asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Split pdf into multiple files software SDK cloud windows wpf html class PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics83-part1839

Transformers are also used at several points in the power distribution systems, such as illustrated inFigure 23.27. Power is sent long distances at
high voltages, because less current is required for a given amount of power, and this means less line loss, as was discussed previously. But high
voltages pose greater hazards, so that transformers are employed to produce lower voltage at the user’s location.
Figure 23.26The plug-in transformer has become increasingly familiar with the proliferation of electronic devices that operate on voltages other than common 120 V AC. Most
are in the 3 to 12 V range. (credit: Shop Xtreme)
Figure 23.27Transformers change voltages at several points in a power distribution system. Electric power is usually generated at greater than 10 kV, and transmitted long
distances at voltages over 200 kV—sometimes as great as 700 kV—to limit energy losses. Local power distribution to neighborhoods or industries goes through a substation
and is sent short distances at voltages ranging from 5 to 13 kV. This is reduced to 120, 240, or 480 V for safety at the individual user site.
The type of transformer considered in this text—seeFigure 23.28—is based on Faraday’s law of induction and is very similar in construction to the
apparatus Faraday used to demonstrate magnetic fields could cause currents. The two coils are called theprimaryandsecondary coils. In normal
use, the input voltage is placed on the primary, and the secondary produces the transformed output voltage. Not only does the iron core trap the
magnetic field created by the primary coil, its magnetization increases the field strength. Since the input voltage is AC, a time-varying magnetic flux is
sent to the secondary, inducing its AC output voltage.
Figure 23.28A typical construction of a simple transformer has two coils wound on a ferromagnetic core that is laminated to minimize eddy currents. The magnetic field
created by the primary is mostly confined to and increased by the core, which transmits it to the secondary coil. Any change in current in the primary induces a current in the
secondary.
For the simple transformer shown inFigure 23.28, the output voltage
V
s
depends almost entirely on the input voltage
V
p
and the ratio of the
number of loops in the primary and secondary coils. Faraday’s law of induction for the secondary coil gives its induced output voltage
V
s
to be
CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES S 829
Split pdf into multiple files - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf insert page break; break pdf into smaller files
Split pdf into multiple files - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break a pdf file into parts; acrobat split pdf
(23.24)
V
s
=−N
s
ΔΦ
Δt
,
where
N
s
is the number of loops in the secondary coil and
ΔΦ
/
Δt
is the rate of change of magnetic flux. Note that the output voltage equals the
induced emf (
V
s
=emf
s
), provided coil resistance is small (a reasonable assumption for transformers). The cross-sectional area of the coils is the
same on either side, as is the magnetic field strength, and so
ΔΦ
/
Δt
is the same on either side. The input primary voltage
V
p
is also related to
changing flux by
(23.25)
V
p
=−N
p
ΔΦ
Δt
.
The reason for this is a little more subtle. Lenz’s law tells us that the primary coil opposes the change in flux caused by the input voltage
V
p
, hence
the minus sign (This is an example ofself-inductance, a topic to be explored in some detail in later sections). Assuming negligible coil resistance,
Kirchhoff’s loop rule tells us that the induced emf exactly equals the input voltage. Taking the ratio of these last two equations yields a useful
relationship:
(23.26)
V
s
V
p
=
N
s
N
p
.
This is known as thetransformer equation, and it simply states that the ratio of the secondary to primary voltages in a transformer equals the ratio
of the number of loops in their coils.
The output voltage of a transformer can be less than, greater than, or equal to the input voltage, depending on the ratio of the number of loops in their
coils. Some transformers even provide a variable output by allowing connection to be made at different points on the secondary coil. Astep-up
transformeris one that increases voltage, whereas astep-down transformerdecreases voltage. Assuming, as we have, that resistance is
negligible, the electrical power output of a transformer equals its input. This is nearly true in practice—transformer efficiency often exceeds 99%.
Equating the power input and output,
(23.27)
P
p
=I
p
V
p
=I
s
V
s
=P
s
.
Rearranging terms gives
(23.28)
V
s
V
p
=
I
p
I
s
.
Combining this with
V
s
V
p
=
N
s
N
p
, we find that
(23.29)
I
s
I
p
=
N
p
N
s
is the relationship between the output and input currents of a transformer. So if voltage increases, current decreases. Conversely, if voltage
decreases, current increases.
Example 23.5Calculating Characteristics of a Step-Up Transformer
A portable x-ray unit has a step-up transformer, the 120 V input of which is transformed to the 100 kV output needed by the x-ray tube. The
primary has 50 loops and draws a current of 10.00 A when in use. (a) What is the number of loops in the secondary? (b) Find the current output
of the secondary.
Strategy and Solution for (a)
We solve
V
s
V
p
=
N
s
N
p
for
N
s
, the number of loops in the secondary, and enter the known values. This gives
(23.30)
N
s
N
p
V
s
V
p
= (50)
100,000 V
120 V
=4.17×10
4
.
Discussion for (a)
A large number of loops in the secondary (compared with the primary) is required to produce such a large voltage. This would be true for neon
sign transformers and those supplying high voltage inside TVs and CRTs.
Strategy and Solution for (b)
We can similarly find the output current of the secondary by solving
I
s
I
p
=
N
p
N
s
for
I
s
and entering known values. This gives
830 CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
Easy split! We try to make it as easy as possible to split your PDF files into Multiple ones. You can receive the PDF files by simply
c# print pdf to specific printer; break apart pdf
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
VB.NET Demo code to Combine and Merge Multiple PDF Files into One. This part illustrates how to combine three PDF files into a new file in VB.NET application.
break pdf password online; combine pages of pdf documents into one
(23.31)
I
s
I
p
N
p
N
s
= (10.00 A)
50
4.17×10
4
= 12.0 mA.
Discussion for (b)
As expected, the current output is significantly less than the input. In certain spectacular demonstrations, very large voltages are used to produce
long arcs, but they are relatively safe because the transformer output does not supply a large current. Note that the power input here is
P
p
=I
p
V
p
=(10.00A)(120V)=1.20kW
. This equals the power output
P
p
=I
s
V
s
=(12.0mA)(100kV)=1.20kW
, as we
assumed in the derivation of the equations used.
The fact that transformers are based on Faraday’s law of induction makes it clear why we cannot use transformers to change DC voltages. If there is
no change in primary voltage, there is no voltage induced in the secondary. One possibility is to connect DC to the primary coil through a switch. As
the switch is opened and closed, the secondary produces a voltage like that inFigure 23.29. This is not really a practical alternative, and AC is in
common use wherever it is necessary to increase or decrease voltages.
Figure 23.29Transformers do not work for pure DC voltage input, but if it is switched on and off as on the top graph, the output will look something like that on the bottom
graph. This is not the sinusoidal AC most AC appliances need.
Example 23.6Calculating Characteristics of a Step-Down Transformer
A battery charger meant for a series connection of ten nickel-cadmium batteries (total emf of 12.5 V DC) needs to have a 15.0 V output to charge
the batteries. It uses a step-down transformer with a 200-loop primary and a 120 V input. (a) How many loops should there be in the secondary
coil? (b) If the charging current is 16.0 A, what is the input current?
Strategy and Solution for (a)
You would expect the secondary to have a small number of loops. Solving
V
s
V
p
=
N
s
N
p
for
N
s
and entering known values gives
(23.32)
N
s
N
p
V
s
V
p
= (200)
15.0 V
120 V
=25.
Strategy and Solution for (b)
The current input can be obtained by solving
I
s
I
p
=
N
p
N
s
for
I
p
and entering known values. This gives
(23.33)
I
p
I
s
N
s
N
p
= (16.0 A)
25
200
=2.00 A.
Discussion
CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES S 831
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
the ability to inserting a new PDF page into existing PDF PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how to split PDF document in
cannot print pdf file no pages selected; break a pdf into parts
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
C# Demo Code: Combine and Merge Multiple PDF Files into One in .NET. This part illustrates how to combine three PDF files into a new file in C# application.
pdf separate pages; break password on pdf
The number of loops in the secondary is small, as expected for a step-down transformer. We also see that a small input current produces a
larger output current in a step-down transformer. When transformers are used to operate large magnets, they sometimes have a small number of
very heavy loops in the secondary. This allows the secondary to have low internal resistance and produce large currents. Note again that this
solution is based on the assumption of 100% efficiency—or power out equals power in (
P
p
=P
s
)—reasonable for good transformers. In this
case the primary and secondary power is 240 W. (Verify this for yourself as a consistency check.) Note that the Ni-Cd batteries need to be
charged from a DC power source (as would a 12 V battery). So the AC output of the secondary coil needs to be converted into DC. This is done
using something called a rectifier, which uses devices called diodes that allow only a one-way flow of current.
Transformers have many applications in electrical safety systems, which are discussed inElectrical Safety: Systems and Devices.
PhET Explorations: Generator
Generate electricity with a bar magnet! Discover the physics behind the phenomena by exploring magnets and how you can use them to make a
bulb light.
Figure 23.30Generator (http://cnx.org/content/m42414/1.4/generator_en.jar)
23.8Electrical Safety: Systems and Devices
Electricity has two hazards. Athermal hazardoccurs when there is electrical overheating. Ashock hazardoccurs when electric current passes
through a person. Both hazards have already been discussed. Here we will concentrate on systems and devices that prevent electrical hazards.
Figure 23.31shows the schematic for a simple AC circuit with no safety features. This is not how power is distributed in practice. Modern household
and industrial wiring requires thethree-wire system, shown schematically inFigure 23.32, which has several safety features. First is the familiar
circuit breaker(orfuse) to prevent thermal overload. Second, there is a protectivecasearound the appliance, such as a toaster or refrigerator. The
case’s safety feature is that it prevents a person from touching exposed wires and coming into electrical contact with the circuit, helping prevent
shocks.
Figure 23.31Schematic of a simple AC circuit with a voltage source and a single appliance represented by the resistance
R
. There are no safety features in this circuit.
Figure 23.32The three-wire system connects the neutral wire to the earth at the voltage source and user location, forcing it to be at zero volts and supplying an alternative
return path for the current through the earth. Also grounded to zero volts is the case of the appliance. A circuit breaker or fuse protects against thermal overload and is in
series on the active (live/hot) wire. Note that wire insulation colors vary with region and it is essential to check locally to determine which color codes are in use (and even if
they were followed in the particular installation).
832 CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. Turn multiple pages PDF into multiple jpg files in VB.NET class.
break a pdf; pdf format specification
VB.NET TWAIN: Scanning Multiple Pages into PDF & TIFF File Using
This VB.NET TWAIN pages scanning control add-on is developed to offer programmers an efficient solution to scan multiple pages into one PDF or TIFF
pdf rotate single page; acrobat separate pdf pages
There arethree connections to earth or ground(hereafter referred to as “earth/ground”) shown inFigure 23.32. Recall that an earth/ground
connection is a low-resistance path directly to the earth. The two earth/ground connections on theneutral wireforce it to be at zero volts relative to
the earth, giving the wire its name. This wire is therefore safe to touch even if its insulation, usually white, is missing. The neutral wire is the return
path for the current to follow to complete the circuit. Furthermore, the two earth/ground connections supply an alternative path through the earth, a
good conductor, to complete the circuit. The earth/ground connection closest to the power source could be at the generating plant, while the other is
at the user’s location. The third earth/ground is to the case of the appliance, through the greenearth/ground wire, forcing the case, too, to be at zero
volts. Theliveorhot wire(hereafter referred to as “live/hot”) supplies voltage and current to operate the appliance.Figure 23.33shows a more
pictorial version of how the three-wire system is connected through a three-prong plug to an appliance.
Figure 23.33The standard three-prong plug can only be inserted in one way, to assure proper function of the three-wire system.
A note on insulation color-coding: Insulating plastic is color-coded to identify live/hot, neutral and ground wires but these codes vary around the world.
Live/hot wires may be brown, red, black, blue or grey. Neutral wire may be blue, black or white. Since the same color may be used for live/hot or
neutral in different parts of the world, it is essential to determine the color code in your region. The only exception is the earth/ground wire which is
often green but may be yellow or just bare wire. Striped coatings are sometimes used for the benefit of those who are colorblind.
The three-wire system replaced the older two-wire system, which lacks an earth/ground wire. Under ordinary circumstances, insulation on the live/hot
and neutral wires prevents the case from being directly in the circuit, so that the earth/ground wire may seem like double protection. Grounding the
case solves more than one problem, however. The simplest problem is worn insulation on the live/hot wire that allows it to contact the case, as shown
inFigure 23.34. Lacking an earth/ground connection (some people cut the third prong off the plug because they only have outdated two hole
receptacles), a severe shock is possible. This is particularly dangerous in the kitchen, where a good connection to earth/ground is available through
water on the floor or a water faucet. With the earth/ground connection intact, the circuit breaker will trip, forcing repair of the appliance. Why are some
appliances still sold with two-prong plugs? These have nonconducting cases, such as power tools with impact resistant plastic cases, and are called
doubly insulated. Modern two-prong plugs can be inserted into the asymmetric standard outlet in only one way, to ensure proper connection of live/
hot and neutral wires.
CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES S 833
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
C#.NET PDF Splitter to Split PDF File. In this section, we aims to tell you how to divide source PDF file into two smaller PDF documents at the page
break apart pdf pages; cannot select text in pdf
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Simply integrate into VB.NET project, supporting conversions to or from multiple supported images formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete
reader split pdf; can't select text in pdf file
Figure 23.34Worn insulation allows the live/hot wire to come into direct contact with the metal case of this appliance. (a) The earth/ground connection being broken, the
person is severely shocked. The appliance may operate normally in this situation. (b) With a proper earth/ground, the circuit breaker trips, forcing repair of the appliance.
Electromagnetic induction causes a more subtle problem that is solved by grounding the case. The AC current in appliances can induce an emf on
the case. If grounded, the case voltage is kept near zero, but if the case is not grounded, a shock can occur as pictured inFigure 23.35. Current
driven by the induced case emf is called aleakage current, although current does not necessarily pass from the resistor to the case.
Figure 23.35AC currents can induce an emf on the case of an appliance. The voltage can be large enough to cause a shock. If the case is grounded, the induced emf is kept
near zero.
834 CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Aground fault interrupter(GFI) is a safety device found in updated kitchen and bathroom wiring that works based on electromagnetic induction. GFIs
compare the currents in the live/hot and neutral wires. When live/hot and neutral currents are not equal, it is almost always because current in the
neutral is less than in the live/hot wire. Then some of the current, again called a leakage current, is returning to the voltage source by a path other
than through the neutral wire. It is assumed that this path presents a hazard, such as shown inFigure 23.36. GFIs are usually set to interrupt the
circuit if the leakage current is greater than 5 mA, the accepted maximum harmless shock. Even if the leakage current goes safely to earth/ground
through an intact earth/ground wire, the GFI will trip, forcing repair of the leakage.
Figure 23.36A ground fault interrupter (GFI) compares the currents in the live/hot and neutral wires and will trip if their difference exceeds a safe value. The leakage current
here follows a hazardous path that could have been prevented by an intact earth/ground wire.
Figure 23.37shows how a GFI works. If the currents in the live/hot and neutral wires are equal, then they induce equal and opposite emfs in the coil.
If not, then the circuit breaker will trip.
Figure 23.37A GFI compares currents by using both to induce an emf in the same coil. If the currents are equal, they will induce equal but opposite emfs.
Another induction-based safety device is theisolation transformer, shown inFigure 23.38. Most isolation transformers have equal input and output
voltages. Their function is to put a large resistance between the original voltage source and the device being operated. This prevents a complete
circuit between them, even in the circumstance shown. There is a complete circuit through the appliance. But there is not a complete circuit for
current to flow through the person in the figure, who is touching only one of the transformer’s output wires, and neither output wire is grounded. The
appliance is isolated from the original voltage source by the high resistance of the material between the transformer coils, hence the name isolation
transformer. For current to flow through the person, it must pass through the high-resistance material between the coils, through the wire, the person,
and back through the earth—a path with such a large resistance that the current is negligible.
Figure 23.38An isolation transformer puts a large resistance between the original voltage source and the device, preventing a complete circuit between them.
CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES S 835
The basics of electrical safety presented here help prevent many electrical hazards. Electrical safety can be pursued to greater depths. There are, for
example, problems related to different earth/ground connections for appliances in close proximity. Many other examples are found in hospitals.
Microshock-sensitive patients, for instance, require special protection. For these people, currents as low as 0.1 mA may cause ventricular fibrillation.
The interested reader can use the material presented here as a basis for further study.
23.9Inductance
Inductors
Induction is the process in which an emf is induced by changing magnetic flux. Many examples have been discussed so far, some more effective than
others. Transformers, for example, are designed to be particularly effective at inducing a desired voltage and current with very little loss of energy to
other forms. Is there a useful physical quantity related to how “effective” a given device is? The answer is yes, and that physical quantity is called
inductance.
Mutual inductanceis the effect of Faraday’s law of induction for one device upon another, such as the primary coil in transmitting energy to the
secondary in a transformer. SeeFigure 23.39, where simple coils induce emfs in one another.
Figure 23.39These coils can induce emfs in one another like an inefficient transformer. Their mutual inductance M indicates the effectiveness of the coupling between them.
Here a change in current in coil 1 is seen to induce an emf in coil 2. (Note that "
E
2
induced" represents the induced emf in coil 2.)
In the many cases where the geometry of the devices is fixed, flux is changed by varying current. We therefore concentrate on the rate of change of
current,
ΔIt
, as the cause of induction. A change in the current
I
1
in one device, coil 1 in the figure, induces an
emf
2
in the other. We express
this in equation form as
(23.34)
emf
2
=−M
ΔI
1
Δt
,
where
M
is defined to be the mutual inductance between the two devices. The minus sign is an expression of Lenz’s law. The larger the mutual
inductance
M
, the more effective the coupling. For example, the coils inFigure 23.39have a small
M
compared with the transformer coils in
Figure 23.28. Units for
M
are
(V⋅s)/A= Ω Ω ⋅s
, which is named ahenry(H), after Joseph Henry. That is,
1 H=1 1 Ω ⋅s
.
Nature is symmetric here. If we change the current
I
2
in coil 2, we induce an
emf
1
in coil 1, which is given by
(23.35)
emf
1
=−M
ΔI
2
Δt
,
where
M
is the same as for the reverse process. Transformers run backward with the same effectiveness, or mutual inductance
M
.
A large mutual inductance
M
may or may not be desirable. We want a transformer to have a large mutual inductance. But an appliance, such as an
electric clothes dryer, can induce a dangerous emf on its case if the mutual inductance between its coils and the case is large. One way to reduce
mutual inductance
M
is to counterwind coils to cancel the magnetic field produced. (SeeFigure 23.40.)
836 CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 23.40The heating coils of an electric clothes dryer can be counter-wound so that their magnetic fields cancel one another, greatly reducing the mutual inductance with
the case of the dryer.
Self-inductance, the effect of Faraday’s law of induction of a device on itself, also exists. When, for example, current through a coil is increased, the
magnetic field and flux also increase, inducing a counter emf, as required by Lenz’s law. Conversely, if the current is decreased, an emf is induced
that opposes the decrease. Most devices have a fixed geometry, and so the change in flux is due entirely to the change in current
ΔI
through the
device. The induced emf is related to the physical geometry of the device and the rate of change of current. It is given by
(23.36)
emf=−L
ΔI
Δt
,
where
L
is the self-inductance of the device. A device that exhibits significant self-inductance is called aninductor, and given the symbol inFigure
23.41.
Figure 23.41
The minus sign is an expression of Lenz’s law, indicating that emf opposes the change in current. Units of self-inductance are henries (H) just as for
mutual inductance. The larger the self-inductance
L
of a device, the greater its opposition to any change in current through it. For example, a large
coil with many turns and an iron core has a large
L
and will not allow current to change quickly. To avoid this effect, a small
L
must be achieved,
such as by counterwinding coils as inFigure 23.40.
A 1 H inductor is a large inductor. To illustrate this, consider a device with
L=1.0 H
that has a 10 A current flowing through it. What happens if we
try to shut off the current rapidly, perhaps in only 1.0 ms? An emf, given by
emf=−LIt)
, will oppose the change. Thus an emf will be
induced given by
emf=−LIt)=(1.0 H)[(10 A)/(1.0 ms)]=10,000 V
. The positive sign means this large voltage is in the same
direction as the current, opposing its decrease. Such large emfs can cause arcs, damaging switching equipment, and so it may be necessary to
change current more slowly.
There are uses for such a large induced voltage. Camera flashes use a battery, two inductors that function as a transformer, and a switching system
or oscillator to induce large voltages. (Remember that we need a changing magnetic field, brought about by a changing current, to induce a voltage in
another coil.) The oscillator system will do this many times as the battery voltage is boosted to over one thousand volts. (You may hear the high
pitched whine from the transformer as the capacitor is being charged.) A capacitor stores the high voltage for later use in powering the flash. (See
Figure 23.42.)
CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES S 837
Figure 23.42Through rapid switching of an inductor, 1.5 V batteries can be used to induce emfs of several thousand volts. This voltage can be used to store charge in a
capacitor for later use, such as in a camera flash attachment.
It is possible to calculate
L
for an inductor given its geometry (size and shape) and knowing the magnetic field that it produces. This is difficult in
most cases, because of the complexity of the field created. So in this text the inductance
L
is usually a given quantity. One exception is the solenoid,
because it has a very uniform field inside, a nearly zero field outside, and a simple shape. It is instructive to derive an equation for its inductance. We
start by noting that the induced emf is given by Faraday’s law of induction as
emf=−NΦt)
and, by the definition of self-inductance, as
emf=−LIt)
. Equating these yields
(23.37)
emf=−N
ΔΦ
Δt
=−L
ΔI
Δt
.
Solving for
L
gives
(23.38)
L=N
ΔΦ
ΔI
.
This equation for the self-inductance
L
of a device is always valid. It means that self-inductance
L
depends on how effective the current is in
creating flux; the more effective, the greater
ΔΦ
/
ΔI
is.
Let us use this last equation to find an expression for the inductance of a solenoid. Since the area
A
of a solenoid is fixed, the change in flux is
ΔΦ=Δ(BA)=AΔB
. To find
ΔB
, we note that the magnetic field of a solenoid is given by
B=μ
0
nI=μ
0
NI
. (Here
n=N/
, where
N
is
the number of coils and
is the solenoid’s length.) Only the current changes, so that
ΔΦ=AΔB=μ
0
NA
ΔI
. Substituting
ΔΦ
into
L=N
ΔΦ
ΔI
gives
(23.39)
L=N
ΔΦ
ΔI
=N
μ
0
NA
ΔI
ΔI
.
This simplifies to
(23.40)
L=
μ
0
N
2
A
(solenoid).
This is the self-inductance of a solenoid of cross-sectional area
A
and length
. Note that the inductance depends only on the physical
characteristics of the solenoid, consistent with its definition.
Example 23.7Calculating the Self-inductance of a Moderate Size Solenoid
Calculate the self-inductance of a 10.0 cm long, 4.00 cm diameter solenoid that has 200 coils.
Strategy
This is a straightforward application of
L=
μ
0
N
2
A
, since all quantities in the equation except
L
are known.
Solution
Use the following expression for the self-inductance of a solenoid:
(23.41)
L=
μ
0
N
2
A
.
The cross-sectional area in this example is
A=πr
2
=(3.14...)(0.0200 m)
2
=1.26×10
−3
m
2
,
N
is given to be 200, and the length
is
0.100 m. We know the permeability of free space is
μ
0
=4π×10
−7
T⋅m/A
. Substituting these into the expression for
L
gives
838 CHAPTER 23 | ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION, AC CIRCUITS, AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGIES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested