The PoWR Handbook 2008: What about Web 2.0? 
39999    
1. Blogs 
Examples: Blogger, Wordpress, Edublogs, Warwick Blogs 
Uses: Publishing online journals for a wide variety of information dissemination 
purposes. Often readers can leave comments on individual entries. 
2. Wikis 
Examples: Mediawiki, Wetpaint, Tiddlywiki 
Uses: Collaboratively creating online hypertexts, electronic research or reference 
resources, mini-websites, class projects. 
Advantages: Quick, easy, free to set up. Enable collaboration and long-distance working. 
Flexible regarding the management of attachments. Built-in version control and rollback 
features. Some wikis can feasibly be used as a form of EDRMS. 
3. Social bookmarking 
Examples: Delicious, CiteULike, Connotea 
Uses: Recording lists of bookmarks (links to online resources). Bookmarks are usually 
tagged, and can be viewed, shared and discovered by others using the same application. 
Useful for teachers creating reading lists, or students and researchers creating 
bibliographies. 
4. Media sharing services 
Examples: Flickr, Slideshare, YouTube. (Scribd, DeviantArt) 
Uses: Galleries of images and videos; sharing presentations. Sharing multimedia 
resources for teaching and research, including podcasts and videos of lectures etc. 
Advantages: Quick, easy and free to set up. Obviates the immediate need to find server 
space for large resources that need to be shared quickly. Many of these services allow 
tagging and comments on the resource. 
5. Social networking systems 
Examples: Facebook, Ning, Elgg, Crowdvine, LinkedIn 
Uses: Allowing people to communicate and share information online, either openly or in 
by-invitation-only groups. Virtual, online study, project or research groups can easily set 
up an environment which combines many other Web 2.0 features. Conversations begun 
face-to-face, for example at conference, can continue online, and vice-versa. 
Advantages: Quick and easy and free to set up. Brand recognition leads to widespread 
use. 
6. Collaborative editing tools 
Examples: Google Docs 
Pdf no pages selected to print - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf specification; cannot print pdf no pages selected
Pdf no pages selected to print - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break a pdf into multiple files; break a pdf apart
The PoWR Handbook 2008: What about Web 2.0? 
440000    
Uses: Collaborating to edit documents and spreadsheets, allowing users in different 
locations to collaboratively edit the same document at the same time. 
Advantages: Quick and easy and free to set up; change-tracking; location and software 
independent. Ease of retrieval and migration / export to other formats / locations. 
7. Syndication and notification technologies 
Examples: Netvibes, Technorati 
Uses: Collating and aggregating news items from diverse sources. Uses XML newsfeeds 
(RSS and Atom) in diverse ways to alert subscribing users to events, such as new blog 
posts, podcasts and other new or updated online resources. 
Advantages: Creating a dynamic, personal online environment embedding or linking to 
commonly used web resources. Quick and easy and free to set up. 
8. Instant Messaging 
Examples: Facebook Chat, Google Chat, Skype, Jabber, Windows Messenger 
Uses: Informal messages for conducting informal business. However, it is possible that a 
thread starts as an informal chat and develops into something more formal along the 
way. It's possible to decide in advance that you're going to use IM for formal work, thus 
obliging a record-keeping step. See also the Case study on Preservation and Instant 
Messaging. 
Creation and preservation issues 
Some of these applications and services listed above are still at an 'experimental' stage 
and (at time of writing) being used in Institutions primarily by early adopters of new 
technologies. But it is possible to discern the same underlying issues with all these 
applications, regardless of the software or its outputs. The two most important ones are 
ownership and retention. 
Ownership and responsibility 
Quite often in an academic context these applications rely on the individual to create 
and manage their own resources. A likely scenario is that the academic, staff member or 
student creates and manages his or her own external accounts in Flickr, Slideshare or 
Wordpress.com; but they are not Institutional accounts. It is thus possible with Web 2.0 
application for academics to conduct a significant amount of Institutional business 
outside of any known Institution network. The Institution either doesn't know this activity 
is taking place, or ownership of the resources is not recognised officially. In such a 
scenario, it is likely the resources are at risk. 
Because of the nature of the relationship between naive but enthusiastic users and 
external service providers, undesirable outcomes may result. For example, by joining and 
uploading material to Facebook, many users are unwittingly accepting the following 
agreement that apparently permits Facebook to do whatever it wants with it - a far cry 
from Creative Commons: 
By posting User Content to any part of the Site, you automatically grant, and you 
represent and warrant that you have the right to grant, to the Company an irrevocable, 
perpetual, non-exclusive, transferable, fully paid, worldwide license (with the right to 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK deployment on IIS in .NET
the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer Bit Applications" in accordance with the selected DLL (x86 site configured in IIS has no sufficient authority
pdf split; split pdf
VB.NET PDF - VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer Deployment on IIS
the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer Bit Applications" in accordance with the selected DLL (x86 site configured in IIS has no sufficient authority
pdf file specification; break a pdf file
The PoWR Handbook 2008: What about Web 2.0? 
41111    
sublicense) to use, copy, publicly perform, publicly display, reformat, translate, excerpt 
(in whole or in part) and distribute such User Content for any purpose, commercial, 
advertising, or otherwise, on or in connection with the Site or the promotion thereof, 
to prepare derivative works of, or incorporate into other works, such User Content, and 
to grant and authorize sublicenses of the foregoing. 
By contrast, one would expect blogs and wikis hosted by the institution to offer more 
acceptable terms of use, in line with existing policies on rights, retention and reuse, as 
expressed in IT and information policy, conditions of employment or matriculation, etc. 
Retention of 'master copies' 
Third-party sites such as Slideshare or YouTube are excellent for dissemination, but they 
cannot be relied on to preserve your materials permanently. If you have created a 
resource - slideshow, moving image, audio, whatever it be - that requires retention or 
preservation, then someone needs to make arrangements for the 'master copy'. 
Ideally, you want to bring these arrangements in line with the larger web archiving 
programme. However, if there is a need for short-term action, and the amount of 
resources involved are (though important) relatively small, then remedial action for 
master copies may be appropriate. Some possible remedial actions are: 
• Store it in the EDRMS 
• Store it on the Institution website 
• Store it in the IR 
• Store it on a local networked drive  
It's important to ensure that materials stored in these locations are being preserved, or 
managed in some way. For that reason, don't use untrusted storage methods, such as 
storing the resource on your C Drive (where it won't be backed up) or burn it to a disk. As 
suggested, this kind of remedial action goes against the underlying intentions of the 
Handbook, and we recommend that retention and preservation activities are carried out 
within an agreed records management or asset management framework. Failing that, 
create a local written policy for your external activities that explains what you and your 
department are doing, and which could be used to demonstrate some form of IM 
compliance. (See MacGlone, 2008) 
In the case of blogs, wikis and collaborative tools, content is created directly in them, 
and access is entirely dependent on the availability of the host and the continued 
functioning of the software. Users of such tools should be encouraged and assisted to 
ensure significant outputs of online collaborative work are exported and managed 
locally. 
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Printer Control; Print TIFF Using VB.NET
document printing add-on has no limitation on the function to print multiple TIFF pages by defining powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
break a pdf into smaller files; can't select text in pdf file
C# Image: Create C#.NET Windows Document Image Viewer | Online
C# Windows Document Image Viewer Features. No need for viewing multiple document & image formats (PDF, MS Word value of selected drop-down list to switch pages.
pdf no pages selected; break a pdf file into parts
The PoWR Handbook 2008: Scenarios and case studies 
442222    
Chapter 13: Scenarios and case studies 
Scenario: Home page history 
Description
Description
Description
Description: Your institution is about to commemorate an important anniversary (10 
years, 50 years or 250 years since it was founded). Your VC wants to highlight the fact 
that the institution is actively engaging with new technologies, and would like to provide 
an example of how the institution's website has developed since it was launched. 
Issues 
• How has your institutional home page changed over time? 
• Have you kept records of the changes and the decisions which were made 
(and how they were made)? 
• If you needed to do this for your institution, do you feel you would be able to 
deliver a solution? How far back could you go?  
Approaches 
• The Internet Archive has been taking snapshots of websites since 1996 and 
may have captured web pages from your institution. The University of Bath 
used the snapshots of its Home Page captured by the Internet Archive's 
WayBack Machine to illustrate how it had changed between 1997 and 2007: 
an animated visualisation of the changes, linking to the IA's snapshots, is 
available at UKOLN's website. However, there is no guarantee that the Internet 
Archive will have captured every iteration of your institution's website, nor that 
the copies it has are complete and fully functional.  
• Even there are few, or no, surviving copies of previous versions of your 
website, there is no time like the present to start making sure snapshots are 
kept, either by taking your own copies, or ensuring the Internet Archive takes a 
copy. You can use an online form to nominate a site for crawling by the Internet 
Archive. It is also possible to nominate your site for capture by the UK Web 
Archiving Consortium. See Chapter 21: : Can other people do it for you?  
• Another approach is to build a compiled online history. The University of 
Virginia maintains a web page detailing 14 years of its website history. It 
includes fascinating statistical information based on analysis of the web server 
logs. Copies of the website are not available before 1996, while the image of 
the website in 1996 is taken from the Internet Archive. All subsequent 
snapshots are hosted on the main U.Va website, in subdirectories 
(/virginia1999, /virginia2000, etc.). Some years are missing: whether because 
the changes were insignificant, or no copy survives is not clear. Although there 
are many dead links in the archived sites, or anachronistic links to current 
versions of pages, the archived snapshots provide a valuable view of the 
evolution of the institution's web presence.  
VB.NET Word: Use VB.NET Code to Convert Word Document to TIFF
Render one or multiple selected DOCXPage instances into to TIFF image converting application, no external Word user guides with RasteEdge .NET PDF SDK using VB
break password on pdf; split pdf into individual pages
The PoWR Handbook 2008: Scenarios and case studies 
43333    
Scenario: Putting the prospectus online 
Description
Description
Description
Description:
::
: The Institution currently provides prospective students with a printed copy 
of its prospectus, while only limited information on courses has been made available on 
the institutional website. This information is fairly general to avoid legal vulnerabilities 
and to minimise maintenance issues. There is growing pressure to improve the online 
prospectus content, and even make it comprehensive enough to supersede the print 
version. The Web Manager is keen to pursue this, but is unsure of how to proceed. 
Issues 
• Who has responsibility for such a project? The creation, editing and publishing 
of an online prospectus will involve shared ownership, including for example 
Marketing, the Academic Office, the Undergraduate Admissions office, the 
Publications office, and the Web team. 
• Creation and ongoing management of an online prospectus is likely to present 
not only technical challenges, but also necessitate cultural and administrative 
change. The content will be updated much more frequently by many 
contributors. How will old versions of the prospectus (or parts of it) be stored, 
managed and accessed? 
• Students will be making decisions about their academic career based on what 
they find in this prospectus. It may be important for the Institution to know 
precisely when it was made available online, and precisely what content was 
viewable within that timeframe. Ideally, you would want to be able to access 
time-based snapshots of this part of the website, or previous (dated) versions 
of the prospectus. 
• Discussions at the third PoWR workshop revealed that the distinctions 
between a printed prospectus and an online version are increasingly becoming 
blurred. Some years ago, it used to be common practice to copy and paste a 
static document into a web page; now it's more likely that the online version 
will be 'poured' into a printable document. Some say the online version has 
supplemental material, while others see it as subordinate to the printed 
version.  
Approaches 
• Creating an online prospectus may simply be matter of creating PDF versions 
of the document, not dissimilar to the paper versions, and attaching the PDFs 
to the website. This should be considered part of the Institution's publication 
programme (and ought to be declared in the FOIA Publication Scheme). It will 
need to be managed, and copies of this serial publication will still need to be 
retained (probably permanently) by the archivist. 
• Another approach is to use an online publishing system, which may have 
automated version control and a facility for storing and retaining backup 
copies. Presumably it would also allow content to be dynamically updated. You 
may need a method to ensure that versions and changes can be captured, 
preserved, and subsequently accessed.  
The PoWR Handbook 2008: Scenarios and case studies 
444444    
Scenario: Vanishing domain names 
Description
Description
Description
Description:
::
: A project team in the Institution has purchased a domain in the .org TLD, 
outside of the main Institution domain, in order to expose and store its project outputs. 
The project is now developing into a successful service, there are numerous 
dependencies, and users have come to trust the domain. But the project manager failed 
to renew the domain name subscription, and it has now been purchased by a third 
party. This third party is now requesting a significant fee to release the domain name 
back to the Institution. 
Issues 
If your resources are located on the main institutional Website (usually in the .ac.uk 
second-level domain, managed by JANET), then your domain is unlikely to disappear: if it 
did, then this will probably be a result of major changes affecting your institution. 
If, however, you are using an alternative domain name (such as a .org, .org.uk, .co.uk or 
.com) then you will need to take care in managing the registration for your domain. If you 
have an annual re-registration for your domain, you will need to ensure that your internal 
administrative management procedures will ensure that the domain name is renewed 
prior to the expiry. 
You may ask why you would wish to make use of a non-.ac.uk domain in light of such 
possible dangers. JANET, the organisation responsible for managing .ac.uk domains, 
does not sell off its domains to the highest bidder. It does, however, have strict eligibility 
guidelines that may not be met by short-term or collaborative or cross-sectoral projects 
and services, that may involve many institutions, some international. Equally within 
institutions, the allocation of fourth-level subdomains (e.g. specialproject.london.ac.uk) 
is often tightly controlled or subject to considerable bureaucracy. 
Approaches 
• Carry out an audit of the Institution's use of non-.ac.uk domains. 
• Ensure that such domains have adequate administrative processes in place to 
ensure that the domain name is not lost if, for example, project funding ceases 
and staff involved in the project leave the Institution. 
• Carry out a risk assessment of the dangers of losing such domains, and the 
costs your institution may be willing to pay to claim back the domain.  
The PoWR Handbook 2008: Scenarios and case studies 
45555    
Scenario: Student blogs 
Description
Description
Description
Description:
::
: Your Institution runs a blog service, that all students and staff can use for 
personal and social activities, or research and study projects. One enthusiastic alumna 
wants to migrate the extensive blog she has kept for three years, but your institution, like 
many others, systematically deletes files and accounts held by students on Institution 
servers shortly after they graduate. How should the institution respond if students wish 
to maintain or migrate the content of their blog (including embedded resources, 
comments, etc.)? 
Issues 
Blogs may contain valuable discussions on important topics, as well as reflecting the 
intellectual and social life of the institution. The most-read blogs typically accumulate a 
large number of links to them, many from outside the institution's domain. These links 
will die if the blog is deleted, or if it is moved to another location (e.g. to an archive or 
alumni subdomain). 
Should the option be open to students to have their resources persist on institutional 
servers after they leave - perhaps as part of an Alumni programme? Should this be an 
opt-in or opt-out process, and should fees be involved? 
Students are increasingly encouraged to use blogging as a way of reflecting on their 
experience, but why should anyone invest effort in the construction of an artefact, and 
believe that that effort is valued, if no thought has been given to its preservation and 
continuation. The absence of some kind of migration or continuity option might create 
motivational and validity issues that could undermine the value of the facility. 
Does an institution have permission to archive the content of blogs (and make it 
available elsewhere)? This might include permission not only from the blog author (which 
might be obtainable in the general terms and conditions of registering with the 
Institution), but also third-party content: embedded quotes, images, audio, video. Is it 
possible to excise potentially offending material, or is the risk (probably negligible) that 
an Institution might be sued for copyright breaches acceptable? Are institutional staff 
and students as well informed about the issues of online copyright as they are expected 
to be about plagiarism, citation or photocopying regulations? Is it possible to include a 
default Creative Commons licence in the terms of use of the system? 
Is it more sustainable for the institution to host and manage a blogging service for its 
own students, or to use third-party providers such as Blogger.com or Wordpress.com? In 
the latter case, resources created can persist at the discretion of the student (and the 
third-party host), independently of institutional policy. 
Approaches 
• Decide that the issue is predominantly one of policy, not of self-hosting versus 
third-party hosting. If an educational institution is encouraging use of blogs to 
support reflection, discourse and deep-learning, it has a responsibility to make 
that online environment as safe as it tries to make its physical campus. 
• Institutions could recommend the use of mature hosted blogging services for 
members of the institution - such as students - who will normally only be at the 
institution for a short period. Third-party hosting might be a reasonable 
alternative to the costs of service development and maintenance, but the 
institution must examine the T&C and functionality very carefully to ensure 
they meet standards it can recommend to those in its charge. Blogger, 
The PoWR Handbook 2008: Scenarios and case studies 
446666    
Wordpress.com and Facebook are very general 'tools', and a particular 
institution might legitimately want something more tailored - like Edublogs, 
ELGG, Club Penguin even - or something truly bespoke. 
• Seek permission from the owners of the blog content before making copies. 
Investigate wider application of Creative Commons licences. Work towards 
resolving third-party issues.  
The PoWR Handbook 2008: Scenarios and case studies 
47777    
Case study: The Vanishing Blog 
Background 
The e-learning team at the University of Bath set up a blog called Auricle in early 2004. 
The blog was hosted in the bath.ac.uk domain. Derek Morrison, head of the e-learning 
unit, was interested to explore the potential of new technologies, one example of this 
being the series of podcast interviews he recorded and made available on the blog in 
2005. 
During the course of the JISC-PoWR project, Brian Kelly searched for an article in Auricle. 
Being a very Google-friendly name, a Google search for "Auricle Bath" easily found links 
to the blog. However, the URL Google displayed for the Auricle blog at Bath led only to a 
404 (Page not found) error message on Bath's web server. 
It seemed highly regrettable that potentially valuable historical content giving views on 
the potential of the Web (including technologies such as blogs and podcasts) to enhance 
the quality of students' learning experiences was now no longer available. The Institution 
might reasonably have legitimate concerns about this loss of its intellectual endeavours 
demonstrating its own early endeavours in blogging and e-learning. 
Why did the blog disappear? 
The URL for Auricle blog (www.bath.ac.uk/dacs/cdntl/pMachine/morriblog.php) provides 
some clues. DACS is the Division of Access and Continuing Studies, and CDNTL is the 
Centre for the Development of New Technologies in Learning - but neither of these 
departments still exists. 'pMachine' is the blogging software, and morriblog clearly refers 
to Derek Morrison, who left the Institution a number of years ago to support the HE 
Academy's Pathfinder programme. 
Following staff departures and organisational changes, support for learning at the 
Institution is now provided by the Learning and Teaching Enhancement Office (LTEO) 
with the e-Learning Team having responsibility for managing and supporting e-learning 
developments. As a result, it seemed that the Auricle blog got lost somewhere along the 
way. 
Could any of the resources be retrieved? 
Since the blog was public, the contents of the blog have been indexed by Google. Using a 
combination of search terms, such as "Auricle Bath", it is also possible to discover Web 
resources which cite the Auricle blog, for example a contemporary post on Stephen 
Downes's blog (Downes, 2004) citing Derek Morrison's views of the potential of blogs as 
"the basis for a distributed, not centralised, information and learning object system": 
It was also discovered, through further Googling, that the Auricle podcast resources were 
still available, on the University of Bath Website. An RSS file also contains the 
publication dates, confirming that the podcasts were published in 2005. 
Better still, further Googling at length revealed that the Auricle blog is alive and well. Its 
new address www.auricle.org/ (an improvement on the original URL; but see also 
Scenario on Vanishing Domain Names). The blog now uses Wordpress, and posts from 
the original pMachine implementation at Bath have been imported. 
This doesn't mean the blog has been preserved. It might be more accurate to observe 
that it continues to be used and be useful. Nevertheless anyone who has bookmarked it 
The PoWR Handbook 2008: Scenarios and case studies 
448888    
at its original address is going to have to be persistent if they want to find it. 
The Lessons 
What are the implications of this case study for the wider community? And what lessons 
can be learnt? 
Web managers should be aware of the dangers of associating services too closely with 
departmental names and specific technologies. "It is the the duty of a Webmaster to 
allocate URLs which you will be able to stand by in 2 years, in 20 years, in 200 years. 
This needs thought, and organization, and commitment." (Berners-Lee, 1998).  
Departments need to audit their networked services, and document their policies 
regarding the sustainability of such services. Such documented policies should be 
examined when departments change their names, or there are significant changes in 
personnel.  
This case provides an interesting example of a service which has been driven by an 
individual, who feels personal ownership for the content. It was this personal and 
professional attachment that led to the blog being continued in a new location, and 
former content being migrated. But who owns the blog? And what would have happened 
if there had been a dispute over ownership of the blog content, or even its distinctive 
name? These are questions which will be relevant to many academics who make use of 
blogs to support their professional activities.  
The Institution had originally provided the technical platform for a blog that was intended 
to offer some value to the wider sector. But without one or more champions to sustain 
the momentum and assume ownership once the original team left the Institution, Auricle 
(in its original form) became the victim of annual online account housekeeping.  
Now that the issue has been identified, what should the Institution do about the dead 
hyperlinks? A page pointing to Auricle.org could be inserted; It would even be possible to 
effect forwarding from every old addresses in the Institution domain, to new addresses 
in auricle.org. A 'Page not found' error seems the least desirable option.  
Another interesting issue is the value perceived by the different actors. The owner valued 
Auricle for its ability to help organise and rehearse material and arguments for public 
consideration, and others working and studying in the field valued it as a resource. But, 
in common with other HEIs, once personnel leave an institution, electronic resources 
associated with them - emails, server and web space - are indiscriminately deleted. They 
rarely seem to be analysed for the potential value of their content. This is unfortunate, 
because it represents a lost opportunity for ongoing collaboration, discourages future 
investment by blog or wiki authors in such institutionally-hosted resources, and forces a 
move to outside the institution (so reducing the chances of generating assets of future 
value to the institution). Nevertheless it should be recognised that supporting such 
resources represents an ongoing cost for an institution (albeit a relatively tiny one in 
Institution financial terms).  
On the other hand, should a decision about value be left to an individual? It can be 
argued that information of significant value to the Institution should be deposited in 
shared or managed spaces, such as document management systems, records 
management systems, institutional repositories, etc. Are archivists and records 
managers aware that this material is being generated? Are their information and 
retention policies governing these systems sufficiently advanced to accommodate new 
breeds of online resource like blogs and wikis?  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested