asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Break pdf password SDK application project winforms html azure UWP PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics91-part1848

Figure 25.34Real images can be projected. (a) A real image of the person is projected onto film. (b) The converging nature of the multiple surfaces that make up the eye
result in the projection of a real image on the retina.
Several important distances appear inFigure 25.33. We define
d
o
to be the object distance, the distance of an object from the center of a lens.
Image distance
d
i
is defined to be the distance of the image from the center of a lens. The height of the object and height of the image are given
the symbols
h
o
and
h
i
, respectively. Images that appear upright relative to the object have heights that are positive and those that are inverted
have negative heights. Using the rules of ray tracing and making a scale drawing with paper and pencil, like that inFigure 25.33, we can accurately
describe the location and size of an image. But the real benefit of ray tracing is in visualizing how images are formed in a variety of situations. To
obtain numerical information, we use a pair of equations that can be derived from a geometric analysis of ray tracing for thin lenses. Thethin lens
equationsare
(25.24)
1
d
o
+
1
d
i
=
1
f
and
(25.25)
h
i
h
o
=−
d
i
d
o
=m.
We define the ratio of image height to object height (
h
i
/h
o
) to be themagnification
m
. (The minus sign in the equation above will be discussed
shortly.) The thin lens equations are broadly applicable to all situations involving thin lenses (and “thin” mirrors, as we will see later). We will explore
many features of image formation in the following worked examples.
Image Distance
The distance of the image from the center of the lens is called image distance.
Thin Lens Equations and Magnification
(25.26)
1
d
o
+
1
d
i
=
1
f
(25.27)
h
i
h
o
=−
d
i
d
o
=m
Example 25.6Finding the Image of a Light Bulb Filament by Ray Tracing and by the Thin Lens Equations
A clear glass light bulb is placed 0.750 m from a convex lens having a 0.500 m focal length, as shown inFigure 25.35. Use ray tracing to get an
approximate location for the image. Then use the thin lens equations to calculate (a) the location of the image and (b) its magnification. Verify
that ray tracing and the thin lens equations produce consistent results.
CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS S 909
Break pdf password - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break a pdf into smaller files; pdf rotate single page
Break pdf password - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
acrobat split pdf; cannot select text in pdf
Figure 25.35A light bulb placed 0.750 m from a lens having a 0.500 m focal length produces a real image on a poster board as discussed in the example above. Ray
tracing predicts the image location and size.
Strategy and Concept
Since the object is placed farther away from a converging lens than the focal length of the lens, this situation is analogous to those illustrated in
Figure 25.33andFigure 25.34. Ray tracing to scale should produce similar results for
d
i
. Numerical solutions for
d
i
and
m
can be obtained
using the thin lens equations, noting that
d
o
=0.750 m andf=0.500 m
.
Solutions (Ray tracing)
The ray tracing to scale inFigure 25.35shows two rays from a point on the bulb’s filament crossing about 1.50 m on the far side of the lens.
Thus the image distance
d
i
is about 1.50 m. Similarly, the image height based on ray tracing is greater than the object height by about a factor
of 2, and the image is inverted. Thus
m
is about –2. The minus sign indicates that the image is inverted.
The thin lens equations can be used to find
d
i
from the given information:
(25.28)
1
d
o
+
1
d
i
=
1
f
.
Rearranging to isolate
d
i
gives
(25.29)
1
d
i
=
1
f
1
d
o
.
Entering known quantities gives a value for
1/d
i
:
(25.30)
1
d
i
=
1
0.500 m
1
0.750 m
=
0.667
m
.
This must be inverted to find
d
i
:
(25.31)
d
i
=
m
0.667
=1.50 m.
Note that another way to find
d
i
is to rearrange the equation:
(25.32)
1
d
i
=
1
f
1
d
o
.
This yields the equation for the image distance as:
(25.33)
d
i
=
fd
o
d
o
f
.
Note that there is no inverting here.
The thin lens equations can be used to find the magnification
m
, since both
d
i
and
d
o
are known. Entering their values gives
(25.34)
m= –
d
i
d
o
= –
1.50 m
0.750 m
= –2.00.
Discussion
Note that the minus sign causes the magnification to be negative when the image is inverted. Ray tracing and the use of the thin lens equations
produce consistent results. The thin lens equations give the most precise results, being limited only by the accuracy of the given information. Ray
tracing is limited by the accuracy with which you can draw, but it is highly useful both conceptually and visually.
Real images, such as the one considered in the previous example, are formed by converging lenses whenever an object is farther from the lens than
its focal length. This is true for movie projectors, cameras, and the eye. We shall refer to these ascase 1images. A case 1 image is formed when
d
o
f
and
f
is positive, as inFigure 25.36(a). (A summary of the three cases or types of image formation appears at the end of this section.)
910 CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
pdf split file; split pdf into multiple files
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. FileType.IMG_JPEG); switch (result) { case ConvertResult. NO_ERROR: Console.WriteLine("Success"); break; case ConvertResult
break apart a pdf file; can't select text in pdf file
A different type of image is formed when an object, such as a person's face, is held close to a convex lens. The image is upright and larger than the
object, as seen inFigure 25.36(b), and so the lens is called a magnifier. If you slowly pull the magnifier away from the face, you will see that the
magnification steadily increases until the image begins to blur. Pulling the magnifier even farther away produces an inverted image as seen inFigure
25.36(a). The distance at which the image blurs, and beyond which it inverts, is the focal length of the lens. To use a convex lens as a magnifier, the
object must be closer to the converging lens than its focal length. This is called acase 2image. A case 2 image is formed when
d
o
<f
and
f
is
positive.
Figure 25.36(a) When a converging lens is held farther away from the face than the lens’s focal length, an inverted image is formed. This is a case 1 image. Note that the
image is in focus but the face is not, because the image is much closer to the camera taking this photograph than the face. (credit: DaMongMan, Flickr) (b) A magnified image
of a face is produced by placing it closer to the converging lens than its focal length. This is a case 2 image. (credit: Casey Fleser, Flickr)
Figure 25.37uses ray tracing to show how an image is formed when an object is held closer to a converging lens than its focal length. Rays coming
from a common point on the object continue to diverge after passing through the lens, but all appear to originate from a point at the location of the
image. The image is on the same side of the lens as the object and is farther away from the lens than the object. This image, like all case 2 images,
cannot be projected and, hence, is called avirtual image. Light rays only appear to originate at a virtual image; they do not actually pass through
that location in space. A screen placed at the location of a virtual image will receive only diffuse light from the object, not focused rays from the lens.
Additionally, a screen placed on the opposite side of the lens will receive rays that are still diverging, and so no image will be projected on it. We can
see the magnified image with our eyes, because the lens of the eye converges the rays into a real image projected on our retina. Finally, we note that
a virtual image is upright and larger than the object, meaning that the magnification is positive and greater than 1.
CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS S 911
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Forms. Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free SDK library for Visual Studio .NET. Independent
break pdf; split pdf files
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
break pdf file into parts; pdf no pages selected to print
Figure 25.37Ray tracing predicts the image location and size for an object held closer to a converging lens than its focal length. Ray 1 enters parallel to the axis and exits
through the focal point on the opposite side, while ray 2 passes through the center of the lens without changing path. The two rays continue to diverge on the other side of the
lens, but both appear to come from a common point, locating the upright, magnified, virtual image. This is a case 2 image.
Virtual Image
An image that is on the same side of the lens as the object and cannot be projected on a screen is called a virtual image.
Example 25.7Image Produced by a Magnifying Glass
Suppose the book page inFigure 25.37(a) is held 7.50 cm from a convex lens of focal length 10.0 cm, such as a typical magnifying glass might
have. What magnification is produced?
Strategy and Concept
We are given that
d
o
=7.50 cm
and
f=10.0 cm
, so we have a situation where the object is placed closer to the lens than its focal length.
We therefore expect to get a case 2 virtual image with a positive magnification that is greater than 1. Ray tracing produces an image like that
shown inFigure 25.37, but we will use the thin lens equations to get numerical solutions in this example.
Solution
To find the magnification
m
, we try to use magnification equation,
m=–d
i
/d
o
. We do not have a value for
d
i
, so that we must first find the
location of the image using lens equation. (The procedure is the same as followed in the preceding example, where
d
o
and
f
were known.)
Rearranging the magnification equation to isolate
d
i
gives
(25.35)
1
d
i
=
1
f
1
d
o
.
Entering known values, we obtain a value for
1/d
i
:
(25.36)
1
d
i
=
1
10.0 cm
1
7.50 cm
=
−0.0333
cm
.
This must be inverted to find
d
i
:
(25.37)
d
i
=−
cm
0.0333
=−30.0 cm.
Now the thin lens equation can be used to find the magnification
m
, since both
d
i
and
d
o
are known. Entering their values gives
(25.38)
m=−
d
i
d
o
=−
−30.0 cm
10.0 cm
=3.00.
912 CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's not supported tell stop.
break pdf password; break apart pdf pages
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's
break a pdf into multiple files; acrobat split pdf into multiple files
Discussion
A number of results in this example are true of all case 2 images, as well as being consistent withFigure 25.37. Magnification is indeed positive
(as predicted), meaning the image is upright. The magnification is also greater than 1, meaning that the image is larger than the object—in this
case, by a factor of 3. Note that the image distance is negative. This means the image is on the same side of the lens as the object. Thus the
image cannot be projected and is virtual. (Negative values of
d
i
occur for virtual images.) The image is farther from the lens than the object,
since the image distance is greater in magnitude than the object distance. The location of the image is not obvious when you look through a
magnifier. In fact, since the image is bigger than the object, you may think the image is closer than the object. But the image is farther away, a
fact that is useful in correcting farsightedness, as we shall see in a later section.
A third type of image is formed by a diverging or concave lens. Try looking through eyeglasses meant to correct nearsightedness. (SeeFigure
25.38.) You will see an image that is upright but smaller than the object. This means that the magnification is positive but less than 1. The ray
diagram inFigure 25.39shows that the image is on the same side of the lens as the object and, hence, cannot be projected—it is a virtual image.
Note that the image is closer to the lens than the object. This is acase 3image, formed for any object by a negative focal length or diverging lens.
Figure 25.38A car viewed through a concave or diverging lens looks upright. This is a case 3 image. (credit: Daniel Oines, Flickr)
Figure 25.39Ray tracing predicts the image location and size for a concave or diverging lens. Ray 1 enters parallel to the axis and is bent so that it appears to originate from
the focal point. Ray 2 passes through the center of the lens without changing path. The two rays appear to come from a common point, locating the upright image. This is a
case 3 image, which is closer to the lens than the object and smaller in height.
Example 25.8Image Produced by a Concave Lens
Suppose an object such as a book page is held 7.50 cm from a concave lens of focal length –10.0 cm. Such a lens could be used in eyeglasses
to correct pronounced nearsightedness. What magnification is produced?
Strategy and Concept
This example is identical to the preceding one, except that the focal length is negative for a concave or diverging lens. The method of solution is
thus the same, but the results are different in important ways.
CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS S 913
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
foreach (TwainStaticFrameSizeType frame in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
break apart pdf; c# print pdf to specific printer
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. if (device.Compression != TwainCompressionMode.Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
pdf link to specific page; cannot print pdf no pages selected
Solution
To find the magnification
m
, we must first find the image distance
d
i
using thin lens equation
(25.39)
1
d
i
=
1
f
1
d
o
,
or its alternative rearrangement
(25.40)
d
i
=
fd
o
d
o
f
.
We are given that
f=–10.0 cm
and
d
o
=7.50 cm
. Entering these yields a value for
1/d
i
:
(25.41)
1
d
i
=
1
−10.0 cm
1
7.50 cm
=
−0.2333
cm
.
This must be inverted to find
d
i
:
(25.42)
d
i
=−
cm
0.2333
=−4.29 cm.
Or
(25.43)
d
i
=
(7.5)(−10)
7.5−(−10)
=−75/17.5=−4.29 cm.
Now the magnification equation can be used to find the magnification
m
, since both
d
i
and
d
o
are known. Entering their values gives
(25.44)
m=−
d
i
d
o
=−
−4.29 cm
7.50 cm
=0.571.
Discussion
A number of results in this example are true of all case 3 images, as well as being consistent withFigure 25.39. Magnification is positive (as
predicted), meaning the image is upright. The magnification is also less than 1, meaning the image is smaller than the object—in this case, a little
over half its size. The image distance is negative, meaning the image is on the same side of the lens as the object. (The image is virtual.) The
image is closer to the lens than the object, since the image distance is smaller in magnitude than the object distance. The location of the image is
not obvious when you look through a concave lens. In fact, since the image is smaller than the object, you may think it is farther away. But the
image is closer than the object, a fact that is useful in correcting nearsightedness, as we shall see in a later section.
Table 25.3summarizes the three types of images formed by single thin lenses. These are referred to as case 1, 2, and 3 images. Convex
(converging) lenses can form either real or virtual images (cases 1 and 2, respectively), whereas concave (diverging) lenses can form only virtual
images (always case 3). Real images are always inverted, but they can be either larger or smaller than the object. For example, a slide projector
forms an image larger than the slide, whereas a camera makes an image smaller than the object being photographed. Virtual images are always
upright and cannot be projected. Virtual images are larger than the object only in case 2, where a convex lens is used. The virtual image produced by
a concave lens is always smaller than the object—a case 3 image. We can see and photograph virtual images only by using an additional lens to
form a real image.
Table 25.3Three Types of Images Formed By Thin Lenses
Type
Formed when
Image type
d
i
m
Case 1
f
positive,
d
o
f
real
positive negative
Case 2
f
positive,
d
o
f
virtual
negative
positive
m>1
Case 3
f
negative
virtual
negative positive
m<1
InImage Formation by Mirrors, we shall see that mirrors can form exactly the same types of images as lenses.
Take-Home Experiment: Concentrating Sunlight
Find several lenses and determine whether they are converging or diverging. In general those that are thicker near the edges are diverging and
those that are thicker near the center are converging. On a bright sunny day take the converging lenses outside and try focusing the sunlight
onto a piece of paper. Determine the focal lengths of the lenses. Be careful because the paper may start to burn, depending on the type of lens
you have selected.
Problem-Solving Strategies for Lenses
Step 1. Examine the situation to determine that image formation by a lens is involved.
914 CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Step 2. Determine whether ray tracing, the thin lens equations, or both are to be employed. A sketch is very useful even if ray tracing is not
specifically required by the problem. Write symbols and values on the sketch.
Step 3. Identify exactly what needs to be determined in the problem (identify the unknowns).
Step 4. Make alist of what is given or can be inferred from the problem as stated (identify the knowns). It is helpful to determine whether the situation
involves a case 1, 2, or 3 image. While these are just names for types of images, they have certain characteristics (given inTable 25.3) that can be of
great use in solving problems.
Step 5. If ray tracing is required, use the ray tracing rules listed near the beginning of this section.
Step 6. Most quantitative problems require the use of the thin lens equations. These are solved in the usual manner by substituting knowns and
solving for unknowns. Several worked examples serve as guides.
Step 7. Check to see if the answer is reasonable: Does it make sense?If you have identified the type of image (case 1, 2, or 3), you should assess
whether your answer is consistent with the type of image, magnification, and so on.
Misconception Alert
We do not realize that light rays are coming from every part of the object, passing through every part of the lens, and all can be used to form the
final image.
We generally feel the entire lens, or mirror, is needed to form an image. Actually, half a lens will form the same, though a fainter, image.
25.7Image Formation by Mirrors
We only have to look as far as the nearest bathroom to find an example of an image formed by a mirror. Images in flat mirrors are the same size as
the object and are located behind the mirror. Like lenses, mirrors can form a variety of images. For example, dental mirrors may produce a magnified
image, just as makeup mirrors do. Security mirrors in shops, on the other hand, form images that are smaller than the object. We will use the law of
reflection to understand how mirrors form images, and we will find that mirror images are analogous to those formed by lenses.
Figure 25.40helps illustrate how a flat mirror forms an image. Two rays are shown emerging from the same point, striking the mirror, and being
reflected into the observer’s eye. The rays can diverge slightly, and both still get into the eye. If the rays are extrapolated backward, they seem to
originate from a common point behind the mirror, locating the image. (The paths of the reflected rays into the eye are the same as if they had come
directly from that point behind the mirror.) Using the law of reflection—the angle of reflection equals the angle of incidence—we can see that the
image and object are the same distance from the mirror. This is a virtual image, since it cannot be projected—the rays only appear to originate from a
common point behind the mirror. Obviously, if you walk behind the mirror, you cannot see the image, since the rays do not go there. But in front of the
mirror, the rays behave exactly as if they had come from behind the mirror, so that is where the image is situated.
Figure 25.40Two sets of rays from common points on an object are reflected by a flat mirror into the eye of an observer. The reflected rays seem to originate from behind the
mirror, locating the virtual image.
Now let us consider the focal length of a mirror—for example, the concave spherical mirrors inFigure 25.41. Rays of light that strike the surface
follow the law of reflection. For a mirror that is large compared with its radius of curvature, as inFigure 25.41(a), we see that the reflected rays do not
cross at the same point, and the mirror does not have a well-defined focal point. If the mirror had the shape of a parabola, the rays would all cross at
a single point, and the mirror would have a well-defined focal point. But parabolic mirrors are much more expensive to make than spherical mirrors.
The solution is to use a mirror that is small compared with its radius of curvature, as shown inFigure 25.41(b). (This is the mirror equivalent of the
thin lens approximation.) To a very good approximation, this mirror has a well-defined focal point at F that is the focal distance
f
from the center of
the mirror. The focal length
f
of a concave mirror is positive, since it is a converging mirror.
CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS S 915
Figure 25.41(a) Parallel rays reflected from a large spherical mirror do not all cross at a common point. (b) If a spherical mirror is small compared with its radius of curvature,
parallel rays are focused to a common point. The distance of the focal point from the center of the mirror is its focal length
f
. Since this mirror is converging, it has a positive
focal length.
Just as for lenses, the shorter the focal length, the more powerful the mirror; thus,
P=1/f
for a mirror, too. A more strongly curved mirror has a
shorter focal length and a greater power. Using the law of reflection and some simple trigonometry, it can be shown that the focal length is half the
radius of curvature, or
(25.45)
f=
R
2
,
where
R
is the radius of curvature of a spherical mirror. The smaller the radius of curvature, the smaller the focal length and, thus, the more powerful
the mirror.
The convex mirror shown inFigure 25.42also has a focal point. Parallel rays of light reflected from the mirror seem to originate from the point F at
the focal distance
f
behind the mirror. The focal length and power of a convex mirror are negative, since it is a diverging mirror.
Figure 25.42Parallel rays of light reflected from a convex spherical mirror (small in size compared with its radius of curvature) seem to originate from a well-defined focal point
at the focal distance
f
behind the mirror. Convex mirrors diverge light rays and, thus, have a negative focal length.
Ray tracing is as useful for mirrors as for lenses. The rules for ray tracing for mirrors are based on the illustrations just discussed:
1. A ray approaching a concave converging mirror parallel to its axis is reflected through the focal point F of the mirror on the same side. (See rays
1 and 3 inFigure 25.41(b).)
2. A ray approaching a convex diverging mirror parallel to its axis is reflected so that it seems to come from the focal point F behind the mirror.
(See rays 1 and 3 inFigure 25.42.)
3. Any ray striking the center of a mirror is followed by applying the law of reflection; it makes the same angle with the axis when leaving as when
approaching. (See ray 2 inFigure 25.43.)
4. A ray approaching a concave converging mirror through its focal point is reflected parallel to its axis. (The reverse of rays 1 and 3 inFigure
25.41.)
916 CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
5. A ray approaching a convex diverging mirror by heading toward its focal point on the opposite side is reflected parallel to the axis. (The reverse
of rays 1 and 3 inFigure 25.42.)
We will use ray tracing to illustrate how images are formed by mirrors, and we can use ray tracing quantitatively to obtain numerical information. But
since we assume each mirror is small compared with its radius of curvature, we can use the thin lens equations for mirrors just as we did for lenses.
Consider the situation shown inFigure 25.43, concave spherical mirror reflection, in which an object is placed farther from a concave (converging)
mirror than its focal length. That is,
f
is positive and
d
o
>
f
, so that we may expect an image similar to the case 1 real image formed by a
converging lens. Ray tracing inFigure 25.43shows that the rays from a common point on the object all cross at a point on the same side of the
mirror as the object. Thus a real image can be projected onto a screen placed at this location. The image distance is positive, and the image is
inverted, so its magnification is negative. This is acase 1 image for mirrors. It differs from the case 1 image for lenses only in that the image is on the
same side of the mirror as the object. It is otherwise identical.
Figure 25.43A case 1 image for a mirror. An object is farther from the converging mirror than its focal length. Rays from a common point on the object are traced using the
rules in the text. Ray 1 approaches parallel to the axis, ray 2 strikes the center of the mirror, and ray 3 goes through the focal point on the way toward the mirror. All three rays
cross at the same point after being reflected, locating the inverted real image. Although three rays are shown, only two of the three are needed to locate the image and
determine its height.
Example 25.9A Concave Reflector
Electric room heaters use a concave mirror to reflect infrared (IR) radiation from hot coils. Note that IR follows the same law of reflection as
visible light. Given that the mirror has a radius of curvature of 50.0 cm and produces an image of the coils 3.00 m away from the mirror, where
are the coils?
Strategy and Concept
We are given that the concave mirror projects a real image of the coils at an image distance
d
i
=3.00 m
. The coils are the object, and we are
asked to find their location—that is, to find the object distance
d
o
. We are also given the radius of curvature of the mirror, so that its focal length
is
f=R
/
2=25.0 cm
(positive since the mirror is concave or converging). Assuming the mirror is small compared with its radius of
curvature, we can use the thin lens equations, to solve this problem.
Solution
Since
d
i
and
f
are known, thin lens equation can be used to find
d
o
:
(25.46)
1
d
o
+
1
d
i
=
1
f
.
Rearranging to isolate
d
o
gives
(25.47)
1
d
o
=
1
f
1
d
i
.
Entering known quantities gives a value for
1/d
o
:
(25.48)
1
d
o
=
1
0.250 m
1
3.00 m
=
3.667
m
.
This must be inverted to find
d
o
:
(25.49)
d
o
=
1 m
3.667
=27.3 cm.
Discussion
Note that the object (the filament) is farther from the mirror than the mirror’s focal length. This is a case 1 image (
d
o
>f
and
f
positive),
consistent with the fact that a real image is formed. You will get the most concentrated thermal energy directly in front of the mirror and 3.00 m
away from it. Generally, this is not desirable, since it could cause burns. Usually, you want the rays to emerge parallel, and this is accomplished
by having the filament at the focal point of the mirror.
Note that the filament here is not much farther from the mirror than its focal length and that the image produced is considerably farther away.
This is exactly analogous to a slide projector. Placing a slide only slightly farther away from the projector lens than its focal length produces an
CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS S 917
image significantly farther away. As the object gets closer to the focal distance, the image gets farther away. In fact, as the object distance
approaches the focal length, the image distance approaches infinity and the rays are sent out parallel to one another.
Example 25.10Solar Electric Generating System
One of the solar technologies used today for generating electricity is a device (called a parabolic trough or concentrating collector) that
concentrates the sunlight onto a blackened pipe that contains a fluid. This heated fluid is pumped to a heat exchanger, where its heat energy is
transferred to another system that is used to generate steam—and so generate electricity through a conventional steam cycle.Figure 25.44
shows such a working system in southern California. Concave mirrors are used to concentrate the sunlight onto the pipe. The mirror has the
approximate shape of a section of a cylinder. For the problem, assume that the mirror is exactly one-quarter of a full cylinder.
a. If we wish to place the fluid-carrying pipe 40.0 cm from the concave mirror at the mirror’s focal point, what will be the radius of curvature of
the mirror?
b. Per meter of pipe, what will be the amount of sunlight concentrated onto the pipe, assuming the insolation (incident solar radiation) is
0.900 kW/m
2
?
c. If the fluid-carrying pipe has a 2.00-cm diameter, what will be the temperature increase of the fluid per meter of pipe over a period of one
minute? Assume all the solar radiation incident on the reflector is absorbed by the pipe, and that the fluid is mineral oil.
Strategy
To solve anIntegrated Concept Problemwe must first identify the physical principles involved. Part (a) is related to the current topic. Part (b)
involves a little math, primarily geometry. Part (c) requires an understanding of heat and density.
Solution to (a)
To a good approximation for a concave or semi-spherical surface, the point where the parallel rays from the sun converge will be at the focal
point, so
R=2f=80.0 cm
.
Solution to (b)
The insolation is
900 W/m
2
. We must find the cross-sectional area
A
of the concave mirror, since the power delivered is
900 W/m
2
×A
.
The mirror in this case is a quarter-section of a cylinder, so the area for a length
L
of the mirror is
A=
1
4
(2πR)L
. The area for a length of 1.00
m is then
(25.50)
A=
π
2
R(1.00 m)=
(3.14)
2
(0.800 m)(1.00 m)=1.26m
2
.
The insolation on the 1.00-m length of pipe is then
(25.51)
9.00×10
2
W
m
2
1.26m
2
=1130 W.
Solution to (c)
The increase in temperature is given by
Q=mcΔT
. The mass
m
of the mineral oil in the one-meter section of pipe is
(25.52)
ρV=ρπ
d
2
2
(1.00 m)
=
8.00×10
2
kg/m
3
(3.14)(0.0100 m)
2
(1.00 m)
= 0.251 kg.
Therefore, the increase in temperature in one minute is
(25.53)
ΔQ/mc
=
(1130 W)(60.0 s)
(0.251 kg)(1670 J·kg/ºC)
= 162ºC.
Discussion for (c)
An array of such pipes in the California desert can provide a thermal output of 250 MW on a sunny day, with fluids reaching temperatures as high
as
400ºC
. We are considering only one meter of pipe here, and ignoring heat losses along the pipe.
918 CHAPTER 25 | GEOMETRIC OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested