asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Break pdf into pages control application platform web page azure windows web browser PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics81-part1837

this force indicates the need for very large currents and magnetic fields
to make practical MHD drives.)
37.A wire carrying a 30.0-A current passes between the poles of a
strong magnet that is perpendicular to its field and experiences a
2.16-N force on the 4.00 cm of wire in the field. What is the average
field strength?
38.(a) A 0.750-m-long section of cable carrying current to a car starter
motor makes an angle of
60º
with the Earth’s
5.50×10
−5
T
field.
What is the current when the wire experiences a force of
7.00×10
−3
N
? (b) If you run the wire between the poles of a strong
horseshoe magnet, subjecting 5.00 cm of it to a 1.75-T field, what force
is exerted on this segment of wire?
39.(a) What is the angle between a wire carrying an 8.00-A current and
the 1.20-T field it is in if 50.0 cm of the wire experiences a magnetic
force of 2.40 N? (b) What is the force on the wire if it is rotated to make
an angle of
90º
with the field?
40.The force on the rectangular loop of wire in the magnetic field in
Figure 22.56can be used to measure field strength. The field is
uniform, and the plane of the loop is perpendicular to the field. (a) What
is the direction of the magnetic force on the loop? Justify the claim that
the forces on the sides of the loop are equal and opposite, independent
of how much of the loop is in the field and do not affect the net force on
the loop. (b) If a current of 5.00 A is used, what is the force per tesla on
the 20.0-cm-wide loop?
Figure 22.56A rectangular loop of wire carrying a current is perpendicular to a
magnetic field. The field is uniform in the region shown and is zero outside that
region.
22.8Torque on a Current Loop: Motors and Meters
41.(a) By how many percent is the torque of a motor decreased if its
permanent magnets lose 5.0% of their strength? (b) How many percent
would the current need to be increased to return the torque to original
values?
42.(a) What is the maximum torque on a 150-turn square loop of wire
18.0 cm on a side that carries a 50.0-A current in a 1.60-T field? (b)
What is the torque when
θ
is
10.9º?
43.Find the current through a loop needed to create a maximum torque
of
9.00 N⋅m.
The loop has 50 square turns that are 15.0 cm on a
side and is in a uniform 0.800-T magnetic field.
44.Calculate the magnetic field strength needed on a 200-turn square
loop 20.0 cm on a side to create a maximum torque of
300 N⋅m
if
the loop is carrying 25.0 A.
45.Since the equation for torque on a current-carrying loop is
τ=NIABsinθ
, the units of
N⋅m
must equal units of
A⋅m
2
T
.
Verify this.
46.(a) At what angle
θ
is the torque on a current loop 90.0% of
maximum? (b) 50.0% of maximum? (c) 10.0% of maximum?
47.A proton has a magnetic field due to its spin on its axis. The field is
similar to that created by a circular current loop
0.650×10
−15
m
in
radius with a current of
1.05×10
4
A
(no kidding). Find the maximum
torque on a proton in a 2.50-T field. (This is a significant torque on a
small particle.)
48.(a) A 200-turn circular loop of radius 50.0 cm is vertical, with its axis
on an east-west line. A current of 100 A circulates clockwise in the loop
when viewed from the east. The Earth’s field here is due north, parallel
to the ground, with a strength of
3.00×10
−5
T
. What are the direction
and magnitude of the torque on the loop? (b) Does this device have any
practical applications as a motor?
49.RepeatExercise 22.41, but with the loop lying flat on the ground
with its current circulating counterclockwise (when viewed from above)
in a location where the Earth’s field is north, but at an angle
45.0º
below the horizontal and with a strength of
6.00×10
−5
T
.
22.10Magnetic Force between Two Parallel
Conductors
50.(a) The hot and neutral wires supplying DC power to a light-rail
commuter train carry 800 A and are separated by 75.0 cm. What is the
magnitude and direction of the force between 50.0 m of these wires?
(b) Discuss the practical consequences of this force, if any.
51.The force per meter between the two wires of a jumper cable being
used to start a stalled car is 0.225 N/m. (a) What is the current in the
wires, given they are separated by 2.00 cm? (b) Is the force attractive
or repulsive?
52.A 2.50-m segment of wire supplying current to the motor of a
submerged submarine carries 1000 A and feels a 4.00-N repulsive
force from a parallel wire 5.00 cm away. What is the direction and
magnitude of the current in the other wire?
53.The wire carrying 400 A to the motor of a commuter train feels an
attractive force of
4.00×10
−3
N/m
due to a parallel wire carrying
5.00 A to a headlight. (a) How far apart are the wires? (b) Are the
currents in the same direction?
54.An AC appliance cord has its hot and neutral wires separated by
3.00 mm and carries a 5.00-A current. (a) What is the average force per
meter between the wires in the cord? (b) What is the maximum force
per meter between the wires? (c) Are the forces attractive or repulsive?
(d) Do appliance cords need any special design features to compensate
for these forces?
55.Figure 22.57shows a long straight wire near a rectangular current
loop. What is the direction and magnitude of the total force on the loop?
Figure 22.57
56.Find the direction and magnitude of the force that each wire
experiences inFigure 22.58(a) by, using vector addition.
CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
809
Break pdf into pages - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break apart a pdf file; pdf split pages in half
Break pdf into pages - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
split pdf into individual pages; break pdf file into multiple files
Figure 22.58
57.Find the direction and magnitude of the force that each wire
experiences inFigure 22.58(b), using vector addition.
22.11More Applications of Magnetism
58.Indicate whether the magnetic field created in each of the three
situations shown inFigure 22.59is into or out of the page on the left
and right of the current.
Figure 22.59
59.What are the directions of the fields in the center of the loop and
coils shown inFigure 22.60?
Figure 22.60
60.What are the directions of the currents in the loop and coils shown
inFigure 22.61?
Figure 22.61
61.To see why an MRI utilizes iron to increase the magnetic field
created by a coil, calculate the current needed in a 400-loop-per-meter
circular coil 0.660 m in radius to create a 1.20-T field (typical of an MRI
instrument) at its center with no iron present. The magnetic field of a
proton is approximately like that of a circular current loop
0.650×10
−15
m
in radius carrying
1.05×10
4
A
. What is the field at
the center of such a loop?
62.Inside a motor, 30.0 A passes through a 250-turn circular loop that
is 10.0 cm in radius. What is the magnetic field strength created at its
center?
63.Nonnuclear submarines use batteries for power when submerged.
(a) Find the magnetic field 50.0 cm from a straight wire carrying 1200 A
from the batteries to the drive mechanism of a submarine. (b) What is
the field if the wires to and from the drive mechanism are side by side?
(c) Discuss the effects this could have for a compass on the submarine
that is not shielded.
64.How strong is the magnetic field inside a solenoid with 10,000 turns
per meter that carries 20.0 A?
65.What current is needed in the solenoid described inExercise 22.58
to produce a magnetic field
10
4
times the Earth’s magnetic field of
5.00×10
−5
T
?
66.How far from the starter cable of a car, carrying 150 A, must you be
to experience a field less than the Earth’s
(5.00×10
−5
T)?
Assume a
long straight wire carries the current. (In practice, the body of your car
shields the dashboard compass.)
67.Measurements affect the system being measured, such as the
current loop inFigure 22.56. (a) Estimate the field the loop creates by
calculating the field at the center of a circular loop 20.0 cm in diameter
carrying 5.00 A. (b) What is the smallest field strength this loop can be
used to measure, if its field must alter the measured field by less than
0.0100%?
68.Figure 22.62shows a long straight wire just touching a loop
carrying a current
I
1
. Both lie in the same plane. (a) What direction
must the current
I
2
in the straight wire have to create a field at the
center of the loop in the direction opposite to that created by the loop?
(b) What is the ratio of
I
1
/I
2
that gives zero field strength at the
center of the loop? (c) What is the direction of the field directly above
the loop under this circumstance?
Figure 22.62
69.Find the magnitude and direction of the magnetic field at the point
equidistant from the wires inFigure 22.58(a), using the rules of vector
addition to sum the contributions from each wire.
70.Find the magnitude and direction of the magnetic field at the point
equidistant from the wires inFigure 22.58(b), using the rules of vector
addition to sum the contributions from each wire.
71.What current is needed in the top wire inFigure 22.58(a) to
produce a field of zero at the point equidistant from the wires, if the
currents in the bottom two wires are both 10.0 A into the page?
72.Calculate the size of the magnetic field 20 m below a high voltage
power line. The line carries 450 MW at a voltage of 300,000 V.
73.Integrated Concepts
(a) A pendulum is set up so that its bob (a thin copper disk) swings
between the poles of a permanent magnet as shown inFigure 22.63.
What is the magnitude and direction of the magnetic force on the bob at
the lowest point in its path, if it has a positive
0.250 μC
charge and is
released from a height of 30.0 cm above its lowest point? The magnetic
field strength is 1.50 T. (b) What is the acceleration of the bob at the
bottom of its swing if its mass is 30.0 grams and it is hung from a
flexible string? Be certain to include a free-body diagram as part of your
analysis.
810 CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class.
break pdf documents; split pdf by bookmark
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Offer PDF page break inserting function. PDF document editor library control, RasterEdge XDoc.PDF, offers easy to add & insert an (empty) page into an existing
pdf split pages; acrobat split pdf into multiple files
Figure 22.63
74.Integrated Concepts
(a) What voltage will accelerate electrons to a speed of
6.00×10
−7
m/s
? (b) Find the radius of curvature of the path of a
protonaccelerated through this potential in a 0.500-T field and compare
this with the radius of curvature of an electron accelerated through the
same potential.
75.Integrated Concepts
Find the radius of curvature of the path of a 25.0-MeV proton moving
perpendicularly to the 1.20-T field of a cyclotron.
76.Integrated Concepts
To construct a nonmechanical water meter, a 0.500-T magnetic field is
placed across the supply water pipe to a home and the Hall voltage is
recorded. (a) Find the flow rate in liters per second through a 3.00-cm-
diameter pipe if the Hall voltage is 60.0 mV. (b) What would the Hall
voltage be for the same flow rate through a 10.0-cm-diameter pipe with
the same field applied?
77.Integrated Concepts
(a) Using the values given for an MHD drive inExercise 22.59, and
assuming the force is uniformly applied to the fluid, calculate the
pressure created in
N/m
2
.
(b) Is this a significant fraction of an
atmosphere?
78.Integrated Concepts
(a) Calculate the maximum torque on a 50-turn, 1.50 cm radius circular
current loop carrying
50 μA
in a 0.500-T field. (b) If this coil is to be
used in a galvanometer that reads
50 μA
full scale, what force
constant spring must be used, if it is attached 1.00 cm from the axis of
rotation and is stretched by the
60º
arc moved?
79.Integrated Concepts
A current balance used to define the ampere is designed so that the
current through it is constant, as is the distance between wires. Even
so, if the wires change length with temperature, the force between them
will change. What percent change in force per degree will occur if the
wires are copper?
80.Integrated Concepts
(a) Show that the period of the circular orbit of a charged particle
moving perpendicularly to a uniform magnetic field is
T=2πm/(qB)
.
(b) What is the frequency
f
? (c) What is the angular velocity
ω
? Note
that these results are independent of the velocity and radius of the orbit
and, hence, of the energy of the particle. (Figure 22.64.)
Figure 22.64Cyclotrons accelerate charged particles orbiting in a magnetic field by
placing an AC voltage on the metal Dees, between which the particles move, so that
energy is added twice each orbit. The frequency is constant, since it is independent
of the particle energy—the radius of the orbit simply increases with energy until the
particles approach the edge and are extracted for various experiments and
applications.
81.Integrated Concepts
A cyclotron accelerates charged particles as shown inFigure 22.64.
Using the results of the previous problem, calculate the frequency of the
accelerating voltage needed for a proton in a 1.20-T field.
82.Integrated Concepts
(a) A 0.140-kg baseball, pitched at 40.0 m/s horizontally and
perpendicular to the Earth’s horizontal
5.00×10
−5
T
field, has a
100-nC charge on it. What distance is it deflected from its path by the
magnetic force, after traveling 30.0 m horizontally? (b) Would you
suggest this as a secret technique for a pitcher to throw curve balls?
83.Integrated Concepts
(a) What is the direction of the force on a wire carrying a current due
east in a location where the Earth’s field is due north? Both are parallel
to the ground. (b) Calculate the force per meter if the wire carries 20.0
A and the field strength is
3.00×10
−5
T
. (c) What diameter copper
wire would have its weight supported by this force? (d) Calculate the
resistance per meter and the voltage per meter needed.
84.Integrated Concepts
One long straight wire is to be held directly above another by repulsion
between their currents. The lower wire carries 100 A and the wire 7.50
cm above it is 10-gauge (2.588 mm diameter) copper wire. (a) What
current must flow in the upper wire, neglecting the Earth’s field? (b)
What is the smallest current if the Earth’s
3.00×10
−5
T
field is
parallel to the ground and is not neglected? (c) Is the supported wire in
a stable or unstable equilibrium if displaced vertically? If displaced
horizontally?
85.Unreasonable Results
(a) Find the charge on a baseball, thrown at 35.0 m/s perpendicular to
the Earth’s
5.00×10
−5
T
field, that experiences a 1.00-N magnetic
force. (b) What is unreasonable about this result? (c) Which assumption
or premise is responsible?
86.Unreasonable Results
A charged particle having mass
6.64×10
−27
kg
(that of a helium
atom) moving at
8.70×10
5
m/s
perpendicular to a 1.50-T magnetic
field travels in a circular path of radius 16.0 mm. (a) What is the charge
of the particle? (b) What is unreasonable about this result? (c) Which
assumptions are responsible?
87.Unreasonable Results
CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
811
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
how to split pdf file by pages; break pdf into pages
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. is not a document"); default: Console.WriteLine("Fail: unknown error"); break; }. This demo code convert word file all pages to Jpeg
can print pdf no pages selected; break pdf
An inventor wants to generate 120-V power by moving a 1.00-m-long
wire perpendicular to the Earth’s
5.00×10
−5
T
field. (a) Find the
speed with which the wire must move. (b) What is unreasonable about
this result? (c) Which assumption is responsible?
88.Unreasonable Results
Frustrated by the small Hall voltage obtained in blood flow
measurements, a medical physicist decides to increase the applied
magnetic field strength to get a 0.500-V output for blood moving at 30.0
cm/s in a 1.50-cm-diameter vessel. (a) What magnetic field strength is
needed? (b) What is unreasonable about this result? (c) Which premise
is responsible?
89.Unreasonable Results
A surveyor 100 m from a long straight 200-kV DC power line suspects
that its magnetic field may equal that of the Earth and affect compass
readings. (a) Calculate the current in the wire needed to create a
5.00×10
−5
T
field at this distance. (b) What is unreasonable about
this result? (c) Which assumption or premise is responsible?
90.Construct Your Own Problem
Consider a mass separator that applies a magnetic field perpendicular
to the velocity of ions and separates the ions based on the radius of
curvature of their paths in the field. Construct a problem in which you
calculate the magnetic field strength needed to separate two ions that
differ in mass, but not charge, and have the same initial velocity. Among
the things to consider are the types of ions, the velocities they can be
given before entering the magnetic field, and a reasonable value for the
radius of curvature of the paths they follow. In addition, calculate the
separation distance between the ions at the point where they are
detected.
91.Construct Your Own Problem
Consider using the torque on a current-carrying coil in a magnetic field
to detect relatively small magnetic fields (less than the field of the Earth,
for example). Construct a problem in which you calculate the maximum
torque on a current-carrying loop in a magnetic field. Among the things
to be considered are the size of the coil, the number of loops it has, the
current you pass through the coil, and the size of the field you wish to
detect. Discuss whether the torque produced is large enough to be
effectively measured. Your instructor may also wish for you to consider
the effects, if any, of the field produced by the coil on the surroundings
that could affect detection of the small field.
812 CHAPTER 22 | MAGNETISM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
can set and integrate this duplex scanning feature into your C# device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device
break a pdf password; cannot select text in pdf file
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
how to install XImage.Twain into visual studio RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device. TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE
pdf no pages selected; pdf file specification
23
ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS,
AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES
Figure 23.1This wind turbine in the Thames Estuary in the UK is an example of induction at work. Wind pushes the blades of the turbine, spinning a shaft attached to
magnets. The magnets spin around a conductive coil, inducing an electric current in the coil, and eventually feeding the electrical grid. (credit: phault, Flickr)
CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES S 813
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
you want to acquire an image directly into the C# RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
split pdf into multiple files; split pdf files
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
foreach (TwainStaticFrameSizeType frame in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
pdf print error no pages selected; pdf split file
Learning Objectives
23.1.Induced Emf and Magnetic Flux
• Calculate the flux of a uniform magnetic field through a loop of arbitrary orientation.
• Describe methods to produce an electromotive force (emf) with a magnetic field or magnet and a loop of wire.
23.2.Faraday’s Law of Induction: Lenz’s Law
• Calculate emf, current, and magnetic fields using Faraday’s Law.
• Explain the physical results of Lenz’s Law
23.3.Motional Emf
• Calculate emf, force, magnetic field, and work due to the motion of an object in a magnetic field.
23.4.Eddy Currents and Magnetic Damping
• Explain the magnitude and direction of an induced eddy current, and the effect this will have on the object it is induced in.
• Describe several applications of magnetic damping.
23.5.Electric Generators
• Calculate the emf induced in a generator.
• Calculate the peak emf which can be induced in a particular generator system.
23.6.Back Emf
• Explain what back emf is and how it is induced.
23.7.Transformers
• Explain how a transformer works.
• Calculate voltage, current, and/or number of turns given the other quantities.
23.8.Electrical Safety: Systems and Devices
• Explain how various modern safety features in electric circuits work, with an emphasis on how induction is employed.
23.9.Inductance
• Calculate the inductance of an inductor.
• Calculate the energy stored in an inductor.
• Calculate the emf generated in an inductor.
23.10.RL Circuits
• Calculate the current in an RL circuit after a specified number of characteristic time steps.
• Calculate the characteristic time of an RL circuit.
• Sketch the current in an RL circuit over time.
23.11.Reactance, Inductive and Capacitive
• Sketch voltage and current versus time in simple inductive, capacitive, and resistive circuits.
• Calculate inductive and capacitive reactance.
• Calculate current and/or voltage in simple inductive, capacitive, and resistive circuits.
23.12.RLC Series AC Circuits
• Calculate the impedance, phase angle, resonant frequency, power, power factor, voltage, and/or current in a RLC series circuit.
• Draw the circuit diagram for an RLC series circuit.
• Explain the significance of the resonant frequency.
Introduction to Electromagnetic Induction, AC Circuits and Electrical Technologies
Nature’s displays of symmetry are beautiful and alluring. A butterfly’s wings exhibit an appealing symmetry in a complex system. (SeeFigure 23.2.)
The laws of physics display symmetries at the most basic level—these symmetries are a source of wonder and imply deeper meaning. Since we
place a high value on symmetry, we look for it when we explore nature. The remarkable thing is that we find it.
Figure 23.2Physics, like this butterfly, has inherent symmetries. (credit: Thomas Bresson)
The hint of symmetry between electricity and magnetism found in the preceding chapter will be elaborated upon in this chapter. Specifically, we know
that a current creates a magnetic field. If nature is symmetric here, then perhaps a magnetic field can create a current. The Hall effect is a voltage
caused by a magnetic force. That voltage could drive a current. Historically, it was very shortly after Oersted discovered currents cause magnetic
fields that other scientists asked the following question: Can magnetic fields cause currents? The answer was soon found by experiment to be yes. In
1831, some 12 years after Oersted’s discovery, the English scientist Michael Faraday (1791–1862) and the American scientist Joseph Henry
(1797–1878) independently demonstrated that magnetic fields can produce currents. The basic process of generating emfs (electromotive force) and,
hence, currents with magnetic fields is known asinduction; this process is also called magnetic induction to distinguish it from charging by induction,
which utilizes the Coulomb force.
Today, currents induced by magnetic fields are essential to our technological society. The ubiquitous generator—found in automobiles, on bicycles, in
nuclear power plants, and so on—uses magnetism to generate current. Other devices that use magnetism to induce currents include pickup coils in
electric guitars, transformers of every size, certain microphones, airport security gates, and damping mechanisms on sensitive chemical balances.
Not so familiar perhaps, but important nevertheless, is that the behavior of AC circuits depends strongly on the effect of magnetic fields on currents.
814 CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
23.1Induced Emf and Magnetic Flux
The apparatus used by Faraday to demonstrate that magnetic fields can create currents is illustrated inFigure 23.3. When the switch is closed, a
magnetic field is produced in the coil on the top part of the iron ring and transmitted to the coil on the bottom part of the ring. The galvanometer is
used to detect any current induced in the coil on the bottom. It was found that each time the switch is closed, the galvanometer detects a current in
one direction in the coil on the bottom. (You can also observe this in a physics lab.) Each time the switch is opened, the galvanometer detects a
current in the opposite direction. Interestingly, if the switch remains closed or open for any length of time, there is no current through the
galvanometer.Closing and opening the switchinduces the current. It is thechangein magnetic field that creates the current. More basic than the
current that flows is the emfthat causes it. The current is a result of anemf induced by a changing magnetic field, whether or not there is a path for
current to flow.
Figure 23.3Faraday’s apparatus for demonstrating that a magnetic field can produce a current. A change in the field produced by the top coil induces an emf and, hence, a
current in the bottom coil. When the switch is opened and closed, the galvanometer registers currents in opposite directions. No current flows through the galvanometer when
the switch remains closed or open.
An experiment easily performed and often done in physics labs is illustrated inFigure 23.4. An emf is induced in the coil when a bar magnet is
pushed in and out of it. Emfs of opposite signs are produced by motion in opposite directions, and the emfs are also reversed by reversing poles. The
same results are produced if the coil is moved rather than the magnet—it is the relative motion that is important. The faster the motion, the greater
the emf, and there is no emf when the magnet is stationary relative to the coil.
Figure 23.4Movement of a magnet relative to a coil produces emfs as shown. The same emfs are produced if the coil is moved relative to the magnet. The greater the speed,
the greater the magnitude of the emf, and the emf is zero when there is no motion.
The method of inducing an emf used in most electric generators is shown inFigure 23.5. A coil is rotated in a magnetic field, producing an alternating
current emf, which depends on rotation rate and other factors that will be explored in later sections. Note that the generator is remarkably similar in
construction to a motor (another symmetry).
CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES S 815
Figure 23.5Rotation of a coil in a magnetic field produces an emf. This is the basic construction of a generator, where work done to turn the coil is converted to electric energy.
Note the generator is very similar in construction to a motor.
So we see that changing the magnitude or direction of a magnetic field produces an emf. Experiments revealed that there is a crucial quantity called
themagnetic flux,
Φ
, given by
(23.1)
Φ=BAcosθ,
where
B
is the magnetic field strength over an area
A
, at an angle
θ
with the perpendicular to the area as shown inFigure 23.6.Any change in
magnetic flux
Φ
induces an emf.This process is defined to beelectromagnetic induction. Units of magnetic flux
Φ
are
T⋅m
2
. As seen in
Figure 23.6,
Bcosθ=B
, which is the component of
B
perpendicular to the area
A
. Thus magnetic flux is
Φ=B
A
, the product of the area
and the component of the magnetic field perpendicular to it.
Figure 23.6Magnetic flux
Φ
is related to the magnetic field and the area over which it exists. The flux
Φ=BAcosθ
is related to induction; any change in
Φ
induces
an emf.
All induction, including the examples given so far, arises from some change in magnetic flux
Φ
. For example, Faraday changed
B
and hence
Φ
when opening and closing the switch in his apparatus (shown inFigure 23.3). This is also true for the bar magnet and coil shown inFigure 23.4.
When rotating the coil of a generator, the angle
θ
and, hence,
Φ
is changed. Just how great an emf and what direction it takes depend on the
change in
Φ
and how rapidly the change is made, as examined in the next section.
23.2Faraday’s Law of Induction: Lenz’s Law
Faraday’s and Lenz’s Law
Faraday’s experiments showed that the emf induced by a change in magnetic flux depends on only a few factors. First, emf is directly proportional to
the change in flux
ΔΦ
. Second, emf is greatest when the change in time
Δt
is smallest—that is, emf is inversely proportional to
Δt
. Finally, if a
816 CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
coil has
N
turns, an emf will be produced that is
N
times greater than for a single coil, so that emf is directly proportional to
N
. The equation for
the emf induced by a change in magnetic flux is
(23.2)
emf=−N
ΔΦ
Δt
.
This relationship is known asFaraday’s law of induction. The units for emf are volts, as is usual.
The minus sign in Faraday’s law of induction is very important. The minus means thatthe emf creates a current I and magnetic field B that oppose
the change in flux
ΔΦ
—this is known as Lenz’s law. The direction (given by the minus sign) of the emfis so important that it is calledLenz’s law
after the Russian Heinrich Lenz (1804–1865), who, like Faraday and Henry,independently investigated aspects of induction. Faraday was aware of
the direction, but Lenz stated it so clearly that he is credited for its discovery. (SeeFigure 23.7.)
Figure 23.7(a) When this bar magnet is thrust into the coil, the strength of the magnetic field increases in the coil. The current induced in the coil creates another field, in the
opposite direction of the bar magnet’s to oppose the increase. This is one aspect ofLenz’s law—induction opposes any change in flux. (b) and (c) are two other situations.
Verify for yourself that the direction of the induced
B
coil
shown indeed opposes the change in flux and that the current direction shown is consistent with RHR-2.
Problem-Solving Strategy for Lenz’s Law
To use Lenz’s law to determine the directions of the induced magnetic fields, currents, and emfs:
1. Make a sketch of the situation for use in visualizing and recording directions.
2. Determine the direction of the magnetic field B.
3. Determine whether the flux is increasing or decreasing.
4. Now determine the direction of the induced magnetic field B. It opposes thechangein flux by adding or subtracting from the original field.
5. Use RHR-2 to determine the direction of the induced current I that is responsible for the induced magnetic field B.
6. The direction (or polarity) of the induced emf will now drive a current in this direction and can be represented as current emerging from the
positive terminal of the emf and returning to its negative terminal.
For practice, apply these steps to the situations shown inFigure 23.7and to others that are part of the following text material.
Applications of Electromagnetic Induction
There are many applications of Faraday’s Law of induction, as we will explore in this chapter and others. At this juncture, let us mention several that
have to do with data storage and magnetic fields. A very important application has to do with audio and videorecording tapes. A plastic tape, coated
with iron oxide, moves past a recording head. This recording head is basically a round iron ring about which is wrapped a coil of wire—an
electromagnet (Figure 23.8). A signal in the form of a varying input current from a microphone or camera goes to the recording head. These signals
(which are a function of the signal amplitude and frequency) produce varying magnetic fields at the recording head. As the tape moves past the
recording head, the magnetic field orientations of the iron oxide molecules on the tape are changed thus recording the signal. In the playback mode,
the magnetized tape is run past another head, similar in structure to the recording head. The different magnetic field orientations of the iron oxide
molecules on the tape induces an emf in the coil of wire in the playback head. This signal then is sent to a loudspeaker or video player.
CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES S 817
Figure 23.8Recording and playback heads used with audio and video magnetic tapes. (credit: Steve Jurvetson)
Similar principles apply to computer hard drives, except at a much faster rate. Here recordings are on a coated, spinning disk. Read heads historically
were made to work on the principle of induction. However, the input information is carried in digital rather than analog form – a series of 0’s or 1’s are
written upon the spinning hard drive. Today, most hard drive readout devices do not work on the principle of induction, but use a technique known as
giant magnetoresistance. (The discovery that weak changes in a magnetic field in a thin film of iron and chromium could bring about much larger
changes in electrical resistance was one of the first large successes of nanotechnology.) Another application of induction is found on the magnetic
stripe on the back of your personal credit card as used at the grocery store or the ATM machine. This works on the same principle as the audio or
video tape mentioned in the last paragraph in which a head reads personal information from your card.
Another application of electromagnetic induction is when electrical signals need to be transmitted across a barrier. Consider thecochlear implant
shown below. Sound is picked up by a microphone on the outside of the skull and is used to set up a varying magnetic field. A current is induced in a
receiver secured in the bone beneath the skin and transmitted to electrodes in the inner ear. Electromagnetic induction can be used in other
instances where electric signals need to be conveyed across various media.
Figure 23.9Electromagnetic induction used in transmitting electric currents across mediums. The device on the baby’s head induces an electrical current in a receiver secured
in the bone beneath the skin. (credit: Bjorn Knetsch)
Another contemporary area of research in which electromagnetic induction is being successfully implemented (and with substantial potential) is
transcranial magnetic simulation. A host of disorders, including depression and hallucinations can be traced to irregular localized electrical activity in
the brain. Intranscranial magnetic stimulation, a rapidly varying and very localized magnetic field is placed close to certain sites identified in the brain.
Weak electric currents are induced in the identified sites and can result in recovery of electrical functioning in the brain tissue.
Sleep apnea(“the cessation of breath”) affects both adults and infants (especially premature babies and it may be a cause of sudden infant deaths
[SID]). In such individuals, breath can stop repeatedly during their sleep. A cessation of more than 20 seconds can be very dangerous. Stroke, heart
failure, and tiredness are just some of the possible consequences for a person having sleep apnea. The concern in infants is the stopping of breath
for these longer times. One type of monitor to alert parents when a child is not breathing uses electromagnetic induction. A wire wrapped around the
infant’s chest has an alternating current running through it. The expansion and contraction of the infant’s chest as the infant breathes changes the
area through the coil. A pickup coil located nearby has an alternating current induced in it due to the changing magnetic field of the initial wire. If the
child stops breathing, there will be a change in the induced current, and so a parent can be alerted.
Making Connections: Conservation of Energy
Lenz’s law is a manifestation of the conservation of energy. The induced emf produces a current that opposes the change in flux, because a
change in flux means a change in energy. Energy can enter or leave, but not instantaneously. Lenz’s law is a consequence. As the change
begins, the law says induction opposes and, thus, slows the change. In fact, if the induced emf were in the same direction as the change in flux,
there would be a positive feedback that would give us free energy from no apparent source—conservation of energy would be violated.
Example 23.1Calculating Emf: How Great Is the Induced Emf?
Calculate the magnitude of the induced emf when the magnet inFigure 23.7(a) is thrust into the coil, given the following information: the single
loop coil has a radius of 6.00 cm and the average value of
Bcosθ
(this is given, since the bar magnet’s field is complex) increases from 0.0500
T to 0.250 T in 0.100 s.
Strategy
To find themagnitudeof emf, we use Faraday’s law of induction as stated by
emf=−N
ΔΦ
Δt
, but without the minus sign that indicates
direction:
(23.3)
emf=N
ΔΦ
Δt
.
Solution
818 CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested