asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Break a pdf application Library tool html asp.net web page online PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics99-part1856

phase-contrast microscope:
polarization microscope:
polarization:
polarized:
Rayleigh criterion:
reflected light that is completely polarized:
thin film interference:
ultraviolet (UV) microscopes:
unpolarized:
vertically polarized:
wavelength in a medium:
microscope utilizing wave interference and differences in phases to enhance contrast
microscope that enhances contrast by utilizing a wave characteristic of light, useful for objects that are optically active
the attribute that wave oscillations have a definite direction relative to the direction of propagation of the wave
waves having the electric and magnetic field oscillations in a definite direction
two images are just resolvable when the center of the diffraction pattern of one is directly over the first minimum of the
diffraction pattern of the other
light reflected at the angle of reflection
θ
b
, known as Brewster’s angle
interference between light reflected from different surfaces of a thin film
microscopes constructed with special lenses that transmit UV rays and utilize photographic or electronic
techniques to record images
waves that are randomly polarized
the oscillations are in a vertical plane
λ
n
=λ/n
, where
λ
is the wavelength in vacuum, and
n
is the index of refraction of the medium
Section Summary
27.1The Wave Aspect of Light: Interference
• Wave optics is the branch of optics that must be used when light interacts with small objects or whenever the wave characteristics of light are
considered.
• Wave characteristics are those associated with interference and diffraction.
• Visible light is the type of electromagnetic wave to which our eyes respond and has a wavelength in the range of 380 to 760 nm.
• Like all EM waves, the following relationship is valid in vacuum:
c
, where
c=3×10
8
m/s
is the speed of light,
f
is the frequency of
the electromagnetic wave, and
λ
is its wavelength in vacuum.
• The wavelength
λ
n
of light in a medium with index of refraction
n
is
λ
n
=λ/n
. Its frequency is the same as in vacuum.
27.2Huygens's Principle: Diffraction
• An accurate technique for determining how and where waves propagate is given by Huygens’s principle: Every point on a wavefront is a source
of wavelets that spread out in the forward direction at the same speed as the wave itself. The new wavefront is a line tangent to all of the
wavelets.
• Diffraction is the bending of a wave around the edges of an opening or other obstacle.
27.3Young’s Double Slit Experiment
• Young’s double slit experiment gave definitive proof of the wave character of light.
• An interference pattern is obtained by the superposition of light from two slits.
• There is constructive interference when
dsinθ=(form=0,1,−1,2,−2,…)
, where
d
is the distance between the slits,
θ
is the
angle relative to the incident direction, and
m
is the order of the interference.
• There is destructive interference when
sinθ=
m+
1
2
λ(for m=0,1,−1,2,−2,…)
.
27.4Multiple Slit Diffraction
• A diffraction grating is a large collection of evenly spaced parallel slits that produces an interference pattern similar to but sharper than that of a
double slit.
• There is constructive interference for a diffraction grating when
sinθ=(form=0,1,–1,2,–2,…)
, where
d
is the distance
between slits in the grating,
λ
is the wavelength of light, and
m
is the order of the maximum.
27.5Single Slit Diffraction
• A single slit produces an interference pattern characterized by a broad central maximum with narrower and dimmer maxima to the sides.
• There is destructive interference for a single slit when
sinθ=mλ,(form=1,–1,2,–2,3,…)
, where
D
is the slit width,
λ
is the
light’s wavelength,
θ
is the angle relative to the original direction of the light, and
m
is the order of the minimum. Note that there is no
m=0
minimum.
27.6Limits of Resolution: The Rayleigh Criterion
• Diffraction limits resolution.
• For a circular aperture, lens, or mirror, the Rayleigh criterion states that two images are just resolvable when the center of the diffraction pattern
of one is directly over the first minimum of the diffraction pattern of the other.
CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS S 989
Break a pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
split pdf into multiple files; split pdf into individual pages
Break a pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf into multiple pages; break pdf file into parts
• This occurs for two point objects separated by the angle
θ=1.22
λ
D
, where
λ
is the wavelength of light (or other electromagnetic radiation)
and
D
is the diameter of the aperture, lens, mirror, etc. This equation also gives the angular spreading of a source of light having a diameter
D
.
27.7Thin Film Interference
• Thin film interference occurs between the light reflected from the top and bottom surfaces of a film. In addition to the path length difference,
there can be a phase change.
• When light reflects from a medium having an index of refraction greater than that of the medium in which it is traveling, a
180º
phase change
(or a
λ/2
shift) occurs.
27.8Polarization
• Polarization is the attribute that wave oscillations have a definite direction relative to the direction of propagation of the wave.
• EM waves are transverse waves that may be polarized.
• The direction of polarization is defined to be the direction parallel to the electric field of the EM wave.
• Unpolarized light is composed of many rays having random polarization directions.
• Light can be polarized by passing it through a polarizing filter or other polarizing material. The intensity
I
of polarized light after passing
through a polarizing filter is
I=I
0
cos
2
θ,
where
I
0
is the original intensity and
θ
is the angle between the direction of polarization and the
axis of the filter.
• Polarization is also produced by reflection.
• Brewster’s law states that reflected light will be completely polarized at the angle of reflection
θ
b
, known as Brewster’s angle, given by a
statement known as Brewster’s law:
tanθ
b
=
n
2
n
1
, where
n
1
is the medium in which the incident and reflected light travel and
n
2
is the index
of refraction of the medium that forms the interface that reflects the light.
• Polarization can also be produced by scattering.
• There are a number of types of optically active substances that rotate the direction of polarization of light passing through them.
27.9*Extended Topic* Microscopy Enhanced by the Wave Characteristics of Light
• To improve microscope images, various techniques utilizing the wave characteristics of light have been developed. Many of these enhance
contrast with interference effects.
Conceptual Questions
27.1The Wave Aspect of Light: Interference
1.What type of experimental evidence indicates that light is a wave?
2.Give an example of a wave characteristic of light that is easily observed outside the laboratory.
27.2Huygens's Principle: Diffraction
3.How do wave effects depend on the size of the object with which the wave interacts? For example, why does sound bend around the corner of a
building while light does not?
4.Under what conditions can light be modeled like a ray? Like a wave?
5.Go outside in the sunlight and observe your shadow. It has fuzzy edges even if you do not. Is this a diffraction effect? Explain.
6.Why does the wavelength of light decrease when it passes from vacuum into a medium? State which attributes change and which stay the same
and, thus, require the wavelength to decrease.
7.Does Huygens’s principle apply to all types of waves?
27.3Young’s Double Slit Experiment
8.Young’s double slit experiment breaks a single light beam into two sources. Would the same pattern be obtained for two independent sources of
light, such as the headlights of a distant car? Explain.
9.Suppose you use the same double slit to perform Young’s double slit experiment in air and then repeat the experiment in water. Do the angles to
the same parts of the interference pattern get larger or smaller? Does the color of the light change? Explain.
10.Is it possible to create a situation in which there is only destructive interference? Explain.
11.Figure 27.55shows the central part of the interference pattern for a pure wavelength of red light projected onto a double slit. The pattern is
actually a combination of single slit and double slit interference. Note that the bright spots are evenly spaced. Is this a double slit or single slit
characteristic? Note that some of the bright spots are dim on either side of the center. Is this a single slit or double slit characteristic? Which is
smaller, the slit width or the separation between slits? Explain your responses.
Figure 27.55This double slit interference pattern also shows signs of single slit interference. (credit: PASCO)
990 CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
break pdf documents; break password on pdf
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. FileType.IMG_JPEG); switch (result) { case ConvertResult. NO_ERROR: Console.WriteLine("Success"); break; case ConvertResult
pdf splitter; break apart pdf pages
27.4Multiple Slit Diffraction
12.What is the advantage of a diffraction grating over a double slit in dispersing light into a spectrum?
13.What are the advantages of a diffraction grating over a prism in dispersing light for spectral analysis?
14.Can the lines in a diffraction grating be too close together to be useful as a spectroscopic tool for visible light? If so, what type of EM radiation
would the grating be suitable for? Explain.
15.If a beam of white light passes through a diffraction grating with vertical lines, the light is dispersed into rainbow colors on the right and left. If a
glass prism disperses white light to the right into a rainbow, how does the sequence of colors compare with that produced on the right by a diffraction
grating?
16.Suppose pure-wavelength light falls on a diffraction grating. What happens to the interference pattern if the same light falls on a grating that has
more lines per centimeter? What happens to the interference pattern if a longer-wavelength light falls on the same grating? Explain how these two
effects are consistent in terms of the relationship of wavelength to the distance between slits.
17.Suppose a feather appears green but has no green pigment. Explain in terms of diffraction.
18.It is possible that there is no minimum in the interference pattern of a single slit. Explain why. Is the same true of double slits and diffraction
gratings?
27.5Single Slit Diffraction
19.As the width of the slit producing a single-slit diffraction pattern is reduced, how will the diffraction pattern produced change?
27.6Limits of Resolution: The Rayleigh Criterion
20.A beam of light always spreads out. Why can a beam not be created with parallel rays to prevent spreading? Why can lenses, mirrors, or
apertures not be used to correct the spreading?
27.7Thin Film Interference
21.What effect does increasing the wedge angle have on the spacing of interference fringes? If the wedge angle is too large, fringes are not
observed. Why?
22.How is the difference in paths taken by two originally in-phase light waves related to whether they interfere constructively or destructively? How
can this be affected by reflection? By refraction?
23.Is there a phase change in the light reflected from either surface of a contact lens floating on a person’s tear layer? The index of refraction of the
lens is about 1.5, and its top surface is dry.
24.In placing a sample on a microscope slide, a glass cover is placed over a water drop on the glass slide. Light incident from above can reflect from
the top and bottom of the glass cover and from the glass slide below the water drop. At which surfaces will there be a phase change in the reflected
light?
25.Answer the above question if the fluid between the two pieces of crown glass is carbon disulfide.
26.While contemplating the food value of a slice of ham, you notice a rainbow of color reflected from its moist surface. Explain its origin.
27.An inventor notices that a soap bubble is dark at its thinnest and realizes that destructive interference is taking place for all wavelengths. How
could she use this knowledge to make a non-reflective coating for lenses that is effective at all wavelengths? That is, what limits would there be on
the index of refraction and thickness of the coating? How might this be impractical?
28.A non-reflective coating like the one described inExample 27.6works ideally for a single wavelength and for perpendicular incidence. What
happens for other wavelengths and other incident directions? Be specific.
29.Why is it much more difficult to see interference fringes for light reflected from a thick piece of glass than from a thin film? Would it be easier if
monochromatic light were used?
27.8Polarization
30.Under what circumstances is the phase of light changed by reflection? Is the phase related to polarization?
31.Can a sound wave in air be polarized? Explain.
32.No light passes through two perfect polarizing filters with perpendicular axes. However, if a third polarizing filter is placed between the original
two, some light can pass. Why is this? Under what circumstances does most of the light pass?
33.Explain what happens to the energy carried by light that it is dimmed by passing it through two crossed polarizing filters.
34.When particles scattering light are much smaller than its wavelength, the amount of scattering is proportional to
1/λ
4
. Does this mean there is
more scattering for small
λ
than large
λ
? How does this relate to the fact that the sky is blue?
35.Using the information given in the preceding question, explain why sunsets are red.
36.When light is reflected at Brewster’s angle from a smooth surface, it is
100%
polarized parallel to the surface. Part of the light will be refracted
into the surface. Describe how you would do an experiment to determine the polarization of the refracted light. What direction would you expect the
polarization to have and would you expect it to be
100%
?
27.9*Extended Topic* Microscopy Enhanced by the Wave Characteristics of Light
37.Explain how microscopes can use wave optics to improve contrast and why this is important.
38.A bright white light under water is collimated and directed upon a prism. What range of colors does one see emerging?
CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS S 991
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Forms. Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free SDK library for Visual Studio .NET. Independent
cannot select text in pdf file; pdf split
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
break apart pdf; break a pdf file
Problems & Exercises
27.1The Wave Aspect of Light: Interference
1.Show that when light passes from air to water, its wavelength
decreases to 0.750 times its original value.
2.Find the range of visible wavelengths of light in crown glass.
3.What is the index of refraction of a material for which the wavelength
of light is 0.671 times its value in a vacuum? Identify the likely
substance.
4.Analysis of an interference effect in a clear solid shows that the
wavelength of light in the solid is 329 nm. Knowing this light comes from
a He-Ne laser and has a wavelength of 633 nm in air, is the substance
zircon or diamond?
5.What is the ratio of thicknesses of crown glass and water that would
contain the same number of wavelengths of light?
27.3Young’s Double Slit Experiment
6.At what angle is the first-order maximum for 450-nm wavelength blue
light falling on double slits separated by 0.0500 mm?
7.Calculate the angle for the third-order maximum of 580-nm
wavelength yellow light falling on double slits separated by 0.100 mm.
8.What is the separation between two slits for which 610-nm orange
light has its first maximum at an angle of
30.0º
?
9.Find the distance between two slits that produces the first minimum
for 410-nm violet light at an angle of
45.0º
.
10.Calculate the wavelength of light that has its third minimum at an
angle of
30.0º
when falling on double slits separated by
3.00μm
.
Explicitly, show how you follow the steps inProblem-Solving
Strategies for Wave Optics.
11.What is the wavelength of light falling on double slits separated by
2.00μm
if the third-order maximum is at an angle of
60.0º
?
12.At what angle is the fourth-order maximum for the situation in
Exercise 27.6?
13.What is the highest-order maximum for 400-nm light falling on
double slits separated by
25.0μm
?
14.Find the largest wavelength of light falling on double slits separated
by
1.20μm
for which there is a first-order maximum. Is this in the
visible part of the spectrum?
15.What is the smallest separation between two slits that will produce a
second-order maximum for 720-nm red light?
16.(a) What is the smallest separation between two slits that will
produce a second-order maximum for any visible light? (b) For all
visible light?
17.(a) If the first-order maximum for pure-wavelength light falling on a
double slit is at an angle of
10.0º
, at what angle is the second-order
maximum? (b) What is the angle of the first minimum? (c) What is the
highest-order maximum possible here?
18.Figure 27.56shows a double slit located a distance
x
from a
screen, with the distance from the center of the screen given by
y
.
When the distance
d
between the slits is relatively large, there will be
numerous bright spots, called fringes. Show that, for small angles
(where
sinθθ
, with
θ
in radians), the distance between fringes is
given by
Δy=/d
.
Figure 27.56The distance between adjacent fringes is
Δy=/d
, assuming
the slit separation
d
is large compared with
λ
.
19.Using the result of the problem above, calculate the distance
between fringes for 633-nm light falling on double slits separated by
0.0800 mm, located 3.00 m from a screen as inFigure 27.56.
20.Using the result of the problem two problems prior, find the
wavelength of light that produces fringes 7.50 mm apart on a screen
2.00 m from double slits separated by 0.120 mm (seeFigure 27.56).
27.4Multiple Slit Diffraction
21.A diffraction grating has 2000 lines per centimeter. At what angle
will the first-order maximum be for 520-nm-wavelength green light?
22.Find the angle for the third-order maximum for 580-nm-wavelength
yellow light falling on a diffraction grating having 1500 lines per
centimeter.
23.How many lines per centimeter are there on a diffraction grating that
gives a first-order maximum for 470-nm blue light at an angle of
25.0º
?
24.What is the distance between lines on a diffraction grating that
produces a second-order maximum for 760-nm red light at an angle of
60.0º
?
25.Calculate the wavelength of light that has its second-order
maximum at
45.0º
when falling on a diffraction grating that has 5000
lines per centimeter.
26.An electric current through hydrogen gas produces several distinct
wavelengths of visible light. What are the wavelengths of the hydrogen
spectrum, if they form first-order maxima at angles of
24.2º
,
25.7º
,
29.1º
, and
41.0º
when projected on a diffraction grating having
10,000 lines per centimeter? Explicitly show how you follow the steps in
Problem-Solving Strategies for Wave Optics
27.(a) What do the four angles in the above problem become if a
5000-line-per-centimeter diffraction grating is used? (b) Using this
grating, what would the angles be for the second-order maxima? (c)
Discuss the relationship between integral reductions in lines per
centimeter and the new angles of various order maxima.
28.What is the maximum number of lines per centimeter a diffraction
grating can have and produce a complete first-order spectrum for
visible light?
29.The yellow light from a sodium vapor lampseemsto be of pure
wavelength, but it produces two first-order maxima at
36.093º
and
36.129º
when projected on a 10,000 line per centimeter diffraction
grating. What are the two wavelengths to an accuracy of 0.1 nm?
30.What is the spacing between structures in a feather that acts as a
reflection grating, given that they produce a first-order maximum for
525-nm light at a
30.0º
angle?
31.Structures on a bird feather act like a reflection grating having 8000
lines per centimeter. What is the angle of the first-order maximum for
600-nm light?
992 CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's not supported tell stop.
pdf rotate single page; break apart a pdf in reader
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's
break pdf into multiple files; break pdf password online
32.An opal such as that shown inFigure 27.17acts like a reflection
grating with rows separated by about
8μm
. If the opal is illuminated
normally, (a) at what angle will red light be seen and (b) at what angle
will blue light be seen?
33.At what angle does a diffraction grating produces a second-order
maximum for light having a first-order maximum at
20.0º
?
34.Show that a diffraction grating cannot produce a second-order
maximum for a given wavelength of light unless the first-order
maximum is at an angle less than
30.0º
.
35.If a diffraction grating produces a first-order maximum for the
shortest wavelength of visible light at
30.0º
, at what angle will the first-
order maximum be for the longest wavelength of visible light?
36.(a) Find the maximum number of lines per centimeter a diffraction
grating can have and produce a maximum for the smallest wavelength
of visible light. (b) Would such a grating be useful for ultraviolet
spectra? (c) For infrared spectra?
37.(a) Show that a 30,000-line-per-centimeter grating will not produce
a maximum for visible light. (b) What is the longest wavelength for
which it does produce a first-order maximum? (c) What is the greatest
number of lines per centimeter a diffraction grating can have and
produce a complete second-order spectrum for visible light?
38.A He–Ne laser beam is reflected from the surface of a CD onto a
wall. The brightest spot is the reflected beam at an angle equal to the
angle of incidence. However, fringes are also observed. If the wall is
1.50 m from the CD, and the first fringe is 0.600 m from the central
maximum, what is the spacing of grooves on the CD?
39.The analysis shown in the figure below also applies to diffraction
gratings with lines separated by a distance
d
. What is the distance
between fringes produced by a diffraction grating having 125 lines per
centimeter for 600-nm light, if the screen is 1.50 m away?
Figure 27.57The distance between adjacent fringes is
Δy=/d
, assuming
the slit separation
d
is large compared with
λ
.
40.Unreasonable Results
Red light of wavelength of 700 nm falls on a double slit separated by
400 nm. (a) At what angle is the first-order maximum in the diffraction
pattern? (b) What is unreasonable about this result? (c) Which
assumptions are unreasonable or inconsistent?
41.Unreasonable Results
(a) What visible wavelength has its fourth-order maximum at an angle
of
25.0º
when projected on a 25,000-line-per-centimeter diffraction
grating? (b) What is unreasonable about this result? (c) Which
assumptions are unreasonable or inconsistent?
42.Construct Your Own Problem
Consider a spectrometer based on a diffraction grating. Construct a
problem in which you calculate the distance between two wavelengths
of electromagnetic radiation in your spectrometer. Among the things to
be considered are the wavelengths you wish to be able to distinguish,
the number of lines per meter on the diffraction grating, and the
distance from the grating to the screen or detector. Discuss the
practicality of the device in terms of being able to discern between
wavelengths of interest.
27.5Single Slit Diffraction
43.(a) At what angle is the first minimum for 550-nm light falling on a
single slit of width
1.00μm
? (b) Will there be a second minimum?
44.(a) Calculate the angle at which a
2.00-μm
-wide slit produces its
first minimum for 410-nm violet light. (b) Where is the first minimum for
700-nm red light?
45.(a) How wide is a single slit that produces its first minimum for
633-nm light at an angle of
28.0º
? (b) At what angle will the second
minimum be?
46.(a) What is the width of a single slit that produces its first minimum
at
60.0º
for 600-nm light? (b) Find the wavelength of light that has its
first minimum at
62.0º
.
47.Find the wavelength of light that has its third minimum at an angle
of
48.6º
when it falls on a single slit of width
3.00μm
.
48.Calculate the wavelength of light that produces its first minimum at
an angle of
36.9º
when falling on a single slit of width
1.00μm
.
49.(a) Sodium vapor light averaging 589 nm in wavelength falls on a
single slit of width
7.50μm
. At what angle does it produces its second
minimum? (b) What is the highest-order minimum produced?
50.(a) Find the angle of the third diffraction minimum for 633-nm light
falling on a slit of width
20.0μm
. (b) What slit width would place this
minimum at
85.0º
? Explicitly show how you follow the steps in
Problem-Solving Strategies for Wave Optics
51.(a) Find the angle between the first minima for the two sodium
vapor lines, which have wavelengths of 589.1 and 589.6 nm, when they
fall upon a single slit of width
2.00μm
. (b) What is the distance
between these minima if the diffraction pattern falls on a screen 1.00 m
from the slit? (c) Discuss the ease or difficulty of measuring such a
distance.
52.(a) What is the minimum width of a single slit (in multiples of
λ
) that
will produce a first minimum for a wavelength
λ
? (b) What is its
minimum width if it produces 50 minima? (c) 1000 minima?
53.(a) If a single slit produces a first minimum at
14.5º
, at what angle
is the second-order minimum? (b) What is the angle of the third-order
minimum? (c) Is there a fourth-order minimum? (d) Use your answers to
illustrate how the angular width of the central maximum is about twice
the angular width of the next maximum (which is the angle between the
first and second minima).
54.A double slit produces a diffraction pattern that is a combination of
single and double slit interference. Find the ratio of the width of the slits
to the separation between them, if the first minimum of the single slit
pattern falls on the fifth maximum of the double slit pattern. (This will
greatly reduce the intensity of the fifth maximum.)
55.Integrated Concepts
A water break at the entrance to a harbor consists of a rock barrier with
a 50.0-m-wide opening. Ocean waves of 20.0-m wavelength approach
the opening straight on. At what angle to the incident direction are the
boats inside the harbor most protected against wave action?
56.Integrated Concepts
An aircraft maintenance technician walks past a tall hangar door that
acts like a single slit for sound entering the hangar. Outside the door, on
a line perpendicular to the opening in the door, a jet engine makes a
600-Hz sound. At what angle with the door will the technician observe
the first minimum in sound intensity if the vertical opening is 0.800 m
wide and the speed of sound is 340 m/s?
CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS S 993
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
foreach (TwainStaticFrameSizeType frame in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
pdf format specification; acrobat split pdf bookmark
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. if (device.Compression != TwainCompressionMode.Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
break a pdf into smaller files; pdf split pages in half
27.6Limits of Resolution: The Rayleigh Criterion
57.The 300-m-diameter Arecibo radio telescope pictured inFigure
27.28detects radio waves with a 4.00 cm average wavelength.
(a) What is the angle between two just-resolvable point sources for this
telescope?
(b) How close together could these point sources be at the 2 million
light year distance of the Andromeda galaxy?
58.Assuming the angular resolution found for the Hubble Telescope in
Example 27.5, what is the smallest detail that could be observed on the
Moon?
59.Diffraction spreading for a flashlight is insignificant compared with
other limitations in its optics, such as spherical aberrations in its mirror.
To show this, calculate the minimum angular spreading of a flashlight
beam that is originally 5.00 cm in diameter with an average wavelength
of 600 nm.
60.(a) What is the minimum angular spread of a 633-nm wavelength
He-Ne laser beam that is originally 1.00 mm in diameter?
(b) If this laser is aimed at a mountain cliff 15.0 km away, how big will
the illuminated spot be?
(c) How big a spot would be illuminated on the Moon, neglecting
atmospheric effects? (This might be done to hit a corner reflector to
measure the round-trip time and, hence, distance.) Explicitly show how
you follow the steps inProblem-Solving Strategies for Wave Optics.
61.A telescope can be used to enlarge the diameter of a laser beam
and limit diffraction spreading. The laser beam is sent through the
telescope in opposite the normal direction and can then be projected
onto a satellite or the Moon.
(a) If this is done with the Mount Wilson telescope, producing a 2.54-m-
diameter beam of 633-nm light, what is the minimum angular spread of
the beam?
(b) Neglecting atmospheric effects, what is the size of the spot this
beam would make on the Moon, assuming a lunar distance of
3.84×10
8
m
?
62.The limit to the eye’s acuity is actually related to diffraction by the
pupil.
(a) What is the angle between two just-resolvable points of light for a
3.00-mm-diameter pupil, assuming an average wavelength of 550 nm?
(b) Take your result to be the practical limit for the eye. What is the
greatest possible distance a car can be from you if you can resolve its
two headlights, given they are 1.30 m apart?
(c) What is the distance between two just-resolvable points held at an
arm’s length (0.800 m) from your eye?
(d) How does your answer to (c) compare to details you normally
observe in everyday circumstances?
63.What is the minimum diameter mirror on a telescope that would
allow you to see details as small as 5.00 km on the Moon some
384,000 km away? Assume an average wavelength of 550 nm for the
light received.
64.You are told not to shoot until you see the whites of their eyes. If the
eyes are separated by 6.5 cm and the diameter of your pupil is 5.0 mm,
at what distance can you resolve the two eyes using light of wavelength
555 nm?
65.(a) The planet Pluto and its Moon Charon are separated by 19,600
km. Neglecting atmospheric effects, should the 5.08-m-diameter Mount
Palomar telescope be able to resolve these bodies when they are
4.50×10
9
km
from Earth? Assume an average wavelength of 550
nm.
(b) In actuality, it is just barely possible to discern that Pluto and Charon
are separate bodies using an Earth-based telescope. What are the
reasons for this?
66.The headlights of a car are 1.3 m apart. What is the maximum
distance at which the eye can resolve these two headlights? Take the
pupil diameter to be 0.40 cm.
67.When dots are placed on a page from a laser printer, they must be
close enough so that you do not see the individual dots of ink. To do
this, the separation of the dots must be less than Raleigh’s criterion.
Take the pupil of the eye to be 3.0 mm and the distance from the paper
to the eye of 35 cm; find the minimum separation of two dots such that
they cannot be resolved. How many dots per inch (dpi) does this
correspond to?
68.Unreasonable Results
An amateur astronomer wants to build a telescope with a diffraction
limit that will allow him to see if there are people on the moons of
Jupiter.
(a) What diameter mirror is needed to be able to see 1.00 m detail on a
Jovian Moon at a distance of
7.50×10
8
km
from Earth? The
wavelength of light averages 600 nm.
(b) What is unreasonable about this result?
(c) Which assumptions are unreasonable or inconsistent?
69.Construct Your Own Problem
Consider diffraction limits for an electromagnetic wave interacting with a
circular object. Construct a problem in which you calculate the limit of
angular resolution with a device, using this circular object (such as a
lens, mirror, or antenna) to make observations. Also calculate the limit
to spatial resolution (such as the size of features observable on the
Moon) for observations at a specific distance from the device. Among
the things to be considered are the wavelength of electromagnetic
radiation used, the size of the circular object, and the distance to the
system or phenomenon being observed.
27.7Thin Film Interference
70.A soap bubble is 100 nm thick and illuminated by white light incident
perpendicular to its surface. What wavelength and color of visible light
is most constructively reflected, assuming the same index of refraction
as water?
71.An oil slick on water is 120 nm thick and illuminated by white light
incident perpendicular to its surface. What color does the oil appear
(what is the most constructively reflected wavelength), given its index of
refraction is 1.40?
72.Calculate the minimum thickness of an oil slick on water that
appears blue when illuminated by white light perpendicular to its
surface. Take the blue wavelength to be 470 nm and the index of
refraction of oil to be 1.40.
73.Find the minimum thickness of a soap bubble that appears red
when illuminated by white light perpendicular to its surface. Take the
wavelength to be 680 nm, and assume the same index of refraction as
water.
74.A film of soapy water (
n=1.33
) on top of a plastic cutting board
has a thickness of 233 nm. What color is most strongly reflected if it is
illuminated perpendicular to its surface?
75.What are the three smallest non-zero thicknesses of soapy water (
n=1.33
) on Plexiglas if it appears green (constructively reflecting
520-nm light) when illuminated perpendicularly by white light? Explicitly
show how you follow the steps inProblem Solving Strategies for
Wave Optics.
76.Suppose you have a lens system that is to be used primarily for
700-nm red light. What is the second thinnest coating of fluorite
(magnesium fluoride) that would be non-reflective for this wavelength?
77.(a) As a soap bubble thins it becomes dark, because the path
length difference becomes small compared with the wavelength of light
and there is a phase shift at the top surface. If it becomes dark when
the path length difference is less than one-fourth the wavelength, what
is the thickest the bubble can be and appear dark at all visible
994 CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
wavelengths? Assume the same index of refraction as water. (b)
Discuss the fragility of the film considering the thickness found.
78.A film of oil on water will appear dark when it is very thin, because
the path length difference becomes small compared with the
wavelength of light and there is a phase shift at the top surface. If it
becomes dark when the path length difference is less than one-fourth
the wavelength, what is the thickest the oil can be and appear dark at
all visible wavelengths? Oil has an index of refraction of 1.40.
79.Figure 27.34shows two glass slides illuminated by pure-
wavelength light incident perpendicularly. The top slide touches the
bottom slide at one end and rests on a 0.100-mm-diameter hair at the
other end, forming a wedge of air. (a) How far apart are the dark bands,
if the slides are 7.50 cm long and 589-nm light is used? (b) Is there any
difference if the slides are made from crown or flint glass? Explain.
80.Figure 27.34shows two 7.50-cm-long glass slides illuminated by
pure 589-nm wavelength light incident perpendicularly. The top slide
touches the bottom slide at one end and rests on some debris at the
other end, forming a wedge of air. How thick is the debris, if the dark
bands are 1.00 mm apart?
81.RepeatExercise 27.70, but take the light to be incident at a
45º
angle.
82.RepeatExercise 27.71, but take the light to be incident at a
45º
angle.
83.Unreasonable Results
To save money on making military aircraft invisible to radar, an inventor
decides to coat them with a non-reflective material having an index of
refraction of 1.20, which is between that of air and the surface of the
plane. This, he reasons, should be much cheaper than designing
Stealth bombers. (a) What thickness should the coating be to inhibit the
reflection of 4.00-cm wavelength radar? (b) What is unreasonable about
this result? (c) Which assumptions are unreasonable or inconsistent?
27.8Polarization
84.What angle is needed between the direction of polarized light and
the axis of a polarizing filter to cut its intensity in half?
85.The angle between the axes of two polarizing filters is
45.0º
. By
how much does the second filter reduce the intensity of the light coming
through the first?
86.If you have completely polarized light of intensity
150 W/m
2
,
what will its intensity be after passing through a polarizing filter with its
axis at an
89.0º
angle to the light’s polarization direction?
87.What angle would the axis of a polarizing filter need to make with
the direction of polarized light of intensity
1.00kW/m
2
to reduce the
intensity to
10.0W/m
2
?
88.At the end ofExample 27.8, it was stated that the intensity of
polarized light is reduced to
90.0%
of its original value by passing
through a polarizing filter with its axis at an angle of
18.4º
to the
direction of polarization. Verify this statement.
89.Show that if you have three polarizing filters, with the second at an
angle of
45º
to the first and the third at an angle of
90.0º
to the first,
the intensity of light passed by the first will be reduced to
25.0%
of its
value. (This is in contrast to having only the first and third, which
reduces the intensity to zero, so that placing the second between them
increases the intensity of the transmitted light.)
90.Prove that, if
I
is the intensity of light transmitted by two polarizing
filters with axes at an angle
θ
and
I
is the intensity when the axes
are at an angle
90.0º−θ,
then
I+I′=I
0,
the original intensity.
(Hint: Use the trigonometric identities
cos(90.0º−θ)=sinθ
and
cos
2
θ+sin
2
θ=1.
)
91.At what angle will light reflected from diamond be completely
polarized?
92.What is Brewster’s angle for light traveling in water that is reflected
from crown glass?
93.A scuba diver sees light reflected from the water’s surface. At what
angle will this light be completely polarized?
94.At what angle is light inside crown glass completely polarized when
reflected from water, as in a fish tank?
95.Light reflected at
55.6º
from a window is completely polarized.
What is the window’s index of refraction and the likely substance of
which it is made?
96.(a) Light reflected at
62.5º
from a gemstone in a ring is completely
polarized. Can the gem be a diamond? (b) At what angle would the light
be completely polarized if the gem was in water?
97.If
θ
b
is Brewster’s angle for light reflected from the top of an
interface between two substances, and
θ
b
is Brewster’s angle for
light reflected from below, prove that
θ
b
+θ
b
=90.0º.
98.Integrated Concepts
If a polarizing filter reduces the intensity of polarized light to
50.0%
of
its original value, by how much are the electric and magnetic fields
reduced?
99.Integrated Concepts
Suppose you put on two pairs of Polaroid sunglasses with their axes at
an angle of
15.0º
. How much longer will it take the light to deposit a
given amount of energy in your eye compared with a single pair of
sunglasses? Assume the lenses are clear except for their polarizing
characteristics.
100.Integrated Concepts
(a) On a day when the intensity of sunlight is
1.00kW/m
2
, a circular
lens 0.200 m in diameter focuses light onto water in a black beaker.
Two polarizing sheets of plastic are placed in front of the lens with their
axes at an angle of
20.0º.
Assuming the sunlight is unpolarized and
the polarizers are
100%
efficient, what is the initial rate of heating of
the water in
ºC/s
, assuming it is
80.0%
absorbed? The aluminum
beaker has a mass of 30.0 grams and contains 250 grams of water. (b)
Do the polarizing filters get hot? Explain.
CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS S 995
996 CHAPTER 27 | WAVE OPTICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
28
SPECIAL RELATIVITY
Figure 28.1Special relativity explains why traveling to other star systems, such as these in the Orion Nebula, is unreasonable using our current level of technology. (credit:
s58y, Flickr)
Learning Objectives
28.1.Einstein’s Postulates
• State and explain both of Einstein’s postulates.
• Explain what an inertial frame of reference is.
• Describe one way the speed of light can be changed.
28.2.Simultaneity And Time Dilation
• Describe simultaneity.
• Describe time dilation.
• Calculate γ.
• Compare proper time and the observer’s measured time.
• Explain why the twin paradox is a false paradox.
28.3.Length Contraction
• Describe proper length.
• Calculate length contraction.
• Explain why we don’t notice these effects at everyday scales.
28.4.Relativistic Addition of Velocities
• Calculate relativistic velocity addition.
• Explain when relativistic velocity addition should be used instead of classical addition of velocities.
• Calculate relativistic Doppler shift.
28.5.Relativistic Momentum
• Calculate relativistic momentum.
• Explain why the only mass it makes sense to talk about is rest mass.
28.6.Relativistic Energy
• Compute total energy of a relativistic object.
• Compute the kinetic energy of a relativistic object.
• Describe rest energy, and explain how it can be converted to other forms.
• Explain why massive particles cannot reach C.
Introduction to Special Relativity
Have you ever looked up at the night sky and dreamed of traveling to other planets in faraway star systems? Would there be other life forms? What
would other worlds look like? You might imagine that such an amazing trip would be possible if we could just travel fast enough, but you will read in
this chapter why this is not true. In 1905 Albert Einstein developed the theory of special relativity. This theory explains the limit on an object’s speed
and describes the consequences.
Relativity. The wordrelativitymight conjure an image of Einstein, but the idea did not begin with him. People have been exploring relativity for many
centuries. Relativity is the study of how different observers measure the same event. Galileo and Newton developed the first correct version of
classical relativity. Einstein developed the modern theory of relativity. Modern relativity is divided into two parts.Special relativitydeals with observers
who are moving at constant velocity.General relativitydeals with observers who are undergoing acceleration. Einstein is famous because his
theories of relativity made revolutionary predictions. Most importantly, his theories have been verified to great precision in a vast range of
experiments, altering forever our concept of space and time.
CHAPTER 28 | SPECIAL RELATIVITY Y 997
Figure 28.2Many people think that Albert Einstein (1879–1955) was the greatest physicist of the 20th century. Not only did he develop modern relativity, thus revolutionizing
our concept of the universe, he also made fundamental contributions to the foundations of quantum mechanics. (credit: The Library of Congress)
It is important to note that although classical mechanic, in general, and classical relativity, in particular, are limited, they are extremely good
approximations for large, slow-moving objects. Otherwise, we could not use classical physics to launch satellites or build bridges. In the classical limit
(objects larger than submicroscopic and moving slower than about 1% of the speed of light), relativistic mechanics becomes the same as classical
mechanics. This fact will be noted at appropriate places throughout this chapter.
28.1Einstein’s Postulates
Figure 28.3Special relativity resembles trigonometry in that both are reliable because they are based on postulates that flow one from another in a logical way. (credit: Jon
Oakley, Flickr)
Have you ever used the Pythagorean Theorem and gotten a wrong answer? Probably not, unless you made a mistake in either your algebra or your
arithmetic. Each time you perform the same calculation, you know that the answer will be the same. Trigonometry is reliable because of the certainty
that one part always flows from another in a logical way. Each part is based on a set of postulates, and you can always connect the parts by applying
those postulates. Physics is the same way with the exception thatallparts must describe nature. If we are careful to choose the correct postulates,
then our theory will follow and will be verified by experiment.
Einstein essentially did the theoretical aspect of this method forrelativity. With two deceptively simple postulates and a careful consideration of how
measurements are made, he produced the theory ofspecial relativity.
Einstein’s First Postulate
The first postulate upon which Einstein based the theory of special relativity relates to reference frames. All velocities are measured relative to some
frame of reference. For example, a car’s motion is measured relative to its starting point or the road it is moving over, a projectile’s motion is
measured relative to the surface it was launched from, and a planet’s orbit is measured relative to the star it is orbiting around. The simplest frames of
reference are those that are not accelerated and are not rotating. Newton’s first law, the law of inertia, holds exactly in such a frame.
Inertial Reference Frame
Aninertial frame of referenceis a reference frame in which a body at rest remains at rest and a body in motion moves at a constant speed in a
straight line unless acted on by an outside force.
The laws of physics seem to be simplest in inertial frames. For example, when you are in a plane flying at a constant altitude and speed, physics
seems to work exactly the same as if you were standing on the surface of the Earth. However, in a plane that is taking off, matters are somewhat
more complicated. In these cases, the net force on an object,
F
, is not equal to the product of mass and acceleration,
ma
. Instead,
F
is equal to
ma
plus a fictitious force. This situation is not as simple as in an inertial frame. Not only are laws of physics simplest in inertial frames, but they
998 CHAPTER 28 | SPECIAL RELATIVITY
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested