asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Split pdf files Library SDK class asp.net .net wpf ajax PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics96-part1853

Figure 27.7Huygens’s principle applied to a straight wavefront traveling from one medium to another where its speed is less. The ray bends toward the perpendicular, since
the wavelets have a lower speed in the second medium.
What happens when a wave passes through an opening, such as light shining through an open door into a dark room? For light, we expect to see a
sharp shadow of the doorway on the floor of the room, and we expect no light to bend around corners into other parts of the room. When sound
passes through a door, we expect to hear it everywhere in the room and, thus, expect that sound spreads out when passing through such an opening
(seeFigure 27.8). What is the difference between the behavior of sound waves and light waves in this case? The answer is that light has very short
wavelengths and acts like a ray. Sound has wavelengths on the order of the size of the door and bends around corners (for frequency of 1000 Hz,
λ=c/=(330m/s)/(1000s
−1
)=0.33 m
, about three times smaller than the width of the doorway).
Figure 27.8(a) Light passing through a doorway makes a sharp outline on the floor. Since light’s wavelength is very small compared with the size of the door, it acts like a ray.
(b) Sound waves bend into all parts of the room, a wave effect, because their wavelength is similar to the size of the door.
If we pass light through smaller openings, often called slits, we can use Huygens’s principle to see that light bends as sound does (seeFigure 27.9).
The bending of a wave around the edges of an opening or an obstacle is calleddiffraction. Diffraction is a wave characteristic and occurs for all
types of waves. If diffraction is observed for some phenomenon, it is evidence that the phenomenon is a wave. Thus the horizontal diffraction of the
laser beam after it passes through slits inFigure 27.3is evidence that light is a wave.
Figure 27.9Huygens’s principle applied to a straight wavefront striking an opening. The edges of the wavefront bend after passing through the opening, a process called
diffraction. The amount of bending is more extreme for a small opening, consistent with the fact that wave characteristics are most noticeable for interactions with objects about
the same size as the wavelength.
27.3Young’s Double Slit Experiment
Although Christiaan Huygens thought that light was a wave, Isaac Newton did not. Newton felt that there were other explanations for color, and for
the interference and diffraction effects that were observable at the time. Owing to Newton’s tremendous stature, his view generally prevailed. The fact
that Huygens’s principle worked was not considered evidence that was direct enough to prove that light is a wave. The acceptance of the wave
character of light came many years later when, in 1801, the English physicist and physician Thomas Young (1773–1829) did his now-classic double
slit experiment (seeFigure 27.10).
CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS S 959
Split pdf files - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
split pdf into multiple files; break up pdf into individual pages
Split pdf files - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf into multiple documents; pdf link to specific page
Figure 27.10Young’s double slit experiment. Here pure-wavelength light sent through a pair of vertical slits is diffracted into a pattern on the screen of numerous vertical lines
spread out horizontally. Without diffraction and interference, the light would simply make two lines on the screen.
Why do we not ordinarily observe wave behavior for light, such as observed in Young’s double slit experiment? First, light must interact with
something small, such as the closely spaced slits used by Young, to show pronounced wave effects. Furthermore, Young first passed light from a
single source (the Sun) through a single slit to make the light somewhat coherent. Bycoherent, we mean waves are in phase or have a definite
phase relationship.Incoherentmeans the waves have random phase relationships. Why did Young then pass the light through a double slit? The
answer to this question is that two slits provide two coherent light sources that then interfere constructively or destructively. Young used sunlight,
where each wavelength forms its own pattern, making the effect more difficult to see. We illustrate the double slit experiment with monochromatic
(single
λ
) light to clarify the effect.Figure 27.11shows the pure constructive and destructive interference of two waves having the same wavelength
and amplitude.
Figure 27.11The amplitudes of waves add. (a) Pure constructive interference is obtained when identical waves are in phase. (b) Pure destructive interference occurs when
identical waves are exactly out of phase, or shifted by half a wavelength.
When light passes through narrow slits, it is diffracted into semicircular waves, as shown inFigure 27.12(a). Pure constructive interference occurs
where the waves are crest to crest or trough to trough. Pure destructive interference occurs where they are crest to trough. The light must fall on a
screen and be scattered into our eyes for us to see the pattern. An analogous pattern for water waves is shown inFigure 27.12(b). Note that regions
of constructive and destructive interference move out from the slits at well-defined angles to the original beam. These angles depend on wavelength
and the distance between the slits, as we shall see below.
960 CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
Easy split! We try to make it as easy as possible to split your PDF files into Multiple ones. You can receive the PDF files by simply
can print pdf no pages selected; pdf rotate single page
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
File: Merge, Append PDF Files. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Merge and Append PDF. VB.NET Demo code to Combine and Merge Multiple PDF Files into One.
break a pdf apart; pdf split pages in half
Figure 27.12Double slits produce two coherent sources of waves that interfere. (a) Light spreads out (diffracts) from each slit, because the slits are narrow. These waves
overlap and interfere constructively (bright lines) and destructively (dark regions). We can only see this if the light falls onto a screen and is scattered into our eyes. (b) Double
slit interference pattern for water waves are nearly identical to that for light. Wave action is greatest in regions of constructive interference and least in regions of destructive
interference. (c) When light that has passed through double slits falls on a screen, we see a pattern such as this. (credit: PASCO)
To understand the double slit interference pattern, we consider how two waves travel from the slits to the screen, as illustrated inFigure 27.13. Each
slit is a different distance from a given point on the screen. Thus different numbers of wavelengths fit into each path. Waves start out from the slits in
phase (crest to crest), but they may end up out of phase (crest to trough) at the screen if the paths differ in length by half a wavelength, interfering
destructively as shown inFigure 27.13(a). If the paths differ by a whole wavelength, then the waves arrive in phase (crest to crest) at the screen,
interfering constructively as shown inFigure 27.13(b). More generally, if the paths taken by the two waves differ by any half-integral number of
wavelengths [
(1/2)λ
,
(3/2)λ
,
(5/2)λ
, etc.], then destructive interference occurs. Similarly, if the paths taken by the two waves differ by any
integral number of wavelengths (
λ
,
2λ
,
3λ
, etc.), then constructive interference occurs.
Take-Home Experiment: Using Fingers as Slits
Look at a light, such as a street lamp or incandescent bulb, through the narrow gap between two fingers held close together. What type of pattern
do you see? How does it change when you allow the fingers to move a little farther apart? Is it more distinct for a monochromatic source, such as
the yellow light from a sodium vapor lamp, than for an incandescent bulb?
Figure 27.13Waves follow different paths from the slits to a common point on a screen. (a) Destructive interference occurs here, because one path is a half wavelength longer
than the other. The waves start in phase but arrive out of phase. (b) Constructive interference occurs here because one path is a whole wavelength longer than the other. The
waves start out and arrive in phase.
Figure 27.14shows how to determine the path length difference for waves traveling from two slits to a common point on a screen. If the screen is a
large distance away compared with the distance between the slits, then the angle
θ
between the path and a line from the slits to the screen (see the
figure) is nearly the same for each path. The difference between the paths is shown in the figure; simple trigonometry shows it to be
dsinθ
, where
d
is the distance between the slits. To obtainconstructive interference for a double slit, the path length difference must be an integral multiple of
the wavelength, or
(27.3)
sinθ=, form=0,1,−1,2,−2, …
(constructive).
Similarly, to obtaindestructive interference for a double slit, the path length difference must be a half-integral multiple of the wavelength, or
(27.4)
sinθ=
m+
1
2
λ, form=0,1,−1,2,−2, … … (destructive),
where
λ
is the wavelength of the light,
d
is the distance between slits, and
θ
is the angle from the original direction of the beam as discussed
above. We call
m
theorderof the interference. For example,
m=4
is fourth-order interference.
CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS S 961
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
' Convert PDF file to HTML5 files DocumentConverter.ConvertToHtml5("..\1.pdf", "..output\", RelativeType.SVG). Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
acrobat separate pdf pages; break apart a pdf file
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to HTML5 Files in C#.NET Class. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
break a pdf apart; acrobat split pdf into multiple files
Figure 27.14The paths from each slit to a common point on the screen differ by an amount
dsinθ
, assuming the distance to the screen is much greater than the distance
between slits (not to scale here).
The equations for double slit interference imply that a series of bright and dark lines are formed. For vertical slits, the light spreads out horizontally on
either side of the incident beam into a pattern called interference fringes, illustrated inFigure 27.15. The intensity of the bright fringes falls off on
either side, being brightest at the center. The closer the slits are, the more is the spreading of the bright fringes. We can see this by examining the
equation
(27.5)
sinθ=,form=0,1,−1,2,−2, ….
For fixed
λ
and
m
, the smaller
d
is, the larger
θ
must be, since
sinθ=d
. This is consistent with our contention that wave effects are
most noticeable when the object the wave encounters (here, slits a distance
d
apart) is small. Small
d
gives large
θ
, hence a large effect.
Figure 27.15The interference pattern for a double slit has an intensity that falls off with angle. The photograph shows multiple bright and dark lines, or fringes, formed by light
passing through a double slit.
Example 27.1Finding a Wavelength from an Interference Pattern
Suppose you pass light from a He-Ne laser through two slits separated by 0.0100 mm and find that the third bright line on a screen is formed at
an angle of
10.95º
relative to the incident beam. What is the wavelength of the light?
Strategy
The third bright line is due to third-order constructive interference, which means that
m=3
. We are given
d=0.0100mm
and
θ=10.95º
.
The wavelength can thus be found using the equation
sinθ=
for constructive interference.
Solution
The equation is
sinθ=
. Solving for the wavelength
λ
gives
(27.6)
λ=
sinθ
m
.
Substituting known values yields
(27.7)
λ =
(0.0100 mm)(sin 10.95º)
3
= 6.33×10
−4
mm=633 nm.
Discussion
To three digits, this is the wavelength of light emitted by the common He-Ne laser. Not by coincidence, this red color is similar to that emitted by
neon lights. More important, however, is the fact that interference patterns can be used to measure wavelength. Young did this for visible
962 CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
File: Merge, Append PDF Files. |. Home Our .NET PDF SDK empowers C# programmers to easily merge and append PDF files with mature APIs. To
cannot select text in pdf; acrobat split pdf pages
XDoc, XImage SDK for .NET - View, Annotate, Convert, Edit, Scan
process. 100+ images. Learn More. PDF XDoc.PDF. .NET PDF SDK to Edit, Convert,. View, Write, Comment PDF files. Learn More. OFFICE XDoc
pdf print error no pages selected; split pdf
wavelengths. This analytical technique is still widely used to measure electromagnetic spectra. For a given order, the angle for constructive
interference increases with
λ
, so that spectra (measurements of intensity versus wavelength) can be obtained.
Example 27.2Calculating Highest Order Possible
Interference patterns do not have an infinite number of lines, since there is a limit to how big
m
can be. What is the highest-order constructive
interference possible with the system described in the preceding example?
Strategy and Concept
The equation
sinθ=(form=0,1,−1,2,−2, …
describes constructive interference. For fixed values of
d
and
λ
, the larger
m
is, the larger
sinθ
is. However, the maximum value that
sinθ
can have is 1, for an angle of
90º
. (Larger angles imply that light goes
backward and does not reach the screen at all.) Let us find which
m
corresponds to this maximum diffraction angle.
Solution
Solving the equation
dsinθ=
for
m
gives
(27.8)
m=
dsinθ
λ
.
Taking
sinθ=1
and substituting the values of
d
and
λ
from the preceding example gives
(27.9)
m=
(0.0100 mm)(1)
633 nm
≈15.8.
Therefore, the largest integer
m
can be is 15, or
(27.10)
m=15.
Discussion
The number of fringes depends on the wavelength and slit separation. The number of fringes will be very large for large slit separations.
However, if the slit separation becomes much greater than the wavelength, the intensity of the interference pattern changes so that the screen
has two bright lines cast by the slits, as expected when light behaves like a ray. We also note that the fringes get fainter further away from the
center. Consequently, not all 15 fringes may be observable.
27.4Multiple Slit Diffraction
An interesting thing happens if you pass light through a large number of evenly spaced parallel slits, called adiffraction grating. An interference
pattern is created that is very similar to the one formed by a double slit (seeFigure 27.16). A diffraction grating can be manufactured by scratching
glass with a sharp tool in a number of precisely positioned parallel lines, with the untouched regions acting like slits. These can be photographically
mass produced rather cheaply. Diffraction gratings work both for transmission of light, as inFigure 27.16, and for reflection of light, as on butterfly
wings and the Australian opal inFigure 27.17or the CD pictured in the opening photograph of this chapter,Figure 27.1. In addition to their use as
novelty items, diffraction gratings are commonly used for spectroscopic dispersion and analysis of light. What makes them particularly useful is the
fact that they form a sharper pattern than double slits do. That is, their bright regions are narrower and brighter, while their dark regions are darker.
Figure 27.18shows idealized graphs demonstrating the sharper pattern. Natural diffraction gratings occur in the feathers of certain birds. Tiny, finger-
like structures in regular patterns act as reflection gratings, producing constructive interference that gives the feathers colors not solely due to their
pigmentation. This is called iridescence.
Figure 27.16A diffraction grating is a large number of evenly spaced parallel slits. (a) Light passing through is diffracted in a pattern similar to a double slit, with bright regions
at various angles. (b) The pattern obtained for white light incident on a grating. The central maximum is white, and the higher-order maxima disperse white light into a rainbow
of colors.
CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS S 963
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
file using C#. Instantly convert all PDF document pages to SVG image files in C#.NET class application. Perform high-fidelity PDF
c# split pdf; break a pdf file into parts
VB.NET PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in vb.net
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. FREE TRIAL: HOW TO:
break password pdf; pdf insert page break
Figure 27.17(a) This Australian opal and (b) the butterfly wings have rows of reflectors that act like reflection gratings, reflecting different colors at different angles. (credits: (a)
Opals-On-Black.com, via Flickr (b) whologwhy, Flickr)
Figure 27.18Idealized graphs of the intensity of light passing through a double slit (a) and a diffraction grating (b) for monochromatic light. Maxima can be produced at the
same angles, but those for the diffraction grating are narrower and hence sharper. The maxima become narrower and the regions between darker as the number of slits is
increased.
The analysis of a diffraction grating is very similar to that for a double slit (seeFigure 27.19). As we know from our discussion of double slits in
Young's Double Slit Experiment, light is diffracted by each slit and spreads out after passing through. Rays traveling in the same direction (at an
angle
θ
relative to the incident direction) are shown in the figure. Each of these rays travels a different distance to a common point on a screen far
away. The rays start in phase, and they can be in or out of phase when they reach a screen, depending on the difference in the path lengths traveled.
As seen in the figure, each ray travels a distance
dsinθ
different from that of its neighbor, where
d
is the distance between slits. If this distance
equals an integral number of wavelengths, the rays all arrive in phase, and constructive interference (a maximum) is obtained. Thus, the condition
necessary to obtainconstructive interference for a diffraction gratingis
(27.11)
sinθ=, form=0,1,–1,2,–2,…(constructive),
where
d
is the distance between slits in the grating,
λ
is the wavelength of light, and
m
is the order of the maximum. Note that this is exactly the
same equation as for double slits separated by
d
. However, the slits are usually closer in diffraction gratings than in double slits, producing fewer
maxima at larger angles.
964 CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 27.19Diffraction grating showing light rays from each slit traveling in the same direction. Each ray travels a different distance to reach a common point on a screen (not
shown). Each ray travels a distance
sinθ
different from that of its neighbor.
Where are diffraction gratings used? Diffraction gratings are key components of monochromators used, for example, in optical imaging of particular
wavelengths from biological or medical samples. A diffraction grating can be chosen to specifically analyze a wavelength emitted by molecules in
diseased cells in a biopsy sample or to help excite strategic molecules in the sample with a selected frequency of light. Another vital use is in optical
fiber technologies where fibers are designed to provide optimum performance at specific wavelengths. A range of diffraction gratings are available for
selecting specific wavelengths for such use.
Take-Home Experiment: Rainbows on a CD
The spacing
d
of the grooves in a CD or DVD can be well determined by using a laser and the equation
sinθ=, form=0,1,–1,2,–2,…
. However, we can still make a good estimate of this spacing by using white light and the
rainbow of colors that comes from the interference. Reflect sunlight from a CD onto a wall and use your best judgment of the location of a
strongly diffracted color to find the separation
d
.
Example 27.3Calculating Typical Diffraction Grating Effects
Diffraction gratings with 10,000 lines per centimeter are readily available. Suppose you have one, and you send a beam of white light through it
to a screen 2.00 m away. (a) Find the angles for the first-order diffraction of the shortest and longest wavelengths of visible light (380 and 760
nm). (b) What is the distance between the ends of the rainbow of visible light produced on the screen for first-order interference? (SeeFigure
27.20.)
CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS S 965
Figure 27.20The diffraction grating considered in this example produces a rainbow of colors on a screen a distance
x=2.00m
from the grating. The distances
along the screen are measured perpendicular to the
x
-direction. In other words, the rainbow pattern extends out of the page.
Strategy
The angles can be found using the equation
(27.12)
sinθ=(form=0,1,–1,2,–2,…)
once a value for the slit spacing
d
has been determined. Since there are 10,000 lines per centimeter, each line is separated by
1/10,000
of a
centimeter. Once the angles are found, the distances along the screen can be found using simple trigonometry.
Solution for (a)
The distance between slits is
d=(1 cm)/10,000=1.00×10
−4
cm
or
1.00×10
−6
m
. Let us call the two angles
θ
V
for violet (380 nm)
and
θ
R
for red (760 nm). Solving the equation
dsinθ
V
=
for
sinθ
V
,
(27.13)
sinθ
V
=
V
d
,
where
m=1
for first order and
λ
V
=380nm=3.80×10
−7
m
. Substituting these values gives
(27.14)
sinθ
V
=
3.80×10
−7
m
1.00×10
−6
m
=0.380.
Thus the angle
θ
V
is
(27.15)
θ
V
=sin
−1
0.380=22.33º.
Similarly,
(27.16)
sinθ
R
=
7.60×10
−7
m
1.00×10
−6
m
.
Thus the angle
θ
R
is
(27.17)
θ
R
=sin
−1
0.760=49.46º.
Notice that in both equations, we reported the results of these intermediate calculations to four significant figures to use with the calculation in
part (b).
Solution for (b)
The distances on the screen are labeled
y
V
and
y
R
inFigure 27.20. Noting that
tanθ=y/x
, we can solve for
y
V
and
y
R
. That is,
(27.18)
y
V
=xtanθ
V
=(2.00 m)(tan 22.33º)=0.815 m
966 CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
and
(27.19)
y
R
=xtanθ
R
=(2.00 m)(tan 49.46º)=2.338 m.
The distance between them is therefore
(27.20)
y
R
y
V
=1.52 m.
Discussion
The large distance between the red and violet ends of the rainbow produced from the white light indicates the potential this diffraction grating has
as a spectroscopic tool. The more it can spread out the wavelengths (greater dispersion), the more detail can be seen in a spectrum. This
depends on the quality of the diffraction grating—it must be very precisely made in addition to having closely spaced lines.
27.5Single Slit Diffraction
Light passing through a single slit forms a diffraction pattern somewhat different from those formed by double slits or diffraction gratings.Figure 27.21
shows a single slit diffraction pattern. Note that the central maximum is larger than those on either side, and that the intensity decreases rapidly on
either side. In contrast, a diffraction grating produces evenly spaced lines that dim slowly on either side of center.
Figure 27.21(a) Single slit diffraction pattern. Monochromatic light passing through a single slit has a central maximum and many smaller and dimmer maxima on either side.
The central maximum is six times higher than shown. (b) The drawing shows the bright central maximum and dimmer and thinner maxima on either side.
The analysis of single slit diffraction is illustrated inFigure 27.22. Here we consider light coming from different parts of thesameslit. According to
Huygens’s principle, every part of the wavefront in the slit emits wavelets. These are like rays that start out in phase and head in all directions. (Each
ray is perpendicular to the wavefront of a wavelet.) Assuming the screen is very far away compared with the size of the slit, rays heading toward a
common destination are nearly parallel. When they travel straight ahead, as inFigure 27.22(a), they remain in phase, and a central maximum is
obtained. However, when rays travel at an angle
θ
relative to the original direction of the beam, each travels a different distance to a common
location, and they can arrive in or out of phase. InFigure 27.22(b), the ray from the bottom travels a distance of one wavelength
λ
farther than the
ray from the top. Thus a ray from the center travels a distance
λ/2
farther than the one on the left, arrives out of phase, and interferes destructively.
A ray from slightly above the center and one from slightly above the bottom will also cancel one another. In fact, each ray from the slit will have
another to interfere destructively, and a minimum in intensity will occur at this angle. There will be another minimum at the same angle to the right of
the incident direction of the light.
CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS S 967
Figure 27.22Light passing through a single slit is diffracted in all directions and may interfere constructively or destructively, depending on the angle. The difference in path
length for rays from either side of the slit is seen to be
Dsinθ
.
At the larger angle shown inFigure 27.22(c), the path lengths differ by
3λ/2
for rays from the top and bottom of the slit. One ray travels a distance
λ
different from the ray from the bottom and arrives in phase, interfering constructively. Two rays, each from slightly above those two, will also add
constructively. Most rays from the slit will have another to interfere with constructively, and a maximum in intensity will occur at this angle. However,
all rays do not interfere constructively for this situation, and so the maximum is not as intense as the central maximum. Finally, inFigure 27.22(d), the
angle shown is large enough to produce a second minimum. As seen in the figure, the difference in path length for rays from either side of the slit is
Dsinθ
, and we see that a destructive minimum is obtained when this distance is an integral multiple of the wavelength.
Figure 27.23A graph of single slit diffraction intensity showing the central maximum to be wider and much more intense than those to the sides. In fact the central maximum is
six times higher than shown here.
968 CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested