26
VISION AND OPTICAL INSTRUMENTS
Figure 26.1A scientist examines minute details on the surface of a disk drive at a magnification of 100,000 times. The image was produced using an electron microscope.
(credit: Robert Scoble)
Learning Objectives
26.1.Physics of the Eye
• Explain the image formation by the eye.
• Explain why peripheral images lack detail and color.
• Define refractive indices.
• Analyze the accommodation of the eye for distant and near vision.
26.2.Vision Correction
• Identify and discuss common vision defects.
• Explain nearsightedness and farsightedness corrections.
• Explain laser vision correction.
26.3.Color and Color Vision
• Explain the simple theory of color vision.
• Outline the coloring properties of light sources.
• Describe the retinex theory of color vision.
26.4.Microscopes
• Investigate different types of microscopes.
• Learn how image is formed in a compound microscope.
26.5.Telescopes
• Outline the invention of a telescope.
• Describe the working of a telescope.
26.6.Aberrations
• Describe optical aberration.
Introduction to Vision and Optical Instruments
Explore how the image on the computer screen is formed. How is the image formation on the computer screen different from the image formation in
your eye as you look down the microscope? How can videos of living cell processes be taken for viewing later on, and by many different people?
CHAPTER 26 | VISION AND OPTICAL INSTRUMENTS S 929
Pdf no pages selected - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break a pdf apart; break pdf documents
Pdf no pages selected - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf into multiple pages; pdf format specification
Seeing faces and objects we love and cherish is a delight—one’s favorite teddy bear, a picture on the wall, or the sun rising over the mountains.
Intricate images help us understand nature and are invaluable for developing techniques and technologies in order to improve the quality of life. The
image of a red blood cell that almost fills the cross-sectional area of a tiny capillary makes us wonder how blood makes it through and not get stuck.
We are able to see bacteria and viruses and understand their structure. It is the knowledge of physics that provides fundamental understanding and
models required to develop new techniques and instruments. Therefore, physics is called anenabling science—a science that enables development
and advancement in other areas. It is through optics and imaging that physics enables advancement in major areas of biosciences. This chapter
illustrates the enabling nature of physics through an understanding of how a human eye is able to see and how we are able to use optical instruments
to see beyond what is possible with the naked eye. It is convenient to categorize these instruments on the basis of geometric optics (seeGeometric
Optics) and wave optics (seeWave Optics).
26.1Physics of the Eye
The eye is perhaps the most interesting of all optical instruments. The eye is remarkable in how it forms images and in the richness of detail and color
it can detect. However, our eyes commonly need some correction, to reach what is called “normal” vision, but should be called ideal rather than
normal. Image formation by our eyes and common vision correction are easy to analyze with the optics discussed inGeometric Optics.
Figure 26.2shows the basic anatomy of the eye. The cornea and lens form a system that, to a good approximation, acts as a single thin lens. For
clear vision, a real image must be projected onto the light-sensitive retina, which lies at a fixed distance from the lens. The lens of the eye adjusts its
power to produce an image on the retina for objects at different distances. The center of the image falls on the fovea, which has the greatest density
of light receptors and the greatest acuity (sharpness) in the visual field. The variable opening (or pupil) of the eye along with chemical adaptation
allows the eye to detect light intensities from the lowest observable to
10
10
times greater (without damage). This is an incredible range of detection.
Our eyes perform a vast number of functions, such as sense direction, movement, sophisticated colors, and distance. Processing of visual nerve
impulses begins with interconnections in the retina and continues in the brain. The optic nerve conveys signals received by the eye to the brain.
Figure 26.2The cornea and lens of an eye act together to form a real image on the light-sensing retina, which has its densest concentration of receptors in the fovea and a
blind spot over the optic nerve. The power of the lens of an eye is adjustable to provide an image on the retina for varying object distances. Layers of tissues with varying
indices of refraction in the lens are shown here. However, they have been omitted from other pictures for clarity.
Refractive indices are crucial to image formation using lenses.Table 26.1shows refractive indices relevant to the eye. The biggest change in the
refractive index, and bending of rays, occurs at the cornea rather than the lens. The ray diagram inFigure 26.3shows image formation by the cornea
and lens of the eye. The rays bend according to the refractive indices provided inTable 26.1. The cornea provides about two-thirds of the power of
the eye, owing to the fact that speed of light changes considerably while traveling from air into cornea. The lens provides the remaining power
needed to produce an image on the retina. The cornea and lens can be treated as a single thin lens, even though the light rays pass through several
layers of material (such as cornea, aqueous humor, several layers in the lens, and vitreous humor), changing direction at each interface. The image
formed is much like the one produced by a single convex lens. This is a case 1 image. Images formed in the eye are inverted but the brain inverts
them once more to make them seem upright.
Table 26.1Refractive Indices Relevant to the Eye
Material
Index of Refraction
Water
1.33
Air
1.0
Cornea
1.38
Aqueous humor r 1.34
Lens
1.41 average (varies throughout the lens, greatest in center)
Vitreous humor r 1.34
930 CHAPTER 26 | VISION AND OPTICAL INSTRUMENTS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET TWAIN: TWAIN Image Scanning in Console Application
First, there is no SelectSourceDialog in VB.NET TWAIN console scanning application. image scanning SDK, like how to scan multiple pages to one PDF or TIFF
break a pdf; add page break to pdf
VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
VB.NET programmers can easily render selected PowerPoint slide our VB.NET PowerPoint to PDF conversion add pptx document file independently, no other external
can't cut and paste from pdf; break apart a pdf
Figure 26.3An image is formed on the retina with light rays converging most at the cornea and upon entering and exiting the lens. Rays from the top and bottom of the object
are traced and produce an inverted real image on the retina. The distance to the object is drawn smaller than scale.
As noted, the image must fall precisely on the retina to produce clear vision — that is, the image distance
d
i
must equal the lens-to-retina distance.
Because the lens-to-retina distance does not change, the image distance
d
i
must be the same for objects at all distances. The eye manages this by
varying the power (and focal length) of the lens to accommodate for objects at various distances. The process of adjusting the eye’s focal length is
calledaccommodation. A person with normal (ideal) vision can see objects clearly at distances ranging from 25 cm to essentially infinity. However,
although the near point (the shortest distance at which a sharp focus can be obtained) increases with age (becoming meters for some older people),
we will consider it to be 25 cm in our treatment here.
Figure 26.4shows the accommodation of the eye for distant and near vision. Since light rays from a nearby object can diverge and still enter the eye,
the lens must be more converging (more powerful) for close vision than for distant vision. To be more converging, the lens is made thicker by the
action of the ciliary muscle surrounding it. The eye is most relaxed when viewing distant objects, one reason that microscopes and telescopes are
designed to produce distant images. Vision of very distant objects is calledtotally relaxed, while close vision is termedaccommodated, with the
closest vision beingfully accommodated.
Figure 26.4Relaxed and accommodated vision for distant and close objects. (a) Light rays from the same point on a distant object must be nearly parallel while entering the
eye and more easily converge to produce an image on the retina. (b) Light rays from a nearby object can diverge more and still enter the eye. A more powerful lens is needed
to converge them on the retina than if they were parallel.
CHAPTER 26 | VISION AND OPTICAL INSTRUMENTS S 931
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK deployment on IIS in .NET
the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer Bit Applications" in accordance with the selected DLL (x86 site configured in IIS has no sufficient authority
break pdf documents; pdf no pages selected to print
VB.NET PDF - VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer Deployment on IIS
the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer Bit Applications" in accordance with the selected DLL (x86 site configured in IIS has no sufficient authority
break up pdf file; how to split pdf file by pages
We will use the thin lens equations to examine image formation by the eye quantitatively. First, note the power of a lens is given as
p=1/f
, so we
rewrite the thin lens equations as
(26.1)
P=
1
d
o
+
1
d
i
and
(26.2)
h
i
h
o
=−
d
i
d
o
=m.
We understand that
d
i
must equal the lens-to-retina distance to obtain clear vision, and that normal vision is possible for objects at distances
d
o
=25 cm
to infinity.
Take-Home Experiment: The Pupil
Look at the central transparent area of someone’s eye, the pupil, in normal room light. Estimate the diameter of the pupil. Now turn off the lights
and darken the room. After a few minutes turn on the lights and promptly estimate the diameter of the pupil. What happens to the pupil as the
eye adjusts to the room light? Explain your observations.
The eye can detect an impressive amount of detail, considering how small the image is on the retina. To get some idea of how small the image can
be, consider the following example.
Example 26.1Size of Image on Retina
What is the size of the image on the retina of a
1.20×10
−2
cm diameter human hair, held at arm’s length (60.0 cm) away? Take the lens-to-
retina distance to be 2.00 cm.
Strategy
We want to find the height of the image
h
i
, given the height of the object is
h
o
=1.20×10
−2
cm. We also know that the object is 60.0 cm
away, so that
d
o
=60.0 cm
. For clear vision, the image distance must equal the lens-to-retina distance, and so
d
i
=2.00 cm
. The equation
h
i
h
o
=−
d
i
d
o
=m
can be used to find
h
i
with the known information.
Solution
The only unknown variable in the equation
h
i
h
o
=−
d
i
d
o
=m
is
h
i
:
(26.3)
h
i
h
o
=−
d
i
d
o
.
Rearranging to isolate
h
i
yields
(26.4)
h
i
=−h
o
d
i
d
o
.
Substituting the known values gives
(26.5)
h
i
= −(1.20×10
−2
cm)
2.00 cm
60.0 cm
= −4.00×10
−4
cm.
Discussion
This truly small image is not the smallest discernible—that is, the limit to visual acuity is even smaller than this. Limitations on visual acuity have
to do with the wave properties of light and will be discussed in the next chapter. Some limitation is also due to the inherent anatomy of the eye
and processing that occurs in our brain.
Example 26.2Power Range of the Eye
Calculate the power of the eye when viewing objects at the greatest and smallest distances possible with normal vision, assuming a lens-to-
retina distance of 2.00 cm (a typical value).
Strategy
932 CHAPTER 26 | VISION AND OPTICAL INSTRUMENTS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# Image: Create C#.NET Windows Document Image Viewer | Online
C# Windows Document Image Viewer Features. No need for viewing multiple document & image formats (PDF, MS Word value of selected drop-down list to switch pages.
split pdf; pdf specification
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Printer Control; Print TIFF Using VB.NET
document printing add-on has no limitation on the function to print multiple TIFF pages by defining powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf insert page break; break a pdf into parts
For clear vision, the image must be on the retina, and so
d
i
=2.00 cm
here. For distant vision,
d
o
≈∞
, and for close vision,
d
o
=25.0 cm
, as discussed earlier. The equation
P=
1
d
o
+
1
d
i
as written just above, can be used directly to solve for
P
in both cases,
since we know
d
i
and
d
o
. Power has units of diopters, where
1 D=1/m
, and so we should express all distances in meters.
Solution
For distant vision,
(26.6)
P=
1
d
o
+
1
d
i
=
1
+
1
0.0200 m
.
Since
1/∞ =0
, this gives
(26.7)
P=0+50.0/m=50.0 D (distant vision).
Now, for close vision,
(26.8)
=
1
d
o
+
1
d
i
=
1
0.250 m
+
1
0.0200 m
=
4.00
m
+
50.0
m
=4.00 D+50.0 D
= 54.0 D (close vision).
Discussion
For an eye with this typical 2.00 cm lens-to-retina distance, the power of the eye ranges from 50.0 D (for distant totally relaxed vision) to 54.0 D
(for close fully accommodated vision), which is an 8% increase. This increase in power for close vision is consistent with the preceding
discussion and the ray tracing inFigure 26.4. An 8% ability to accommodate is considered normal but is typical for people who are about 40
years old. Younger people have greater accommodation ability, whereas older people gradually lose the ability to accommodate. When an
optometrist identifies accommodation as a problem in elder people, it is most likely due to stiffening of the lens. The lens of the eye changes with
age in ways that tend to preserve the ability to see distant objects clearly but do not allow the eye to accommodate for close vision, a condition
calledpresbyopia(literally, elder eye). To correct this vision defect, we place a converging, positive power lens in front of the eye, such as found
in reading glasses. Commonly available reading glasses are rated by their power in diopters, typically ranging from 1.0 to 3.5 D.
26.2Vision Correction
The need for some type of vision correction is very common. Common vision defects are easy to understand, and some are simple to correct.Figure
26.5illustrates two common vision defects.Nearsightedness, ormyopia, is the inability to see distant objects clearly while close objects are clear.
The eye overconverges the nearly parallel rays from a distant object, and the rays cross in front of the retina. More divergent rays from a close object
are converged on the retina for a clear image. The distance to the farthest object that can be seen clearly is called thefar pointof the eye (normally
infinity).Farsightedness, orhyperopia, is the inability to see close objects clearly while distant objects may be clear. A farsighted eye does not
converge sufficient rays from a close object to make the rays meet on the retina. Less diverging rays from a distant object can be converged for a
clear image. The distance to the closest object that can be seen clearly is called thenear pointof the eye (normally 25 cm).
Figure 26.5(a) The nearsighted (myopic) eye converges rays from a distant object in front of the retina; thus, they are diverging when they strike the retina, producing a blurry
image. This can be caused by the lens of the eye being too powerful or the length of the eye being too great. (b) The farsighted (hyperopic) eye is unable to converge the rays
from a close object by the time they strike the retina, producing blurry close vision. This can be caused by insufficient power in the lens or by the eye being too short.
Since the nearsighted eye over converges light rays, the correction for nearsightedness is to place a diverging spectacle lens in front of the eye. This
reduces the power of an eye that is too powerful. Another way of thinking about this is that a diverging spectacle lens produces a case 3 image,
CHAPTER 26 | VISION AND OPTICAL INSTRUMENTS S 933
VB.NET Word: Use VB.NET Code to Convert Word Document to TIFF
Render one or multiple selected DOCXPage instances into to TIFF image converting application, no external Word user guides with RasteEdge .NET PDF SDK using VB
break pdf into pages; break a pdf into smaller files
C# Word: C#.NET Word Rotator, How to Rotate and Reorient Word Page
Remarkably, no other external products, including Microsoft Office rotate all MS Word document pages by 90 & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
break pdf into single pages; pdf file specification
which is closer to the eye than the object (seeFigure 26.6). To determine the spectacle power needed for correction, you must know the person’s far
point—that is, you must know the greatest distance at which the person can see clearly. Then the image produced by a spectacle lens must be at this
distance or closer for the nearsighted person to be able to see it clearly. It is worth noting that wearing glasses does not change the eye in any way.
The eyeglass lens is simply used to create an image of the object at a distance where the nearsighted person can see it clearly. Whereas someone
not wearing glasses can see clearlyobjectsthat fall between their near point and their far point, someone wearing glasses can seeimagesthat fall
between their near point and their far point.
Figure 26.6Correction of nearsightedness requires a diverging lens that compensates for the overconvergence by the eye. The diverging lens produces an image closer to
the eye than the object, so that the nearsighted person can see it clearly.
Example 26.3Correcting Nearsightedness
What power of spectacle lens is needed to correct the vision of a nearsighted person whose far point is 30.0 cm? Assume the spectacle
(corrective) lens is held 1.50 cm away from the eye by eyeglass frames.
Strategy
You want this nearsighted person to be able to see very distant objects clearly. That means the spectacle lens must produce an image 30.0 cm
from the eye for an object very far away. An image 30.0 cm from the eye will be 28.5 cm to the left of the spectacle lens (seeFigure 26.6).
Therefore, we must get
d
i
=−28.5 cm
when
d
o
≈ ∞
. The image distance is negative, because it is on the same side of the spectacle as
the object.
Solution
Since
d
i
and
d
o
are known, the power of the spectacle lens can be found using
P=
1
d
o
+
1
d
i
as written earlier:
(26.9)
P=
1
d
o
+
1
d
i
=
1
+
1
−0.285 m
.
Since
1/∞= 0
, we obtain:
(26.10)
P=0−3.51/m=−3.51 D.
Discussion
The negative power indicates a diverging (or concave) lens, as expected. The spectacle produces a case 3 image closer to the eye, where the
person can see it. If you examine eyeglasses for nearsighted people, you will find the lenses are thinnest in the center. Additionally, if you
examine a prescription for eyeglasses for nearsighted people, you will find that the prescribed power is negative and given in units of diopters.
Since the farsighted eye under converges light rays, the correction for farsightedness is to place a converging spectacle lens in front of the eye. This
increases the power of an eye that is too weak. Another way of thinking about this is that a converging spectacle lens produces a case 2 image,
which is farther from the eye than the object (seeFigure 26.7). To determine the spectacle power needed for correction, you must know the person’s
near point—that is, you must know the smallest distance at which the person can see clearly. Then the image produced by a spectacle lens must be
at this distance or farther for the farsighted person to be able to see it clearly.
934 CHAPTER 26 | VISION AND OPTICAL INSTRUMENTS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 26.7Correction of farsightedness uses a converging lens that compensates for the under convergence by the eye. The converging lens produces an image farther from
the eye than the object, so that the farsighted person can see it clearly.
Example 26.4Correcting Farsightedness
What power of spectacle lens is needed to allow a farsighted person, whose near point is 1.00 m, to see an object clearly that is 25.0 cm away?
Assume the spectacle (corrective) lens is held 1.50 cm away from the eye by eyeglass frames.
Strategy
When an object is held 25.0 cm from the person’s eyes, the spectacle lens must produce an image 1.00 m away (the near point). An image 1.00
m from the eye will be 98.5 cm to the left of the spectacle lens because the spectacle lens is 1.50 cm from the eye (seeFigure 26.7). Therefore,
d
i
=−98.5 cm
. The image distance is negative, because it is on the same side of the spectacle as the object. The object is 23.5 cm to the left
of the spectacle, so that
d
o
=23.5 cm
.
Solution
Since
d
i
and
d
o
are known, the power of the spectacle lens can be found using
P=
1
d
o
+
1
d
i
:
(26.11)
=
1
d
o
+
1
d
i
=
1
0.235 m
+
1
−0.985 m
= 4.26 D−1.02 D=3.24 D.
Discussion
The positive power indicates a converging (convex) lens, as expected. The convex spectacle produces a case 2 image farther from the eye,
where the person can see it. If you examine eyeglasses of farsighted people, you will find the lenses to be thickest in the center. In addition, a
prescription of eyeglasses for farsighted people has a prescribed power that is positive.
Another common vision defect isastigmatism, an unevenness or asymmetry in the focus of the eye. For example, rays passing through a vertical
region of the eye may focus closer than rays passing through a horizontal region, resulting in the image appearing elongated. This is mostly due to
irregularities in the shape of the cornea but can also be due to lens irregularities or unevenness in the retina. Because of these irregularities, different
parts of the lens system produce images at different locations. The eye-brain system can compensate for some of these irregularities, but they
generally manifest themselves as less distinct vision or sharper images along certain axes.Figure 26.8shows a chart used to detect astigmatism.
Astigmatism can be at least partially corrected with a spectacle having the opposite irregularity of the eye. If an eyeglass prescription has a cylindrical
correction, it is there to correct astigmatism. The normal corrections for short- or farsightedness are spherical corrections, uniform along all axes.
CHAPTER 26 | VISION AND OPTICAL INSTRUMENTS S 935
Figure 26.8This chart can detect astigmatism, unevenness in the focus of the eye. Check each of your eyes separately by looking at the center cross (without spectacles if
you wear them). If lines along some axes appear darker or clearer than others, you have an astigmatism.
Contact lenses have advantages over glasses beyond their cosmetic aspects. One problem with glasses is that as the eye moves, it is not at a fixed
distance from the spectacle lens. Contacts rest on and move with the eye, eliminating this problem. Because contacts cover a significant portion of
the cornea, they provide superior peripheral vision compared with eyeglasses. Contacts also correct some corneal astigmatism caused by surface
irregularities. The tear layer between the smooth contact and the cornea fills in the irregularities. Since the index of refraction of the tear layer and the
cornea are very similar, you now have a regular optical surface in place of an irregular one. If the curvature of a contact lens is not the same as the
cornea (as may be necessary with some individuals to obtain a comfortable fit), the tear layer between the contact and cornea acts as a lens. If the
tear layer is thinner in the center than at the edges, it has a negative power, for example. Skilled optometrists will adjust the power of the contact to
compensate.
Laser vision correctionhas progressed rapidly in the last few years. It is the latest and by far the most successful in a series of procedures that
correct vision by reshaping the cornea. As noted at the beginning of this section, the cornea accounts for about two-thirds of the power of the eye.
Thus, small adjustments of its curvature have the same effect as putting a lens in front of the eye. To a reasonable approximation, the power of
multiple lenses placed close together equals the sum of their powers. For example, a concave spectacle lens (for nearsightedness) having
P=−3.00 D
has the same effect on vision as reducing the power of the eye itself by 3.00 D. So to correct the eye for nearsightedness, the cornea
is flattened to reduce its power. Similarly, to correct for farsightedness, the curvature of the cornea is enhanced to increase the power of the eye—the
same effect as the positive power spectacle lens used for farsightedness. Laser vision correction uses high intensity electromagnetic radiation to
ablate (to remove material from the surface) and reshape the corneal surfaces.
Today, the most commonly used laser vision correction procedure isLaser in situ Keratomileusis (LASIK). The top layer of the cornea is surgically
peeled back and the underlying tissue ablated by multiple bursts of finely controlled ultraviolet radiation produced by an excimer laser. Lasers are
used because they not only produce well-focused intense light, but they also emit very pure wavelength electromagnetic radiation that can be
controlled more accurately than mixed wavelength light. The 193 nm wavelength UV commonly used is extremely and strongly absorbed by corneal
tissue, allowing precise evaporation of very thin layers. A computer controlled program applies more bursts, usually at a rate of 10 per second, to the
areas that require deeper removal. Typically a spot less than 1 mm in diameter and about
0.3μm
in thickness is removed by each burst.
Nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism can be corrected with an accuracy that produces normal distant vision in more than 90% of the
patients, in many cases right away. The corneal flap is replaced; healing takes place rapidly and is nearly painless. More than 1 million Americans per
year undergo LASIK (seeFigure 26.9).
Figure 26.9Laser vision correction is being performed using the LASIK procedure. Reshaping of the cornea by laser ablation is based on a careful assessment of the patient’s
vision and is computer controlled. The upper corneal layer is temporarily peeled back and minimally disturbed in LASIK, providing for more rapid and less painful healing of the
less sensitive tissues below. (credit: U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Brien Aho)
26.3Color and Color Vision
The gift of vision is made richer by the existence of color. Objects and lights abound with thousands of hues that stimulate our eyes, brains, and
emotions. Two basic questions are addressed in this brief treatment—what does color mean in scientific terms, and how do we, as humans, perceive
it?
Simple Theory of Color Vision
We have already noted that color is associated with the wavelength of visible electromagnetic radiation. When our eyes receive pure-wavelength
light, we tend to see only a few colors. Six of these (most often listed) are red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and violet. These are the rainbow of colors
936 CHAPTER 26 | VISION AND OPTICAL INSTRUMENTS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
produced when white light is dispersed according to different wavelengths. There are thousands of otherhuesthat we can perceive. These include
brown, teal, gold, pink, and white. One simple theory of color vision implies that all these hues are our eye’s response to different combinations of
wavelengths. This is true to an extent, but we find that color perception is even subtler than our eye’s response for various wavelengths of light.
The two major types of light-sensing cells (photoreceptors) in the retina arerods and cones. Rods are more sensitive than cones by a factor of
about 1000 and are solely responsible for peripheral vision as well as vision in very dark environments. They are also important for motion detection.
There are about 120 million rods in the human retina. Rods do not yield color information. You may notice that you lose color vision when it is very
dark, but you retain the ability to discern grey scales.
Take-Home Experiment: Rods and Cones
1. Go into a darkened room from a brightly lit room, or from outside in the Sun. How long did it take to start seeing shapes more clearly? What
about color? Return to the bright room. Did it take a few minutes before you could see things clearly?
2. Demonstrate the sensitivity of foveal vision. Look at the letter G in the word ROGERS. What about the clarity of the letters on either side of
G?
Cones are most concentrated in the fovea, the central region of the retina. There are no rods here. The fovea is at the center of the macula, a 5 mm
diameter region responsible for our central vision. The cones work best in bright light and are responsible for high resolution vision. There are about 6
million cones in the human retina. There are three types of cones, and each type is sensitive to different ranges of wavelengths, as illustrated in
Figure 26.10. Asimplified theory of color visionis that there are threeprimary colorscorresponding to the three types of cones. The thousands of
other hues that we can distinguish among are created by various combinations of stimulations of the three types of cones. Color television uses a
three-color system in which the screen is covered with equal numbers of red, green, and blue phosphor dots. The broad range of hues a viewer sees
is produced by various combinations of these three colors. For example, you will perceive yellow when red and green are illuminated with the correct
ratio of intensities. White may be sensed when all three are illuminated. Then, it would seem that all hues can be produced by adding three primary
colors in various proportions. But there is an indication that color vision is more sophisticated. There is no unique set of three primary colors. Another
set that works is yellow, green, and blue. A further indication of the need for a more complex theory of color vision is that various different
combinations can produce the same hue. Yellow can be sensed with yellow light, or with a combination of red and green, and also with white light
from which violet has been removed. The three-primary-colors aspect of color vision is well established; more sophisticated theories expand on it
rather than deny it.
Figure 26.10The image shows the relative sensitivity of the three types of cones, which are named according to wavelengths of greatest sensitivity. Rods are about 1000
times more sensitive, and their curve peaks at about 500 nm. Evidence for the three types of cones comes from direct measurements in animal and human eyes and testing of
color blind people.
Consider why various objects display color—that is, why are feathers blue and red in a crimson rosella? Thetrue color of an objectis defined by its
absorptive or reflective characteristics.Figure 26.11shows white light falling on three different objects, one pure blue, one pure red, and one black,
as well as pure red light falling on a white object. Other hues are created by more complex absorption characteristics. Pink, for example on a galah
cockatoo, can be due to weak absorption of all colors except red. An object can appear a different color under non-white illumination. For example, a
pure blue object illuminated with pure red light willappearblack, because it absorbs all the red light falling on it. But, the true color of the object is
blue, which is independent of illumination.
Figure 26.11Absorption characteristics determine the true color of an object. Here, three objects are illuminated by white light, and one by pure red light. White is the equal
mixture of all visible wavelengths; black is the absence of light.
CHAPTER 26 | VISION AND OPTICAL INSTRUMENTS S 937
Similarly,light sources have colorsthat are defined by the wavelengths they produce. A helium-neon laser emits pure red light. In fact, the phrase
“pure red light” is defined by having a sharp constrained spectrum, a characteristic of laser light. The Sun produces a broad yellowish spectrum,
fluorescent lights emit bluish-white light, and incandescent lights emit reddish-white hues as seen inFigure 26.12. As you would expect, you sense
these colors when viewing the light source directly or when illuminating a white object with them. All of this fits neatly into the simplified theory that a
combination of wavelengths produces various hues.
Take-Home Experiment: Exploring Color Addition
This activity is best done with plastic sheets of different colors as they allow more light to pass through to our eyes. However, thin sheets of
paper and fabric can also be used. Overlay different colors of the material and hold them up to a white light. Using the theory described above,
explain the colors you observe. You could also try mixing different crayon colors.
Figure 26.12Emission spectra for various light sources are shown. Curve A is average sunlight at Earth’s surface, curve B is light from a fluorescent lamp, and curve C is the
output of an incandescent light. The spike for a helium-neon laser (curve D) is due to its pure wavelength emission. The spikes in the fluorescent output are due to atomic
spectra—a topic that will be explored later.
Color Constancy and a Modified Theory of Color Vision
The eye-brain color-sensing system can, by comparing various objects in its view, perceive the true color of an object under varying lighting
conditions—an ability that is calledcolor constancy. We can sense that a white tablecloth, for example, is white whether it is illuminated by sunlight,
fluorescent light, or candlelight. The wavelengths entering the eye are quite different in each case, as the graphs inFigure 26.12imply, but our color
vision can detect the true color by comparing the tablecloth with its surroundings.
Theories that take color constancy into account are based on a large body of anatomical evidence as well as perceptual studies. There are nerve
connections among the light receptors on the retina, and there are far fewer nerve connections to the brain than there are rods and cones. This
means that there is signal processing in the eye before information is sent to the brain. For example, the eye makes comparisons between adjacent
light receptors and is very sensitive to edges as seen inFigure 26.13. Rather than responding simply to the light entering the eye, which is uniform in
the various rectangles in this figure, the eye responds to the edges and senses false darkness variations.
Figure 26.13The importance of edges is shown. Although the grey strips are uniformly shaded, as indicated by the graph immediately below them, they do not appear uniform
at all. Instead, they are perceived darker on the dark side and lighter on the light side of the edge, as shown in the bottom graph. This is due to nerve impulse processing in the
eye.
938 CHAPTER 26 | VISION AND OPTICAL INSTRUMENTS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested