The Ampere
The official definition of the ampere is:
One ampere of current through each of two parallel conductors of infinite length, separated by one meter in empty space free of other magnetic
fields, causes a force of exactly
2×10
−7
N/m
on each conductor.
Infinite-length straight wires are impractical and so, in practice, a current balance is constructed with coils of wire separated by a few centimeters.
Force is measured to determine current. This also provides us with a method for measuring the coulomb. We measure the charge that flows for a
current of one ampere in one second. That is,
1 C=1 A⋅s
. For both the ampere and the coulomb, the method of measuring force between
conductors is the most accurate in practice.
22.11More Applications of Magnetism
Mass Spectrometry
The curved paths followed by charged particles in magnetic fields can be put to use. A charged particle moving perpendicular to a magnetic field
travels in a circular path having a radius
r
.
(22.34)
r=
mv
qB
It was noted that this relationship could be used to measure the mass of charged particles such as ions. A mass spectrometer is a device that
measures such masses. Most mass spectrometers use magnetic fields for this purpose, although some of them have extremely sophisticated
designs. Since there are five variables in the relationship, there are many possibilities. However, if
v
,
q
, and
B
can be fixed, then the radius of the
path
r
is simply proportional to the mass
m
of the charged particle. Let us examine one such mass spectrometer that has a relatively simple
design. (SeeFigure 22.43.) The process begins with an ion source, a device like an electron gun. The ion source gives ions their charge, accelerates
them to some velocity
v
, and directs a beam of them into the next stage of the spectrometer. This next region is avelocity selectorthat only allows
particles with a particular value of
v
to get through.
Figure 22.43This mass spectrometer uses a velocity selector to fix
v
so that the radius of the path is proportional to mass.
The velocity selector has both an electric field and a magnetic field, perpendicular to one another, producing forces in opposite directions on the ions.
Only those ions for which the forces balance travel in a straight line into the next region. If the forces balance, then the electric force
F=qE
equals
the magnetic force
F=qvB
, so that
qE=qvB
. Noting that
q
cancels, we see that
(22.35)
v=
E
B
is the velocity particles must have to make it through the velocity selector, and further, that
v
can be selected by varying
E
and
B
. In the final
region, there is only a uniform magnetic field, and so the charged particles move in circular arcs with radii proportional to particle mass. The paths
also depend on charge
q
, but since
q
is in multiples of electron charges, it is easy to determine and to discriminate between ions in different charge
states.
CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
799
Break pdf password - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break apart a pdf file; break up pdf into individual pages
Break pdf password - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf into single pages; pdf split file
Mass spectrometry today is used extensively in chemistry and biology laboratories to identify chemical and biological substances according to their
mass-to-charge ratios. In medicine, mass spectrometers are used to measure the concentration of isotopes used as tracers. Usually, biological
molecules such as proteins are very large, so they are broken down into smaller fragments before analyzing. Recently, large virus particles have
been analyzed as a whole on mass spectrometers. Sometimes a gas chromatograph or high-performance liquid chromatograph provides an initial
separation of the large molecules, which are then input into the mass spectrometer.
Cathode Ray Tubes—CRTs—and the Like
What do non-flat-screen TVs, old computer monitors, x-ray machines, and the 2-mile-long Stanford Linear Accelerator have in common? All of them
accelerate electrons, making them different versions of the electron gun. Many of these devices use magnetic fields to steer the accelerated
electrons.Figure 22.44shows the construction of the type of cathode ray tube (CRT) found in some TVs, oscilloscopes, and old computer monitors.
Two pairs of coils are used to steer the electrons, one vertically and the other horizontally, to their desired destination.
Figure 22.44The cathode ray tube (CRT) is so named because rays of electrons originate at the cathode in the electron gun. Magnetic coils are used to steer the beam in
many CRTs. In this case, the beam is moved down. Another pair of horizontal coils would steer the beam horizontally.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)is one of the most useful and rapidly growing medical imaging tools. It non-invasively produces two-dimensional
and three-dimensional images of the body that provide important medical information with none of the hazards of x-rays. MRI is based on an effect
callednuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)in which an externally applied magnetic field interacts with the nuclei of certain atoms, particularly those
of hydrogen (protons). These nuclei possess their own small magnetic fields, similar to those of electrons and the current loops discussed earlier in
this chapter.
When placed in an external magnetic field, such nuclei experience a torque that pushes or aligns the nuclei into one of two new energy
states—depending on the orientation of its spin (analogous to the N pole and S pole in a bar magnet). Transitions from the lower to higher energy
state can be achieved by using an external radio frequency signal to “flip” the orientation of the small magnets. (This is actually a quantum
mechanical process. The direction of the nuclear magnetic field is quantized as is energy in the radio waves. We will return to these topics in later
chapters.) The specific frequency of the radio waves that are absorbed and reemitted depends sensitively on the type of nucleus, the chemical
environment, and the external magnetic field strength. Therefore, this is aresonancephenomenon in whichnucleiin amagneticfield act like
resonators (analogous to those discussed in the treatment of sound inOscillatory Motion and Waves) that absorb and reemit only certain
frequencies. Hence, the phenomenon is namednuclear magnetic resonance (NMR).
NMR has been used for more than 50 years as an analytical tool. It was formulated in 1946 by F. Bloch and E. Purcell, with the 1952 Nobel Prize in
Physics going to them for their work. Over the past two decades, NMR has been developed to produce detailed images in a process now called
magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a name coined to avoid the use of the word “nuclear” and the concomitant implication that nuclear radiation is
involved. (It is not.) The 2003 Nobel Prize in Medicine went to P. Lauterbur and P. Mansfield for their work with MRI applications.
The largest part of the MRI unit is a superconducting magnet that creates a magnetic field, typically between 1 and 2 T in strength, over a relatively
large volume. MRI images can be both highly detailed and informative about structures and organ functions. It is helpful that normal and non-normal
tissues respond differently for slight changes in the magnetic field. In most medical images, the protons that are hydrogen nuclei are imaged. (About
2/3 of the atoms in the body are hydrogen.) Their location and density give a variety of medically useful information, such as organ function, the
condition of tissue (as in the brain), and the shape of structures, such as vertebral disks and knee-joint surfaces. MRI can also be used to follow the
movement of certain ions across membranes, yielding information on active transport, osmosis, dialysis, and other phenomena. With excellent spatial
resolution, MRI can provide information about tumors, strokes, shoulder injuries, infections, etc.
An image requires position information as well as the density of a nuclear type (usually protons). By varying the magnetic field slightly over the
volume to be imaged, the resonant frequency of the protons is made to vary with position. Broadcast radio frequencies are swept over an appropriate
range and nuclei absorb and reemit them only if the nuclei are in a magnetic field with the correct strength. The imaging receiver gathers information
through the body almost point by point, building up a tissue map. The reception of reemitted radio waves as a function of frequency thus gives
position information. These “slices” or cross sections through the body are only several mm thick. The intensity of the reemitted radio waves is
proportional to the concentration of the nuclear type being flipped, as well as information on the chemical environment in that area of the body.
Various techniques are available for enhancing contrast in images and for obtaining more information. Scans called T1, T2, or proton density scans
rely on different relaxation mechanisms of nuclei. Relaxation refers to the time it takes for the protons to return to equilibrium after the external field is
turned off. This time depends upon tissue type and status (such as inflammation).
While MRI images are superior to x rays for certain types of tissue and have none of the hazards of x rays, they do not completely supplant x-ray
images. MRI is less effective than x rays for detecting breaks in bone, for example, and in imaging breast tissue, so the two diagnostic tools
complement each other. MRI images are also expensive compared to simple x-ray images and tend to be used most often where they supply
information not readily obtained from x rays. Another disadvantage of MRI is that the patient is totally enclosed with detectors close to the body for
about 30 minutes or more, leading to claustrophobia. It is also difficult for the obese patient to be in the magnet tunnel. New “open-MRI” machines are
now available in which the magnet does not completely surround the patient.
Over the last decade, the development of much faster scans, called “functional MRI” (fMRI), has allowed us to map the functioning of various regions
in the brain responsible for thought and motor control. This technique measures the change in blood flow for activities (thought, experiences, action)
in the brain. The nerve cells increase their consumption of oxygen when active. Blood hemoglobin releases oxygen to active nerve cells and has
800 CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
can print pdf no pages selected; acrobat split pdf into multiple files
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. FileType.IMG_JPEG); switch (result) { case ConvertResult. NO_ERROR: Console.WriteLine("Success"); break; case ConvertResult
pdf split pages; split pdf by bookmark
B-field:
Ampere’s law:
Biot-Savart law:
Curie temperature:
direction of magnetic field lines:
domains:
electromagnet:
electromagnetism:
ferromagnetic:
gauss:
Hall effect:
Hall emf:
Lorentz force:
Maxwell’s equations:
magnetic field lines:
somewhat different magnetic properties when oxygenated than when deoxygenated. With MRI, we can measure this and detect a blood oxygen-
dependent signal. Most of the brain scans today use fMRI.
Other Medical Uses of Magnetic Fields
Currents in nerve cells and the heart create magnetic fields like any other currents. These can be measured but with some difficulty since their
strengths are about
10
−6
to
10
−8
lessthan the Earth’s magnetic field. Recording of the heart’s magnetic field as it beats is called a
magnetocardiogram (MCG), while measurements of the brain’s magnetic field is called amagnetoencephalogram (MEG). Both give information
that differs from that obtained by measuring the electric fields of these organs (ECGs and EEGs), but they are not yet of sufficient importance to
make these difficult measurements common.
In both of these techniques, the sensors do not touch the body. MCG can be used in fetal studies, and is probably more sensitive than
echocardiography. MCG also looks at the heart’s electrical activity whose voltage output is too small to be recorded by surface electrodes as in EKG.
It has the potential of being a rapid scan for early diagnosis of cardiac ischemia (obstruction of blood flow to the heart) or problems with the fetus.
MEG can be used to identify abnormal electrical discharges in the brain that produce weak magnetic signals. Therefore, it looks at brain activity, not
just brain structure. It has been used for studies of Alzheimer’s disease and epilepsy. Advances in instrumentation to measure very small magnetic
fields have allowed these two techniques to be used more in recent years. What is used is a sensor called a SQUID, for superconducting quantum
interference device. This operates at liquid helium temperatures and can measure magnetic fields thousands of times smaller than the Earth’s.
Finally, there is a burgeoning market for magnetic cures in which magnets are applied in a variety of ways to the body, from magnetic bracelets to
magnetic mattresses. The best that can be said for such practices is that they are apparently harmless, unless the magnets get close to the patient’s
computer or magnetic storage disks. Claims are made for a broad spectrum of benefits from cleansing the blood to giving the patient more energy,
but clinical studies have not verified these claims, nor is there an identifiable mechanism by which such benefits might occur.
PhET Explorations: Magnet and Compass
Ever wonder how a compass worked to point you to the Arctic? Explore the interactions between a compass and bar magnet, and then add the
Earth and find the surprising answer! Vary the magnet's strength, and see how things change both inside and outside. Use the field meter to
measure how the magnetic field changes.
Figure 22.45Magnet and Compass (http://cnx.org/content/m42388/1.3/magnet-and-compass_en.jar)
Glossary
another term for magnetic field
the physical law that states that the magnetic field around an electric current is proportional to the current; each segment of current
produces a magnetic field like that of a long straight wire, and the total field of any shape current is the vector sum of the fields due to each
segment
a physical law that describes the magnetic field generated by an electric current in terms of a specific equation
the temperature above which a ferromagnetic material cannot be magnetized
the direction that the north end of a compass needle points
regions within a material that behave like small bar magnets
an object that is temporarily magnetic when an electrical current is passed through it
the use of electrical currents to induce magnetism
materials, such as iron, cobalt, nickel, and gadolinium, that exhibit strong magnetic effects
G, the unit of the magnetic field strength;
1 G=10
–4
T
the creation of voltage across a current-carrying conductor by a magnetic field
the electromotive force created by a current-carrying conductor by a magnetic field,
ε=Blv
the force on a charge moving in a magnetic field
a set of four equations that describe electromagnetic phenomena
the pictorial representation of the strength and the direction of a magnetic field
CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
801
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Forms. Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free SDK library for Visual Studio .NET. Independent
pdf print error no pages selected; break password pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
pdf split; cannot print pdf file no pages selected
magnetic field strength (magnitude) produced by a long straight current-carrying wire:
magnetic field strength at the center of a circular loop:
magnetic field strength inside a solenoid:
magnetic field:
magnetic force:
magnetic monopoles:
magnetic resonance imaging (MRI):
magnetized:
magnetocardiogram (MCG):
magnetoencephalogram (MEG):
meter:
motor:
north magnetic pole:
nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR):
permeability of free space:
right hand rule 1 (RHR-1):
right hand rule 2 (RHR-2):
solenoid:
south magnetic pole:
tesla:
defined as
B=
μ
0
I
2πr
, where
I
is the current,
r
is
the shortest distance to the wire, and
μ
0
is the permeability of free space
defined as
B=
μ
0
I
2R
where
R
is the radius of the loop
defined as
B=μ
0
nI
where
n
is the number of loops per unit length of the solenoid
(n=N/l
,
with
N
being the number of loops and
l
the length)
the representation of magnetic forces
the force on a charge produced by its motion through a magnetic field; the Lorentz force
an isolated magnetic pole; a south pole without a north pole, or vice versa (no magnetic monopole has ever been
observed)
a medical imaging technique that uses magnetic fields create detailed images of internal tissues and organs
to be turned into a magnet; to be induced to be magnetic
a recording of the heart’s magnetic field as it beats
a measurement of the brain’s magnetic field
common application of magnetic torque on a current-carrying loop that is very similar in construction to a motor; by design, the torque is
proportional to
I
and not
θ
, so the needle deflection is proportional to the current
loop of wire in a magnetic field; when current is passed through the loops, the magnetic field exerts torque on the loops, which rotates a
shaft; electrical energy is converted to mechanical work in the process
the end or the side of a magnet that is attracted toward Earth’s geographic north pole
a phenomenon in which an externally applied magnetic field interacts with the nuclei of certain atoms
the measure of the ability of a material, in this case free space, to support a magnetic field; the constant
μ
0
=4π×10
−7
T⋅m/A
the rule to determine the direction of the magnetic force on a positive moving charge: when the thumb of the right hand
points in the direction of the charge’s velocity
v
and the fingers point in the direction of the magnetic field
B
, then the force on the charge is
perpendicular and away from the palm; the force on a negative charge is perpendicular and into the palm
a rule to determine the direction of the magnetic field induced by a current-carrying wire: Point the thumb of the right
hand in the direction of current, and the fingers curl in the direction of the magnetic field loops
a thin wire wound into a coil that produces a magnetic field when an electric current is passed through it
the end or the side of a magnet that is attracted toward Earth’s geographic south pole
T, the SI unit of the magnetic field strength;
1 T=
1 N
A⋅m
Section Summary
22.1Magnets
• Magnetism is a subject that includes the properties of magnets, the effect of the magnetic force on moving charges and currents, and the
creation of magnetic fields by currents.
• There are two types of magnetic poles, called the north magnetic pole and south magnetic pole.
• North magnetic poles are those that are attracted toward the Earth’s geographic north pole.
• Like poles repel and unlike poles attract.
• Magnetic poles always occur in pairs of north and south—it is not possible to isolate north and south poles.
22.2Ferromagnets and Electromagnets
• Magnetic poles always occur in pairs of north and south—it is not possible to isolate north and south poles.
• All magnetism is created by electric current.
• Ferromagnetic materials, such as iron, are those that exhibit strong magnetic effects.
• The atoms in ferromagnetic materials act like small magnets (due to currents within the atoms) and can be aligned, usually in millimeter-sized
regions called domains.
• Domains can grow and align on a larger scale, producing permanent magnets. Such a material is magnetized, or induced to be magnetic.
• Above a material’s Curie temperature, thermal agitation destroys the alignment of atoms, and ferromagnetism disappears.
• Electromagnets employ electric currents to make magnetic fields, often aided by induced fields in ferromagnetic materials.
802 CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's not supported tell stop.
pdf insert page break; break pdf documents
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's
pdf specification; break pdf into separate pages
22.3Magnetic Fields and Magnetic Field Lines
• Magnetic fields can be pictorially represented by magnetic field lines, the properties of which are as follows:
1. The field is tangent to the magnetic field line.
2. Field strength is proportional to the line density.
3. Field lines cannot cross.
4. Field lines are continuous loops.
22.4Magnetic Field Strength: Force on a Moving Charge in a Magnetic Field
• Magnetic fields exert a force on a moving chargeq, the magnitude of which is
F=qvBsinθ,
where
θ
is the angle between the directions of
v
and
B
.
• The SI unit for magnetic field strength
B
is the tesla (T), which is related to other units by
1 T=
1 N
C⋅m/s
=
1 N
A⋅m
.
• Thedirectionof the force on a moving charge is given by right hand rule 1 (RHR-1): Point the thumb of the right hand in the direction of
v
, the
fingers in the direction of
B
, and a perpendicular to the palm points in the direction of
F
.
• The force is perpendicular to the plane formed by
v
and
B
. Since the force is zero if
v
is parallel to
B
, charged particles often follow
magnetic field lines rather than cross them.
22.5Force on a Moving Charge in a Magnetic Field: Examples and Applications
• Magnetic force can supply centripetal force and cause a charged particle to move in a circular path of radius
r=
mv
qB
,
where
v
is the component of the velocity perpendicular to
B
for a charged particle with mass
m
and charge
q
.
22.6The Hall Effect
• The Hall effect is the creation of voltage
ε
, known as the Hall emf, across a current-carrying conductor by a magnetic field.
• The Hall emf is given by
ε=Blv(B,v,andl,mutually perpendicular)
for a conductor of width
l
through which charges move at a speed
v
.
22.7Magnetic Force on a Current-Carrying Conductor
• The magnetic force on current-carrying conductors is given by
F=IlBsinθ,
where
I
is the current,
l
is the length of a straight conductor in a uniform magnetic field
B
, and
θ
is the angle between
I
and
B
. The force
follows RHR-1 with the thumb in the direction of
I
.
22.8Torque on a Current Loop: Motors and Meters
• The torque
τ
on a current-carrying loop of any shape in a uniform magnetic field. is
τ=NIABsinθ,
where
N
is the number of turns,
I
is the current,
A
is the area of the loop,
B
is the magnetic field strength, and
θ
is the angle between the
perpendicular to the loop and the magnetic field.
22.9Magnetic Fields Produced by Currents: Ampere’s Law
• The strength of the magnetic field created by current in a long straight wire is given by
B=
μ
0
I
2πr
(long straight wire),
where
I
is the current,
r
is the shortest distance to the wire, and the constant
μ
0
=4π×10
−7
T⋅m/A
is the permeability of free space.
• The direction of the magnetic field created by a long straight wire is given by right hand rule 2 (RHR-2):Point the thumb of the right hand in the
direction of current, and the fingers curl in the direction of the magnetic field loopscreated by it.
• The magnetic field created by current following any path is the sum (or integral) of the fields due to segments along the path (magnitude and
direction as for a straight wire), resulting in a general relationship between current and field known as Ampere’s law.
• The magnetic field strength at the center of a circular loop is given by
B=
μ
0
I
2R
(at center of loop),
where
R
is the radius of the loop. This equation becomes
B=μ
0
nI/(2R)
for a flat coil of
N
loops. RHR-2 gives the direction of the field
about the loop. A long coil is called a solenoid.
• The magnetic field strength inside a solenoid is
B=μ
0
nI (inside a solenoid),
where
n
is the number of loops per unit length of the solenoid. The field inside is very uniform in magnitude and direction.
22.10Magnetic Force between Two Parallel Conductors
CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
803
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
foreach (TwainStaticFrameSizeType frame in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
break pdf password; pdf split and merge
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. if (device.Compression != TwainCompressionMode.Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
a pdf page cut; c# split pdf
• The force between two parallel currents
I
1
and
I
2
, separated by a distance
r
, has a magnitude per unit length given by
F
l
=
μ
0
I
1
I
2
2πr
.
• The force is attractive if the currents are in the same direction, repulsive if they are in opposite directions.
22.11More Applications of Magnetism
• Crossed (perpendicular) electric and magnetic fields act as a velocity filter, giving equal and opposite forces on any charge with velocity
perpendicular to the fields and of magnitude
v=
E
B
.
Conceptual Questions
22.1Magnets
1.Volcanic and other such activity at the mid-Atlantic ridge extrudes material to fill the gap between separating tectonic plates associated with
continental drift. The magnetization of rocks is found to reverse in a coordinated manner with distance from the ridge. What does this imply about the
Earth’s magnetic field and how could the knowledge of the spreading rate be used to give its historical record?
22.3Magnetic Fields and Magnetic Field Lines
2.Explain why the magnetic field would not be unique (that is, not have a single value) at a point in space where magnetic field lines might cross.
(Consider the direction of the field at such a point.)
3.List the ways in which magnetic field lines and electric field lines are similar. For example, the field direction is tangent to the line at any point in
space. Also list the ways in which they differ. For example, electric force is parallel to electric field lines, whereas magnetic force on moving charges
is perpendicular to magnetic field lines.
4.Noting that the magnetic field lines of a bar magnet resemble the electric field lines of a pair of equal and opposite charges, do you expect the
magnetic field to rapidly decrease in strength with distance from the magnet? Is this consistent with your experience with magnets?
5.Is the Earth’s magnetic field parallel to the ground at all locations? If not, where is it parallel to the surface? Is its strength the same at all locations?
If not, where is it greatest?
22.4Magnetic Field Strength: Force on a Moving Charge in a Magnetic Field
6.If a charged particle moves in a straight line through some region of space, can you say that the magnetic field in that region is necessarily zero?
22.5Force on a Moving Charge in a Magnetic Field: Examples and Applications
7.How can the motion of a charged particle be used to distinguish between a magnetic and an electric field?
8.High-velocity charged particles can damage biological cells and are a component of radiation exposure in a variety of locations ranging from
research facilities to natural background. Describe how you could use a magnetic field to shield yourself.
9.If a cosmic ray proton approaches the Earth from outer space along a line toward the center of the Earth that lies in the plane of the equator, in
what direction will it be deflected by the Earth’s magnetic field? What about an electron? A neutron?
10.What are the signs of the charges on the particles inFigure 22.46?
Figure 22.46
11.Which of the particles inFigure 22.47has the greatest velocity, assuming they have identical charges and masses?
Figure 22.47
12.Which of the particles inFigure 22.47has the greatest mass, assuming all have identical charges and velocities?
804 CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
13.While operating, a high-precision TV monitor is placed on its side during maintenance. The image on the monitor changes color and blurs slightly.
Discuss the possible relation of these effects to the Earth’s magnetic field.
22.6The Hall Effect
14.Discuss how the Hall effect could be used to obtain information on free charge density in a conductor. (Hint: Consider how drift velocity and
current are related.)
22.7Magnetic Force on a Current-Carrying Conductor
15.Draw a sketch of the situation inFigure 22.30showing the direction of electrons carrying the current, and use RHR-1 to verify the direction of the
force on the wire.
16.Verify that the direction of the force in an MHD drive, such as that inFigure 22.32, does not depend on the sign of the charges carrying the
current across the fluid.
17.Why would a magnetohydrodynamic drive work better in ocean water than in fresh water? Also, why would superconducting magnets be
desirable?
18.Which is more likely to interfere with compass readings, AC current in your refrigerator or DC current when you start your car? Explain.
22.8Torque on a Current Loop: Motors and Meters
19.Draw a diagram and use RHR-1 to show that the forces on the top and bottom segments of the motor’s current loop inFigure 22.34are vertical
and produce no torque about the axis of rotation.
22.9Magnetic Fields Produced by Currents: Ampere’s Law
20.Make a drawing and use RHR-2 to find the direction of the magnetic field of a current loop in a motor (such as inFigure 22.34). Then show that
the direction of the torque on the loop is the same as produced by like poles repelling and unlike poles attracting.
22.10Magnetic Force between Two Parallel Conductors
21.Is the force attractive or repulsive between the hot and neutral lines hung from power poles? Why?
22.If you have three parallel wires in the same plane, as inFigure 22.48, with currents in the outer two running in opposite directions, is it possible
for the middle wire to be repelled by both? Attracted by both? Explain.
Figure 22.48Three parallel coplanar wires with currents in the outer two in opposite directions.
23.Suppose two long straight wires run perpendicular to one another without touching. Does one exert a net force on the other? If so, what is its
direction? Does one exert a net torque on the other? If so, what is its direction? Justify your responses by using the right hand rules.
24.Use the right hand rules to show that the force between the two loops inFigure 22.49is attractive if the currents are in the same direction and
repulsive if they are in opposite directions. Is this consistent with like poles of the loops repelling and unlike poles of the loops attracting? Draw
sketches to justify your answers.
CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
805
Figure 22.49Two loops of wire carrying currents can exert forces and torques on one another.
25.If one of the loops inFigure 22.49is tilted slightly relative to the other and their currents are in the same direction, what are the directions of the
torques they exert on each other? Does this imply that the poles of the bar magnet-like fields they create will line up with each other if the loops are
allowed to rotate?
26.Electric field lines can be shielded by the Faraday cage effect. Can we have magnetic shielding? Can we have gravitational shielding?
22.11More Applications of Magnetism
27.Measurements of the weak and fluctuating magnetic fields associated with brain activity are called magnetoencephalograms (MEGs). Do the
brain’s magnetic fields imply coordinated or uncoordinated nerve impulses? Explain.
28.Discuss the possibility that a Hall voltage would be generated on the moving heart of a patient during MRI imaging. Also discuss the same effect
on the wires of a pacemaker. (The fact that patients with pacemakers are not given MRIs is significant.)
29.A patient in an MRI unit turns his head quickly to one side and experiences momentary dizziness and a strange taste in his mouth. Discuss the
possible causes.
30.You are told that in a certain region there is either a uniform electric or magnetic field. What measurement or observation could you make to
determine the type? (Ignore the Earth’s magnetic field.)
31.An example of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) comes from the flow of a river (salty water). This fluid interacts with the Earth’s magnetic field to
produce a potential difference between the two river banks. How would you go about calculating the potential difference?
32.Draw gravitational field lines between 2 masses, electric field lines between a positive and a negative charge, electric field lines between 2
positive charges and magnetic field lines around a magnet. Qualitatively describe the differences between the fields and the entities responsible for
the field lines.
806 CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Problems & Exercises
22.4Magnetic Field Strength: Force on a Moving
Charge in a Magnetic Field
1.What is the direction of the magnetic force on a positive charge that
moves as shown in each of the six cases shown inFigure 22.50?
Figure 22.50
2.RepeatExercise 22.1for a negative charge.
3.What is the direction of the velocity of a negative charge that
experiences the magnetic force shown in each of the three cases in
Figure 22.51, assuming it moves perpendicular to
B?
Figure 22.51
4.RepeatExercise 22.3for a positive charge.
5.What is the direction of the magnetic field that produces the magnetic
force on a positive charge as shown in each of the three cases in the
figure below, assuming
B
is perpendicular to
v
?
Figure 22.52
6.RepeatExercise 22.5for a negative charge.
7.What is the maximum force on an aluminum rod with a
0.100-μC
charge that you pass between the poles of a 1.50-T permanent magnet
at a speed of 5.00 m/s? In what direction is the force?
8.(a) Aircraft sometimes acquire small static charges. Suppose a
supersonic jet has a
0.500-μC
charge and flies due west at a speed
of 660 m/s over the Earth’s south magnetic pole, where the
8.00×10
−5
-T
magnetic field points straight up. What are the
direction and the magnitude of the magnetic force on the plane? (b)
Discuss whether the value obtained in part (a) implies this is a
significant or negligible effect.
9.(a) A cosmic ray proton moving toward the Earth at
5.00×10
7
m/s
experiences a magnetic force of
1.70×10
−16
N
. What is the strength
of the magnetic field if there is a
45º
angle between it and the proton’s
velocity? (b) Is the value obtained in part (a) consistent with the known
strength of the Earth’s magnetic field on its surface? Discuss.
10.An electron moving at
4.00×10
3
m/s
in a 1.25-T magnetic field
experiences a magnetic force of
1.40×10
−16
N
. What angle does
the velocity of the electron make with the magnetic field? There are two
answers.
11.(a) A physicist performing a sensitive measurement wants to limit
the magnetic force on a moving charge in her equipment to less than
1.00×10
−12
N
. What is the greatest the charge can be if it moves at
a maximum speed of 30.0 m/s in the Earth’s field? (b) Discuss whether
it would be difficult to limit the charge to less than the value found in (a)
by comparing it with typical static electricity and noting that static is
often absent.
22.5Force on a Moving Charge in a Magnetic Field:
Examples and Applications
If you need additional support for these problems, seeMore
Applications of Magnetism.
12.A cosmic ray electron moves at
7.50×10
6
m/s
perpendicular to
the Earth’s magnetic field at an altitude where field strength is
1.00×10
−5
T
. What is the radius of the circular path the electron
follows?
13.A proton moves at
7.50×10
7
m/s
perpendicular to a magnetic
field. The field causes the proton to travel in a circular path of radius
0.800 m. What is the field strength?
14.(a) Viewers ofStar Trekhear of an antimatter drive on the Starship
Enterprise. One possibility for such a futuristic energy source is to store
antimatter charged particles in a vacuum chamber, circulating in a
magnetic field, and then extract them as needed. Antimatter annihilates
with normal matter, producing pure energy. What strength magnetic
field is needed to hold antiprotons, moving at
5.00×10
7
m/s
in a
circular path 2.00 m in radius? Antiprotons have the same mass as
protons but the opposite (negative) charge. (b) Is this field strength
obtainable with today’s technology or is it a futuristic possibility?
15.(a) An oxygen-16 ion with a mass of
2.66×10
−26
kg
travels at
5.00×10
6
m/s
perpendicular to a 1.20-T magnetic field, which makes
it move in a circular arc with a 0.231-m radius. What positive charge is
on the ion? (b) What is the ratio of this charge to the charge of an
electron? (c) Discuss why the ratio found in (b) should be an integer.
16.What radius circular path does an electron travel if it moves at the
same speed and in the same magnetic field as the proton inExercise
22.13?
17.A velocity selector in a mass spectrometer uses a 0.100-T magnetic
field. (a) What electric field strength is needed to select a speed of
4.00×10
6
m/s
? (b) What is the voltage between the plates if they are
separated by 1.00 cm?
18.An electron in a TV CRT moves with a speed of
6.00×10
7
m/s
, in
a direction perpendicular to the Earth’s field, which has a strength of
CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
807
5.00×10
−5
T
. (a) What strength electric field must be applied
perpendicular to the Earth’s field to make the electron moves in a
straight line? (b) If this is done between plates separated by 1.00 cm,
what is the voltage applied? (Note that TVs are usually surrounded by a
ferromagnetic material to shield against external magnetic fields and
avoid the need for such a correction.)
19.(a) At what speed will a proton move in a circular path of the same
radius as the electron inExercise 22.12? (b) What would the radius of
the path be if the proton had the same speed as the electron? (c) What
would the radius be if the proton had the same kinetic energy as the
electron? (d) The same momentum?
20.A mass spectrometer is being used to separate common oxygen-16
from the much rarer oxygen-18, taken from a sample of old glacial ice.
(The relative abundance of these oxygen isotopes is related to climatic
temperature at the time the ice was deposited.) The ratio of the masses
of these two ions is 16 to 18, the mass of oxygen-16 is
2.66×10
−26
kg,
and they are singly charged and travel at
5.00×10
6
m/s
in a 1.20-T magnetic field. What is the separation
between their paths when they hit a target after traversing a semicircle?
21.(a) Triply charged uranium-235 and uranium-238 ions are being
separated in a mass spectrometer. (The much rarer uranium-235 is
used as reactor fuel.) The masses of the ions are
3.90×10
−25
kg
and
3.95×10
−25
kg
, respectively, and they travel at
3.00×10
5
m/s
in a 0.250-T field. What is the separation between their paths when they
hit a target after traversing a semicircle? (b) Discuss whether this
distance between their paths seems to be big enough to be practical in
the separation of uranium-235 from uranium-238.
22.6The Hall Effect
22.A large water main is 2.50 m in diameter and the average water
velocity is 6.00 m/s. Find the Hall voltage produced if the pipe runs
perpendicular to the Earth’s
5.00×10
−5
-T
field.
23.What Hall voltage is produced by a 0.200-T field applied across a
2.60-cm-diameter aorta when blood velocity is 60.0 cm/s?
24.(a) What is the speed of a supersonic aircraft with a 17.0-m
wingspan, if it experiences a 1.60-V Hall voltage between its wing tips
when in level flight over the north magnetic pole, where the Earth’s field
strength is
8.00×10
−5
T?
(b) Explain why very little current flows as
a result of this Hall voltage.
25.A nonmechanical water meter could utilize the Hall effect by
applying a magnetic field across a metal pipe and measuring the Hall
voltage produced. What is the average fluid velocity in a 3.00-cm-
diameter pipe, if a 0.500-T field across it creates a 60.0-mV Hall
voltage?
26.Calculate the Hall voltage induced on a patient’s heart while being
scanned by an MRI unit. Approximate the conducting path on the heart
wall by a wire 7.50 cm long that moves at 10.0 cm/s perpendicular to a
1.50-T magnetic field.
27.A Hall probe calibrated to read
1.00 μV
when placed in a 2.00-T
field is placed in a 0.150-T field. What is its output voltage?
28.Using information inExample 20.6, what would the Hall voltage be
if a 2.00-T field is applied across a 10-gauge copper wire (2.588 mm in
diameter) carrying a 20.0-A current?
29.Show that the Hall voltage across wires made of the same material,
carrying identical currents, and subjected to the same magnetic field is
inversely proportional to their diameters. (Hint: Consider how drift
velocity depends on wire diameter.)
30.A patient with a pacemaker is mistakenly being scanned for an MRI
image. A 10.0-cm-long section of pacemaker wire moves at a speed of
10.0 cm/s perpendicular to the MRI unit’s magnetic field and a 20.0-mV
Hall voltage is induced. What is the magnetic field strength?
22.7Magnetic Force on a Current-Carrying Conductor
31.What is the direction of the magnetic force on the current in each of
the six cases inFigure 22.53?
Figure 22.53
32.What is the direction of a current that experiences the magnetic
force shown in each of the three cases inFigure 22.54, assuming the
current runs perpendicular to
B
?
Figure 22.54
33.What is the direction of the magnetic field that produces the
magnetic force shown on the currents in each of the three cases in
Figure 22.55, assuming
B
is perpendicular to
I
?
Figure 22.55
34.(a) What is the force per meter on a lightning bolt at the equator that
carries 20,000 A perpendicular to the Earth’s
3.00×10
−5
-T
field? (b)
What is the direction of the force if the current is straight up and the
Earth’s field direction is due north, parallel to the ground?
35.(a) A DC power line for a light-rail system carries 1000 A at an
angle of
30.0º
to the Earth’s
5.00×10
−5
-T
field. What is the force
on a 100-m section of this line? (b) Discuss practical concerns this
presents, if any.
36.What force is exerted on the water in an MHD drive utilizing a
25.0-cm-diameter tube, if 100-A current is passed across the tube that
is perpendicular to a 2.00-T magnetic field? (The relatively small size of
808 CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested