asp net pdf viewer user control c# : C# print pdf to specific printer Library SDK class asp.net .net windows ajax PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics97-part1854

Thus, to obtaindestructive interference for a single slit,
(27.21)
Dsinθ=mλ,form=1,–1,2,–2,3, … … (destructive),
where
D
is the slit width,
λ
is the light’s wavelength,
θ
is the angle relative to the original direction of the light, and
m
is the order of the minimum.
Figure 27.23shows a graph of intensity for single slit interference, and it is apparent that the maxima on either side of the central maximum are much
less intense and not as wide. This is consistent with the illustration inFigure 27.21(b).
Example 27.4Calculating Single Slit Diffraction
Visible light of wavelength 550 nm falls on a single slit and produces its second diffraction minimum at an angle of
45.0º
relative to the incident
direction of the light. (a) What is the width of the slit? (b) At what angle is the first minimum produced?
Figure 27.24A graph of the single slit diffraction pattern is analyzed in this example.
Strategy
From the given information, and assuming the screen is far away from the slit, we can use the equation
Dsinθ=
first to find
D
, and
again to find the angle for the first minimum
θ
1
.
Solution for (a)
We are given that
λ=550 nm
,
m=2
, and
θ
2
=45.0º
. Solving the equation
sinθ=
for
D
and substituting known values gives
(27.22)
=
sinθ
2
=
2(550 nm)
sin 45.0º
=
1100×10
−9
0.707
= 1.56×10
−6
.
Solution for (b)
Solving the equation
sinθ=
for
sinθ
1
and substituting the known values gives
(27.23)
sinθ
1
=
D
=
1
550×10
−9
m
1.56×10
−6
m
.
Thus the angle
θ
1
is
(27.24)
θ
1
=sin
−1
0.354=20.7º.
Discussion
We see that the slit is narrow (it is only a few times greater than the wavelength of light). This is consistent with the fact that light must interact
with an object comparable in size to its wavelength in order to exhibit significant wave effects such as this single slit diffraction pattern. We also
see that the central maximum extends
20.7º
on either side of the original beam, for a width of about
41º
. The angle between the first and
second minima is only about
24º(45.0º−20.7º)
. Thus the second maximum is only about half as wide as the central maximum.
CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS S 969
C# print pdf to specific printer - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break pdf into single pages; pdf no pages selected
C# print pdf to specific printer - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break up pdf file; pdf file specification
27.6Limits of Resolution: The Rayleigh Criterion
Light diffracts as it moves through space, bending around obstacles, interfering constructively and destructively. While this can be used as a
spectroscopic tool—a diffraction grating disperses light according to wavelength, for example, and is used to produce spectra—diffraction also limits
the detail we can obtain in images.Figure 27.25(a) shows the effect of passing light through a small circular aperture. Instead of a bright spot with
sharp edges, a spot with a fuzzy edge surrounded by circles of light is obtained. This pattern is caused by diffraction similar to that produced by a
single slit. Light from different parts of the circular aperture interferes constructively and destructively. The effect is most noticeable when the aperture
is small, but the effect is there for large apertures, too.
Figure 27.25(a) Monochromatic light passed through a small circular aperture produces this diffraction pattern. (b) Two point light sources that are close to one another
produce overlapping images because of diffraction. (c) If they are closer together, they cannot be resolved or distinguished.
How does diffraction affect the detail that can be observed when light passes through an aperture?Figure 27.25(b) shows the diffraction pattern
produced by two point light sources that are close to one another. The pattern is similar to that for a single point source, and it is just barely possible
to tell that there are two light sources rather than one. If they were closer together, as inFigure 27.25(c), we could not distinguish them, thus limiting
the detail or resolution we can obtain. This limit is an inescapable consequence of the wave nature of light.
There are many situations in which diffraction limits the resolution. The acuity of our vision is limited because light passes through the pupil, the
circular aperture of our eye. Be aware that the diffraction-like spreading of light is due to the limited diameter of a light beam, not the interaction with
an aperture. Thus light passing through a lens with a diameter
D
shows this effect and spreads, blurring the image, just as light passing through an
aperture of diameter
D
does. So diffraction limits the resolution of any system having a lens or mirror. Telescopes are also limited by diffraction,
because of the finite diameter
D
of their primary mirror.
Take-Home Experiment: Resolution of the Eye
Draw two lines on a white sheet of paper (several mm apart). How far away can you be and still distinguish the two lines? What does this tell you
about the size of the eye’s pupil? Can you be quantitative? (The size of an adult’s pupil is discussed inPhysics of the Eye.)
Just what is the limit? To answer that question, consider the diffraction pattern for a circular aperture, which has a central maximum that is wider and
brighter than the maxima surrounding it (similar to a slit) [seeFigure 27.26(a)]. It can be shown that, for a circular aperture of diameter
D
, the first
minimum in the diffraction pattern occurs at
θ=1.22λ/D
(providing the aperture is large compared with the wavelength of light, which is the case
for most optical instruments). The accepted criterion for determining the diffraction limit to resolution based on this angle was developed by Lord
Rayleigh in the 19th century. TheRayleigh criterionfor the diffraction limit to resolution states thattwo images are just resolvable when the center of
the diffraction pattern of one is directly over the first minimum of the diffraction pattern of the other. SeeFigure 27.26(b). The first minimum is at an
angle of
θ=1.22λ/D
, so that two point objects are just resolvable if they are separated by the angle
(27.25)
θ=1.22
λ
D
,
where
λ
is the wavelength of light (or other electromagnetic radiation) and
D
is the diameter of the aperture, lens, mirror, etc., with which the two
objects are observed. In this expression,
θ
has units of radians.
970 CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Printer Control; Print TIFF Using VB.NET
SDK Features. Fully programmed in managed C# code and If you want to print certain one page from powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
break a pdf into multiple files; break a pdf into separate pages
C# Word: How to Use C# Code to Print Word Document for .NET
The following C# class code example demonstrates how to print defined pages to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
break pdf into smaller files; can't select text in pdf file
Figure 27.26(a) Graph of intensity of the diffraction pattern for a circular aperture. Note that, similar to a single slit, the central maximum is wider and brighter than those to the
sides. (b) Two point objects produce overlapping diffraction patterns. Shown here is the Rayleigh criterion for being just resolvable. The central maximum of one pattern lies on
the first minimum of the other.
Connections: Limits to Knowledge
All attempts to observe the size and shape of objects are limited by the wavelength of the probe. Even the small wavelength of light prohibits
exact precision. When extremely small wavelength probes as with an electron microscope are used, the system is disturbed, still limiting our
knowledge, much as making an electrical measurement alters a circuit. Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle asserts that this limit is fundamental
and inescapable, as we shall see in quantum mechanics.
Example 27.5Calculating Diffraction Limits of the Hubble Space Telescope
The primary mirror of the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope has a diameter of 2.40 m. Being in orbit, this telescope avoids the degrading effects
of atmospheric distortion on its resolution. (a) What is the angle between two just-resolvable point light sources (perhaps two stars)? Assume an
average light wavelength of 550 nm. (b) If these two stars are at the 2 million light year distance of the Andromeda galaxy, how close together
can they be and still be resolved? (A light year, or ly, is the distance light travels in 1 year.)
Strategy
The Rayleigh criterion stated in the equation
θ=1.22
λ
D
gives the smallest possible angle
θ
between point sources, or the best obtainable
resolution. Once this angle is found, the distance between stars can be calculated, since we are given how far away they are.
Solution for (a)
The Rayleigh criterion for the minimum resolvable angle is
(27.26)
θ=1.22
λ
D
.
Entering known values gives
(27.27)
θ=1.22
550×10
−9
m
2.40 m
= 2.80×10
−7
rad.
Solution for (b)
The distance
s
between two objects a distance
r
away and separated by an angle
θ
is
s=
.
Substituting known values gives
(27.28)
= (2.0×10
6
ly)(2.80×10
−7
rad)
= 0.56 ly.
Discussion
The angle found in part (a) is extraordinarily small (less than 1/50,000 of a degree), because the primary mirror is so large compared with the
wavelength of light. As noticed, diffraction effects are most noticeable when light interacts with objects having sizes on the order of the
wavelength of light. However, the effect is still there, and there is a diffraction limit to what is observable. The actual resolution of the Hubble
Telescope is not quite as good as that found here. As with all instruments, there are other effects, such as non-uniformities in mirrors or
aberrations in lenses that further limit resolution. However,Figure 27.27gives an indication of the extent of the detail observable with the Hubble
because of its size and quality and especially because it is above the Earth’s atmosphere.
CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS S 971
VB.NET Word: Free VB.NET Tutorial for Printing Microsoft Word
want to use this Control to print Word document your Visual Studio to incorporate our C#.NET Word powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
break pdf into separate pages; break a pdf into parts
C# Imaging - C# Code 93 Generator Tutorial
NET web application and WinForms program using Visual C# code in png, jpeg, gif, bmp, TIFF, PDF, Word, Excel 1D bar codes on images & documents in specific area.
a pdf page cut; split pdf by bookmark
Figure 27.27These two photographs of the M82 galaxy give an idea of the observable detail using the Hubble Space Telescope compared with that using a ground-
based telescope. (a) On the left is a ground-based image. (credit: Ricnun, Wikimedia Commons) (b) The photo on the right was captured by Hubble. (credit: NASA, ESA,
and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA))
The answer in part (b) indicates that two stars separated by about half a light year can be resolved. The average distance between stars in a
galaxy is on the order of 5 light years in the outer parts and about 1 light year near the galactic center. Therefore, the Hubble can resolve most of
the individual stars in Andromeda galaxy, even though it lies at such a huge distance that its light takes 2 million years for its light to reach us.
Figure 27.28shows another mirror used to observe radio waves from outer space.
Figure 27.28A 305-m-diameter natural bowl at Arecibo in Puerto Rico is lined with reflective material, making it into a radio telescope. It is the largest curved focusing
dish in the world. Although
D
for Arecibo is much larger than for the Hubble Telescope, it detects much longer wavelength radiation and its diffraction limit is significantly
poorer than Hubble’s. Arecibo is still very useful, because important information is carried by radio waves that is not carried by visible light. (credit: Tatyana Temirbulatova,
Flickr)
Diffraction is not only a problem for optical instruments but also for the electromagnetic radiation itself. Any beam of light having a finite diameter
D
and a wavelength
λ
exhibits diffraction spreading. The beam spreads out with an angle
θ
given by the equation
θ=1.22
λ
D
. Take, for example, a
laser beam made of rays as parallel as possible (angles between rays as close to
θ=0º
as possible) instead spreads out at an angle
θ=1.22λ/D
, where
D
is the diameter of the beam and
λ
is its wavelength. This spreading is impossible to observe for a flashlight, because its
beam is not very parallel to start with. However, for long-distance transmission of laser beams or microwave signals, diffraction spreading can be
significant (seeFigure 27.29). To avoid this, we can increase
D
. This is done for laser light sent to the Moon to measure its distance from the Earth.
The laser beam is expanded through a telescope to make
D
much larger and
θ
smaller.
Figure 27.29The beam produced by this microwave transmission antenna will spread out at a minimum angle
θ=1.22λ/D
due to diffraction. It is impossible to produce
a near-parallel beam, because the beam has a limited diameter.
In most biology laboratories, resolution is presented when the use of the microscope is introduced. The ability of a lens to produce sharp images of
two closely spaced point objects is called resolution. The smaller the distance
x
by which two objects can be separated and still be seen as distinct,
the greater the resolution. The resolving power of a lens is defined as that distance
x
. An expression for resolving power is obtained from the
Rayleigh criterion. InFigure 27.30(a) we have two point objects separated by a distance
x
. According to the Rayleigh criterion, resolution is possible
when the minimum angular separation is
(27.29)
θ=1.22
λ
D
=
x
d
,
972 CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# Image: Document Image Ellipse Annotation Creating and Adding
in C#; Use .NET image printer to print annotated image in pages at the same time with C#.NET Imaging powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add page break to pdf; break a pdf
Generate and draw QR Code for Java
and can be printed with any printer even the is installed and valid for implementation to print QR Code Build a Java barcode object for a specific barcode type
pdf link to specific page; pdf separate pages
where
d
is the distance between the specimen and the objective lens, and we have used the small angle approximation (i.e., we have assumed that
x
is much smaller than
d
), so that
tanθ≈sinθθ
.
Therefore, the resolving power is
(27.30)
x=1.22
λd
D
.
Another way to look at this is by re-examining the concept of Numerical Aperture (
NA
) discussed inMicroscopes. There,
NA
is a measure of the
maximum acceptance angle at which the fiber will take light and still contain it within the fiber.Figure 27.30(b) shows a lens and an object at point P.
The
NA
here is a measure of the ability of the lens to gather light and resolve fine detail. The angle subtended by the lens at its focus is defined to
be
θ=2α
. From the figure and again using the small angle approximation, we can write
(27.31)
sinα=
D/2
d
=
D
2d
.
The
NA
for a lens is
NA=nsinα
, where
n
is the index of refraction of the medium between the objective lens and the object at point P.
From this definition for
NA
, we can see that
(27.32)
x=1.22
λd
D
=1.22
λ
2sinα
=0.61
λn
NA
.
In a microscope,
NA
is important because it relates to the resolving power of a lens. A lens with a large
NA
will be able to resolve finer details.
Lenses with larger
NA
will also be able to collect more light and so give a brighter image. Another way to describe this situation is that the larger the
NA
, the larger the cone of light that can be brought into the lens, and so more of the diffraction modes will be collected. Thus the microscope has
more information to form a clear image, and so its resolving power will be higher.
Figure 27.30(a) Two points separated by at distance
x
and a positioned a distance
d
away from the objective. (credit: Infopro, Wikimedia Commons) (b) Terms and
symbols used in discussion of resolving power for a lens and an object at point P. (credit: Infopro, Wikimedia Commons)
One of the consequences of diffraction is that the focal point of a beam has a finite width and intensity distribution. Consider focusing when only
considering geometric optics, shown inFigure 27.31(a). The focal point is infinitely small with a huge intensity and the capacity to incinerate most
samples irrespective of the
NA
of the objective lens. For wave optics, due to diffraction, the focal point spreads to become a focal spot (seeFigure
27.31(b)) with the size of the spot decreasing with increasing
NA
. Consequently, the intensity in the focal spot increases with increasing
NA
. The
higher the
NA
, the greater the chances of photodegrading the specimen. However, the spot never becomes a true point.
CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS S 973
Figure 27.31(a) In geometric optics, the focus is a point, but it is not physically possible to produce such a point because it implies infinite intensity. (b) In wave optics, the
focus is an extended region.
27.7Thin Film Interference
The bright colors seen in an oil slick floating on water or in a sunlit soap bubble are caused by interference. The brightest colors are those that
interfere constructively. This interference is between light reflected from different surfaces of a thin film; thus, the effect is known asthin film
interference. As noticed before, interference effects are most prominent when light interacts with something having a size similar to its wavelength. A
thin film is one having a thickness
t
smaller than a few times the wavelength of light,
λ
. Since color is associated indirectly with
λ
and since all
interference depends in some way on the ratio of
λ
to the size of the object involved, we should expect to see different colors for different
thicknesses of a film, as inFigure 27.32.
Figure 27.32These soap bubbles exhibit brilliant colors when exposed to sunlight. (credit: Scott Robinson, Flickr)
What causes thin film interference?Figure 27.33shows how light reflected from the top and bottom surfaces of a film can interfere. Incident light is
only partially reflected from the top surface of the film (ray 1). The remainder enters the film and is itself partially reflected from the bottom surface.
Part of the light reflected from the bottom surface can emerge from the top of the film (ray 2) and interfere with light reflected from the top (ray 1).
Since the ray that enters the film travels a greater distance, it may be in or out of phase with the ray reflected from the top. However, consider for a
moment, again, the bubbles inFigure 27.32. The bubbles are darkest where they are thinnest. Furthermore, if you observe a soap bubble carefully,
you will note it gets dark at the point where it breaks. For very thin films, the difference in path lengths of ray 1 and ray 2 inFigure 27.33is negligible;
so why should they interfere destructively and not constructively? The answer is that a phase change can occur upon reflection. The rule is as
follows:
When light reflects from a medium having an index of refraction greater than that of the medium in which it is traveling, a
180º
phase
change (or a
λ/2
shift) occurs.
974 CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 27.33Light striking a thin film is partially reflected (ray 1) and partially refracted at the top surface. The refracted ray is partially reflected at the bottom surface and
emerges as ray 2. These rays will interfere in a way that depends on the thickness of the film and the indices of refraction of the various media.
If the film inFigure 27.33is a soap bubble (essentially water with air on both sides), then there is a
λ/2
shift for ray 1 and none for ray 2. Thus,
when the film is very thin, the path length difference between the two rays is negligible, they are exactly out of phase, and destructive interference will
occur at all wavelengths and so the soap bubble will be dark here.
The thickness of the film relative to the wavelength of light is the other crucial factor in thin film interference. Ray 2 inFigure 27.33travels a greater
distance than ray 1. For light incident perpendicular to the surface, ray 2 travels a distance approximately
2t
farther than ray 1. When this distance is
an integral or half-integral multiple of the wavelength in the medium (
λ
n
=λ/n
, where
λ
is the wavelength in vacuum and
n
is the index of
refraction), constructive or destructive interference occurs, depending also on whether there is a phase change in either ray.
Example 27.6Calculating Non-reflective Lens Coating Using Thin Film Interference
Sophisticated cameras use a series of several lenses. Light can reflect from the surfaces of these various lenses and degrade image clarity. To
limit these reflections, lenses are coated with a thin layer of magnesium fluoride that causes destructive thin film interference. What is the
thinnest this film can be, if its index of refraction is 1.38 and it is designed to limit the reflection of 550-nm light, normally the most intense visible
wavelength? The index of refraction of glass is 1.52.
Strategy
Refer toFigure 27.33and use
n
1
=100
for air,
n
2
=1.38
, and
n
3
=1.52
. Both ray 1 and ray 2 will have a
λ/2
shift upon reflection.
Thus, to obtain destructive interference, ray 2 will need to travel a half wavelength farther than ray 1. For rays incident perpendicularly, the path
length difference is
2t
.
Solution
To obtain destructive interference here,
(27.33)
2t=
λ
n
2
2
,
where
λ
n
2
is the wavelength in the film and is given by
λ
n
2
=
λ
n
2
.
Thus,
(27.34)
2t=
λ/n
2
2
.
Solving for
t
and entering known values yields
(27.35)
=
λ/n
2
4
=
(550 nm)/1.38
4
= 99.6 nm.
Discussion
CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS S 975
Films such as the one in this example are most effective in producing destructive interference when the thinnest layer is used, since light over a
broader range of incident angles will be reduced in intensity. These films are called non-reflective coatings; this is only an approximately correct
description, though, since other wavelengths will only be partially cancelled. Non-reflective coatings are used in car windows and sunglasses.
Thin film interference is most constructive or most destructive when the path length difference for the two rays is an integral or half-integral
wavelength, respectively. That is, for rays incident perpendicularly,
2t=λ
n
,
n
,
n
,
or
2t=λ
n
/2,3λ
n
/2,5λ
n
/2,…
. To know whether
interference is constructive or destructive, you must also determine if there is a phase change upon reflection. Thin film interference thus depends on
film thickness, the wavelength of light, and the refractive indices. For white light incident on a film that varies in thickness, you will observe rainbow
colors of constructive interference for various wavelengths as the thickness varies.
Example 27.7Soap Bubbles: More Than One Thickness can be Constructive
(a) What are the three smallest thicknesses of a soap bubble that produce constructive interference for red light with a wavelength of 650 nm?
The index of refraction of soap is taken to be the same as that of water. (b) What three smallest thicknesses will give destructive interference?
Strategy and Concept
UseFigure 27.33to visualize the bubble. Note that
n
1
=n
3
=1.00
for air, and
n
2
=1.333
for soap (equivalent to water). There is a
λ/2
shift for ray 1 reflected from the top surface of the bubble, and no shift for ray 2 reflected from the bottom surface. To get constructive
interference, then, the path length difference (
2t
) must be a half-integral multiple of the wavelength—the first three being
λ
n
/2,3λ
n
/2
, and
n
/2
. To get destructive interference, the path length difference must be an integral multiple of the wavelength—the first three being
0,λ
n
,
and
n
.
Solution for (a)
Constructive interferenceoccurs here when
(27.36)
2t
c
=
λ
n
2
,
n
2
,
n
2
,….
The smallest constructive thickness
t
c
thus is
(27.37)
t
c
=
λ
n
4
=
λ/n
4
=
(650nm)/1.333
4
= 122 nm.
The next thickness that gives constructive interference is
t
c
=3λ
n
/4
, so that
(27.38)
t
c
=366 nm.
Finally, the third thickness producing constructive interference is
t′′
c
≤5λ
n
/4
, so that
(27.39)
t′′
c
=610nm.
Solution for (b)
Fordestructive interference, the path length difference here is an integral multiple of the wavelength. The first occurs for zero thickness, since
there is a phase change at the top surface. That is,
(27.40)
t
d
=0.
The first non-zero thickness producing destructive interference is
(27.41)
2t
d
=λ
n
.
Substituting known values gives
(27.42)
t
d
=
λ
2
=
λ/n
2
=
(650nm)/1.333
2
= 244 nm.
Finally, the third destructive thickness is
2t′′
d
=2λ
n
, so that
(27.43)
t′′
d
λ
n
=
λ
n
=
650nm
1.333
= 488 nm.
Discussion
If the bubble was illuminated with pure red light, we would see bright and dark bands at very uniform increases in thickness. First would be a
dark band at 0 thickness, then bright at 122 nm thickness, then dark at 244 nm, bright at 366 nm, dark at 488 nm, and bright at 610 nm. If the
bubble varied smoothly in thickness, like a smooth wedge, then the bands would be evenly spaced.
976 CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Another example of thin film interference can be seen when microscope slides are separated (seeFigure 27.34). The slides are very flat, so that the
wedge of air between them increases in thickness very uniformly. A phase change occurs at the second surface but not the first, and so there is a
dark band where the slides touch. The rainbow colors of constructive interference repeat, going from violet to red again and again as the distance
between the slides increases. As the layer of air increases, the bands become more difficult to see, because slight changes in incident angle have
greater effects on path length differences. If pure-wavelength light instead of white light is used, then bright and dark bands are obtained rather than
repeating rainbow colors.
Figure 27.34(a) The rainbow color bands are produced by thin film interference in the air between the two glass slides. (b) Schematic of the paths taken by rays in the wedge
of air between the slides.
An important application of thin film interference is found in the manufacturing of optical instruments. A lens or mirror can be compared with a master
as it is being ground, allowing it to be shaped to an accuracy of less than a wavelength over its entire surface.Figure 27.35illustrates the
phenomenon called Newton’s rings, which occurs when the plane surfaces of two lenses are placed together. (The circular bands are called Newton’s
rings because Isaac Newton described them and their use in detail. Newton did not discover them; Robert Hooke did, and Newton did not believe
they were due to the wave character of light.) Each successive ring of a given color indicates an increase of only one wavelength in the distance
between the lens and the blank, so that great precision can be obtained. Once the lens is perfect, there will be no rings.
Figure 27.35“Newton's rings” interference fringes are produced when two plano-convex lenses are placed together with their plane surfaces in contact. The rings are created
by interference between the light reflected off the two surfaces as a result of a slight gap between them, indicating that these surfaces are not precisely plane but are slightly
convex. (credit: Ulf Seifert, Wikimedia Commons)
The wings of certain moths and butterflies have nearly iridescent colors due to thin film interference. In addition to pigmentation, the wing’s color is
affected greatly by constructive interference of certain wavelengths reflected from its film-coated surface. Car manufacturers are offering special paint
jobs that use thin film interference to produce colors that change with angle. This expensive option is based on variation of thin film path length
differences with angle. Security features on credit cards, banknotes, driving licenses and similar items prone to forgery use thin film interference,
diffraction gratings, or holograms. Australia led the way with dollar bills printed on polymer with a diffraction grating security feature making the
currency difficult to forge. Other countries such as New Zealand and Taiwan are using similar technologies, while the United States currency includes
a thin film interference effect.
Making Connections: Take-Home Experiment—Thin Film Interference
One feature of thin film interference and diffraction gratings is that the pattern shifts as you change the angle at which you look or move your
head. Find examples of thin film interference and gratings around you. Explain how the patterns change for each specific example. Find
examples where the thickness changes giving rise to changing colors. If you can find two microscope slides, then try observing the effect shown
inFigure 27.34. Try separating one end of the two slides with a hair or maybe a thin piece of paper and observe the effect.
Problem-Solving Strategies for Wave Optics
Step 1.Examine the situation to determine that interference is involved. Identify whether slits or thin film interference are considered in the problem.
Step 2.If slits are involved, note that diffraction gratings and double slits produce very similar interference patterns, but that gratings have narrower
(sharper) maxima. Single slit patterns are characterized by a large central maximum and smaller maxima to the sides.
Step 3.If thin film interference is involved, take note of the path length difference between the two rays that interfere. Be certain to use the
wavelength in the medium involved, since it differs from the wavelength in vacuum. Note also that there is an additional
λ/2
phase shift when light
reflects from a medium with a greater index of refraction.
Step 4.Identify exactly what needs to be determined in the problem (identify the unknowns). A written list is useful. Draw a diagram of the situation.
Labeling the diagram is useful.
Step 5.Make a list of what is given or can be inferred from the problem as stated (identify the knowns).
CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS S 977
Step 6.Solve the appropriate equation for the quantity to be determined (the unknown), and enter the knowns. Slits, gratings, and the Rayleigh limit
involve equations.
Step 7.For thin film interference, you will have constructive interference for a total shift that is an integral number of wavelengths. You will have
destructive interference for a total shift of a half-integral number of wavelengths. Always keep in mind that crest to crest is constructive whereas crest
to trough is destructive.
Step 8.Check to see if the answer is reasonable: Does it make sense?Angles in interference patterns cannot be greater than
90º
, for example.
27.8Polarization
Polaroid sunglasses are familiar to most of us. They have a special ability to cut the glare of light reflected from water or glass (seeFigure 27.36).
Polaroids have this ability because of a wave characteristic of light called polarization. What is polarization? How is it produced? What are some of its
uses? The answers to these questions are related to the wave character of light.
Figure 27.36These two photographs of a river show the effect of a polarizing filter in reducing glare in light reflected from the surface of water. Part (b) of this figure was taken
with a polarizing filter and part (a) was not. As a result, the reflection of clouds and sky observed in part (a) is not observed in part (b). Polarizing sunglasses are particularly
useful on snow and water. (credit: Amithshs, Wikimedia Commons)
Light is one type of electromagnetic (EM) wave. As noted earlier, EM waves aretransverse wavesconsisting of varying electric and magnetic fields
that oscillate perpendicular to the direction of propagation (seeFigure 27.37). There are specific directions for the oscillations of the electric and
magnetic fields.Polarizationis the attribute that a wave’s oscillations have a definite direction relative to the direction of propagation of the wave.
(This is not the same type of polarization as that discussed for the separation of charges.) Waves having such a direction are said to bepolarized.
For an EM wave, we define thedirection of polarizationto be the direction parallel to the electric field. Thus we can think of the electric field arrows
as showing the direction of polarization, as inFigure 27.37.
Figure 27.37An EM wave, such as light, is a transverse wave. The electric and magnetic fields are perpendicular to the direction of propagation.
To examine this further, consider the transverse waves in the ropes shown inFigure 27.38. The oscillations in one rope are in a vertical plane and
are said to bevertically polarized. Those in the other rope are in a horizontal plane and arehorizontally polarized. If a vertical slit is placed on the
first rope, the waves pass through. However, a vertical slit blocks the horizontally polarized waves. For EM waves, the direction of the electric field is
analogous to the disturbances on the ropes.
Figure 27.38The transverse oscillations in one rope are in a vertical plane, and those in the other rope are in a horizontal plane. The first is said to be vertically polarized, and
the other is said to be horizontally polarized. Vertical slits pass vertically polarized waves and block horizontally polarized waves.
The Sun and many other light sources produce waves that are randomly polarized (seeFigure 27.39). Such light is said to beunpolarizedbecause
it is composed of many waves with all possible directions of polarization. Polaroid materials, invented by the founder of Polaroid Corporation, Edwin
978 CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested