asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Acrobat split pdf software control project winforms web page html UWP PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics88-part1844

amplitude modulation (AM):
amplitude:
carrier wave:
electric field lines:
electric field strength:
electric field:
electromagnetic spectrum:
Example 24.4Calculate Microwave Intensities and Fields
On its highest power setting, a certain microwave oven projects 1.00 kW of microwaves onto a 30.0 by 40.0 cm area. (a) What is the intensity in
W/m
2
? (b) Calculate the peak electric field strength
E
0
in these waves. (c) What is the peak magnetic field strength
B
0
?
Strategy
In part (a), we can find intensity from its definition as power per unit area. Once the intensity is known, we can use the equations below to find
the field strengths asked for in parts (b) and (c).
Solution for (a)
Entering the given power into the definition of intensity, and noting the area is 0.300 by 0.400 m, yields
(24.21)
I=
P
A
=
1.00 kW
0.300 m×0.400 m
.
Here
I=I
ave
, so that
(24.22)
I
ave
=
1000 W
0.120m
2
=8.33×10
3
W/m
2
.
Note that the peak intensity is twice the average:
(24.23)
I
0
=2I
ave
=1.67×10
4
W/m
2
.
Solution for (b)
To find
E
0
, we can rearrange the first equation given above for
I
ave
to give
(24.24)
E
0
=
2I
ave
0
1/2
.
Entering known values gives
(24.25)
E
0
=
2(8.33×10
3
W/m
2
)
(3.00×10
8
m/s)(8.85×10
–12
C
2
/N⋅m
2
)
= 2.51×10
3
V/m.
Solution for (c)
Perhaps the easiest way to find magnetic field strength, now that the electric field strength is known, is to use the relationship given by
(24.26)
B
0
=
E
0
c
.
Entering known values gives
(24.27)
B
0
=
2.51×10
3
V/m
3.0×10
8
m/s
= 8.35×10
−6
T.
Discussion
As before, a relatively strong electric field is accompanied by a relatively weak magnetic field in an electromagnetic wave, since
B=E/c
, and
c
is a large number.
Glossary
a method for placing information on electromagnetic waves by modulating the amplitude of a carrier wave with an
audio signal, resulting in a wave with constant frequency but varying amplitude
the height, or magnitude, of an electromagnetic wave
an electromagnetic wave that carries a signal by modulation of its amplitude or frequency
a pattern of imaginary lines that extend between an electric source and charged objects in the surrounding area, with arrows
pointed away from positively charged objects and toward negatively charged objects. The more lines in the pattern, the stronger the electric
field in that region
the magnitude of the electric field, denotedE-field
a vector quantity (E); the lines of electric force per unit charge, moving radially outward from a positive charge and in toward a
negative charge
the full range of wavelengths or frequencies of electromagnetic radiation
CHAPTER 24 | ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES S 879
Acrobat split pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf splitter; pdf split file
Acrobat split pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
acrobat split pdf into multiple files; break a pdf
electromagnetic waves:
electromotive force (emf):
extremely low frequency (ELF):
frequency modulation (FM):
frequency:
gamma ray:
hertz:
infrared radiation (IR):
intensity:
Maxwell’s equations:
magnetic field lines:
magnetic field strength:
magnetic field:
maximum field strength:
microwaves:
oscillate:
RLC circuit:
radar:
radio waves:
resonant:
speed of light:
standing wave:
TV:
thermal agitation:
transverse wave:
ultra-high frequency (UHF):
ultraviolet radiation (UV):
very high frequency (VHF):
visible light:
wavelength:
X-ray:
radiation in the form of waves of electric and magnetic energy
energy produced per unit charge, drawn from a source that produces an electrical current
electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths usually in the range of 0 to 300 Hz, but also about 1kHz
a method of placing information on electromagnetic waves by modulating the frequency of a carrier wave with an
audio signal, producing a wave of constant amplitude but varying frequency
the number of complete wave cycles (up-down-up) passing a given point within one second (cycles/second)
(
γ
ray); extremely high frequency electromagnetic radiation emitted by the nucleus of an atom, either from natural nuclear decay or
induced nuclear processes in nuclear reactors and weapons. The lower end of the
γ
-ray frequency range overlaps the upper end of the X-
ray range, but
γ
rays can have the highest frequency of any electromagnetic radiation
an SI unit denoting the frequency of an electromagnetic wave, in cycles per second
a region of the electromagnetic spectrum with a frequency range that extends from just below the red region of the visible
light spectrum up to the microwave region, or from
0.74μm
to
300μm
the power of an electric or magnetic field per unit area, for example, Watts per square meter
a set of four equations that comprise a complete, overarching theory of electromagnetism
a pattern of continuous, imaginary lines that emerge from and enter into opposite magnetic poles. The density of the lines
indicates the magnitude of the magnetic field
the magnitude of the magnetic field, denotedB-field
a vector quantity (B); can be used to determine the magnetic force on a moving charged particle
the maximum amplitude an electromagnetic wave can reach, representing the maximum amount of electric force and/or
magnetic flux that the wave can exert
electromagnetic waves with wavelengths in the range from 1 mm to 1 m; they can be produced by currents in macroscopic circuits
and devices
to fluctuate back and forth in a steady beat
an electric circuit that includes a resistor, capacitor and inductor
a common application of microwaves. Radar can determine the distance to objects as diverse as clouds and aircraft, as well as determine
the speed of a car or the intensity of a rainstorm
electromagnetic waves with wavelengths in the range from 1 mm to 100 km; they are produced by currents in wires and circuits and
by astronomical phenomena
a system that displays enhanced oscillation when subjected to a periodic disturbance of the same frequency as its natural frequency
in a vacuum, such as space, the speed of light is a constant 3 x 10
8
m/s
a wave that oscillates in place, with nodes where no motion happens
video and audio signals broadcast on electromagnetic waves
the thermal motion of atoms and molecules in any object at a temperature above absolute zero, which causes them to emit and
absorb radiation
a wave, such as an electromagnetic wave, which oscillates perpendicular to the axis along the line of travel
TV channels in an even higher frequency range than VHF, of 470 to 1000 MHz
electromagnetic radiation in the range extending upward in frequency from violet light and overlapping with the lowest
X-ray frequencies, with wavelengths from 400 nm down to about 10 nm
TV channels utilizing frequencies in the two ranges of 54 to 88 MHz and 174 to 222 MHz
the narrow segment of the electromagnetic spectrum to which the normal human eye responds
the distance from one peak to the next in a wave
invisible, penetrating form of very high frequency electromagnetic radiation, overlapping both the ultraviolet range and the
γ
-ray range
880 CHAPTER 24 | ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Merge, split PDF files. Insert, delete PDF pages. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF.
break pdf password; break password on pdf
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
split pdf into multiple files; cannot select text in pdf
Section Summary
24.1Maxwell’s Equations: Electromagnetic Waves Predicted and Observed
• Electromagnetic waves consist of oscillating electric and magnetic fields and propagate at the speed of light
c
. They were predicted by
Maxwell, who also showed that
c=
1
μ
0
ε
0
,
where
μ
0
is the permeability of free space and
ε
0
is the permittivity of free space.
• Maxwell’s prediction of electromagnetic waves resulted from his formulation of a complete and symmetric theory of electricity and magnetism,
known as Maxwell’s equations.
• These four equations are paraphrased in this text, rather than presented numerically, and encompass the major laws of electricity and
magnetism. First is Gauss’s law for electricity, second is Gauss’s law for magnetism, third is Faraday’s law of induction, including Lenz’s law,
and fourth is Ampere’s law in a symmetric formulation that adds another source of magnetism—changing electric fields.
24.2Production of Electromagnetic Waves
• Electromagnetic waves are created by oscillating charges (which radiate whenever accelerated) and have the same frequency as the
oscillation.
• Since the electric and magnetic fields in most electromagnetic waves are perpendicular to the direction in which the wave moves, it is ordinarily
a transverse wave.
• The strengths of the electric and magnetic parts of the wave are related by
E
B
=c,
which implies that the magnetic field
B
is very weak relative to the electric field
E
.
24.3The Electromagnetic Spectrum
• The relationship among the speed of propagation, wavelength, and frequency for any wave is given by
v
W
, so that for electromagnetic
waves,
c,
where
f
is the frequency,
λ
is the wavelength, and
c
is the speed of light.
• The electromagnetic spectrum is separated into many categories and subcategories, based on the frequency and wavelength, source, and uses
of the electromagnetic waves.
• Any electromagnetic wave produced by currents in wires is classified as a radio wave, the lowest frequency electromagnetic waves. Radio
waves are divided into many types, depending on their applications, ranging up to microwaves at their highest frequencies.
• Infrared radiation lies below visible light in frequency and is produced by thermal motion and the vibration and rotation of atoms and molecules.
Infrared’s lower frequencies overlap with the highest-frequency microwaves.
• Visible light is largely produced by electronic transitions in atoms and molecules, and is defined as being detectable by the human eye. Its
colors vary with frequency, from red at the lowest to violet at the highest.
• Ultraviolet radiation starts with frequencies just above violet in the visible range and is produced primarily by electronic transitions in atoms and
molecules.
• X-rays are created in high-voltage discharges and by electron bombardment of metal targets. Their lowest frequencies overlap the ultraviolet
range but extend to much higher values, overlapping at the high end with gamma rays.
• Gamma rays are nuclear in origin and are defined to include the highest-frequency electromagnetic radiation of any type.
24.4Energy in Electromagnetic Waves
• The energy carried by any wave is proportional to its amplitude squared. For electromagnetic waves, this means intensity can be expressed as
I
ave
=
0
E
0
2
2
,
where
I
ave
is the average intensity in
W/m
2
, and
E
0
is the maximum electric field strength of a continuous sinusoidal wave.
• This can also be expressed in terms of the maximum magnetic field strength
B
0
as
I
ave
=
cB
0
2
0
and in terms of both electric and magnetic fields as
I
ave
=
E
0
B
0
0
.
• The three expressions for
I
ave
are all equivalent.
Conceptual Questions
24.2Production of Electromagnetic Waves
1.The direction of the electric field shown in each part ofFigure 24.5is that produced by the charge distribution in the wire. Justify the direction
shown in each part, using the Coulomb force law and the definition of
E=F/q
, where
q
is a positive test charge.
CHAPTER 24 | ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES S 881
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
acrobat split pdf bookmark; pdf separate pages
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
PDF to Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word Converter doesn't need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft Word.
pdf split pages; break a pdf password
2.Is the direction of the magnetic field shown inFigure 24.6(a) consistent with the right-hand rule for current (RHR-2) in the direction shown in the
figure?
3.Why is the direction of the current shown in each part ofFigure 24.6opposite to the electric field produced by the wire’s charge separation?
4.In which situation shown inFigure 24.24will the electromagnetic wave be more successful in inducing a current in the wire? Explain.
Figure 24.24Electromagnetic waves approaching long straight wires.
5.In which situation shown inFigure 24.25will the electromagnetic wave be more successful in inducing a current in the loop? Explain.
Figure 24.25Electromagnetic waves approaching a wire loop.
6.Should the straight wire antenna of a radio be vertical or horizontal to best receive radio waves broadcast by a vertical transmitter antenna? How
should a loop antenna be aligned to best receive the signals? (Note that the direction of the loop that produces the best reception can be used to
determine the location of the source. It is used for that purpose in tracking tagged animals in nature studies, for example.)
7.Under what conditions might wires in a DC circuit emit electromagnetic waves?
8.Give an example of interference of electromagnetic waves.
9.Figure 24.26shows the interference pattern of two radio antennas broadcasting the same signal. Explain how this is analogous to the interference
pattern for sound produced by two speakers. Could this be used to make a directional antenna system that broadcasts preferentially in certain
directions? Explain.
Figure 24.26An overhead view of two radio broadcast antennas sending the same signal, and the interference pattern they produce.
10.Can an antenna be any length? Explain your answer.
24.3The Electromagnetic Spectrum
11.If you live in a region that has a particular TV station, you can sometimes pick up some of its audio portion on your FM radio receiver. Explain how
this is possible. Does it imply that TV audio is broadcast as FM?
12.Explain why people who have the lens of their eye removed because of cataracts are able to see low-frequency ultraviolet.
13.How do fluorescent soap residues make clothing look “brighter and whiter” in outdoor light? Would this be effective in candlelight?
14.Give an example of resonance in the reception of electromagnetic waves.
15.Illustrate that the size of details of an object that can be detected with electromagnetic waves is related to their wavelength, by comparing details
observable with two different types (for example, radar and visible light or infrared and X-rays).
16.Why don’t buildings block radio waves as completely as they do visible light?
17.Make a list of some everyday objects and decide whether they are transparent or opaque to each of the types of electromagnetic waves.
882 CHAPTER 24 | ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
break a pdf apart; c# print pdf to specific printer
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
a pdf page cut; add page break to pdf
18.Your friend says that more patterns and colors can be seen on the wings of birds if viewed in ultraviolet light. Would you agree with your friend?
Explain your answer.
19.The rate at which information can be transmitted on an electromagnetic wave is proportional to the frequency of the wave. Is this consistent with
the fact that laser telephone transmission at visible frequencies carries far more conversations per optical fiber than conventional electronic
transmission in a wire? What is the implication for ELF radio communication with submarines?
20.Give an example of energy carried by an electromagnetic wave.
21.In an MRI scan, a higher magnetic field requires higher frequency radio waves to resonate with the nuclear type whose density and location is
being imaged. What effect does going to a larger magnetic field have on the most efficient antenna to broadcast those radio waves? Does it favor a
smaller or larger antenna?
22.Laser vision correction often uses an excimer laser that produces 193-nm electromagnetic radiation. This wavelength is extremely strongly
absorbed by the cornea and ablates it in a manner that reshapes the cornea to correct vision defects. Explain how the strong absorption helps
concentrate the energy in a thin layer and thus give greater accuracy in shaping the cornea. Also explain how this strong absorption limits damage to
the lens and retina of the eye.
CHAPTER 24 | ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES S 883
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
pdf file specification; pdf will no pages selected
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
logo) on any desired PDF page. And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat.
cannot select text in pdf file; pdf no pages selected to print
Problems & Exercises
24.1Maxwell’s Equations: Electromagnetic Waves
Predicted and Observed
1.Verify that the correct value for the speed of light
c
is obtained when
numerical values for the permeability and permittivity of free space (
μ
0
and
ε
0
) are entered into the equation
c=
1
μ
0
ε
0
.
2.Show that, when SI units for
μ
0
and
ε
0
are entered, the units given
by the right-hand side of the equation in the problem above are m/s.
24.2Production of Electromagnetic Waves
3.What is the maximum electric field strength in an electromagnetic
wave that has a maximum magnetic field strength of
5.00×10
−4
T
(about 10 times the Earth’s)?
4.The maximum magnetic field strength of an electromagnetic field is
5×10
−6
T
. Calculate the maximum electric field strength if the wave
is traveling in a medium in which the speed of the wave is
0.75c
.
5.Verify the units obtained for magnetic field strength
B
inExample
24.1(using the equation
B=
E
c
) are in fact teslas (T).
24.3The Electromagnetic Spectrum
6.(a) Two microwave frequencies are authorized for use in microwave
ovens: 900 and 2560 MHz. Calculate the wavelength of each. (b) Which
frequency would produce smaller hot spots in foods due to interference
effects?
7.(a) Calculate the range of wavelengths for AM radio given its
frequency range is 540 to 1600 kHz. (b) Do the same for the FM
frequency range of 88.0 to 108 MHz.
8.A radio station utilizes frequencies between commercial AM and FM.
What is the frequency of a 11.12-m-wavelength channel?
9.Find the frequency range of visible light, given that it encompasses
wavelengths from 380 to 760 nm.
10.Combing your hair leads to excess electrons on the comb. How fast
would you have to move the comb up and down to produce red light?
11.Electromagnetic radiation having a
15.0−μm
wavelength is
classified as infrared radiation. What is its frequency?
12.Approximately what is the smallest detail observable with a
microscope that uses ultraviolet light of frequency
1.20×10
15
Hz
?
13.A radar used to detect the presence of aircraft receives a pulse that
has reflected off an object
6×10
−5
s
after it was transmitted. What is
the distance from the radar station to the reflecting object?
14.Some radar systems detect the size and shape of objects such as
aircraft and geological terrain. Approximately what is the smallest
observable detail utilizing 500-MHz radar?
15.Determine the amount of time it takes for X-rays of frequency
3×10
18
Hz
to travel (a) 1 mm and (b) 1 cm.
16.If you wish to detect details of the size of atoms (about
1×10
−10
m
) with electromagnetic radiation, it must have a
wavelength of about this size. (a) What is its frequency? (b) What type
of electromagnetic radiation might this be?
17.If the Sun suddenly turned off, we would not know it until its light
stopped coming. How long would that be, given that the Sun is
1.50×10
11
m
away?
18.Distances in space are often quoted in units of light years, the
distance light travels in one year. (a) How many meters is a light year?
(b) How many meters is it to Andromeda, the nearest large galaxy,
given that it is
2.00×10
6
light years away? (c) The most distant
galaxy yet discovered is
12.0×10
9
light years away. How far is this in
meters?
19.A certain 50.0-Hz AC power line radiates an electromagnetic wave
having a maximum electric field strength of 13.0 kV/m. (a) What is the
wavelength of this very low frequency electromagnetic wave? (b) What
is its maximum magnetic field strength?
20.During normal beating, the heart creates a maximum 4.00-mV
potential across 0.300 m of a person’s chest, creating a 1.00-Hz
electromagnetic wave. (a) What is the maximum electric field strength
created? (b) What is the corresponding maximum magnetic field
strength in the electromagnetic wave? (c) What is the wavelength of the
electromagnetic wave?
21.(a) The ideal size (most efficient) for a broadcast antenna with one
end on the ground is one-fourth the wavelength (
λ/4
) of the
electromagnetic radiation being sent out. If a new radio station has such
an antenna that is 50.0 m high, what frequency does it broadcast most
efficiently? Is this in the AM or FM band? (b) Discuss the analogy of the
fundamental resonant mode of an air column closed at one end to the
resonance of currents on an antenna that is one-fourth their
wavelength.
22.(a) What is the wavelength of 100-MHz radio waves used in an MRI
unit? (b) If the frequencies are swept over a
±1.00
range centered on
100 MHz, what is the range of wavelengths broadcast?
23.(a) What is the frequency of the 193-nm ultraviolet radiation used in
laser eye surgery? (b) Assuming the accuracy with which this EM
radiation can ablate the cornea is directly proportional to wavelength,
how much more accurate can this UV be than the shortest visible
wavelength of light?
24.TV-reception antennas for VHF are constructed with cross wires
supported at their centers, as shown inFigure 24.27. The ideal length
for the cross wires is one-half the wavelength to be received, with the
more expensive antennas having one for each channel. Suppose you
measure the lengths of the wires for particular channels and find them
to be 1.94 and 0.753 m long, respectively. What are the frequencies for
these channels?
Figure 24.27A television reception antenna has cross wires of various lengths to
most efficiently receive different wavelengths.
25.Conversations with astronauts on lunar walks had an echo that was
used to estimate the distance to the Moon. The sound spoken by the
person on Earth was transformed into a radio signal sent to the Moon,
and transformed back into sound on a speaker inside the astronaut’s
space suit. This sound was picked up by the microphone in the space
suit (intended for the astronaut’s voice) and sent back to Earth as a
radio echo of sorts. If the round-trip time was 2.60 s, what was the
approximate distance to the Moon, neglecting any delays in the
electronics?
26.Lunar astronauts placed a reflector on the Moon’s surface, off which
a laser beam is periodically reflected. The distance to the Moon is
calculated from the round-trip time. (a) To what accuracy in meters can
884 CHAPTER 24 | ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
GIF to PDF Converter | Convert GIF to PDF, Convert PDF to GIF
and convert PDF files to GIF images with high quality. It can be functioned as an integrated component without the use of external applications & Adobe Acrobat
pdf split; can print pdf no pages selected
DICOM to PDF Converter | Convert DICOM to PDF, Convert PDF to
Different from other image converters, users do not need to load Adobe Acrobat or any other print drivers when they use DICOM to PDF Converter.
pdf specification; pdf print error no pages selected
the distance to the Moon be determined, if this time can be measured to
0.100 ns? (b) What percent accuracy is this, given the average distance
to the Moon is
3.84×10
8
m
?
27.Radar is used to determine distances to various objects by
measuring the round-trip time for an echo from the object. (a) How far
away is the planet Venus if the echo time is 1000 s? (b) What is the
echo time for a car 75.0 m from a Highway Police radar unit? (c) How
accurately (in nanoseconds) must you be able to measure the echo
time to an airplane 12.0 km away to determine its distance within 10.0
m?
28.Integrated Concepts
(a) Calculate the ratio of the highest to lowest frequencies of
electromagnetic waves the eye can see, given the wavelength range of
visible light is from 380 to 760 nm. (b) Compare this with the ratio of
highest to lowest frequencies the ear can hear.
29.Integrated Concepts
(a) Calculate the rate in watts at which heat transfer through radiation
occurs (almost entirely in the infrared) from
1.0m
2
of the Earth’s
surface at night. Assume the emissivity is 0.90, the temperature of the
Earth is
15ºC
, and that of outer space is 2.7 K. (b) Compare the
intensity of this radiation with that coming to the Earth from the Sun
during the day, which averages about
800W/m
2
, only half of which is
absorbed. (c) What is the maximum magnetic field strength in the
outgoing radiation, assuming it is a continuous wave?
24.4Energy in Electromagnetic Waves
30.What is the intensity of an electromagnetic wave with a peak
electric field strength of 125 V/m?
31.Find the intensity of an electromagnetic wave having a peak
magnetic field strength of
4.00×10
−9
T
.
32.Assume the helium-neon lasers commonly used in student physics
laboratories have power outputs of 0.500 mW. (a) If such a laser beam
is projected onto a circular spot 1.00 mm in diameter, what is its
intensity? (b) Find the peak magnetic field strength. (c) Find the peak
electric field strength.
33.An AM radio transmitter broadcasts 50.0 kW of power uniformly in
all directions. (a) Assuming all of the radio waves that strike the ground
are completely absorbed, and that there is no absorption by the
atmosphere or other objects, what is the intensity 30.0 km away? (Hint:
Half the power will be spread over the area of a hemisphere.) (b) What
is the maximum electric field strength at this distance?
34.Suppose the maximum safe intensity of microwaves for human
exposure is taken to be
1.00 W/m
2
. (a) If a radar unit leaks 10.0 W of
microwaves (other than those sent by its antenna) uniformly in all
directions, how far away must you be to be exposed to an intensity
considered to be safe? Assume that the power spreads uniformly over
the area of a sphere with no complications from absorption or reflection.
(b) What is the maximum electric field strength at the safe intensity?
(Note that early radar units leaked more than modern ones do. This
caused identifiable health problems, such as cataracts, for people who
worked near them.)
35.A 2.50-m-diameter university communications satellite dish receives
TV signals that have a maximum electric field strength (for one channel)
of
7.50μV/m
. (SeeFigure 24.28.) (a) What is the intensity of this
wave? (b) What is the power received by the antenna? (c) If the orbiting
satellite broadcasts uniformly over an area of
1.50×10
13
m
2
(a large
fraction of North America), how much power does it radiate?
Figure 24.28Satellite dishes receive TV signals sent from orbit. Although the
signals are quite weak, the receiver can detect them by being tuned to resonate at
their frequency.
36.Lasers can be constructed that produce an extremely high intensity
electromagnetic wave for a brief time—called pulsed lasers. They are
used to ignite nuclear fusion, for example. Such a laser may produce an
electromagnetic wave with a maximum electric field strength of
1.00×10
11
V/m
for a time of 1.00 ns. (a) What is the maximum
magnetic field strength in the wave? (b) What is the intensity of the
beam? (c) What energy does it deliver on a
1.00-mm
2
area?
37.Show that for a continuous sinusoidal electromagnetic wave, the
peak intensity is twice the average intensity (
I
0
=2I
ave
), using either
the fact that
E
0
= 2
E
rms
, or
B
0
= 2
B
rms
, where rms means
average (actually root mean square, a type of average).
38.Suppose a source of electromagnetic waves radiates uniformly in all
directions in empty space where there are no absorption or interference
effects. (a) Show that the intensity is inversely proportional to
r
2
, the
distance from the source squared. (b) Show that the magnitudes of the
electric and magnetic fields are inversely proportional to
r
.
39.Integrated Concepts
An
LC
circuit with a 5.00-pF capacitor oscillates in such a manner as
to radiate at a wavelength of 3.30 m. (a) What is the resonant
frequency? (b) What inductance is in series with the capacitor?
40.Integrated Concepts
What capacitance is needed in series with an
800−μH
inductor to
form a circuit that radiates a wavelength of 196 m?
41.Integrated Concepts
Police radar determines the speed of motor vehicles using the same
Doppler-shift technique employed for ultrasound in medical diagnostics.
Beats are produced by mixing the double Doppler-shifted echo with the
original frequency. If
1.50×10
9
-Hz
microwaves are used and a beat
frequency of 150 Hz is produced, what is the speed of the vehicle?
(Assume the same Doppler-shift formulas are valid with the speed of
sound replaced by the speed of light.)
42.Integrated Concepts
Assume the mostly infrared radiation from a heat lamp acts like a
continuous wave with wavelength
1.50μm
. (a) If the lamp’s 200-W
output is focused on a person’s shoulder, over a circular area 25.0 cm
in diameter, what is the intensity in
W/m
2
? (b) What is the peak
electric field strength? (c) Find the peak magnetic field strength. (d)
How long will it take to increase the temperature of the 4.00-kg shoulder
CHAPTER 24 | ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES S 885
by
2.00º C
, assuming no other heat transfer and given that its specific
heat is
3.47×10
3
J/kg⋅ºC
?
43.Integrated Concepts
On its highest power setting, a microwave oven increases the
temperature of 0.400 kg of spaghetti by
45.0ºC
in 120 s. (a) What was
the rate of power absorption by the spaghetti, given that its specific heat
is
3.76×10
3
J/kg⋅ºC
? (b) Find the average intensity of the
microwaves, given that they are absorbed over a circular area 20.0 cm
in diameter. (c) What is the peak electric field strength of the
microwave? (d) What is its peak magnetic field strength?
44.Integrated Concepts
Electromagnetic radiation from a 5.00-mW laser is concentrated on a
1.00-mm
2
area. (a) What is the intensity in
W/m
2
? (b) Suppose a
2.00-nC static charge is in the beam. What is the maximum electric
force it experiences? (c) If the static charge moves at 400 m/s, what
maximum magnetic force can it feel?
45.Integrated Concepts
A 200-turn flat coil of wire 30.0 cm in diameter acts as an antenna for
FM radio at a frequency of 100 MHz. The magnetic field of the incoming
electromagnetic wave is perpendicular to the coil and has a maximum
strength of
1.00×10
−12
T
. (a) What power is incident on the coil? (b)
What average emf is induced in the coil over one-fourth of a cycle? (c)
If the radio receiver has an inductance of
2.50μH
, what capacitance
must it have to resonate at 100 MHz?
46.Integrated Concepts
If electric and magnetic field strengths vary sinusoidally in time, being
zero at
t=0
, then
E=E
0
sin2πft
and
B=B
0
sin2πft
. Let
=1.00 GHz
here. (a) When are the field strengths first zero? (b)
When do they reach their most negative value? (c) How much time is
needed for them to complete one cycle?
47.Unreasonable Results
A researcher measures the wavelength of a 1.20-GHz electromagnetic
wave to be 0.500 m. (a) Calculate the speed at which this wave
propagates. (b) What is unreasonable about this result? (c) Which
assumptions are unreasonable or inconsistent?
48.Unreasonable Results
The peak magnetic field strength in a residential microwave oven is
9.20×10
−5
T
. (a) What is the intensity of the microwave? (b) What is
unreasonable about this result? (c) What is wrong about the premise?
49.Unreasonable Results
An
LC
circuit containing a 2.00-H inductor oscillates at such a
frequency that it radiates at a 1.00-m wavelength. (a) What is the
capacitance of the circuit? (b) What is unreasonable about this result?
(c) Which assumptions are unreasonable or inconsistent?
50.Unreasonable Results
An
LC
circuit containing a 1.00-pF capacitor oscillates at such a
frequency that it radiates at a 300-nm wavelength. (a) What is the
inductance of the circuit? (b) What is unreasonable about this result?
(c) Which assumptions are unreasonable or inconsistent?
51.Create Your Own Problem
Consider electromagnetic fields produced by high voltage power lines.
Construct a problem in which you calculate the intensity of this
electromagnetic radiation in
W/m
2
based on the measured magnetic
field strength of the radiation in a home near the power lines. Assume
these magnetic field strengths are known to average less than a
μT
.
The intensity is small enough that it is difficult to imagine mechanisms
for biological damage due to it. Discuss how much energy may be
radiating from a section of power line several hundred meters long and
compare this to the power likely to be carried by the lines. An idea of
how much power this is can be obtained by calculating the approximate
current responsible for
μT
fields at distances of tens of meters.
52.Create Your Own Problem
Consider the most recent generation of residential satellite dishes that
are a little less than half a meter in diameter. Construct a problem in
which you calculate the power received by the dish and the maximum
electric field strength of the microwave signals for a single channel
received by the dish. Among the things to be considered are the power
broadcast by the satellite and the area over which the power is spread,
as well as the area of the receiving dish.
886 CHAPTER 24 | ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
25
GEOMETRIC OPTICS
Figure 25.1Image seen as a result of reflection of light on a plane smooth surface. (credit: NASA Goddard Photo and Video, via Flickr)
Learning Objectives
25.1.The Ray Aspect of Light
• List the ways by which light travels from a source to another location.
25.2.The Law of Reflection
• Explain reflection of light from polished and rough surfaces.
25.3.The Law of Refraction
• Determine the index of refraction, given the speed of light in a medium.
25.4.Total Internal Reflection
• Explain the phenomenon of total internal reflection.
• Describe the workings and uses of fiber optics.
• Analyze the reason for the sparkle of diamonds.
25.5.Dispersion: The Rainbow and Prisms
• Explain the phenomenon of dispersion and discuss its advantages and disadvantages.
25.6.Image Formation by Lenses
• List the rules for ray tracking for thin lenses.
• Illustrate the formation of images using the technique of ray tracking.
• Determine power of a lens given the focal length.
25.7.Image Formation by Mirrors
• Illustrate image formation in a flat mirror.
• Explain with ray diagrams the formation of an image using spherical mirrors.
• Determine focal length and magnification given radius of curvature, distance of object and image.
Introduction to Geometric Optics
Geometric Optics
Light from this page or screen is formed into an image by the lens of your eye, much as the lens of the camera that made this photograph. Mirrors,
like lenses, can also form images that in turn are captured by your eye.
CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS S 887
Our lives are filled with light. Through vision, the most valued of our senses, light can evoke spiritual emotions, such as when we view a magnificent
sunset or glimpse a rainbow breaking through the clouds. Light can also simply amuse us in a theater, or warn us to stop at an intersection. It has
innumerable uses beyond vision. Light can carry telephone signals through glass fibers or cook a meal in a solar oven. Life itself could not exist
without light’s energy. From photosynthesis in plants to the sun warming a cold-blooded animal, its supply of energy is vital.
Figure 25.2Double Rainbow over the bay of Pocitos in Montevideo, Uruguay. (credit: Madrax, Wikimedia Commons)
We already know that visible light is the type of electromagnetic waves to which our eyes respond. That knowledge still leaves many questions
regarding the nature of light and vision. What is color, and how do our eyes detect it? Why do diamonds sparkle? How does light travel? How do
lenses and mirrors form images? These are but a few of the questions that are answered by the study of optics. Optics is the branch of physics that
deals with the behavior of visible light and other electromagnetic waves. In particular, optics is concerned with the generation and propagation of light
and its interaction with matter. What we have already learned about the generation of light in our study of heat transfer by radiation will be expanded
upon in later topics, especially those on atomic physics. Now, we will concentrate on the propagation of light and its interaction with matter.
It is convenient to divide optics into two major parts based on the size of objects that light encounters. When light interacts with an object that is
several times as large as the light’s wavelength, its observable behavior is like that of a ray; it does not prominently display its wave characteristics.
We call this part of optics “geometric optics.” This chapter will concentrate on such situations. When light interacts with smaller objects, it has very
prominent wave characteristics, such as constructive and destructive interference.Wave Opticswill concentrate on such situations.
25.1The Ray Aspect of Light
There are three ways in which light can travel from a source to another location. (SeeFigure 25.3.) It can come directly from the source through
empty space, such as from the Sun to Earth. Or light can travel through various media, such as air and glass, to the person. Light can also arrive
after being reflected, such as by a mirror. In all of these cases, light is modeled as traveling in straight lines called rays. Light may change direction
when it encounters objects (such as a mirror) or in passing from one material to another (such as in passing from air to glass), but it then continues in
a straight line or as a ray. The wordraycomes from mathematics and here means a straight line that originates at some point. It is acceptable to
visualize light rays as laser rays (or even science fiction depictions of ray guns).
Ray
The word “ray” comes from mathematics and here means a straight line that originates at some point.
Figure 25.3Three methods for light to travel from a source to another location. (a) Light reaches the upper atmosphere of Earth traveling through empty space directly from
the source. (b) Light can reach a person in one of two ways. It can travel through media like air and glass. It can also reflect from an object like a mirror. In the situations shown
here, light interacts with objects large enough that it travels in straight lines, like a ray.
Experiments, as well as our own experiences, show that when light interacts with objects several times as large as its wavelength, it travels in straight
lines and acts like a ray. Its wave characteristics are not pronounced in such situations. Since the wavelength of light is less than a micron (a
thousandth of a millimeter), it acts like a ray in the many common situations in which it encounters objects larger than a micron. For example, when
light encounters anything we can observe with unaided eyes, such as a mirror, it acts like a ray, with only subtle wave characteristics. We will
concentrate on the ray characteristics in this chapter.
Since light moves in straight lines, changing directions when it interacts with materials, it is described by geometry and simple trigonometry. This part
of optics, where the ray aspect of light dominates, is therefore calledgeometric optics. There are two laws that govern how light changes direction
888 CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested