We are given that
N=1
and
Δt=0.100s
, but we must determine the change in flux
ΔΦ
before we can find emf. Since the area of the
loop is fixed, we see that
(23.4)
ΔΦ=Δ(BAcosθ)=AΔ(Bcosθ).
Now
Δ(Bcosθ)=0.200 T
, since it was given that
Bcosθ
changes from 0.0500 to 0.250 T. The area of the loop is
A=πr
2
=(3.14...)(0.060 m)
2
=1.13×10
−2
m
2
. Thus,
(23.5)
ΔΦ=(1.13×10
−2
m
2
)(0.200 T).
Entering the determined values into the expression for emf gives
(23.6)
Emf=N
ΔΦ
Δt
=
(1.13×10
−2
m
2
)(0.200T)
0.100s
=22.6mV.
Discussion
While this is an easily measured voltage, it is certainly not large enough for most practical applications. More loops in the coil, a stronger magnet,
and faster movement make induction the practical source of voltages that it is.
PhET Explorations: Faraday's Electromagnetic Lab
Play with a bar magnet and coils to learn about Faraday's law. Move a bar magnet near one or two coils to make a light bulb glow. View the
magnetic field lines. A meter shows the direction and magnitude of the current. View the magnetic field lines or use a meter to show the direction
and magnitude of the current. You can also play with electromagnets, generators and transformers!
Figure 23.10Faraday's Electromagnetic Lab (http://cnx.org/content/m42392/1.3/faraday_en.jar)
23.3Motional Emf
As we have seen, any change in magnetic flux induces an emf opposing that change—a process known as induction. Motion is one of the major
causes of induction. For example, a magnet moved toward a coil induces an emf, and a coil moved toward a magnet produces a similar emf. In this
section, we concentrate on motion in a magnetic field that is stationary relative to the Earth, producing what is loosely calledmotional emf.
One situation where motional emf occurs is known as the Hall effect and has already been examined. Charges moving in a magnetic field experience
the magnetic force
F=qvBsinθ
, which moves opposite charges in opposite directions and produces an
emf=Bℓv
. We saw that the Hall effect
has applications, including measurements of
B
and
v
. We will now see that the Hall effect is one aspect of the broader phenomenon of induction,
and we will find that motional emf can be used as a power source.
Consider the situation shown inFigure 23.11. A rod is moved at a speed
v
along a pair of conducting rails separated by a distance
in a uniform
magnetic field
B
. The rails are stationary relative to
B
and are connected to a stationary resistor
R
. The resistor could be anything from a light bulb
to a voltmeter. Consider the area enclosed by the moving rod, rails, and resistor.
B
is perpendicular to this area, and the area is increasing as the
rod moves. Thus the magnetic flux enclosed by the rails, rod, and resistor is increasing. When flux changes, an emf is induced according to
Faraday’s law of induction.
CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES S 819
Pdf split pages - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break pdf into single pages; break a pdf into multiple files
Pdf split pages - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
acrobat split pdf pages; pdf link to specific page
Figure 23.11(a) A motional
emf=Bℓv
is induced between the rails when this rod moves to the right in the uniform magnetic field. The magnetic field
B
is into the page,
perpendicular to the moving rod and rails and, hence, to the area enclosed by them. (b) Lenz’s law gives the directions of the induced field and current, and the polarity of the
induced emf. Since the flux is increasing, the induced field is in the opposite direction, or out of the page. RHR-2 gives the current direction shown, and the polarity of the rod
will drive such a current. RHR-1 also indicates the same polarity for the rod. (Note that the script E symbol used in the equivalent circuit at the bottom of part (b) represents
emf.)
To find the magnitude of emf induced along the moving rod, we use Faraday’s law of induction without the sign:
(23.7)
emf=N
ΔΦ
Δt
.
Here and below, “emf” implies the magnitude of the emf. In this equation,
N=1
and the flux
Φ=BAcosθ
. We have
θ=0º
and
cosθ=1
,
since
B
is perpendicular to
A
. Now
ΔΦ=Δ(BA)=BΔA
, since
B
is uniform. Note that the area swept out by the rod is
ΔA=Δx
.
Entering these quantities into the expression for emf yields
(23.8)
emf=
BΔA
Δt
=B
Δx
Δt
.
Finally, note that
Δxt=v
, the velocity of the rod. Entering this into the last expression shows that
(23.9)
emf=Bℓv
(B,ℓ, andvperpendicular)
is the motional emf. This is the same expression given for the Hall effect previously.
Making Connections: Unification of Forces
There are many connections between the electric force and the magnetic force. The fact that a moving electric field produces a magnetic field
and, conversely, a moving magnetic field produces an electric field is part of why electric and magnetic forces are now considered to be different
manifestations of the same force. This classic unification of electric and magnetic forces into what is called the electromagnetic force is the
inspiration for contemporary efforts to unify other basic forces.
820 CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how to split PDF document in
pdf will no pages selected; pdf specification
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF.
break password pdf; pdf split
To find the direction of the induced field, the direction of the current, and the polarity of the induced emf, we apply Lenz’s law as explained in
Faraday's Law of Induction: Lenz's Law. (SeeFigure 23.11(b).) Flux is increasing, since the area enclosed is increasing. Thus the induced field
must oppose the existing one and be out of the page. And so the RHR-2 requires thatIbe counterclockwise, which in turn means the top of the rod is
positive as shown.
Motional emf also occurs if the magnetic field moves and the rod (or other object) is stationary relative to the Earth (or some observer). We have seen
an example of this in the situation where a moving magnet induces an emf in a stationary coil. It is the relative motion that is important. What is
emerging in these observations is a connection between magnetic and electric fields. A moving magnetic field produces an electric field through its
induced emf. We already have seen that a moving electric field produces a magnetic field—moving charge implies moving electric field and moving
charge produces a magnetic field.
Motional emfs in the Earth’s weak magnetic field are not ordinarily very large, or we would notice voltage along metal rods, such as a screwdriver,
during ordinary motions. For example, a simple calculation of the motional emf of a 1 m rod moving at 3.0 m/s perpendicular to the Earth’s field gives
emf=Bℓv=(5.0×10
−5
T)(1.0 m)(3.0 m/s)=150 μV
. This small value is consistent with experience. There is a spectacular exception,
however. In 1992 and 1996, attempts were made with the space shuttle to create large motional emfs. The Tethered Satellite was to be let out on a
20 km length of wire as shown inFigure 23.12, to create a 5 kV emf by moving at orbital speed through the Earth’s field. This emf could be used to
convert some of the shuttle’s kinetic and potential energy into electrical energy if a complete circuit could be made. To complete the circuit, the
stationary ionosphere was to supply a return path for the current to flow. (The ionosphere is the rarefied and partially ionized atmosphere at orbital
altitudes. It conducts because of the ionization. The ionosphere serves the same function as the stationary rails and connecting resistor inFigure
23.11, without which there would not be a complete circuit.) Drag on the current in the cable due to the magnetic force
F=IℓBsinθ
does the work
that reduces the shuttle’s kinetic and potential energy and allows it to be converted to electrical energy. The tests were both unsuccessful. In the first,
the cable hung up and could only be extended a couple of hundred meters; in the second, the cable broke when almost fully extended.Example 23.2
indicates feasibility in principle.
Example 23.2Calculating the Large Motional Emf of an Object in Orbit
Figure 23.12Motional emf as electrical power conversion for the space shuttle is the motivation for the Tethered Satellite experiment. A 5 kV emf was predicted to be
induced in the 20 km long tether while moving at orbital speed in the Earth’s magnetic field. The circuit is completed by a return path through the stationary ionosphere.
Calculate the motional emf induced along a 20.0 km long conductor moving at an orbital speed of 7.80 km/s perpendicular to the Earth’s
5.00×10
−5
T
magnetic field.
Strategy
This is a straightforward application of the expression for motional emf—
emf=Bℓv
.
Solution
Entering the given values into
emf=Bℓv
gives
(23.10)
emf = Bℓv
= (5.00×10
−5
T)(2.0×10
4
m)(7.80×10
3
m/s)
= 7.80×10
3
V.
Discussion
The value obtained is greater than the 5 kV measured voltage for the shuttle experiment, since the actual orbital motion of the tether is not
perpendicular to the Earth’s field. The 7.80 kV value is the maximum emf obtained when
θ=90º
and
sinθ=1
.
CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES S 821
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
break a pdf file; split pdf
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Provide C# Users with Mature .NET PDF Document Manipulating Library for Deleting PDF Pages in C#.
break pdf into multiple pages; break a pdf into separate pages
23.4Eddy Currents and Magnetic Damping
Eddy Currents and Magnetic Damping
As discussed inMotional Emf, motional emf is induced when a conductor moves in a magnetic field or when a magnetic field moves relative to a
conductor. If motional emf can cause a current loop in the conductor, we refer to that current as aneddy current. Eddy currents can produce
significant drag, calledmagnetic damping, on the motion involved. Consider the apparatus shown inFigure 23.13, which swings a pendulum bob
between the poles of a strong magnet. (This is another favorite physics lab activity.) If the bob is metal, there is significant drag on the bob as it enters
and leaves the field, quickly damping the motion. If, however, the bob is a slotted metal plate, as shown inFigure 23.13(b), there is a much smaller
effect due to the magnet. There is no discernible effect on a bob made of an insulator. Why is there drag in both directions, and are there any uses for
magnetic drag?
Figure 23.13A common physics demonstration device for exploring eddy currents and magnetic damping. (a) The motion of a metal pendulum bob swinging between the
poles of a magnet is quickly damped by the action of eddy currents. (b) There is little effect on the motion of a slotted metal bob, implying that eddy currents are made less
effective. (c) There is also no magnetic damping on a nonconducting bob, since the eddy currents are extremely small.
Figure 23.14shows what happens to the metal plate as it enters and leaves the magnetic field. In both cases, it experiences a force opposing its
motion. As it enters from the left, flux increases, and so an eddy current is set up (Faraday’s law) in the counterclockwise direction (Lenz’s law), as
shown. Only the right-hand side of the current loop is in the field, so that there is an unopposed force on it to the left (RHR-1). When the metal plate is
completely inside the field, there is no eddy current if the field is uniform, since the flux remains constant in this region. But when the plate leaves the
field on the right, flux decreases, causing an eddy current in the clockwise direction that, again, experiences a force to the left, further slowing the
motion. A similar analysis of what happens when the plate swings from the right toward the left shows that its motion is also damped when entering
and leaving the field.
Figure 23.14A more detailed look at the conducting plate passing between the poles of a magnet. As it enters and leaves the field, the change in flux produces an eddy
current. Magnetic force on the current loop opposes the motion. There is no current and no magnetic drag when the plate is completely inside the uniform field.
When a slotted metal plate enters the field, as shown inFigure 23.15, an emf is induced by the change in flux, but it is less effective because the
slots limit the size of the current loops. Moreover, adjacent loops have currents in opposite directions, and their effects cancel. When an insulating
material is used, the eddy current is extremely small, and so magnetic damping on insulators is negligible. If eddy currents are to be avoided in
conductors, then they can be slotted or constructed of thin layers of conducting material separated by insulating sheets.
822 CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
break pdf into multiple documents; pdf no pages selected to print
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
break pdf file into parts; cannot print pdf no pages selected
Figure 23.15Eddy currents induced in a slotted metal plate entering a magnetic field form small loops, and the forces on them tend to cancel, thereby making magnetic drag
almost zero.
Applications of Magnetic Damping
One use of magnetic damping is found in sensitive laboratory balances. To have maximum sensitivity and accuracy, the balance must be as friction-
free as possible. But if it is friction-free, then it will oscillate for a very long time. Magnetic damping is a simple and ideal solution. With magnetic
damping, drag is proportional to speed and becomes zero at zero velocity. Thus the oscillations are quickly damped, after which the damping force
disappears, allowing the balance to be very sensitive. (SeeFigure 23.16.) In most balances, magnetic damping is accomplished with a conducting
disc that rotates in a fixed field.
Figure 23.16Magnetic damping of this sensitive balance slows its oscillations. Since Faraday’s law of induction gives the greatest effect for the most rapid change, damping is
greatest for large oscillations and goes to zero as the motion stops.
Since eddy currents and magnetic damping occur only in conductors, recycling centers can use magnets to separate metals from other materials.
Trash is dumped in batches down a ramp, beneath which lies a powerful magnet. Conductors in the trash are slowed by magnetic damping while
nonmetals in the trash move on, separating from the metals. (SeeFigure 23.17.) This works for all metals, not just ferromagnetic ones. A magnet can
separate out the ferromagnetic materials alone by acting on stationary trash.
CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES S 823
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Page: Extract, Copy, Paste PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Copy and Paste PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - PDF File Pages Extraction Guide.
can't cut and paste from pdf; add page break to pdf
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
featured with the functions to merge PDF files using C# .NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split PDF document in
pdf splitter; break apart a pdf
Figure 23.17Metals can be separated from other trash by magnetic drag. Eddy currents and magnetic drag are created in the metals sent down this ramp by the powerful
magnet beneath it. Nonmetals move on.
Other major applications of eddy currents are in metal detectors and braking systems in trains and roller coasters. Portable metal detectors (Figure
23.18) consist of a primary coil carrying an alternating current and a secondary coil in which a current is induced. An eddy current will be induced in a
piece of metal close to the detector which will cause a change in the induced current within the secondary coil, leading to some sort of signal like a
shrill noise. Braking using eddy currents is safer because factors such as rain do not affect the braking and the braking is smoother. However, eddy
currents cannot bring the motion to a complete stop, since the force produced decreases with speed. Thus, speed can be reduced from say 20 m/s to
5 m/s, but another form of braking is needed to completely stop the vehicle. Generally, powerful rare earth magnets such as neodymium magnets are
used in roller coasters.Figure 23.19shows rows of magnets in such an application. The vehicle has metal fins (normally containing copper) which
pass through the magnetic field slowing the vehicle down in much the same way as with the pendulum bob shown inFigure 23.13.
Figure 23.18A soldier in Iraq uses a metal detector to search for explosives and weapons. (credit: U.S. Army)
Figure 23.19The rows of rare earth magnets (protruding horizontally) are used for magnetic braking in roller coasters. (credit: Stefan Scheer, Wikimedia Commons)
Induction cooktops have electromagnets under their surface. The magnetic field is varied rapidly producing eddy currents in the base of the pot,
causing the pot and its contents to increase in temperature. Induction cooktops have high efficiencies and good response times but the base of the
pot needs to be ferromagnetic, iron or steel for induction to work.
824 CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
23.5Electric Generators
Electric generatorsinduce an emf by rotating a coil in a magnetic field, as briefly discussed inInduced Emf and Magnetic Flux. We will now
explore generators in more detail. Consider the following example.
Example 23.3Calculating the Emf Induced in a Generator Coil
The generator coil shown inFigure 23.20is rotated through one-fourth of a revolution (from
θ=0º
to
θ=90º
) in 15.0 ms. The 200-turn
circular coil has a 5.00 cm radius and is in a uniform 1.25 T magnetic field. What is the average emf induced?
Figure 23.20When this generator coil is rotated through one-fourth of a revolution, the magnetic flux
Φ
changes from its maximum to zero, inducing an emf.
Strategy
We use Faraday’s law of induction to find the average emf induced over a time
Δt
:
(23.11)
emf=−N
ΔΦ
Δt
.
We know that
N=200
and
Δt=15.0ms
, and so we must determine the change in flux
ΔΦ
to find emf.
Solution
Since the area of the loop and the magnetic field strength are constant, we see that
(23.12)
ΔΦ=Δ(BAcosθ)=ABΔ(cosθ).
Now,
Δ(cosθ)=−1.0
, since it was given that
θ
goes from
to
90º
. Thus
ΔΦ=−AB
, and
(23.13)
emf=N
AB
Δt
.
The area of the loop is
A=πr
2
=(3.14...)(0.0500m)
2
=7.85×10
−3
m
2
. Entering this value gives
(23.14)
emf=200
(7.85×10
−3
m
2
)(1.25T)
15.0×10
−3
s
=131V.
Discussion
This is a practical average value, similar to the 120 V used in household power.
The emf calculated inExample 23.3is the average over one-fourth of a revolution. What is the emf at any given instant? It varies with the angle
between the magnetic field and a perpendicular to the coil. We can get an expression for emf as a function of time by considering the motional emf on
a rotating rectangular coil of width
w
and height
in a uniform magnetic field, as illustrated inFigure 23.21.
CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES S 825
Figure 23.21A generator with a single rectangular coil rotated at constant angular velocity in a uniform magnetic field produces an emf that varies sinusoidally in time. Note
the generator is similar to a motor, except the shaft is rotated to produce a current rather than the other way around.
Charges in the wires of the loop experience the magnetic force, because they are moving in a magnetic field. Charges in the vertical wires experience
forces parallel to the wire, causing currents. But those in the top and bottom segments feel a force perpendicular to the wire, which does not cause a
current. We can thus find the induced emf by considering only the side wires. Motional emf is given to be
emf=Bℓv
, where the velocityvis
perpendicular to the magnetic field
B
. Here the velocity is at an angle
θ
with
B
, so that its component perpendicular to
B
is
vsinθ
(seeFigure
23.21). Thus in this case the emf induced on each side is
emf=Bℓvsinθ
, and they are in the same direction. The total emf around the loop is
then
(23.15)
emf=2Bℓvsinθ.
This expression is valid, but it does not give emf as a function of time. To find the time dependence of emf, we assume the coil rotates at a constant
angular velocity
ω
. The angle
θ
is related to angular velocity by
θ=ωt
, so that
(23.16)
emf=2Bℓvsinωt.
Now, linear velocity
v
is related to angular velocity
ω
by
v=
. Here
r=w/2
, so that
v=(w/2)ω
, and
(23.17)
emf=2Bℓ
w
2
ωsinωt=(ℓw)sinωt.
Noting that the area of the loop is
A=ℓw
, and allowing for
N
loops, we find that
(23.18)
emf=NABωsinωt
is theemf induced in a generator coilof
N
turns and area
A
rotating at a constant angular velocity
ω
in a uniform magnetic field
B
. This can
also be expressed as
(23.19)
emf=emf
0
sinωt,
where
(23.20)
emf
0
=NABω
is the maximum(peak) emf. Note that the frequency of the oscillation is
f=ω/2π
, and the period is
T=1/f=2π/ω
.Figure 23.22shows a
graph of emf as a function of time, and it now seems reasonable that AC voltage is sinusoidal.
Figure 23.22The emf of a generator is sent to a light bulb with the system of rings and brushes shown. The graph gives the emf of the generator as a function of time.
emf
0
is the peak emf. The period is
T=1/=2π/ω
, where
f
is the frequency. Note that the script E stands for emf.
The fact that the peak emf,
emf
0
=NABω
, makes good sense. The greater the number of coils, the larger their area, and the stronger the field, the
greater the output voltage. It is interesting that the faster the generator is spun (greater
ω
), the greater the emf. This is noticeable on bicycle
generators—at least the cheaper varieties. One of the authors as a juvenile found it amusing to ride his bicycle fast enough to burn out his lights, until
he had to ride home lightless one dark night.
826 CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 23.23shows a scheme by which a generator can be made to produce pulsed DC. More elaborate arrangements of multiple coils and split
rings can produce smoother DC, although electronic rather than mechanical means are usually used to make ripple-free DC.
Figure 23.23Split rings, called commutators, produce a pulsed DC emf output in this configuration.
Example 23.4Calculating the Maximum Emf of a Generator
Calculate the maximum emf,
emf
0
, of the generator that was the subject ofExample 23.3.
Strategy
Once
ω
, the angular velocity, is determined,
emf
0
=NABω
can be used to find
emf
0
. All other quantities are known.
Solution
Angular velocity is defined to be the change in angle per unit time:
(23.21)
ω=
Δθ
Δt
.
One-fourth of a revolution is
π/2
radians, and the time is 0.0150 s; thus,
(23.22)
ω =
π/2rad
0.0150 s
= 1047 rad/s.
104.7 rad/s is exactly 1000 rpm. We substitute this value for
ω
and the information from the previous example into
emf
0
=NABω
, yielding
(23.23)
emf
0
NABω
= 200(7.85×10
−3
m
2
)(1.25T)(104.7rad/s)
= 206V
.
Discussion
The maximum emf is greater than the average emf of 131 V found in the previous example, as it should be.
In real life, electric generators look a lot different than the figures in this section, but the principles are the same. The source of mechanical energy
that turns the coil can be falling water (hydropower), steam produced by the burning of fossil fuels, or the kinetic energy of wind.Figure 23.24shows
a cutaway view of a steam turbine; steam moves over the blades connected to the shaft, which rotates the coil within the generator.
CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES S 827
Figure 23.24Steam turbine/generator. The steam produced by burning coal impacts the turbine blades, turning the shaft which is connected to the generator. (credit:
Nabonaco, Wikimedia Commons)
Generators illustrated in this section look very much like the motors illustrated previously. This is not coincidental. In fact, a motor becomes a
generator when its shaft rotates. Certain early automobiles used their starter motor as a generator. InBack Emf, we shall further explore the action of
a motor as a generator.
23.6Back Emf
It has been noted that motors and generators are very similar. Generators convert mechanical energy into electrical energy, whereas motors convert
electrical energy into mechanical energy. Furthermore, motors and generators have the same construction. When the coil of a motor is turned,
magnetic flux changes, and an emf (consistent with Faraday’s law of induction) is induced. The motor thus acts as a generator whenever its coil
rotates. This will happen whether the shaft is turned by an external input, like a belt drive, or by the action of the motor itself. That is, when a motor is
doing work and its shaft is turning, an emf is generated. Lenz’s law tells us the emf opposes any change, so that the input emf that powers the motor
will be opposed by the motor’s self-generated emf, called theback emfof the motor. (SeeFigure 23.25.)
Figure 23.25The coil of a DC motor is represented as a resistor in this schematic. The back emf is represented as a variable emf that opposes the one driving the motor. Back
emf is zero when the motor is not turning, and it increases proportionally to the motor’s angular velocity.
Back emf is the generator output of a motor, and so it is proportional to the motor’s angular velocity
ω
. It is zero when the motor is first turned on,
meaning that the coil receives the full driving voltage and the motor draws maximum current when it is on but not turning. As the motor turns faster
and faster, the back emf grows, always opposing the driving emf, and reduces the voltage across the coil and the amount of current it draws. This
effect is noticeable in a number of situations. When a vacuum cleaner, refrigerator, or washing machine is first turned on, lights in the same circuit dim
briefly due to the
IR
drop produced in feeder lines by the large current drawn by the motor. When a motor first comes on, it draws more current than
when it runs at its normal operating speed. When a mechanical load is placed on the motor, like an electric wheelchair going up a hill, the motor
slows, the back emf drops, more current flows, and more work can be done. If the motor runs at too low a speed, the larger current can overheat it
(via resistive power in the coil,
P=I
2
R
), perhaps even burning it out. On the other hand, if there is no mechanical load on the motor, it will increase
its angular velocity
ω
until the back emf is nearly equal to the driving emf. Then the motor uses only enough energy to overcome friction.
Consider, for example, the motor coils represented inFigure 23.25. The coils have a
0.400 Ω
equivalent resistance and are driven by a 48.0 V
emf. Shortly after being turned on, they draw a current
I=V/R=(48.0V)/(0.400 Ω)=120A
and, thus, dissipate
P=I
2
R=5.76kW
of
energy as heat transfer. Under normal operating conditions for this motor, suppose the back emf is 40.0 V. Then at operating speed, the total voltage
across the coils is 8.0 V (48.0 V minus the 40.0 V back emf), and the current drawn is
I=V/R=(8.0V)/(0.400 Ω)=20A
. Under normal
load, then, the power dissipated is
P=IV=(20A)/(8.0V)=160W
. The latter will not cause a problem for this motor, whereas the former
5.76 kW would burn out the coils if sustained.
23.7Transformers
Transformersdo what their name implies—they transform voltages from one value to another (The term voltage is used rather than emf, because
transformers have internal resistance). For example, many cell phones, laptops, video games, and power tools and small appliances have a
transformer built into their plug-in unit (like that inFigure 23.26) that changes 120 V or 240 V AC into whatever voltage the device uses.
828 CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested