when it interacts with matter. These are the law of reflection, for situations in which light bounces off matter, and the law of refraction, for situations in
which light passes through matter.
Geometric Optics
The part of optics dealing with the ray aspect of light is called geometric optics.
25.2The Law of Reflection
Whenever we look into a mirror, or squint at sunlight glinting from a lake, we are seeing a reflection. When you look at this page, too, you are seeing
light reflected from it. Large telescopes use reflection to form an image of stars and other astronomical objects.
The law of reflection is illustrated inFigure 25.4, which also shows how the angles are measured relative to the perpendicular to the surface at the
point where the light ray strikes. We expect to see reflections from smooth surfaces, butFigure 25.5illustrates how a rough surface reflects light.
Since the light strikes different parts of the surface at different angles, it is reflected in many different directions, or diffused. Diffused light is what
allows us to see a sheet of paper from any angle, as illustrated inFigure 25.6. Many objects, such as people, clothing, leaves, and walls, have rough
surfaces and can be seen from all sides. A mirror, on the other hand, has a smooth surface (compared with the wavelength of light) and reflects light
at specific angles, as illustrated inFigure 25.7. When the moon reflects from a lake, as shown inFigure 25.8, a combination of these effects takes
place.
Figure 25.4The law of reflection states that the angle of reflection equals the angle of incidence—
θ
r
=θ
i
. The angles are measured relative to the perpendicular to the
surface at the point where the ray strikes the surface.
Figure 25.5Light is diffused when it reflects from a rough surface. Here many parallel rays are incident, but they are reflected at many different angles since the surface is
rough.
Figure 25.6When a sheet of paper is illuminated with many parallel incident rays, it can be seen at many different angles, because its surface is rough and diffuses the light.
CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS S 889
Pdf separate pages - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break pdf file into parts; break pdf into multiple files
Pdf separate pages - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf into multiple pages; break up pdf file
Figure 25.7A mirror illuminated by many parallel rays reflects them in only one direction, since its surface is very smooth. Only the observer at a particular angle will see the
reflected light.
Figure 25.8Moonlight is spread out when it is reflected by the lake, since the surface is shiny but uneven. (credit: Diego Torres Silvestre, Flickr)
The law of reflection is very simple: The angle of reflection equals the angle of incidence.
The Law of Reflection
The angle of reflection equals the angle of incidence.
When we see ourselves in a mirror, it appears that our image is actually behind the mirror. This is illustrated inFigure 25.9. We see the light coming
from a direction determined by the law of reflection. The angles are such that our image is exactly the same distance behind the mirror as we stand
away from the mirror. If the mirror is on the wall of a room, the images in it are all behind the mirror, which can make the room seem bigger. Although
these mirror images make objects appear to be where they cannot be (like behind a solid wall), the images are not figments of our imagination. Mirror
images can be photographed and videotaped by instruments and look just as they do with our eyes (optical instruments themselves). The precise
manner in which images are formed by mirrors and lenses will be treated in later sections of this chapter.
Figure 25.9Our image in a mirror is behind the mirror. The two rays shown are those that strike the mirror at just the correct angles to be reflected into the eyes of the person.
The image appears to be in the direction the rays are coming from when they enter the eyes.
Take-Home Experiment: Law of Reflection
Take a piece of paper and shine a flashlight at an angle at the paper, as shown inFigure 25.6. Now shine the flashlight at a mirror at an angle.
Do your observations confirm the predictions inFigure 25.6andFigure 25.7? Shine the flashlight on various surfaces and determine whether
the reflected light is diffuse or not. You can choose a shiny metallic lid of a pot or your skin. Using the mirror and flashlight, can you confirm the
890 CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET TIFF: Merge and Split TIFF Documents with RasterEdge .NET
create a new TIFF document from the source pages. Implement Sample Code below to Separate TIFF File. powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
split pdf files; break pdf into separate pages
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. can easily and quickly convert a large-size multi-page PDF document to a group of high-quality separate JPEG image
combine pages of pdf documents into one; break a pdf file into parts
law of reflection? You will need to draw lines on a piece of paper showing the incident and reflected rays. (This part works even better if you use
a laser pencil.)
25.3The Law of Refraction
It is easy to notice some odd things when looking into a fish tank. For example, you may see the same fish appearing to be in two different places.
(SeeFigure 25.10.) This is because light coming from the fish to us changes direction when it leaves the tank, and in this case, it can travel two
different paths to get to our eyes. The changing of a light ray’s direction (loosely called bending) when it passes through variations in matter is called
refraction. Refraction is responsible for a tremendous range of optical phenomena, from the action of lenses to voice transmission through optical
fibers.
Refraction
The changing of a light ray’s direction (loosely called bending) when it passes through variations in matter is called refraction.
Speed of Light
The speed of light
c
not only affects refraction, it is one of the central concepts of Einstein’s theory of relativity. As the accuracy of the
measurements of the speed of light were improved,
c
was found not to depend on the velocity of the source or the observer. However, the
speed of light does vary in a precise manner with the material it traverses. These facts have far-reaching implications, as we will see inSpecial
Relativity. It makes connections between space and time and alters our expectations that all observers measure the same time for the same
event, for example. The speed of light is so important that its value in a vacuum is one of the most fundamental constants in nature as well as
being one of the four fundamental SI units.
Figure 25.10Looking at the fish tank as shown, we can see the same fish in two different locations, because light changes directions when it passes from water to air. In this
case, the light can reach the observer by two different paths, and so the fish seems to be in two different places. This bending of light is called refraction and is responsible for
many optical phenomena.
Why does light change direction when passing from one material (medium) to another? It is because light changes speed when going from one
material to another. So before we study the law of refraction, it is useful to discuss the speed of light and how it varies in different media.
The Speed of Light
Early attempts to measure the speed of light, such as those made by Galileo, determined that light moved extremely fast, perhaps instantaneously.
The first real evidence that light traveled at a finite speed came from the Danish astronomer Ole Roemer in the late 17th century. Roemer had noted
that the average orbital period of one of Jupiter’s moons, as measured from Earth, varied depending on whether Earth was moving toward or away
from Jupiter. He correctly concluded that the apparent change in period was due to the change in distance between Earth and Jupiter and the time it
took light to travel this distance. From his 1676 data, a value of the speed of light was calculated to be
2.26×10
8
m/s
(only 25% different from
today’s accepted value). In more recent times, physicists have measured the speed of light in numerous ways and with increasing accuracy. One
particularly direct method, used in 1887 by the American physicist Albert Michelson (1852–1931), is illustrated inFigure 25.11. Light reflected from a
rotating set of mirrors was reflected from a stationary mirror 35 km away and returned to the rotating mirrors. The time for the light to travel can be
determined by how fast the mirrors must rotate for the light to be returned to the observer’s eye.
CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS S 891
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
control component makes it extremely easy for C# developers to convert and transform a multi-page PDF document and save each PDF page as a separate HTML file
cannot print pdf file no pages selected; break pdf into single pages
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
NET code. All PDF pages can be converted to separate Word files within a short time in VB.NET class application. In addition, texts
break a pdf into separate pages; how to split pdf file by pages
Figure 25.11A schematic of early apparatus used by Michelson and others to determine the speed of light. As the mirrors rotate, the reflected ray is only briefly directed at the
stationary mirror. The returning ray will be reflected into the observer's eye only if the next mirror has rotated into the correct position just as the ray returns. By measuring the
correct rotation rate, the time for the round trip can be measured and the speed of light calculated. Michelson’s calculated value of the speed of light was only 0.04% different
from the value used today.
The speed of light is now known to great precision. In fact, the speed of light in a vacuum
c
is so important that it is accepted as one of the basic
physical quantities and has the fixed value
(25.1)
c=2.9972458×10
8
m/s≈3.00×10
8
m/s,
where the approximate value of
3.00×10
8
m/s
is used whenever three-digit accuracy is sufficient. The speed of light through matter is less than it
is in a vacuum, because light interacts with atoms in a material. The speed of light depends strongly on the type of material, since its interaction with
different atoms, crystal lattices, and other substructures varies. We define theindex of refraction
n
of a material to be
(25.2)
n=
c
v
,
where
v
is the observed speed of light in the material. Since the speed of light is always less than
c
in matter and equals
c
only in a vacuum, the
index of refraction is always greater than or equal to one.
Value of the Speed of Light
(25.3)
c=2.9972458×10
8
m/s≈3.00×10
8
m/s
Index of Refraction
(25.4)
n=
c
v
That is,
n≥1
.Table 25.1gives the indices of refraction for some representative substances. The values are listed for a particular wavelength of
light, because they vary slightly with wavelength. (This can have important effects, such as colors produced by a prism.) Note that for gases,
n
is
close to 1.0. This seems reasonable, since atoms in gases are widely separated and light travels at
c
in the vacuum between atoms. It is common to
take
n=1
for gases unless great precision is needed. Although the speed of light
v
in a medium varies considerably from its value
c
in a
vacuum, it is still a large speed.
892 CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Merge two or several separate PDF files together and into one PDF document in VB.NET. Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file.
pdf rotate single page; break a pdf into smaller files
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
DOC/DOCX) conversion library can help developers convert multi-page PDF document to multi-page Word file or convert each PDF document page to separate Word file
reader split pdf; split pdf into individual pages
Table 25.1Index of Refraction
in Various Media
Medium
n
Gases at
0ºC
, 1 atm
Air
1.000293
Carbon dioxide
1.00045
Hydrogen
1.000139
Oxygen
1.000271
Liquids at
20ºC
Benzene
1.501
Carbon disulfide
1.628
Carbon tetrachloride e 1.461
Ethanol
1.361
Glycerine
1.473
Water, fresh
1.333
Solids at
20ºC
Diamond
2.419
Fluorite
1.434
Glass, crown
1.52
Glass, flint
1.66
Ice at
20ºC
1.309
Polystyrene
1.49
Plexiglas
1.51
Quartz, crystalline
1.544
Quartz, fused
1.458
Sodium chloride
1.544
Zircon
1.923
Example 25.1Speed of Light in Matter
Calculate the speed of light in zircon, a material used in jewelry to imitate diamond.
Strategy
The speed of light in a material,
v
, can be calculated from the index of refraction
n
of the material using the equation
n=c/v
.
Solution
The equation for index of refraction states that
n=c/v
. Rearranging this to determine
v
gives
(25.5)
v=
c
n
.
The index of refraction for zircon is given as 1.923 inTable 25.1, and
c
is given in the equation for speed of light. Entering these values in the
last expression gives
(25.6)
=
3.00×10
8
m/s
1.923
= 1.56×10
8
m/s.
Discussion
This speed is slightly larger than half the speed of light in a vacuum and is still high compared with speeds we normally experience. The only
substance listed inTable 25.1that has a greater index of refraction than zircon is diamond. We shall see later that the large index of refraction
for zircon makes it sparkle more than glass, but less than diamond.
Law of Refraction
Figure 25.12shows how a ray of light changes direction when it passes from one medium to another. As before, the angles are measured relative to
a perpendicular to the surface at the point where the light ray crosses it. (Some of the incident light will be reflected from the surface, but for now we
will concentrate on the light that is transmitted.) The change in direction of the light ray depends on how the speed of light changes. The change in
CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS S 893
C# Imaging - Read Australia Post in C#.NET
Load an image or a document(PDF, TIFF, Word, Excel, PowerPoint). from an image, or in conjunction with our DocTwain module to separate pages during barcode
break pdf password online; break pdf into multiple documents
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
by keeping original layout. C#.NET class source code for converting each PDF document page to separate text file. Text in any fonts
acrobat split pdf pages; pdf format specification
the speed of light is related to the indices of refraction of the media involved. In the situations shown inFigure 25.12, medium 2 has a greater index
of refraction than medium 1. This means that the speed of light is less in medium 2 than in medium 1. Note that as shown inFigure 25.12(a), the
direction of the ray moves closer to the perpendicular when it slows down. Conversely, as shown inFigure 25.12(b), the direction of the ray moves
away from the perpendicular when it speeds up. The path is exactly reversible. In both cases, you can imagine what happens by thinking about
pushing a lawn mower from a footpath onto grass, and vice versa. Going from the footpath to grass, the front wheels are slowed and pulled to the
side as shown. This is the same change in direction as for light when it goes from a fast medium to a slow one. When going from the grass to the
footpath, the front wheels can move faster and the mower changes direction as shown. This, too, is the same change in direction as for light going
from slow to fast.
Figure 25.12The change in direction of a light ray depends on how the speed of light changes when it crosses from one medium to another. The speed of light is greater in
medium 1 than in medium 2 in the situations shown here. (a) A ray of light moves closer to the perpendicular when it slows down. This is analogous to what happens when a
lawn mower goes from a footpath to grass. (b) A ray of light moves away from the perpendicular when it speeds up. This is analogous to what happens when a lawn mower
goes from grass to footpath. The paths are exactly reversible.
The amount that a light ray changes its direction depends both on the incident angle and the amount that the speed changes. For a ray at a given
incident angle, a large change in speed causes a large change in direction, and thus a large change in angle. The exact mathematical relationship is
thelaw of refraction, or “Snell’s Law,” which is stated in equation form as
(25.7)
n
1
sinθ
1
=n
2
sinθ
2
.
Here
n
1
and
n
2
are the indices of refraction for medium 1 and 2, and
θ
1
and
θ
2
are the angles between the rays and the perpendicular in
medium 1 and 2, as shown inFigure 25.12. The incoming ray is called the incident ray and the outgoing ray the refracted ray, and the associated
angles the incident angle and the refracted angle. The law of refraction is also called Snell’s law after the Dutch mathematician Willebrord Snell
(1591–1626), who discovered it in 1621. Snell’s experiments showed that the law of refraction was obeyed and that a characteristic index of
refraction
n
could be assigned to a given medium. Snell was not aware that the speed of light varied in different media, but through experiments he
was able to determine indices of refraction from the way light rays changed direction.
The Law of Refraction
(25.8)
n
1
sinθ
1
=n
2
sinθ
2
Take-Home Experiment: A Broken Pencil
A classic observation of refraction occurs when a pencil is placed in a glass half filled with water. Do this and observe the shape of the pencil
when you look at the pencil sideways, that is, through air, glass, water. Explain your observations. Draw ray diagrams for the situation.
Example 25.2Determine the Index of Refraction from Refraction Data
Find the index of refraction for medium 2 inFigure 25.12(a), assuming medium 1 is air and given the incident angle is
30.0º
and the angle of
refraction is
22.0º
.
Strategy
The index of refraction for air is taken to be 1 in most cases (and up to four significant figures, it is 1.000). Thus
n
1
=1.00
here. From the given
information,
θ
1
=30.0º
and
θ
2
=22.0º
. With this information, the only unknown in Snell’s law is
n
2
, so that it can be used to find this
unknown.
Solution
Snell’s law is
(25.9)
n
1
sinθ
1
=n
2
sinθ
2
.
Rearranging to isolate
n
2
gives
894 CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
(25.10)
n
2
=n
1
sinθ
1
sinθ
2
.
Entering known values,
(25.11)
n
2
= 1.00
sin30.0º
sin22.0º
=
0.500
0.375
= 1.33.
Discussion
This is the index of refraction for water, and Snell could have determined it by measuring the angles and performing this calculation. He would
then have found 1.33 to be the appropriate index of refraction for water in all other situations, such as when a ray passes from water to glass.
Today we can verify that the index of refraction is related to the speed of light in a medium by measuring that speed directly.
Example 25.3A Larger Change in Direction
Suppose that in a situation like that inExample 25.2, light goes from air to diamond and that the incident angle is
30.0º
. Calculate the angle of
refraction
θ
2
in the diamond.
Strategy
Again the index of refraction for air is taken to be
n
1
=1.00
, and we are given
θ
1
=30.0º
. We can look up the index of refraction for
diamond inTable 25.1, finding
n
2
=2.419
. The only unknown in Snell’s law is
θ
2
, which we wish to determine.
Solution
Solving Snell’s law for sin
θ
2
yields
(25.12)
sinθ
2
=
n
1
n
2
sinθ
1
.
Entering known values,
(25.13)
sinθ
2
=
1.00
2.419
sin30.0º=
0.413
(0.500)=0.207.
The angle is thus
(25.14)
θ
2
=sin
−1
0.207=11.9º.
Discussion
For the same
30º
angle of incidence, the angle of refraction in diamond is significantly smaller than in water (
11.9º
rather than
22º
—see the
preceding example). This means there is a larger change in direction in diamond. The cause of a large change in direction is a large change in
the index of refraction (or speed). In general, the larger the change in speed, the greater the effect on the direction of the ray.
25.4Total Internal Reflection
A good-quality mirror may reflect more than 90% of the light that falls on it, absorbing the rest. But it would be useful to have a mirror that reflects all
of the light that falls on it. Interestingly, we can producetotal reflectionusing an aspect ofrefraction.
Consider what happens when a ray of light strikes the surface between two materials, such as is shown inFigure 25.13(a). Part of the light crosses
the boundary and is refracted; the rest is reflected. If, as shown in the figure, the index of refraction for the second medium is less than for the first,
the ray bends away from the perpendicular. (Since
n
1
>n
2
, the angle of refraction is greater than the angle of incidence—that is,
θ
1
2
.) Now
imagine what happens as the incident angle is increased. This causes
θ
2
to increase also. The largest the angle of refraction
θ
2
can be is
90º
, as
shown inFigure 25.13(b).Thecritical angle
θ
c
for a combination of materials is defined to be the incident angle
θ
1
that produces an angle of
refraction of
90º
. That is,
θ
c
is the incident angle for which
θ
2
=90º
. If the incident angle
θ
1
is greater than the critical angle, as shown in
Figure 25.13(c), then all of the light is reflected back into medium 1, a condition calledtotal internal reflection.
Critical Angle
The incident angle
θ
1
that produces an angle of refraction of
90º
is called the critical angle,
θ
c
.
CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS S 895
Figure 25.13(a) A ray of light crosses a boundary where the speed of light increases and the index of refraction decreases. That is,
n
2
<n
1
. The ray bends away from the
perpendicular. (b) The critical angle
θ
is the one for which the angle of refraction is . (c) Total internal reflection occurs when the incident angle is greater than the critical
angle.
Snell’s law states the relationship between angles and indices of refraction. It is given by
(25.15)
n
1
sinθ
1
=n
2
sinθ
2
.
When the incident angle equals the critical angle (
θ
1
=θ
c
), the angle of refraction is
90º
(
θ
2
=90º
). Noting that
sin 90º=1
, Snell’s law in this
case becomes
(25.16)
n
1
sinθ
1
=n
2
.
The critical angle
θ
c
for a given combination of materials is thus
(25.17)
θ
c
=sin
−1
n
2
/n
1
forn
1
>n
2
.
Total internal reflection occurs for any incident angle greater than the critical angle
θ
c
, and it can only occur when the second medium has an index
of refraction less than the first. Note the above equation is written for a light ray that travels in medium 1 and reflects from medium 2, as shown in the
figure.
Example 25.4How Big is the Critical Angle Here?
What is the critical angle for light traveling in a polystyrene (a type of plastic) pipe surrounded by air?
Strategy
896 CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
The index of refraction for polystyrene is found to be 1.49 inFigure 25.14, and the index of refraction of air can be taken to be 1.00, as before.
Thus, the condition that the second medium (air) has an index of refraction less than the first (plastic) is satisfied, and the equation
θ
c
=sin
−1
n
2
/n
1
can be used to find the critical angle
θ
c
. Here, then,
n
2
=1.00
and
n
1
=1.49
.
Solution
The critical angle is given by
(25.18)
θ
c
=sin
−1
n
2
/n
1
.
Substituting the identified values gives
(25.19)
θ
c
=sin
−1
(1.00/1.49)=sin
−1
(0.671)
42.2º.
Discussion
This means that any ray of light inside the plastic that strikes the surface at an angle greater than
42.2º
will be totally reflected. This will make
the inside surface of the clear plastic a perfect mirror for such rays without any need for the silvering used on common mirrors. Different
combinations of materials have different critical angles, but any combination with
n
1
>n
2
can produce total internal reflection. The same
calculation as made here shows that the critical angle for a ray going from water to air is
48.6º
, while that from diamond to air is
24.4º
, and
that from flint glass to crown glass is
66.3º
. There is no total reflection for rays going in the other direction—for example, from air to
water—since the condition that the second medium must have a smaller index of refraction is not satisfied. A number of interesting applications
of total internal reflection follow.
Fiber Optics: Endoscopes to Telephones
Fiber optics is one application of total internal reflection that is in wide use. In communications, it is used to transmit telephone, internet, and cable TV
signals.Fiber opticsemploys the transmission of light down fibers of plastic or glass. Because the fibers are thin, light entering one is likely to strike
the inside surface at an angle greater than the critical angle and, thus, be totally reflected (SeeFigure 25.14.) The index of refraction outside the fiber
must be smaller than inside, a condition that is easily satisfied by coating the outside of the fiber with a material having an appropriate refractive
index. In fact, most fibers have a varying refractive index to allow more light to be guided along the fiber through total internal refraction. Rays are
reflected around corners as shown, making the fibers into tiny light pipes.
Figure 25.14Light entering a thin fiber may strike the inside surface at large or grazing angles and is completely reflected if these angles exceed the critical angle. Such rays
continue down the fiber, even following it around corners, since the angles of reflection and incidence remain large.
Bundles of fibers can be used to transmit an image without a lens, as illustrated inFigure 25.15. The output of a device called anendoscopeis
shown inFigure 25.15(b). Endoscopes are used to explore the body through various orifices or minor incisions. Light is transmitted down one fiber
bundle to illuminate internal parts, and the reflected light is transmitted back out through another to be observed. Surgery can be performed, such as
arthroscopic surgery on the knee joint, employing cutting tools attached to and observed with the endoscope. Samples can also be obtained, such as
by lassoing an intestinal polyp for external examination.
Fiber optics has revolutionized surgical techniques and observations within the body. There are a host of medical diagnostic and therapeutic uses.
The flexibility of the fiber optic bundle allows it to navigate around difficult and small regions in the body, such as the intestines, the heart, blood
vessels, and joints. Transmission of an intense laser beam to burn away obstructing plaques in major arteries as well as delivering light to activate
chemotherapy drugs are becoming commonplace. Optical fibers have in fact enabled microsurgery and remote surgery where the incisions are small
and the surgeon’s fingers do not need to touch the diseased tissue.
CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS S 897
Figure 25.15(a) An image is transmitted by a bundle of fibers that have fixed neighbors. (b) An endoscope is used to probe the body, both transmitting light to the interior and
returning an image such as the one shown. (credit: Med_Chaos, Wikimedia Commons)
Fibers in bundles are surrounded by a cladding material that has a lower index of refraction than the core. (SeeFigure 25.16.) The cladding prevents
light from being transmitted between fibers in a bundle. Without cladding, light could pass between fibers in contact, since their indices of refraction
are identical. Since no light gets into the cladding (there is total internal reflection back into the core), none can be transmitted between clad fibers
that are in contact with one another. The cladding prevents light from escaping out of the fiber; instead most of the light is propagated along the
length of the fiber, minimizing the loss of signal and ensuring that a quality image is formed at the other end. The cladding and an additional
protective layer make optical fibers flexible and durable.
Figure 25.16Fibers in bundles are clad by a material that has a lower index of refraction than the core to ensure total internal reflection, even when fibers are in contact with
one another. This shows a single fiber with its cladding.
Cladding
The cladding prevents light from being transmitted between fibers in a bundle.
Special tiny lenses that can be attached to the ends of bundles of fibers are being designed and fabricated. Light emerging from a fiber bundle can be
focused and a tiny spot can be imaged. In some cases the spot can be scanned, allowing quality imaging of a region inside the body. Special minute
optical filters inserted at the end of the fiber bundle have the capacity to image tens of microns below the surface without cutting the surface—non-
intrusive diagnostics. This is particularly useful for determining the extent of cancers in the stomach and bowel.
Most telephone conversations and Internet communications are now carried by laser signals along optical fibers. Extensive optical fiber cables have
been placed on the ocean floor and underground to enable optical communications. Optical fiber communication systems offer several advantages
over electrical (copper) based systems, particularly for long distances. The fibers can be made so transparent that light can travel many kilometers
before it becomes dim enough to require amplification—much superior to copper conductors. This property of optical fibers is calledlow loss. Lasers
emit light with characteristics that allow far more conversations in one fiber than are possible with electric signals on a single conductor. This property
of optical fibers is calledhigh bandwidth. Optical signals in one fiber do not produce undesirable effects in other adjacent fibers. This property of
optical fibers is calledreduced crosstalk. We shall explore the unique characteristics of laser radiation in a later chapter.
Corner Reflectors and Diamonds
A light ray that strikes an object consisting of two mutually perpendicular reflecting surfaces is reflected back exactly parallel to the direction from
which it came. This is true whenever the reflecting surfaces are perpendicular, and it is independent of the angle of incidence. Such an object, shown
inFigure 25.52, is called acorner reflector, since the light bounces from its inside corner. Many inexpensive reflector buttons on bicycles, cars, and
warning signs have corner reflectors designed to return light in the direction from which it originated. It was more expensive for astronauts to place
one on the moon. Laser signals can be bounced from that corner reflector to measure the gradually increasing distance to the moon with great
precision.
898 CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested