
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
add page break to pdf; c# print pdf to specific printer
23.(a) A light-rail commuter train accelerates at a rate of
1.35 m/s
2
.
How long does it take to reach its top speed of 80.0 km/h, starting from
rest? (b) The same train ordinarily decelerates at a rate of
1.65 m/s
2
.
How long does it take to come to a stop from its top speed? (c) In
emergencies the train can decelerate more rapidly, coming to rest from
80.0 km/h in 8.30 s. What is its emergency deceleration in
m/s
2
?
24.While entering a freeway, a car accelerates from rest at a rate of
2.40 m/s
2
for 12.0 s. (a) Draw a sketch of the situation. (b) List the
knowns in this problem. (c) How far does the car travel in those 12.0 s?
To solve this part, first identify the unknown, and then discuss how you
chose the appropriate equation to solve for it. After choosing the
equation, show your steps in solving for the unknown, check your units,
and discuss whether the answer is reasonable. (d) What is the car’s
final velocity? Solve for this unknown in the same manner as in part (c),
showing all steps explicitly.
25.At the end of a race, a runner decelerates from a velocity of 9.00
m/s at a rate of
2.00 m/s
2
. (a) How far does she travel in the next
5.00 s? (b) What is her final velocity? (c) Evaluate the result. Does it
make sense?
26.Professional Application:
Blood is accelerated from rest to 30.0 cm/s in a distance of 1.80 cm by
the left ventricle of the heart. (a) Make a sketch of the situation. (b) List
the knowns in this problem. (c) How long does the acceleration take?
To solve this part, first identify the unknown, and then discuss how you
chose the appropriate equation to solve for it. After choosing the
equation, show your steps in solving for the unknown, checking your
units. (d) Is the answer reasonable when compared with the time for a
heartbeat?
27.In a slap shot, a hockey player accelerates the puck from a velocity
of 8.00 m/s to 40.0 m/s in the same direction. If this shot takes
3.33×10
−2
s
, calculate the distance over which the puck
accelerates.
28.A powerful motorcycle can accelerate from rest to 26.8 m/s (100
km/h) in only 3.90 s. (a) What is its average acceleration? (b) How far
does it travel in that time?
29.Freight trains can produce only relatively small accelerations and
decelerations. (a) What is the final velocity of a freight train that
accelerates at a rate of
0.0500 m/s
2
for 8.00 min, starting with an
initial velocity of 4.00 m/s? (b) If the train can slow down at a rate of
0.550 m/s
2
, how long will it take to come to a stop from this velocity?
(c) How far will it travel in each case?
30.A fireworks shell is accelerated from rest to a velocity of 65.0 m/s
over a distance of 0.250 m. (a) How long did the acceleration last? (b)
Calculate the acceleration.
31.A swan on a lake gets airborne by flapping its wings and running on
top of the water. (a) If the swan must reach a velocity of 6.00 m/s to
take off and it accelerates from rest at an average rate of
0.350 m/s
2
,
how far will it travel before becoming airborne? (b) How long does this
take?
32.Professional Application:
A woodpecker’s brain is specially protected from large decelerations by
tendon-like attachments inside the skull. While pecking on a tree, the
woodpecker’s head comes to a stop from an initial velocity of 0.600 m/s
in a distance of only 2.00 mm. (a) Find the acceleration in
m/s
2
and in
multiples of
g
g=9.80m/s
2
. (b) Calculate the stopping time. (c)
The tendons cradling the brain stretch, making its stopping distance
4.50 mm (greater than the head and, hence, less deceleration of the
brain). What is the brain’s deceleration, expressed in multiples of
g
?
33.An unwary football player collides with a padded goalpost while
running at a velocity of 7.50 m/s and comes to a full stop after
compressing the padding and his body 0.350 m. (a) What is his
deceleration? (b) How long does the collision last?
34.In World War II, there were several reported cases of airmen who
jumped from their flaming airplanes with no parachute to escape certain
death. Some fell about 20,000 feet (6000 m), and some of them
survived, with few life-threatening injuries. For these lucky pilots, the
tree branches and snow drifts on the ground allowed their deceleration
to be relatively small. If we assume that a pilot’s speed upon impact
was 123 mph (54 m/s), then what was his deceleration? Assume that
the trees and snow stopped him over a distance of 3.0 m.
35.Consider a grey squirrel falling out of a tree to the ground. (a) If we
ignore air resistance in this case (only for the sake of this problem),
determine a squirrel’s velocity just before hitting the ground, assuming it
fell from a height of 3.0 m. (b) If the squirrel stops in a distance of 2.0
cm through bending its limbs, compare its deceleration with that of the
airman in the previous problem.
36.An express train passes through a station. It enters with an initial
velocity of 22.0 m/s and decelerates at a rate of
0.150 m/s
2
as it goes
through. The station is 210 m long. (a) How long is the nose of the train
in the station? (b) How fast is it going when the nose leaves the station?
(c) If the train is 130 m long, when does the end of the train leave the
station? (d) What is the velocity of the end of the train as it leaves?
37.Dragsters can actually reach a top speed of 145 m/s in only 4.45
s—considerably less time than given inExample 2.10andExample
2.11. (a) Calculate the average acceleration for such a dragster. (b)
Find the final velocity of this dragster starting from rest and accelerating
at the rate found in (a) for 402 m (a quarter mile) without using any
information on time. (c) Why is the final velocity greater than that used
to find the average acceleration?Hint: Consider whether the
assumption of constant acceleration is valid for a dragster. If not,
discuss whether the acceleration would be greater at the beginning or
end of the run and what effect that would have on the final velocity.
38.A bicycle racer sprints at the end of a race to clinch a victory. The
racer has an initial velocity of 11.5 m/s and accelerates at the rate of
0.500 m/s
2
for 7.00 s. (a) What is his final velocity? (b) The racer
continues at this velocity to the finish line. If he was 300 m from the
finish line when he started to accelerate, how much time did he save?
(c) One other racer was 5.00 m ahead when the winner started to
accelerate, but he was unable to accelerate, and traveled at 11.8 m/s
until the finish line. How far ahead of him (in meters and in seconds) did
the winner finish?
39.In 1967, New Zealander Burt Munro set the world record for an
Indian motorcycle, on the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah, of 183.58 mi/h.
The one-way course was 5.00 mi long. Acceleration rates are often
described by the time it takes to reach 60.0 mi/h from rest. If this time
was 4.00 s, and Burt accelerated at this rate until he reached his
maximum speed, how long did it take Burt to complete the course?
40.(a) A world record was set for the men’s 100-m dash in the 2008
Olympic Games in Beijing by Usain Bolt of Jamaica. Bolt “coasted”
across the finish line with a time of 9.69 s. If we assume that Bolt
accelerated for 3.00 s to reach his maximum speed, and maintained
that speed for the rest of the race, calculate his maximum speed and
his acceleration. (b) During the same Olympics, Bolt also set the world
record in the 200-m dash with a time of 19.30 s. Using the same
assumptions as for the 100-m dash, what was his maximum speed for
this race?
2.7Falling Objects
Assume air resistance is negligible unless otherwise stated.
41.Calculate the displacement and velocity at times of (a) 0.500, (b)
1.00, (c) 1.50, and (d) 2.00 s for a ball thrown straight up with an initial
velocity of 15.0 m/s. Take the point of release to be
y
0
=0
.
42.Calculate the displacement and velocity at times of (a) 0.500, (b)
1.00, (c) 1.50, (d) 2.00, and (e) 2.50 s for a rock thrown straight down
with an initial velocity of 14.0 m/s from the Verrazano Narrows Bridge in
New York City. The roadway of this bridge is 70.0 m above the water.
82 CHAPTER 2 | KINEMATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
key. Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components
break password on pdf; how to split pdf file by pages
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata:
acrobat split pdf pages; break a pdf password
43.A basketball referee tosses the ball straight up for the starting tip-
off. At what velocity must a basketball player leave the ground to rise
1.25 m above the floor in an attempt to get the ball?
44.A rescue helicopter is hovering over a person whose boat has sunk.
One of the rescuers throws a life preserver straight down to the victim
with an initial velocity of 1.40 m/s and observes that it takes 1.8 s to
reach the water. (a) List the knowns in this problem. (b) How high above
the water was the preserver released? Note that the downdraft of the
helicopter reduces the effects of air resistance on the falling life
preserver, so that an acceleration equal to that of gravity is reasonable.
45.A dolphin in an aquatic show jumps straight up out of the water at a
velocity of 13.0 m/s. (a) List the knowns in this problem. (b) How high
does his body rise above the water? To solve this part, first note that the
final velocity is now a known and identify its value. Then identify the
unknown, and discuss how you chose the appropriate equation to solve
for it. After choosing the equation, show your steps in solving for the
unknown, checking units, and discuss whether the answer is
reasonable. (c) How long is the dolphin in the air? Neglect any effects
due to his size or orientation.
46.A swimmer bounces straight up from a diving board and falls feet
first into a pool. She starts with a velocity of 4.00 m/s, and her takeoff
point is 1.80 m above the pool. (a) How long are her feet in the air? (b)
What is her highest point above the board? (c) What is her velocity
when her feet hit the water?
47.(a) Calculate the height of a cliff if it takes 2.35 s for a rock to hit the
ground when it is thrown straight up from the cliff with an initial velocity
of 8.00 m/s. (b) How long would it take to reach the ground if it is thrown
straight down with the same speed?
48.A very strong, but inept, shot putter puts the shot straight up
vertically with an initial velocity of 11.0 m/s. How long does he have to
get out of the way if the shot was released at a height of 2.20 m, and he
is 1.80 m tall?
49.You throw a ball straight up with an initial velocity of 15.0 m/s. It
passes a tree branch on the way up at a height of 7.00 m. How much
additional time will pass before the ball passes the tree branch on the
way back down?
50.A kangaroo can jump over an object 2.50 m high. (a) Calculate its
vertical speed when it leaves the ground. (b) How long is it in the air?
51.Standing at the base of one of the cliffs of Mt. Arapiles in Victoria,
Australia, a hiker hears a rock break loose from a height of 105 m. He
can’t see the rock right away but then does, 1.50 s later. (a) How far
above the hiker is the rock when he can see it? (b) How much time
does he have to move before the rock hits his head?
52.An object is dropped from a height of 75.0 m above ground level.
(a) Determine the distance traveled during the first second. (b)
Determine the final velocity at which the object hits the ground. (c)
Determine the distance traveled during the last second of motion before
hitting the ground.
53.There is a 250-m-high cliff at Half Dome in Yosemite National Park
in California. Suppose a boulder breaks loose from the top of this cliff.
(a) How fast will it be going when it strikes the ground? (b) Assuming a
reaction time of 0.300 s, how long will a tourist at the bottom have to get
out of the way after hearing the sound of the rock breaking loose
(neglecting the height of the tourist, which would become negligible
anyway if hit)? The speed of sound is 335 m/s on this day.
54.A ball is thrown straight up. It passes a 2.00-m-high window 7.50 m
off the ground on its path up and takes 1.30 s to go past the window.
What was the ball’s initial velocity?
55.Suppose you drop a rock into a dark well and, using precision
equipment, you measure the time for the sound of a splash to return.
(a) Neglecting the time required for sound to travel up the well,
calculate the distance to the water if the sound returns in 2.0000 s. (b)
Now calculate the distance taking into account the time for sound to
travel up the well. The speed of sound is 332.00 m/s in this well.
56.A steel ball is dropped onto a hard floor from a height of 1.50 m and
rebounds to a height of 1.45 m. (a) Calculate its velocity just before it
strikes the floor. (b) Calculate its velocity just after it leaves the floor on
its way back up. (c) Calculate its acceleration during contact with the
floor if that contact lasts 0.0800 ms
(8.00×10
−5
s)
. (d) How much did
the ball compress during its collision with the floor, assuming the floor is
absolutely rigid?
57.A coin is dropped from a hot-air balloon that is 300 m above the
ground and rising at 10.0 m/s upward. For the coin, find (a) the
maximum height reached, (b) its position and velocity 4.00 s after being
released, and (c) the time before it hits the ground.
58.A soft tennis ball is dropped onto a hard floor from a height of 1.50
m and rebounds to a height of 1.10 m. (a) Calculate its velocity just
before it strikes the floor. (b) Calculate its velocity just after it leaves the
floor on its way back up. (c) Calculate its acceleration during contact
with the floor if that contact lasts 3.50 ms
(3.50×10
−3
s)
. (d) How
much did the ball compress during its collision with the floor, assuming
the floor is absolutely rigid?
2.8Graphical Analysis of One-Dimensional Motion
Note: There is always uncertainty in numbers taken from graphs. If your
answers differ from expected values, examine them to see if they are
within data extraction uncertainties estimated by you.
59.(a) By taking the slope of the curve inFigure 2.60, verify that the
velocity of the jet car is 115 m/s at
t=20 s
. (b) By taking the slope of
the curve at any point inFigure 2.61, verify that the jet car’s
acceleration is
5.0 m/s
2
.
Figure 2.60
Figure 2.61
60.Take the slope of the curve inFigure 2.62to verify that the velocity
at
t=10 s
is 207 m/s.
Figure 2.62
CHAPTER 2 | KINEMATICS S 83
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
may easily create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
break pdf; pdf will no pages selected
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata:
acrobat separate pdf pages; break pdf file into parts
61.Take the slope of the curve inFigure 2.62to verify that the velocity
at
t=30.0 s
is 238 m/s.
62.By taking the slope of the curve inFigure 2.63, verify that the
acceleration is
3.2 m/s
2
at
t=10 s
.
Figure 2.63
63.Construct the displacement graph for the subway shuttle train as
shown inFigure 2.48(a). You will need to use the information on
acceleration and velocity given in the examples for this figure.
64.(a) Take the slope of the curve inFigure 2.64to find the jogger’s
velocity at
t=2.5 s
. (b) Repeat at 7.5 s. These values must be
consistent with the graph inFigure 2.65.
Figure 2.64
Figure 2.65
Figure 2.66
65.A graph of
v(t)
is shown for a world-class track sprinter in a 100-m
race. (SeeFigure 2.67). (a) What is his average velocity for the first 4
s? (b) What is his instantaneous velocity at
t=5 s
? (c) What is his
average acceleration between 0 and 4 s? (d) What is his time for the
race?
Figure 2.67
66.Figure 2.68shows the displacement graph for a particle for 5 s.
Draw the corresponding velocity and acceleration graphs.
Figure 2.68
84 CHAPTER 2 | KINEMATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
3
TWO-DIMENSIONAL KINEMATICS
Figure 3.1Everyday motion that we experience is, thankfully, rarely as tortuous as a rollercoaster ride like this—the Dragon Khan in Spain’s Universal Port Aventura
Amusement Park. However, most motion is in curved, rather than straight-line, paths. Motion along a curved path is two- or three-dimensional motion, and can be described in
a similar fashion to one-dimensional motion. (credit: Boris23/Wikimedia Commons)
Learning Objectives
3.1.Kinematics in Two Dimensions: An Introduction
• Observe that motion in two dimensions consists of horizontal and vertical components.
• Understand the independence of horizontal and vertical vectors in two-dimensional motion.
3.2.Vector Addition and Subtraction: Graphical Methods
• Understand the rules of vector addition, subtraction, and multiplication.
• Apply graphical methods of vector addition and subtraction to determine the displacement of moving objects.
3.3.Vector Addition and Subtraction: Analytical Methods
• Understand the rules of vector addition and subtraction using analytical methods.
• Apply analytical methods to determine vertical and horizontal component vectors.
• Apply analytical methods to determine the magnitude and direction of a resultant vector.
3.4.Projectile Motion
• Identify and explain the properties of a projectile, such as acceleration due to gravity, range, maximum height, and trajectory.
• Determine the location and velocity of a projectile at different points in its trajectory.
• Apply the principle of independence of motion to solve projectile motion problems.
3.5.Addition of Velocities
• Apply principles of vector addition to determine relative velocity.
• Explain the significance of the observer in the measurement of velocity.
CHAPTER 3 | TWO-DIMENSIONAL KINEMATICS S 85
Introduction to Two-Dimensional Kinematics
The arc of a basketball, the orbit of a satellite, a bicycle rounding a curve, a swimmer diving into a pool, blood gushing out of a wound, and a puppy
chasing its tail are but a few examples of motions along curved paths. In fact, most motions in nature follow curved paths rather than straight lines.
Motion along a curved path on a flat surface or a plane (such as that of a ball on a pool table or a skater on an ice rink) is two-dimensional, and thus
described by two-dimensional kinematics. Motion not confined to a plane, such as a car following a winding mountain road, is described by three-
dimensional kinematics. Both two- and three-dimensional kinematics are simple extensions of the one-dimensional kinematics developed for straight-
line motion in the previous chapter. This simple extension will allow us to apply physics to many more situations, and it will also yield unexpected
insights about nature.
3.1Kinematics in Two Dimensions: An Introduction
Figure 3.2Walkers and drivers in a city like New York are rarely able to travel in straight lines to reach their destinations. Instead, they must follow roads and sidewalks,
making two-dimensional, zigzagged paths. (credit: Margaret W. Carruthers)
Two-Dimensional Motion: Walking in a City
Suppose you want to walk from one point to another in a city with uniform square blocks, as pictured inFigure 3.3.
Figure 3.3A pedestrian walks a two-dimensional path between two points in a city. In this scene, all blocks are square and are the same size.
The straight-line path that a helicopter might fly is blocked to you as a pedestrian, and so you are forced to take a two-dimensional path, such as the
one shown. You walk 14 blocks in all, 9 east followed by 5 north. What is the straight-line distance?
An old adage states that the shortest distance between two points is a straight line. The two legs of the trip and the straight-line path form a right
triangle, and so the Pythagorean theorem,
a
2
b
2
c
2
, can be used to find the straight-line distance.
Figure 3.4The Pythagorean theorem relates the length of the legs of a right triangle, labeled
a
and
b
, with the hypotenuse, labeled
c
. The relationship is given by:
a
2
b
2
c
2
. This can be rewritten, solving for
c
:
c = a
2
b
2
.
The hypotenuse of the triangle is the straight-line path, and so in this case its length in units of city blocks is
(9 blocks)
2
+ (5 blocks)
2
= 10.3 blocks
, considerably shorter than the 14 blocks you walked. (Note that we are using three significant figures in
86 CHAPTER 3 | TWO-DIMENSIONAL KINEMATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
the answer. Although it appears that “9” and “5” have only one significant digit, they are discrete numbers. In this case “9 blocks” is the same as “9.0
or 9.00 blocks.” We have decided to use three significant figures in the answer in order to show the result more precisely.)
Figure 3.5The straight-line path followed by a helicopter between the two points is shorter than the 14 blocks walked by the pedestrian. All blocks are square and the same
size.
The fact that the straight-line distance (10.3 blocks) inFigure 3.5is less than the total distance walked (14 blocks) is one example of a general
characteristic of vectors. (Recall thatvectorsare quantities that have both magnitude and direction.)
As for one-dimensional kinematics, we use arrows to represent vectors. The length of the arrow is proportional to the vector’s magnitude. The arrow’s
length is indicated by hash marks inFigure 3.3andFigure 3.5. The arrow points in the same direction as the vector. For two-dimensional motion, the
path of an object can be represented with three vectors: one vector shows the straight-line path between the initial and final points of the motion, one
vector shows the horizontal component of the motion, and one vector shows the vertical component of the motion. The horizontal and vertical
components of the motion add together to give the straight-line path. For example, observe the three vectors inFigure 3.5. The first represents a
9-block displacement east. The second represents a 5-block displacement north. These vectors are added to give the third vector, with a 10.3-block
total displacement. The third vector is the straight-line path between the two points. Note that in this example, the vectors that we are adding are
perpendicular to each other and thus form a right triangle. This means that we can use the Pythagorean theorem to calculate the magnitude of the
total displacement. (Note that we cannot use the Pythagorean theorem to add vectors that are not perpendicular. We will develop techniques for
adding vectors having any direction, not just those perpendicular to one another, inVector Addition and Subtraction: Graphical Methodsand
Vector Addition and Subtraction: Analytical Methods.)
The Independence of Perpendicular Motions
The person taking the path shown inFigure 3.5walks east and then north (two perpendicular directions). How far he or she walks east is only
affected by his or her motion eastward. Similarly, how far he or she walks north is only affected by his or her motion northward.
Independence of Motion
The horizontal and vertical components of two-dimensional motion are independent of each other. Any motion in the horizontal direction does not
affect motion in the vertical direction, and vice versa.
This is true in a simple scenario like that of walking in one direction first, followed by another. It is also true of more complicated motion involving
movement in two directions at once. For example, let’s compare the motions of two baseballs. One baseball is dropped from rest. At the same
instant, another is thrown horizontally from the same height and follows a curved path. A stroboscope has captured the positions of the balls at fixed
time intervals as they fall.
Figure 3.6This shows the motions of two identical balls—one falls from rest, the other has an initial horizontal velocity. Each subsequent position is an equal time interval.
Arrows represent horizontal and vertical velocities at each position. The ball on the right has an initial horizontal velocity, while the ball on the left has no horizontal velocity.
Despite the difference in horizontal velocities, the vertical velocities and positions are identical for both balls. This shows that the vertical and horizontal motions are
independent.
It is remarkable that for each flash of the strobe, the vertical positions of the two balls are the same. This similarity implies that the vertical motion is
independent of whether or not the ball is moving horizontally. (Assuming no air resistance, the vertical motion of a falling object is influenced by
gravity only, and not by any horizontal forces.) Careful examination of the ball thrown horizontally shows that it travels the same horizontal distance
between flashes. This is due to the fact that there are no additional forces on the ball in the horizontal direction after it is thrown. This result means
CHAPTER 3 | TWO-DIMENSIONAL KINEMATICS S 87
that the horizontal velocity is constant, and affected neither by vertical motion nor by gravity (which is vertical). Note that this case is true only for ideal
conditions. In the real world, air resistance will affect the speed of the balls in both directions.
The two-dimensional curved path of the horizontally thrown ball is composed of two independent one-dimensional motions (horizontal and vertical).
The key to analyzing such motion, calledprojectile motion, is toresolve(break) it into motions along perpendicular directions. Resolving two-
dimensional motion into perpendicular components is possible because the components are independent. We shall see how to resolve vectors in
Vector Addition and Subtraction: Graphical MethodsandVector Addition and Subtraction: Analytical Methods. We will find such techniques
to be useful in many areas of physics.
PhET Explorations: Ladybug Motion 2D
Learn about position, velocity and acceleration vectors. Move the ladybug by setting the position, velocity or acceleration, and see how the
vectors change. Choose linear, circular or elliptical motion, and record and playback the motion to analyze the behavior.
Figure 3.7Ladybug Motion 2D (http://cnx.org/content/m42104/1.4/ladybug-motion-2d_en.jar)
3.2Vector Addition and Subtraction: Graphical Methods
Figure 3.8Displacement can be determined graphically using a scale map, such as this one of the Hawaiian Islands. A journey from Hawai’i to Moloka’i has a number of legs,
or journey segments. These segments can be added graphically with a ruler to determine the total two-dimensional displacement of the journey. (credit: US Geological Survey)
Vectors in Two Dimensions
Avectoris a quantity that has magnitude and direction. Displacement, velocity, acceleration, and force, for example, are all vectors. In one-
dimensional, or straight-line, motion, the direction of a vector can be given simply by a plus or minus sign. In two dimensions (2-d), however, we
specify the direction of a vector relative to some reference frame (i.e., coordinate system), using an arrow having length proportional to the vector’s
magnitude and pointing in the direction of the vector.
Figure 3.9shows such agraphical representation of a vector, using as an example the total displacement for the person walking in a city considered
inKinematics in Two Dimensions: An Introduction. We shall use the notation that a boldface symbol, such as
D
, stands for a vector. Its
magnitude is represented by the symbol in italics,
D
, and its direction by
θ
.
Vectors in this Text
In this text, we will represent a vector with a boldface variable. For example, we will represent the quantity force with the vector
F
, which has
both magnitude and direction. The magnitude of the vector will be represented by a variable in italics, such as
F
, and the direction of the
variable will be given by an angle
θ
.
88 CHAPTER 3 | TWO-DIMENSIONAL KINEMATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested