Figure 25.17(a) Astronauts placed a corner reflector on the moon to measure its gradually increasing orbital distance. (credit: NASA) (b) The bright spots on these bicycle
safety reflectors are reflections of the flash of the camera that took this picture on a dark night. (credit: Julo, Wikimedia Commons)
Corner reflectors are perfectly efficient when the conditions for total internal reflection are satisfied. With common materials, it is easy to obtain a
critical angle that is less than
45º
. One use of these perfect mirrors is in binoculars, as shown inFigure 25.18. Another use is in periscopes found in
submarines.
Figure 25.18These binoculars employ corner reflectors with total internal reflection to get light to the observer’s eyes.
The Sparkle of Diamonds
Total internal reflection, coupled with a large index of refraction, explains why diamonds sparkle more than other materials. The critical angle for a
diamond-to-air surface is only
24.4º
, and so when light enters a diamond, it has trouble getting back out. (SeeFigure 25.19.) Although light freely
enters the diamond, it can exit only if it makes an angle less than
24.4º
. Facets on diamonds are specifically intended to make this unlikely, so that
the light can exit only in certain places. Good diamonds are very clear, so that the light makes many internal reflections and is concentrated at the few
places it can exit—hence the sparkle. (Zircon is a natural gemstone that has an exceptionally large index of refraction, but not as large as diamond,
so it is not as highly prized. Cubic zirconia is manufactured and has an even higher index of refraction (
≈2.17
), but still less than that of diamond.)
The colors you see emerging from a sparkling diamond are not due to the diamond’s color, which is usually nearly colorless. Those colors result from
dispersion, the topic ofDispersion: The Rainbow and Prisms. Colored diamonds get their color from structural defects of the crystal lattice and the
inclusion of minute quantities of graphite and other materials. The Argyle Mine in Western Australia produces around 90% of the world’s pink, red,
champagne, and cognac diamonds, while around 50% of the world’s clear diamonds come from central and southern Africa.
CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS S 899
Pdf specification - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break pdf into multiple pages; acrobat split pdf bookmark
Pdf specification - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
acrobat split pdf pages; how to split pdf file by pages
Figure 25.19Light cannot easily escape a diamond, because its critical angle with air is so small. Most reflections are total, and the facets are placed so that light can exit only
in particular ways—thus concentrating the light and making the diamond sparkle.
PhET Explorations: Bending Light
Explore bending of light between two media with different indices of refraction. See how changing from air to water to glass changes the bending
angle. Play with prisms of different shapes and make rainbows.
Figure 25.20Bending Light (http://cnx.org/content/m42462/1.5/bending-light_en.jar)
25.5Dispersion: The Rainbow and Prisms
Everyone enjoys the spectacle of a rainbow glimmering against a dark stormy sky. How does sunlight falling on clear drops of rain get broken into the
rainbow of colors we see? The same process causes white light to be broken into colors by a clear glass prism or a diamond. (SeeFigure 25.21.)
Figure 25.21The colors of the rainbow (a) and those produced by a prism (b) are identical. (credit: Alfredo55, Wikimedia Commons; NASA)
We see about six colors in a rainbow—red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and violet; sometimes indigo is listed, too. Those colors are associated with
different wavelengths of light, as shown inFigure 25.22. When our eye receives pure-wavelength light, we tend to see only one of the six colors,
depending on wavelength. The thousands of other hues we can sense in other situations are our eye’s response to various mixtures of wavelengths.
White light, in particular, is a fairly uniform mixture of all visible wavelengths. Sunlight, considered to be white, actually appears to be a bit yellow
because of its mixture of wavelengths, but it does contain all visible wavelengths. The sequence of colors in rainbows is the same sequence as the
colors plotted versus wavelength inFigure 25.22. What this implies is that white light is spread out according to wavelength in a rainbow.Dispersion
is defined as the spreading of white light into its full spectrum of wavelengths. More technically, dispersion occurs whenever there is a process that
changes the direction of light in a manner that depends on wavelength. Dispersion, as a general phenomenon, can occur for any type of wave and
always involves wavelength-dependent processes.
900 CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# Word: How to Generate Barcodes in C# Word with .NET Library
123456789"; linearBarcode.Resolution = 96; linearBarcode.Rotate = Rotate.Rotate0; // load Word document and you can also load documents like PDF, TIFF, Excel
break password on pdf; break apart a pdf in reader
C# Imaging - C# Code 128 Generation Guide
Automatically add minimum left and right margins that go with specification. Create Code 128 on PDF, Multi-Page TIFF, Word, Excel and PPT.
reader split pdf; break pdf into multiple files
Dispersion
Dispersion is defined to be the spreading of white light into its full spectrum of wavelengths.
Figure 25.22Even though rainbows are associated with seven colors, the rainbow is a continuous distribution of colors according to wavelengths.
Refraction is responsible for dispersion in rainbows and many other situations. The angle of refraction depends on the index of refraction, as we saw
inThe Law of Refraction. We know that the index of refraction
n
depends on the medium. But for a given medium,
n
also depends on
wavelength. (SeeTable 25.2. Note that, for a given medium,
n
increases as wavelength decreases and is greatest for violet light. Thus violet light is
bent more than red light, as shown for a prism inFigure 25.23(b), and the light is dispersed into the same sequence of wavelengths as seen in
Figure 25.21andFigure 25.22.
Making Connections: Dispersion
Any type of wave can exhibit dispersion. Sound waves, all types of electromagnetic waves, and water waves can be dispersed according to
wavelength. Dispersion occurs whenever the speed of propagation depends on wavelength, thus separating and spreading out various
wavelengths. Dispersion may require special circumstances and can result in spectacular displays such as in the production of a rainbow. This is
also true for sound, since all frequencies ordinarily travel at the same speed. If you listen to sound through a long tube, such as a vacuum
cleaner hose, you can easily hear it is dispersed by interaction with the tube. Dispersion, in fact, can reveal a great deal about what the wave has
encountered that disperses its wavelengths. The dispersion of electromagnetic radiation from outer space, for example, has revealed much
about what exists between the stars—the so-called empty space.
Table 25.2Index of Refractionnin Selected Media at Various Wavelengths
Medium
Red (660 nm)
Orange (610 nm)
Yellow (580 nm)
Green (550 nm)
Blue (470 nm)
Violet (410 nm)
Water
1.331
1.332
1.333
1.335
1.338
1.342
Diamond
2.410
2.415
2.417
2.426
2.444
2.458
Glass, crown n 1.512
1.514
1.518
1.519
1.524
1.530
Glass, flint
1.662
1.665
1.667
1.674
1.684
1.698
Polystyrene
1.488
1.490
1.492
1.493
1.499
1.506
Quartz, fused d 1.455
1.456
1.458
1.459
1.462
1.468
CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS S 901
TIFF Image Viewer| What is TIFF
The TIFF specification contains two parts: Baseline TIFF (the core of TIFF) and TIFF and other popular formats, such as Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word
break apart a pdf; can print pdf no pages selected
Generate and Print 1D and 2D Barcodes in Java
linear barcode industry specification with barcode generator for Java. Error correction is valid for all 2D barcodes like QR Code, Data Matrix and PDF 417 in
pdf print error no pages selected; split pdf by bookmark
Figure 25.23(a) A pure wavelength of light falls onto a prism and is refracted at both surfaces. (b) White light is dispersed by the prism (shown exaggerated). Since the index
of refraction varies with wavelength, the angles of refraction vary with wavelength. A sequence of red to violet is produced, because the index of refraction increases steadily
with decreasing wavelength.
Rainbows are produced by a combination of refraction and reflection. You may have noticed that you see a rainbow only when you look away from
the sun. Light enters a drop of water and is reflected from the back of the drop, as shown inFigure 25.24. The light is refracted both as it enters and
as it leaves the drop. Since the index of refraction of water varies with wavelength, the light is dispersed, and a rainbow is observed, as shown in
Figure 25.25(a). (There is no dispersion caused by reflection at the back surface, since the law of reflection does not depend on wavelength.) The
actual rainbow of colors seen by an observer depends on the myriad of rays being refracted and reflected toward the observer’s eyes from numerous
drops of water. The effect is most spectacular when the background is dark, as in stormy weather, but can also be observed in waterfalls and lawn
sprinklers. The arc of a rainbow comes from the need to be looking at a specific angle relative to the direction of the sun, as illustrated inFigure
25.25(b). (If there are two reflections of light within the water drop, another “secondary” rainbow is produced. This rare event produces an arc that
lies above the primary rainbow arc—seeFigure 25.25(c).)
Rainbows
Rainbows are produced by a combination of refraction and reflection.
Figure 25.24Part of the light falling on this water drop enters and is reflected from the back of the drop. This light is refracted and dispersed both as it enters and as it leaves
the drop.
902 CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
Microsoft PowerPoint: PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document Format; TIFF: Tagged Image XPS: XML Paper Specification. Supported Browers: IE9+; Firefox, Firefox
break pdf into pages; can't cut and paste from pdf
.NET PDF Generator | Generate & Manipulate PDF files
archival records creation; Support for template PDF creation; Easy to use, no need to know PDF specification; Fast Document creation
break a pdf file; break pdf into smaller files
Figure 25.25(a) Different colors emerge in different directions, and so you must look at different locations to see the various colors of a rainbow. (b) The arc of a rainbow
results from the fact that a line between the observer and any point on the arc must make the correct angle with the parallel rays of sunlight to receive the refracted rays. (c)
Double rainbow. (credit: Nicholas, Wikimedia Commons)
Dispersion may produce beautiful rainbows, but it can cause problems in optical systems. White light used to transmit messages in a fiber is
dispersed, spreading out in time and eventually overlapping with other messages. Since a laser produces a nearly pure wavelength, its light
experiences little dispersion, an advantage over white light for transmission of information. In contrast, dispersion of electromagnetic waves coming to
us from outer space can be used to determine the amount of matter they pass through. As with many phenomena, dispersion can be useful or a
nuisance, depending on the situation and our human goals.
PhET Explorations: Geometric Optics
How does a lens form an image? See how light rays are refracted by a lens. Watch how the image changes when you adjust the focal length of
the lens, move the object, move the lens, or move the screen.
CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS S 903
GS1-128 Web Server Control for ASP.NET
Microsoft Visual Studio 2005/2008/2010 is supported. GS1-128 is actually a barcode application standard, rather than a barcode specification standard.
pdf will no pages selected; break pdf into separate pages
VB.NET TWAIN: Overview of TWAIN Image Scanning in VB.NET
It includes the specification, data source manager and sample code implement console based TWAIN scanning and scan multiple pages into a single PDF document in
break up pdf file; break pdf password online
Figure 25.26Geometric Optics (http://cnx.org/content/m42466/1.5/geometric-optics_en.jar)
25.6Image Formation by Lenses
Lenses are found in a huge array of optical instruments, ranging from a simple magnifying glass to the eye to a camera’s zoom lens. In this section,
we will use the law of refraction to explore the properties of lenses and how they form images.
The wordlensderives from the Latin word for a lentil bean, the shape of which is similar to the convex lens inFigure 25.27. The convex lens shown
has been shaped so that all light rays that enter it parallel to its axis cross one another at a single point on the opposite side of the lens. (The axis is
defined to be a line normal to the lens at its center, as shown inFigure 25.27.) Such a lens is called aconverging (or convex) lensfor the
converging effect it has on light rays. An expanded view of the path of one ray through the lens is shown, to illustrate how the ray changes direction
both as it enters and as it leaves the lens. Since the index of refraction of the lens is greater than that of air, the ray moves towards the perpendicular
as it enters and away from the perpendicular as it leaves. (This is in accordance with the law of refraction.) Due to the lens’s shape, light is thus bent
toward the axis at both surfaces. The point at which the rays cross is defined to be thefocal pointF of the lens. The distance from the center of the
lens to its focal point is defined to be thefocal length
f
of the lens.Figure 25.28shows how a converging lens, such as that in a magnifying glass,
can converge the nearly parallel light rays from the sun to a small spot.
Figure 25.27Rays of light entering a converging lens parallel to its axis converge at its focal point F. (Ray 2 lies on the axis of the lens.) The distance from the center of the
lens to the focal point is the lens’s focal length
f
. An expanded view of the path taken by ray 1 shows the perpendiculars and the angles of incidence and refraction at both
surfaces.
Converging or Convex Lens
The lens in which light rays that enter it parallel to its axis cross one another at a single point on the opposite side with a converging effect is
called converging lens.
Focal Point F
The point at which the light rays cross is called the focal point F of the lens.
Focal Length
f
The distance from the center of the lens to its focal point is called focal length
f
.
904 CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
XImage.Barcode Generator for .NET, Technical Information Details
View & Process. XImage.Raster. Adobe PDF. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. XImage.OCR. Microsoft Office. View & Process. XImage.Raster. Adobe PDF. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. XImage.
c# split pdf; acrobat separate pdf pages
XImage.Twain for .NET, Technical Information Details
View & Process. XImage.Raster. Adobe PDF. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. XImage.OCR. Microsoft Office. View & Process. XImage.Raster. Adobe PDF. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. XImage.
break a pdf into separate pages; break password pdf
Figure 25.28Sunlight focused by a converging magnifying glass can burn paper. Light rays from the sun are nearly parallel and cross at the focal point of the lens. The more
powerful the lens, the closer to the lens the rays will cross.
The greater effect a lens has on light rays, the more powerful it is said to be. For example, a powerful converging lens will focus parallel light rays
closer to itself and will have a smaller focal length than a weak lens. The light will also focus into a smaller and more intense spot for a more powerful
lens. Thepower
P
of a lens is defined to be the inverse of its focal length. In equation form, this is
(25.20)
P=
1
f
.
Power
P
Thepower
P
of a lens is defined to be the inverse of its focal length. In equation form, this is
(25.21)
P=
1
f
.
where
f
is the focal length of the lens, which must be given in meters (and not cm or mm). The power of a lens
P
has the unit diopters (D),
provided that the focal length is given in meters. That is,
1 D=1/m
, or
1 m
−1
. (Note that this power (optical power, actually) is not the same
as power in watts defined inWork, Energy, and Energy Resources. It is a concept related to the effect of optical devices on light.) Optometrists
prescribe common spectacles and contact lenses in units of diopters.
Example 25.5What is the Power of a Common Magnifying Glass?
Suppose you take a magnifying glass out on a sunny day and you find that it concentrates sunlight to a small spot 8.00 cm away from the lens.
What are the focal length and power of the lens?
Strategy
The situation here is the same as those shown inFigure 25.27andFigure 25.28. The Sun is so far away that the Sun’s rays are nearly parallel
when they reach Earth. The magnifying glass is a convex (or converging) lens, focusing the nearly parallel rays of sunlight. Thus the focal length
of the lens is the distance from the lens to the spot, and its power is the inverse of this distance (in m).
Solution
The focal length of the lens is the distance from the center of the lens to the spot, given to be 8.00 cm. Thus,
(25.22)
=8.00 cm.
To find the power of the lens, we must first convert the focal length to meters; then, we substitute this value into the equation for power. This
gives
(25.23)
P=
1
f
=
1
0.0800 m
=12.5 D.
Discussion
This is a relatively powerful lens. The power of a lens in diopters should not be confused with the familiar concept of power in watts. It is an
unfortunate fact that the word “power” is used for two completely different concepts. If you examine a prescription for eyeglasses, you will note
lens powers given in diopters. If you examine the label on a motor, you will note energy consumption rate given as a power in watts.
Figure 25.29shows a concave lens and the effect it has on rays of light that enter it parallel to its axis (the path taken by ray 2 in the figure is the axis
of the lens). The concave lens is adiverging lens, because it causes the light rays to bend away (diverge) from its axis. In this case, the lens has
been shaped so that all light rays entering it parallel to its axis appear to originate from the same point,
F
, defined to be the focal point of a diverging
lens. The distance from the center of the lens to the focal point is again called the focal length
f
of the lens. Note that the focal length and power of
CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS S 905
a diverging lens are defined to be negative. For example, if the distance to
F
inFigure 25.29is 5.00 cm, then the focal length is
f=–5.00 cm
and the power of the lens is
P=–20 D
. An expanded view of the path of one ray through the lens is shown in the figure to illustrate how the shape
of the lens, together with the law of refraction, causes the ray to follow its particular path and be diverged.
Figure 25.29Rays of light entering a diverging lens parallel to its axis are diverged, and all appear to originate at its focal point
F
. The dashed lines are not rays—they
indicate the directions from which the rays appear to come. The focal length
f
of a diverging lens is negative. An expanded view of the path taken by ray 1 shows the
perpendiculars and the angles of incidence and refraction at both surfaces.
Diverging Lens
A lens that causes the light rays to bend away from its axis is called a diverging lens.
As noted in the initial discussion of the law of refraction inThe Law of Refraction, the paths of light rays are exactly reversible. This means that the
direction of the arrows could be reversed for all of the rays inFigure 25.27andFigure 25.29. For example, if a point light source is placed at the
focal point of a convex lens, as shown inFigure 25.30, parallel light rays emerge from the other side.
Figure 25.30A small light source, like a light bulb filament, placed at the focal point of a convex lens, results in parallel rays of light emerging from the other side. The paths
are exactly the reverse of those shown inFigure 25.27. This technique is used in lighthouses and sometimes in traffic lights to produce a directional beam of light from a
source that emits light in all directions.
Ray Tracing and Thin Lenses
Ray tracingis the technique of determining or following (tracing) the paths that light rays take. For rays passing through matter, the law of refraction
is used to trace the paths. Here we use ray tracing to help us understand the action of lenses in situations ranging from forming images on film to
magnifying small print to correcting nearsightedness. While ray tracing for complicated lenses, such as those found in sophisticated cameras, may
require computer techniques, there is a set of simple rules for tracing rays through thin lenses. Athin lensis defined to be one whose thickness
allows rays to refract, as illustrated inFigure 25.27, but does not allow properties such as dispersion and aberrations. An ideal thin lens has two
refracting surfaces but the lens is thin enough to assume that light rays bend only once. A thin symmetrical lens has two focal points, one on either
side and both at the same distance from the lens. (SeeFigure 25.31.) Another important characteristic of a thin lens is that light rays through its
center are deflected by a negligible amount, as seen inFigure 25.32.
Thin Lens
A thin lens is defined to be one whose thickness allows rays to refract but does not allow properties such as dispersion and aberrations.
Take-Home Experiment: A Visit to the Optician
Look through your eyeglasses (or those of a friend) backward and forward and comment on whether they act like thin lenses.
906 CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 25.31Thin lenses have the same focal length on either side. (a) Parallel light rays entering a converging lens from the right cross at its focal point on the left. (b)
Parallel light rays entering a diverging lens from the right seem to come from the focal point on the right.
Figure 25.32The light ray through the center of a thin lens is deflected by a negligible amount and is assumed to emerge parallel to its original path (shown as a shaded line).
Using paper, pencil, and a straight edge, ray tracing can accurately describe the operation of a lens. The rules for ray tracing for thin lenses are
based on the illustrations already discussed:
1. A ray entering a converging lens parallel to its axis passes through the focal point F of the lens on the other side. (See rays 1 and 3 inFigure
25.27.)
2. A ray entering a diverging lens parallel to its axis seems to come from the focal point F. (See rays 1 and 3 inFigure 25.29.)
3. A ray passing through the center of either a converging or a diverging lens does not change direction. (SeeFigure 25.32, and see ray 2 in
Figure 25.27andFigure 25.29.)
4. A ray entering a converging lens through its focal point exits parallel to its axis. (The reverse of rays 1 and 3 inFigure 25.27.)
5. A ray that enters a diverging lens by heading toward the focal point on the opposite side exits parallel to the axis. (The reverse of rays 1 and 3 in
Figure 25.29.)
Rules for Ray Tracing
1. A ray entering a converging lens parallel to its axis passes through the focal point F of the lens on the other side.
2. A ray entering a diverging lens parallel to its axis seems to come from the focal point F.
3. A ray passing through the center of either a converging or a diverging lens does not change direction.
4. A ray entering a converging lens through its focal point exits parallel to its axis.
5. A ray that enters a diverging lens by heading toward the focal point on the opposite side exits parallel to the axis.
CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS S 907
Image Formation by Thin Lenses
In some circumstances, a lens forms an obvious image, such as when a movie projector casts an image onto a screen. In other cases, the image is
less obvious. Where, for example, is the image formed by eyeglasses? We will use ray tracing for thin lenses to illustrate how they form images, and
we will develop equations to describe the image formation quantitatively.
Consider an object some distance away from a converging lens, as shown inFigure 25.33. To find the location and size of the image formed, we
trace the paths of selected light rays originating from one point on the object, in this case the top of the person’s head. The figure shows three rays
from the top of the object that can be traced using the ray tracing rules given above. (Rays leave this point going in many directions, but we
concentrate on only a few with paths that are easy to trace.) The first ray is one that enters the lens parallel to its axis and passes through the focal
point on the other side (rule 1). The second ray passes through the center of the lens without changing direction (rule 3). The third ray passes through
the nearer focal point on its way into the lens and leaves the lens parallel to its axis (rule 4). The three rays cross at the same point on the other side
of the lens. The image of the top of the person’s head is located at this point. All rays that come from the same point on the top of the person’s head
are refracted in such a way as to cross at the point shown. Rays from another point on the object, such as her belt buckle, will also cross at another
common point, forming a complete image, as shown. Although three rays are traced inFigure 25.33, only two are necessary to locate the image. It is
best to trace rays for which there are simple ray tracing rules. Before applying ray tracing to other situations, let us consider the example shown in
Figure 25.33in more detail.
Figure 25.33Ray tracing is used to locate the image formed by a lens. Rays originating from the same point on the object are traced—the three chosen rays each follow one
of the rules for ray tracing, so that their paths are easy to determine. The image is located at the point where the rays cross. In this case, a real image—one that can be
projected on a screen—is formed.
The image formed inFigure 25.33is areal image, meaning that it can be projected. That is, light rays from one point on the object actually cross at
the location of the image and can be projected onto a screen, a piece of film, or the retina of an eye, for example.Figure 25.34shows how such an
image would be projected onto film by a camera lens. This figure also shows how a real image is projected onto the retina by the lens of an eye. Note
that the image is there whether it is projected onto a screen or not.
Real Image
The image in which light rays from one point on the object actually cross at the location of the image and can be projected onto a screen, a piece
of film, or the retina of an eye is called a real image.
908 CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested