asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Break apart a pdf in reader Library control component asp.net azure html mvc Plyometrics1-part1882

NSCA’s Performance Training Journal   |  www.nsca-lift.org/perform
Vol. 6 No. 5  |  Page 
11
Ounce
of 
Prevention
Jason Brumitt, MSPT, SCS, ATC, CSCS,*D
Figure 3. Lateral Jumps Over a Barrier
Figure 4. Front to Back Jumps 
Over a Barrier
Figure 5. Jump From Box
Employment with Velocity Sports Performance is not for the passive.  We 
are creating the industry of privatized sports performance training, changing 
and shaping lives. 
If your personal mission is to make an impact, drive results, and advance 
your skills along the way, then this is the place for you.
Drop in to any of our national locations to ask about internship and career 
opportunities, or search online for current job openings at: 
What Are You Working For?
®
®
www.velocitysp.com/careers
Desire • Belief • Character • Determination • Heart • Pride
Break apart a pdf in reader - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break apart pdf pages; add page break to pdf
Break apart a pdf in reader - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
can't cut and paste from pdf; acrobat split pdf
NSCA’s Performance Training Journal   |  www.nsca-lift.org/perform
Vol. 6 No. 5  |  Page 
12
Plyometrics
S
trength and conditioning pro-
fessionals have long relied 
on plyometrics as one of the 
primary tools for developing athletic 
power and speed. It is not surprising 
that training exercises such as plyomet-
rics, which are performed with high 
movement speeds would improve the 
performance of activities requiring speed, 
such as jumping, running, and agility. 
周 e technical term for this idea is “speci-
fi city.”  In other words, training that is 
“specifi c” or similar to the activity to be 
performed is believed to be optimal. As 
a result, recreational athletes, as well as 
those who desire to increase their overall 
fi tness and add variety to their training, 
often incorporate plyometric training 
into their programs. 
Plyometrics can be thought of as exer-
cises that train the fast muscle fi bers 
and the nerves that activate them, as 
well as refl exes, and include a variety of 
hopping, jumping, and bounding move-
ments, which ideally are organized into 
a cohesive program. 周 e main diffi  culty 
with creating a plyometric program may 
be the choosing the correct exercises 
and progression of intensity (1). 周 e 
guidelines have been gleaned from these 
studies. Assuming all plyometric exer-
cises are performed maximally:
• Any single leg plyometric exercise is 
more intense than the same exer-
cise performed on both legs. 
• Despite being considered a low 
intensity category, “jumps in place” 
such as the pike and tuck jump 
have the highest knee joint reaction 
forces.
• 周 e height that the athletes jumps 
up to or down from (as in depth 
jumps) is one of the most potent 
predictors of plyometric intensity. 
For example, a person who per-
forms a “jump in place” with a 30 
inch vertical jump will experience 
greater ground reaction force and 
thus stress, than if they performed 
a “depth jump” from an 18 inch 
box. 周 us, “jumps in place” may 
be of higher intensity than “depth 
jumps.”
focus of this article is to help the reader 
understand the basic types of plyometric 
exercises and to provide some guidelines 
regarding the  progression of plyometric 
exercises through increasing intensity 
over the course of a program.
Categorizing Plyometric 
Intensity
Classic text books describe typical cat-
egories of plyometric exercises and 
intensities (2). 周 ese categories are a 
useful starting point for understanding 
plyometric exercise options, their inten-
sity, and program design. Common 
categories and examples of plyometric 
exercises are briefl y described in table 
1, which represent increasing exercise 
intensity from jumps in place to depth 
jumps. Intensity has been defi ned as the 
amount of stress the plyometric drill 
places on the muscle, connective tissue, 
and joints (2). As such, for plyometrics, 
intensity depends on the specifi c exercis-
es performed. However, recent research 
has advanced the understanding of the 
intensity of plyometric exercises based 
on the muscle activation, connective 
tissue, and joint stress associated with 
various plyometrics (1,3). 周 e following 
Practical Guidelines for 
Plyometric Intensity
William P. Ebben, PhD, CSCS,*D
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Apart from the ability to inserting a new PDF page into existing
combine pages of pdf documents into one; break pdf password online
NSCA’s Performance Training Journal   |  www.nsca-lift.org/perform
Vol. 6 No. 5  |  Page 
13
• Jumps performed with added weight, 
such as a weighted vest or dumb-
bells held at the side are typically 
only moderate in intensity as a 
result of the ground reaction forces. 
For this type of plyometric inten-
sity is determined more by the 
jump height than the added weight. 
Since the added weight limits jump 
height, these plyometrics are only 
moderately intense.
• Jumps performed while reaching the 
arms overhead, particularly when 
trying to reach to a challenging 
goal (e.g. basketball rim) result in 
higher jump height and as a result 
are of higher intensity. 
Plyometric Program 
Design Guidelines
Table 2 presents a ranking of plyometric 
exercise intensity based on the research 
(1,3). With the knowledge of exercise 
intensity one can begin to create a program. 
A number of design variables for creating 
plyometric programs have been described 
(2). Plyometrics, like other forms of 
training are usually only performed two 
or three times a week. Training should 
occur in a non-fatigued state. 周 erefore, 
these exercises should not be performed 
after resistance training or aerobic condi-
tioning. Ample rest between sets should 
be used in order to avoid turning these 
speed and power enhancing exercises into 
endurance training. As a general rule, rest 
fi ve to ten times more than it takes you 
to perform the set of plyometrics. 周 us, if 
you do a set of multiple hops that takes 
four seconds, you should rest 20 to 40 
seconds prior to the next set or exercise. 
Another good rule to follow is to limit 
your sets to no more than 10 repetitions. 
In fact, it is probably good to use a range 
contacts of high box depth jumps, single 
leg jumps, pike jumps, and maximal 
overhead jumps and reaches. 
Plyometric programs should start with 
low intensity exercises such as those 
described in table 2. Over time, moder-
ate and eventually higher intensity exer-
cises can be incorporated for those who 
are healthy and fi t. A sample program for 
a fi t and moderately trained exerciser is 
described in table 3. You will notice that 
this program increases the volume (foot 
contacts) to a point and then volume 
eventually decreases as exercise inten-
sity increases, in order to reduce exerciser 
fatigue and increase adaptation to the 
program. 
of repetitions such as sets of one, three, 
fi ve, and ten repetitions in order to train 
explosiveness as well as power endurance 
across a continuum. 
周 e amount of plyometric training, or 
volume, which is performed in any given 
training session is measured by the num-
ber of foot contacts. Beginners often 
perform approximately 80 to 100 foot 
contacts per session (2). However, half of 
that amount may be appropriate, particu-
larly for children, older adults, or those 
who are untrained. Obviously, exercise 
intensity is an important consideration 
as well. Eighty foot contacts of a variety 
of line hopes, cones, and ankle hopes 
is dramatically less intense than 80 foot 
Plyometrics
Practical Guidelines For Plyometric Intensity
Table 1.  Exercise categories for a number of plyometric drills
Jumps in place. These are drills where involving repeated jumps 
• 
and landing in the same place. Some examples include multiple 
vertical jumps while reaching an overhead object, squat jump 
(fi gure 1), pike jump (fi gure 2), or tuck jump. 
Standing jumps. These plyometrics can be performed with either 
• 
a horizontal or vertical emphasis, but typically are performed for 
one maximal e ort. Examples include the single leg jump (fi gure 
3), maximal vertical jump (fi gure 4), standing long jump (fi gure 5), 
or lateral long jump.   
Multiple hops and jumps. These drills involve the performance of 
• 
multiple hops or jumps. Examples would include multiple long 
jumps (fi gure 6) or cone hops performed in succession, such as 5 
hops in a row (fi gure 7).  
Box drills. This type of plyometric is performed using special 
• 
boxes or other stable elevated surfaces that the exerciser 
attempts to jump up to.  Examples of these drills include box 
jumps (fi gure 8), repeated box jumps, and single leg box jumps.  
Depth jumps. These drills are also referred to drop jumps and 
• 
are performed by jumping down from a plyometric box or other 
elevated surface such as the fi rst row of bleachers.  Examples 
include stepping o  the box and landing, stepping o  the box 
and jumping vertically immediately after landing (fi gure 9), or 
stepping o  the box, landing, and sprinting.  
NSCA’s Performance Training Journal   |  www.nsca-lift.org/perform
Vol. 6 No. 5  |  Page 
14
and researcher at Marquette University. 
He has previously served as a strength 
and conditioning coach for the University 
of Wisconsin, U.S. Olympic Education 
Center, Green Bay Packers, Marquette 
University, as well as in small college and 
high school position. He also conducts 
plyometric, vertical jump, and speed devel-
opment camps and works with personal 
training clients. 
Summary 
Plyometrics can be thought of as one 
of the important tools in the tool box 
for those who wish to add another 
dimension to their training programs. 
If improving variables such as speed, 
jumping ability, and agility is a goal, 
plyometrics may be the most important 
of these tools. Maximizing plyometric 
program eff ectiveness and preventing 
injuries depends on the logical pro-
gression of exercise intensity. 周 erefore 
the goal of this article was to provide 
information about the intensity of plyo-
metric exercises, as well as to off er some 
general guidelines for plyometric pro-
gram design. 
References
1. Jensen RL, Ebben WP. (2005). 
Ground and knee joint reaction forces 
during variation of plyometric exercises.”  
In: Proceedings of the XXIII International 
Symposium of the Society of Biomechanics 
in Sports, (K.E. Gianikellis, ed.) Beijing, 
China: 222 – 225. 
2. Potach DH, Chu DA. (2000)  
Plyometric Training. In: Essentials of 
Strength Training and Conditioning. TR 
Beachle and RW Earle (eds). Champaign, 
Il: Human Kinetics. 
3. Simenz C, Leigh D, Geiser C, Melbye 
J, Jensen RL, Ebben WP. (2006). 
Electromyographic analysis of plyomet-
ric exercises. In: Proceedings of the XXIV 
International Symposium of the Society of 
Biomechanics in Sports, (H. Schwameder, 
G. Strutzenberger, V. Fastenbauer, S. 
Lindinger, and E. Muller, eds.) Salzburg, 
Austria.  
About the Author
William Ebben is an assistant professor 
Plyometrics
Practical Guidelines For Plyometric Intensity
• Single leg jumps
• Depth jumps from heights that are similar to the exercisers actual 
vertica jump height
• Tuck and pike jumps
• Maximum jump and reach to overhead goals
• Maximum jump and reach without overhead goals
• Low box and depth jumps
• Weighted jumps
• Squat jumps
• Sub-maximal jumps in place (tall cone hops)
• Sub-maximal jumps in place (short cone hops, ankle hops, split 
squat jumps)
Table 2. The Approximate Highest to Lowest Intensity Plyometric 
Exercises
NSCA’s Performance Training Journal   |  www.nsca-lift.org/perform
Vol. 6 No. 5  |  Page 
16
Plyometrics
Practical Guidelines For Plyometric Intensity
Figure 7. Multiple Cone Hops
Figure 8. Box Jump
Figure 9. Depth Jump
Table 3. Sample 5 week program to be performed twice a week. 
Week 1
Week 2
Week 3
Week 4
Week 5
Volume
60 FC
80 FC
70 FC
60 FC
50 FC
Exercises
line hops 
3x10
line hops 
3x10
squat jumps 
1 x 10
squat jumps 
1 x 10
squat jumps 
1 x 10
ankle hops 
1x10
ankle hops 
2x5
split squat jump 
3 x 5
split squat jump 
2 x 5
multiple long jump 
5 x 3
cone hops 
2x5
cone hops 
3x5
multiple cone hops 
5 x 3
tuck jump 
5 x 1
lateral long jump 
5 x 1
squat jumps 
2x5
squat jumps 
2x5
lateral long jump 
5 x 1
lateral long jump 
5 x 1
pike jump 
5 x 1
split squat jump 
2x5
weighted squat 
jump 10 x 1
weighted squat 
jump 10 x 1
two leg jump/reach 
5 x 1
long jump 
5 x 1
box jump 
2 x 5
box jump 
2 x 5
single leg jump/reach 
5 x 1
12 inch depth 
jumps 10x1
18 inch depth jumps 
5 x 1
FC = Total foot contacts per training session as determined by the total sets and repetitions for that session
NSCA’s Performance Training Journal   |  www.nsca-lift.org/perform
Vol. 6 No. 5  Page 
17
Marathoners should likely ingest 400 
– 800ml/h (4). It is now accepted that 
5 – 10% concentrations of glucose, glu-
cose polymers, and other simple sugars 
do not impair gastric emptying, making 
it possible to simultaneously achieve 
fl uid and carbohydrate requirements of 
endurance exercise (6).
Electrolytes
Sodium needs vary according to the 
concentration of the sodium lost in 
the sweat, the amount of sweat lost, 
environmental conditions, as well as the 
duration and intensity of the exercise. 
Taking in 0.3 – 0.7 grams per liter of 
fl uid (2) can help to off set salt losses 
and minimize muscle cramping and 
the risk of hyponatremia. Measuring 
sweat rate is important in order to 
customize the sodium requirement.  
Devising a diet with individualized 
recommendations for foods, beverages, 
and supplements, when necessary, is 
imperative. 周 is is because some reports 
show sodium supplementation unneces-
sary to maintain serum sodium con-
centrations in athletes completing an 
ironman triathlon  (5), whereas other 
reports show hyponatremia as a real risk 
(9,10). Hyponatremic runners seeking 
medical assistance present with a variety 
of symptoms that range from nausea, 
weakness, confusion, and incoordina-
I
n the last issue of the NSCA’s 
Performance Training Journal, we 
discussed the energy and macro-
nutrient needs of ultra endurance ath-
letes. In this issue, we will review fl uid 
and electrolyte guidelines. Ultra endur-
ance exercise is classifi ed as prolonged 
exercise lasting longer than four hours in 
duration and most commonly, involves 
running, skiing, cycling or swimming 
(1).
Fluids
Meeting nutritional and fl uid intake 
demands is a fi rst priority to ultra-
endurance athletes (6). Any loss of body 
weight in excess of three percent of body 
weight seriously disrupts temperature 
regulation and physical performance.  
Even a 2% loss of body weight can 
degrade aerobic exercise and cognitive / 
mental performance while more severe 
dehydration (3 – 5% body weight) may 
not degrade muscular strength or anaer-
obic performance but can result in other 
serious consequences (8). Consequences 
of dehydration include increased body 
core temperature, increased cardiovascu-
lar strain, increased glycogen utilization, 
altered metabolic function and possibly 
altered CNS function (8).
周 e American College of Sports 
Medicine’s current position statement 
on fl uid intake during exercise recom-
mends intake of 600 – 1200ml/h of 
‘palatable’ cooled fl uid containing 4-5% 
carbohydrate and 0.5 – 0.7g/l sodium in 
events greater that one hour in duration.  
Recent research fi ndings are, however, 
questioning the appropriateness of these 
recommendations (5). 周 is volume may 
be considered too high for ultra-distance 
athletes competing at relatively low-in-
tensities or for smaller athletes with rela-
tively low metabolic and sweat rates dur-
ing exercise.  It has also been postulated 
that female ultra endurance athletes may 
have lower fl uid requirements and are 
at signifi cantly greater risk of develop-
ing hyponatremia due to fl uid overload.  
周 is is thought to be due to lower sweat 
rates as women are usually smaller and 
have smaller fl uid compartments, and 
also due to the longer time taken by 
women to complete events (6).
Ultra-endurance athletes are therefore 
advised to adhere to more conserva-
tive fl uid intake volumes than those 
who exercise more intensely for shorter 
periods.  For instance, in ironman tri-
athlon events the recommendation is 
to limit fl uid intake to 500 – 800ml/h 
during the cycling portion and 300 – 
500ml/h during the running portion, 
with lightweight men and women being 
advised to drink even lower volumes (6). 
Training
Table
Nutrition for Ultra Endurance 
Events:
Fluid and Electrolyte Guidelines 
Part 2 of 2
Debra Wein, MS, RD, LDN, NSCA-CPT,*D
NSCA’s Performance Training Journal   |  www.nsca-lift.org/perform
Vol. 6 No. 5  |  Page 
18
tion to grand mal seizures and comas.  
Athletes engaged in very prolonged exer-
cise should ingest 1g/hour of sodium 
(3).
Fluid and electrolyte balance are critical 
to optimal exercise performance and, 
moreover, health maintenance.  Ultra 
endurance sportsmen and women typi-
cally do not meet their fl uid needs dur-
ing exercise. (7). 周 erefore, a consulta-
tion with a qualifi ed sport nutritionist 
may enhance performance and prevent 
serious consequences. 
About the Author
Debra Wein, MS, RD, LDN, CSSD, 
NSCA-CPT is a faculty member at the 
University of Massachusetts Boston and 
adjunct lecturer at Simmons College. 
Debra is the President and Co-founder of 
Sensible Nutrition, Inc. (www.sensiblenu-
trition.com), a consulting fi rm established 
in 1994 that provides nutrition services 
to athletes, individuals, universities, cor-
porate wellness programs and nonprofi t 
groups. Debra is one of only 60 RDs 
across the country Certifi ed as a Specialist 
in Sports Dietetics (CSSD) through 周 e 
American Dietetic Association. Her sport 
nutrition handouts and free weekly email 
newsletter are available online at www.
sensiblenutrition.com.
Training
Table
Fluid and Electrolyte Guidelines
References
1. Burke JH, Hawley JA. (2002). Eff ects 
of Short term fat adaptation on metabo-
lism and performance of prolonged exer-
cise. Medicine and Science in Sports and 
Exercise, 34(3): 1492 – 1498.
2. Casa DJ, Armstrong LE, Hillman SK, 
Montain SJ, Reiff  RV, Rich BSE, Roberts 
WO, Stone JA. (2000). National Athletic 
Trainers’ Association position statement: 
fl uid replacement for athletes. Journal of 
Athletic Training, 35(2): 212 – 214. 
3.Glace,B.,  Murphy, C., McHugh, M.  
(2002) Food Intake and Electrolyte sta-
tus of ultramarathoners competing in 
extreme heat.  Journal of the American 
College of Nutrition, 21(6): 553 – 559.   
4.Hew-Butler T, Verbalis JG, Noakes 
TD. (2006). Updated Fluid recom-
mendation: Position Statement From 
the International Marathon Medical 
Directors Association. Clinical Journal 
of Sports Medicine,  16(4): 283 – 292.
5. Noakes T. (2004). Sodium ingestion 
and the prevention of hyponatraemia 
during exercise. British Journal of Sports 
Medicine, 38;790 – 792.     
6. Peters E. (2003) Nutritional aspects 
in ultra-endurance exercise. Current 
Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and 
Metabolic Care, 6(4): 427 – 434.  
7. Rehrer NJ. (2001). Fluid and 
Electrolyte Balance in Ultra-Endurance 
Sport. Sports Medicine, 31(10):701 – 
715.  
8. Sawka MN, Burke LM, Eichner ER, 
Maughan RJ, Montain SJ, Stachenfeld 
NS. (2007). Exercise and Fluid 
Replacement. Medicine and Science in 
Sports and Exercise, 39(2):377 – 390.
9. Sharp RL. (2006). Role of Sodium in 
Fluid Homeostasis with Exercise. Journal 
of the American College of Nutrition
25:231S – 239S.
10. von Duvillard S, Braun W, Markofski 
M, Beneke R, Leithäuser R. (2004) 
Fluids and Hydration in Prolonged 
Endurance Performance. Nutrition, 
20(7-8): 651 – 656.
To read part 1 of this article, download 
issue 6.4 of the NSCA’s Performance 
Training Journal on www.nsca-lift.org.
NSCA’s Performance Training Journal   |  www.nsca-lift.org/perform
Vol. 6 No. 5  |  Page 
19
P
ower, the combination of speed 
and strength, is crucial for suc-
cess in many sporting events. 
周 e purpose of plyometric work is the 
same as that of strength training, to 
develop greater physical power. Many 
athletes spend all their time in the 
weight room trying to increase power 
with barbell and dumbbell exercises. 
While these exercises have their place, 
they are not the most effi  cient means 
of developing power. Traditional weight 
room exercises do not allow the athlete 
to move at the speed, or use the move-
ments needed, to develop sport specifi c 
power.
While strength training can create the 
muscular and nervous system adap-
tations necessary for power develop-
ment, plyometrics focuses on the speed 
component of power and transforms 
the physiological changes into athletic 
ability. It does this through the use of 
the elastic properties of muscle and the 
stretch shortening cycle.
Mechanisms 
Behind the SSC 
周 e stretch shortening cycle results in 
more powerful concentric contractions. 
How does this happen? 周 ere are two 
mechanisms that help to contribute 
to the explosive concentric contraction 
these are the elastic potential of the 
muscle and the muscle spindles. 周 e 
muscles contain elastic fi bers made up 
of a protein called elastin. 周 ese fi bers 
are easily stretched and return to their 
original length. 周 ey function similar to 
a rubber band and when stretched can 
add to the power of a movement. Since 
much of the original research into the 
SSC was done on isolated muscles fi bers 
that had been removed from a frog, the 
elastic response was thought to be the 
main cause of the greater power output. 
However, the muscle spindle also plays a 
role when living muscles are activated. 
Muscle spindles are located within a 
muscle near the point that it joins the 
tendon. A spindle consists of a modi-
fi ed skeletal muscle fi ber with a sensory 
nerve wrapped around one end of it. 
周 e muscle spindle senses changes in 
the amount of stretch in a muscle. A 
The Stretch Shortening 
Cycle (SSC)
Muscles are capable of three types of 
contraction.
1. Isometric contraction in which 
the length of the muscle does not 
change
2. Concentric contraction in which 
the muscle is shortened
3. Eccentric contraction in which the 
muscle is lengthened
In normal activity, these contractions 
seldom occur alone. Due to the infl u-
ence of gravity, compression and impact 
forces, from running and jumping 
activities, there is usually an eccentric 
contraction followed by a concentric 
contraction. 周 is combination of eccen-
tric-concentric contractions is known as 
the stretch shortening cycle. 周 e addi-
tion of an eccentric contraction prior to 
a concentric contraction has been found 
to increase the force, speed, and power 
output of the concentric contraction.
Introduction to Plyometrics: 
Converting Strength to Power
Ed McNeely, MS
Plyometrics
NSCA’s Performance Training Journal   |  www.nsca-lift.org/perform
Vol. 6 No. 5  |  Page 
20
signal is sent through the sensory nerve 
to the spinal cord where motor nerves 
are stimulated and the muscle that was 
stretched contracts. 周 is is called the 
myotatic or stretch refl ex. 周 e most 
common example of this is the knee tap 
examination that doctors perform dur-
ing an annual check-up. When tapping 
the knee, the patellar tendon and quad-
riceps muscle group is rapidly stretched. 
周 e quadriceps muscle group will react 
to this by contracting. An impulse is 
also sent to the antagonist muscle group 
inhibiting its contraction. During jump-
ing activities the rapid stretching of the 
muscles on landing causes the spindles 
to be activated and thereby add to the 
power output. 周 e spindles are sensitive 
to the rate of stretch, the more rapid the 
stretch the greater the activation level of 
the spindle. Since most natural move-
ments will involve the activation of both 
the muscle spindle and the elastic com-
ponents of the muscle, they both play 
a role in the increase in power output 
following SSC movements.
Plyometric Sequence
Plyometric exercises always follow the 
same specifi c sequence:
• A landing phase
• An amortization phase 
• Take off 
周 e landing phase starts as soon as the 
muscles start to experience an eccentric 
contraction. 周 e rapid eccentric con-
traction serves to stretch the elastic com-
ponent of the muscle and activate the 
stretch refl ex. A high level of eccentric 
strength is needed during the landing 
phase. Inadequate strength will result in 
a slow rate of stretch and less activation 
of the stretch refl ex.
周 e amortization phase, the time on the 
ground, is the most important part of 
a plyometric exercise. It represents the 
turn around time from landing to take 
off  and is crucial for power development. 
If the amortization phase is too long, 
the stretch refl ex is lost and there is no 
plyometric eff ect.
周 e take off  is the concentric contrac-
tion that follows the landing. During 
this phase the stored elastic energy is 
used to increase jump height and explo-
sive power.
Getting Ready for 
Plyometrics
Plyometrics are a very high intensity 
form of training, placing substantial 
stress on the bones, joints, and con-
nective tissue. While plyometrics can 
enhance an athlete’s speed, power, and 
performance, it also places them at a 
greater risk of injury than less intense 
training methods. Prior to starting a 
program there are several variables to 
consider so the training sessions are per-
formed in a safe and eff ective manner.
Landing 
As a general rule an athlete should not 
be jumping if they do not know how to 
land. A good landing involves the knees 
remaining aligned over the toes, the 
trunk inclined forward slightly, the head 
up, and the back fl at (fi gure 1). When 
an athlete is learning to do plyometrics 
for the fi rst time they should spend 
the fi rst two to three weeks focused on 
landing and being able to move out of 
a landing before moving on to more 
intense drills.
Landing Surface
Plyometrics can be performed indoors 
or outdoors. 周 e landing surface should 
be able to absorb some of the shock of 
landing. Gymnastic or wrestling mats 
are good indoor surfaces as are the 
sprung wood fl oors found in many 
aerobics studios. Outdoors, plyometrics 
are done on the grass or sand. Jumping 
on concrete or asphalt can lead to knee, 
ankle, and hip problems, as such these 
surfaces should be avoided.
Strength
Having a good strength base is essen-
tial for performing plyometrics safely 
and eff ectively. Without good lower 
body and core strength, the amortiza-
tion phase becomes too long and much 
of the benefi t of the plyometric is lost. 
Over the years, the need to squat one 
to two times body weight has been sug-
gested as a requirement for plyometrics. 
While this is a good guideline for some 
of the higher intensity drills, simple 
jumps in place and hops over very low 
barriers can be used with most athletes 
as long as they have demonstrated the 
ability to land properly.
Plyometrics
Introduction to Plyometrics: 
Converting Strength to Power
Figure 1. Landing
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested