Surveying 
Surveying 
and Land 
and Land 
Information 
Information 
Science
Science  
A Scientific and Technical Journal of the National Society of Professional Surveyors, 
the Geographic and Land Information Society, and the American Association for Geodetic Surveying 
Volume 66, Number 2, 2006
Special Content
ACSM–U.S. National Report 
to the International Federation of Surveyors (FIG)
Munich, Germany, October 2006
Wesley Parks, Guest Editor
Pdf rotate single page - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break pdf into pages; pdf separate pages
Pdf rotate single page - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf into multiple documents; split pdf into individual pages
© 2006 National Society of Professional Surveyors (NSPS), Geographic and Land Information Society (GLIS), 
American Association for Geodetic Surveying (AAGS).  The professional societies publishing this journal are
member organizations of the American Congress on Surveying and Mapping.
The Surveying and Land Information Science journal is available in print and online. The online version is 
hosted by Ingenta at www.ingentaconnect.com.
We wish to thank USDI Bureau of 
Land Management, Cadastral Survey 
for the support they have given to the 
ACSM - FIG Forum.
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
And C# users may choose to only rotate a single page of PDF file or all the pages. See C# programming demos below. DLLs for PDF Page Rotation in C#.NET Project.
acrobat split pdf into multiple files; pdf split and merge
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Able to remove a single page from adobe PDF document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge. XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
break a pdf into multiple files; pdf split
S
URVEYING
AND
L
AND
I
NFORMATION
S
CIENCE
V
OL
. 66, N
O
. 2  
J
UNE
2006
A
N
O
FFICIAL
J
OURNAL
OF
AAGS, GLIS, 
AND
NSPS D
EVOTED
TO
THE
S
CIENCES
OF
S
URVEYING
AND
M
APPING
, L
AND
I
NFORMATION
AND
R
ELATED
F
IELDS
(ISSN 1538-1242)
© 2006 NSPS, AAGS, GLIS 
© 2006 NSPS, AAGS, GLIS  
Printed in the U.S. A.
Printed in the U.S. A.
Special Content
ACSM–U.S. National Report 
to the International Federation of Surveyors (FIG)
Munich, Germany, October 2006
Wesley Parks, Guest Editor
Preface
Wesley Parks .............................................................................................................................................     91
American Congress on Surveying and Mapping and FIG
John Fenn, John Hohol, and Curt Sumner  
The American Congress on Surveying and Mapping, Inc., and ACSM’s involvement with FIG ........      
John Hohol
The ACSM FIG Forum and ACSM FIG Delegation ............................................................................     
Control Surveying 
Wendy Lathrop and Daniel Martin
The American Association for Geodetic Surveying: Its Continuing Role in Shaping the Profession ..........      
Dru A. Smith and David R. Doyle
The Future Role of Geodetic Datums in Control Surveying in the United States ...............................
William Henning
The New RTK—Changing Techniques for GPS Surveying in the USA ..............................................
Land Surveying
Robert E. Dahn and Rita Lumos
National Society of Professional Surveyors ..........................................................................................
Donald A. Buhler
Cadastral Survey Activities in the United States ..................................................................................
Geographic Information Systems
Joshua S. Greenfeld
The Geographic and Land Information Society and GIS/LIS Activities in the United States ............
Gary Jeffress and Thomas Meyer 
Two Perspectives of GIS/LIS Education in the United States ...............................................................
Basic Surveying Concepts
Thomas H. Meyer, Daniel R. Roman, David B. Zilkoski
What does height really mean? Part I: Introduction ..............................................................................
Thomas H. Meyer, Daniel R. Roman, and David B. Zilkoski
What Does Height Really Mean? Part II: Physics and Gravity .............................................................. 
Thomas H. Meyer, Daniel R. Roman, David B. Zilkoski
What does height really mean? Part III: Height Systems ......................................................................
95
97
101
107
93
111
115
119
123
127
139
149
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How to
can't cut and paste from pdf; break a pdf file into parts
VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.
anticlockwise in VB.NET. Rotate single specified page or entire pages permanently in PDF file in Visual Basic .NET. Batch change PDF page
break apart pdf; break up pdf into individual pages
S
URVEYING
AND
L
AND
I
NFORMATION
S
CIENCE
Published by the 
American Association for Geodetic Surveying (www.aagsmo.org) 
Geographic and Land Information Society (www.glismo.org)
National Society of Professional Surveyors (www.nspsmo.org)
c/o 6 Montgomery Village Avenue, Suite 403, Gaithersburg, MD 20879
Tel: (240) 632-9716 * Fax: (240) 632-1321 
Editor: Joseph C. Loon, Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi
Associate Editor: Steven Frank, New Mexico State University
Managing Editor: Ilse Genovese, ACSM
Editorial Advisory Board
Grenville Barnes, University of Florida, Gainsville
Dorota Brzezinska, The Ohio State University
Robert W. Dahl, Bureau of Land Management
David Doyle, National Geodetic Survey
Eduardo F. Falcon, Topcon America Corporation
Lewis A. Lapine, Chief, South Carolina  
Geodetic Survey
Wendy Lathrop, Professional Land Surveyor
Mark X. Plog, SurveyPlanet Inc.
Linda L. Velez-Rodriguez, University  
of Puerto Rico
Nancy von Meyer, Fairview Industries
Guoqing Zhou, Old Dominion University
Subscription:  
SaLIS Subscriber Services, P.O.Box 465, Hanover, PA 17331-0465, USA. 
Tel: (717) 632-3535, ext. 8188;  Fax: (717) 633-8920; E-mail: <mbaile@tsp.sheridan.com>
online SaLIS
: Register for access to online SaLIS at www.ingentaconnect.com, then follow 
instructions to activate your subscription. Members will need their membership number.
Reprints:  
Sheridan Press, Reprint Services, P.O. Box 465, Hanover, PA 17331-0465, USA. 
Tel: (717) 632-8448, ext. 8022; E-mail: <Aschriver@tsp.sheridan.com>.
Advertising:  
John D. Hohol, Tel: (608) 222-8277; E-mail: <jhohol@gmail.com>
Section Editors
Education Section
Steven Frank
Book Review
Peter Kuntu-Mensah
Recent Literature Review
Mike and Mary Craymer
International Surveying Forum: FIG
Robert W. Foster
     Surveying and Land Information Science (SaLIS; ISSN 1538-1242) 
is published quarterly (March, June, September, and December) 
by the National Society of Professional Surveyors, the American 
Association for Geodetic Surveying, and the Geographic and Land 
Information Society, c/o 6 Montgomery Village Avenue, Suite 403, 
Gaithersburg, MD 20879.  Periodicals postage paid at Gaithersburg, 
MD, and at additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address 
changes to Surveying and Land Information Science, Member 
Services, 6 Montgomery Village Avenue, Suite 403, Gaithersburg, 
MD 20879.
   The publishers are not responsible for any statements made or opin-
ions expressed in articles, advertisements, or other portions of this 
publication. The appearance of advertising in this publication or the 
use of the publishers’ names or logos on signs, business cards and 
letterheads, or other forms of advertising or publication does not 
imply endorsement or warranty by the publishers of advertisers or 
their products or services.
*    The 2006 SaLIS subscription rates for institutions and non-member 
individuals are: $115 (USA) and $135 (international addresses).  
Annual printed and online subscription rates for institutions are: 
$180 (USA) and $200 (international). Institutional rates for online only 
subscriptions are: $160 (USA) and $180 (international). Individual 
non-member subscriber rates for printed and online  SaLIS are: $130 
(USA) and $150 (international). Individual online only subscription 
rates are: $115 (USA) and $135 (international). Back issues are sold 
to non-members at $20 per copy, plus shipping and handling.
*   Members of the National Society of Professional Surveyors, the 
American Association for Geodetic Surveying, and the Geographic 
Land Information Society receive SaLIS as part of their membership 
dues. The journal subscription of $45 per year is part of membership 
benefits and cannot be deducted from annual dues.
*     Research papers, technical notes, and letters should be sent to the 
editor, Joseph C. Loon, Blucher Endowed Chair in Surveying, Professor 
of Geographic Information Science, Texas A&M University-Corpus 
Christi, ST 207A, 6300 Ocean Drive, Corpus Christi, TX 78412. Tel: 
(361) 825-5854; Fax: (361) 825-5848. E-mail:  <Joseph.Loon@
mail.tamucc.edu>.
*     Books for review should be sent to the Book Review Editor, c/o Ilse 
Genovese, SaLIS Managing Editor, ACSM, 6 Montgomery Village 
Avenue, Suite 403, Gaithersburg, MD 20879. All other communication 
should be addressed to the managing editor at the above address or 
by e-mail at <ilse.genovese@acsm.net>.
*      Surveying and Land Information Science is registered with the Copyright 
Clearance Center (CCC), 222 Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA 01923.  
Articles for which ACSM does not own rights will so be identified at 
their end.  Permission for internal or personal use should be sought by 
libraries and other users registered with the CCC through the CCC.
*     All other requests for permission to use material published in this journal 
should be addressed to the managing editor at (240) 632-9716 ext. 
109 or by e-mail at <ilse.genovese@acsm.net>.
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
c# print pdf to specific printer; split pdf
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C# Users can view PDF document in single page or continue
pdf split pages in half; break a pdf
Surveying and Land Information Science, Vol. 66, No. 2, 2006, pp. 91-92 
Preface
Wesley Parks
Guest Editor
[wwp3@psu.edu]
T
his is a special issue of Surveying and 
Land Information Science, a scientific 
and technical journal of three member 
organizations of the American Congress on 
Surveying and Mapping—AAGS, GLIS, and 
NSPS—and one of the principal journals of 
surveying in the United States of America. The 
issue is special because it constitutes a Report 
to the Federation Internationale des Geometres 
(FIG; International Federation of Surveyors) on 
the current state of U.S. surveying practice. It 
is also special in that it contains papers describ-
ing specific surveying activities that members 
of three U.S. professional surveying societies 
consider representative of current U.S. survey-
ing practice. Besides being a Report to FIG, the 
special issue is a report to the U.S. community 
of surveying and mapping professionals from 
these three professional societies.
The focus of the Report is the basic land survey. 
When a U.S. surveyor is retained by a client to 
do a survey, he or she will probably begin by 
performing some sort of control survey. Further, 
almost all land surveys have some sort of bound-
ary aspect, thus they are at least partially land 
surveys. Results of surveys increasingly include 
various items of information georeferenced to 
some sort of universal coordinate system. This 
information may very well be used ultimately 
in a geographic information system or land 
information system (GIS/LIS). Finally, regard-
less of what type of surveying one is engaged in, 
eventually one will need to confront questions 
regarding such basic concepts as location and 
elevation.
Following this focus, the Report is organized 
into four main sections, with an additional 
introductory section. The main sections are 
Control Surveying, Land Surveying, Geographic 
Information Systems, and Basic Surveying 
Concepts. The introductory section presents the 
American Congress on Surveying and Mapping 
and its involvement with FIG. It begins with a 
paper on the state of U.S. surveying by John 
Fenn John Hohol, and Curt Sumner, which 
presents a historical perspective of ACSM and 
describes recent changes to its structure and 
the impact of these changes on the relationship 
between FIG and ACSM. Following this intro-
duction, John Hohol introduces a new ACSM 
organization, the ACSM FIG Forum, and the 
2006 U.S. delegation to FIG.
The section on current U.S. control surveying 
activity begins with a paper by Wendy Lathrop 
and Daniel Martin of the past, present, and 
future role of the American Association for 
Geodetic Surveying (AAGS), the principal U.S. 
control surveying professional society. The 
authors highlight activities which AAGS believes 
are critical to the future of positioning in the 
U.S. and to those using the technology. United 
States government involvement in control sur-
veying is discussed in a paper by Dru Smith and 
David Doyle which describes the future role of 
geodetic datums in control surveying in the U.S. 
The paper outlines 200 years of U.S. govern-
ment efforts to define, maintain, and provide 
access to geodetic datums, based on a reliance 
on physical monuments. Its authors focus on 
new space geodetic techniques that allow the 
National Geodetic Survey to approach datum 
definition and control surveys in an entirely new 
way, a way that minimizes the need for passive 
survey marks in the ground. An example of 
U.S. private surveying company involvement 
in control surveying is provided in a paper by 
Willam Henning. He describes the private sector 
surveyor as poised to enter a new era of control 
surveying. Henning highlights the trend away 
from surveys using densely spaced permanent 
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Both single page and multipage tiff image files can be created from PDF. Supports tiff compression selection. Supports for changing image size.
pdf print error no pages selected; break a pdf into parts
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
c# split pdf; add page break to pdf
92                                                                                                                    Surveying and Land Information Science
physical monumentation towards surveys utiliz-
ing more sparse physical networks and establish-
ing site coordinates utilizing the Continuously 
Operating Reference Station (CORS) system as 
truth.
The section on current U.S. land surveying 
begins with a paper by Robert Dahn and Rita 
Lumos on the activities, accomplishments, and 
goals of the National Society of Professional 
Surveyors (NSPS), the principal U.S. land 
surveying professional society. United States 
Government involvement in land surveying 
is discussed in a paper by Donald Buhler 
on Cadastral Survey activities in the U.S. 
The author notes that cadastral surveys are 
primarily a function of the more than 3000 
county governments in the U.S. and that, with 
the exception of the original thirteen colonial 
states, most county cadastres are built upon a 
rectangular survey system maintained by the 
U.S. Bureau of Land Management.
The section on current U.S. geographic 
information systems and science begins with a 
paper by Joshua Greenfeld on the activities of 
the Geographic and Land Information Society 
(GLIS), the principal U.S. control GIS/LIS 
professional society. According to Greenfeld, 
a major goal of GLIS has been to bridge the 
gap between traditional surveying and map-
ping professionals and the GIS community. He 
notes that the society was instrumental in bring-
ing about the realization of the importance 
of surveying within the GIS community. Two 
perspectives of GIS/LIS education in the U.S. 
are presented in a paper by Gary Jeffress and 
Thomas Meyer, faculty members of Texas A&M 
University-Corpus Christi and the University of 
Connecticut, respectively. 
The Report’s consideration of basic concepts 
of surveying is presented in three of a series of 
four papers by Thomas Meyer, Daniel Roman, 
and David Zilkoski, in which the authors ask 
“what does height really mean?” The first paper 
reviews reference ellipsoids and mean sea level 
datums; the second focuses on the physics of 
heights, including the notion of the geoid, and 
explains why mean sea level stations are not 
all at the same orthometric height. Both of 
these papers have previously appeared in this 
Journal, in, respectively, vol. 64, no.4, December 
2004, and vol.65, no.1, March 2005. The third 
paper develops the principle notions of height 
from measured, differentially deduced changes 
in elevation to orthometric heights, Helmert 
orthometric heights, normal orthometric 
heights, dynamic heights, and geopotential 
numbers. The fourth paper in this series will 
appear in a forthcoming issue of Surveying and 
Land Information Science.
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
With VB.NET PDF SDK, PDF document page can be rotated to 90, 180, and 270 in clockwise. Both a single page and whole file pages can be rotated and saved as
break a pdf password; break pdf into separate pages
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
break password on pdf; break pdf password online
Surveying and Land Information Science, Vol. 66, No. 2, 2006, pp. 93-94 
The American Congress on Surveying and 
Mapping, Inc., and ACSM’s Involvement with FIG
John Fenn, John Hohol, and Curt Sumner
ABSTRACT: Recent changes to the governance structure of ACSM have resulted in some alterations 
in the character of ACSM’s relationship with FIG. This article provides a historical perspective about 
ACSM, describes the nature of the governance changes and their impact on the ACSM/FIG relationship, 
and explains that the mission of ACSM remains unchanged. 
Introduction
T
he American Congress on Surveying 
and Mapping, Inc. (ACSM) is the orga-
nization representing the surveying 
and mapping community in the United States 
to the FIG; ACSM has been a national associa-
tion member of FIG since 1959. Former ACSM 
President Bob Foster has been a long-time active 
participant in FIG activities, and he served as 
FIG President during 1999-2002.
In 2002, ACSM, along with the American Society 
for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS), 
sponsored the XXII FIG Congress during their 
joint conference in Washington, DC. 
Historical Perspective
Since its establishment in 1941, ACSM has been 
an organization comprised of individual mem-
bers. In one way or another, ACSM members 
have since the beginning categorized them-
selves by internally aligning with others who 
practice their profession within certain elements 
of surveying and mapping. By 1942, three 
technical divisions had been formed—Division 
of Surveying, Mapping, and Photogrammetric 
Instruments; Division of Control Surveys; and 
the Topographic Mapping Division. These later 
became Cartography, Control Surveys, and Land 
Surveys technical divisions. Eventually, the tech-
nical divisions evolved into semiautonomous 
member organizations (MO) known as American 
Cartographic Association; American Association 
for Geodetic Surveying; and National Society 
of Professional Surveyors. The ACSM adopted 
these new organization names in 1980.
Throughout its history, ACSM has attempted 
to adjust its structure to accommodate the 
needs and desires of its members. Thus, the 
American Cartographic Association changed 
its name to Cartography and Geographic 
Information Society (1981), the National Society 
of Professional Surveyors became the first ACSM 
member organization to incorporate (1991) and 
become autonomous, and a fourth member 
organization was established (1993) in recogni-
tion of the growing field in geographic and land 
information technology. This organization was 
appropriately named Geographic and Land 
Information Society.
Governance Changes
In 2004, the American Congress on Surveying 
and Mapping continued its evolution with its 
three other MOs becoming incorporated and 
autonomous. Individual membership shifted 
from ACSM to one or more of the member 
organizations, as selected by each member. This 
means that members now pay dues to the MO(s) 
of their choice, based on which of the member 
organizations most closely identifies with the 
member’s practice area(s). The organizations 
have become members of ACSM as equal, 
autonomous bodies that wish to continue their 
joint efforts on behalf of the entire surveying and 
John Fenn, PLS, Fellow member of ACSM, former president 
of National Society of Professional Surveyors (NSPS), which 
is an ACSM member organization, current Chair of the ACSM 
Congress. Phone: 586-254-9577. E-mail: <john@fennsurveyin
g.com>. John Hohol, Fellow member of ACSM, current Head 
of ACSM FIG Forum delegation. Phone: 608-222-8277. E-mail: 
<jhohol@gmail.com>. Curt Sumner, LS, Fellow member of 
ACSM, former president of NSPS, current Executive Director 
of ACSM. Phone: 240-632-9716, ext. 106. E-mail: <curtis.su
mner@acsm.net>.
94                                                                                                                     Surveying and Land Information Science
mapping community. This new structure makes 
it possible for other autonomous organizations 
with similar interests to become part of ACSM 
without losing their autonomy. The member 
organizations feel that this arrangement will be 
beneficial for their efforts to increase member-
ship to the levels enjoyed as recently as a decade 
ago.
Each member organization selects two del-
egates to a “Congress” which oversees the imple-
mentation of the activities that the MOs have 
chosen to pursue collectively. The Congress also 
exercises oversight of the administrative func-
tions of the headquarters staff under the direc-
tion of ACSM Executive Director Curt Sumner 
(curtis.sumner@acsm.net). The Congress (nor 
ACSM) does not, however, have governing 
authority over the member organizations. A 
chairperson of the Congress is selected in a fash-
ion similar to the rotation among the member 
organizations previously utilized for the nomina-
tion of the ACSM President.
ACSM Mission Unchanged
The mission of ACSM remains the same as it 
has been from the time of the organization’s 
conception in 1938 by a Kentucky educator 
(Professor George Harding) and a WPA
1
offi-
cial from Washington, DC (Murray Y. Polling) 
while rowing on Rainy Lake, Minnesota, during 
a summer surveying camp. That mission is to 
establish and promote high standards and qual-
ity of work, support better educational opportu-
nities in surveying and mapping, provide input 
into the licensing requirements and continuing 
education for those in professional practice, 
and influence legislation and policymaking 
related to surveying and mapping. Although 
the Political Action Committee for ACSM was 
not established until 1982, the Government 
Affairs lobbying program is among the oldest 
and most important that ACSM provides to the 
profession.
The American Congress on Surveying and 
Mapping continues to coordinate activities of 
common interest and for the benefit of all of 
its member organizations, such as conferences, 
government affairs, society outreach, and public 
awareness. The Congress also has a mandate to:
•  Speak on the national and international level 
as the collective voice of the professions 
embodied within ACSM to enhance aware-
ness of their value to the public;
•   Contribute to education in the use of surveys 
and maps, and to encourage further devel-
opment of national spatial information pro-
grams; and
• Encourage improvement of university cur-
ricula for the teaching of all branches of 
surveying, cartography, and geographic 
information sciences. 
Current ACSM/FIG Relationship
In order to properly maintain its relationship 
with FIG, ACSM has formed the ACSM FIG 
Forum which consists of two members from each 
of the three member organizations with interests 
directly tied to the ten FIG Commissions. The 
American Association for Geodetic Surveying, 
the Geographic and Land Information Society, 
and the National Society of Professional 
Surveyors participate in the Forum. The Forum 
representatives make decisions regarding who 
will serve as its Head of Delegation and as 
Delegates in the FIG Commissions.
Current Head of Delegation John Hohol 
has been actively involved in FIG since 1981. 
He, along with the Forum’s FIG Commission 
Delegates for the years 2006-2010 will represent 
ACSM well and work to further the mission and 
goals of FIG.
For information about the ACSM FIG Forum, 
visit www.acsm.net and click the box marked FIG, 
or contact the ACSM headquarters via email at  
curtis.sumner@acsm.net. 
Conclusion
The relationship it has enjoyed with FIG for over 
45 years is of utmost importance to ACSM and 
its constituency. The formation of the ACSM 
FIG Forum is intended to protect that relation-
ship while fulfilling the goals of ACSM’s revised 
governance structure which provides autonomy 
for its member organizations.
1
Works Progress Administration (WPA), a program created by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1935 to provide jobs and income 
to the  unemployed during the Great Depression.
National Association of Professional 
Surveyors  (NSPS)
Patrick Cummins
Craig Savage
ACSM Executive Director, Curtis Sumner
ACSM FIG Head of Delegation, John Hohol
Current ACSM FIG Delegation
(2006- )
Head of Delegation, John Hohol
Commission 1, Wesley Parks
Commission 2, Steve Frank 
Commission 3, Chuck Pearson 
Commission 4, Jerry Mills 
Commission 5, Tomas Soler 
Commission 6, John Hamilton
Commission 7, Don Buhler 
Commission 8, Mike Weir 
Commission 9, Bob Foster 
Commission 10, James Boyer
ACSM FIG Delegation
(2002-2005)
Head of Delegation, Jud Rouch 
Commission 1, Don Buhler
Commission 2, Steve Frank 
Commission 3, Chuck Pearson 
Commission 4, Jerry Mills 
Commission 5, Tomas Soler 
Commission 6, Cecilia Whitaker
Commission 7, John Hohol 
Commission 8, Mike Weir 
Commission 9, Bob Foster 
Commission 10, Vacant
Reporter, Wesley Parks
Surveying and Land Information Science, Vol. 66, No. 2, 2006, p. 95 
The ACSM FIG Forum and ACSM FIG Delegation
John Hohol, Head of Delegation
wish to personally thank Julian (Jud) 
Rouch for his dedicated service as the 
head of the ACSM (American Congress 
on Surveying and Mapping) delegation to 
the International Federation of Surveyors 
(FIG). Jud has been involved in FIG for 
many years.  He has represented ACSM and 
American surveyors well in the international 
surveying community.  Thank you Jud for a 
job well done.
The American Congress on Surveying and 
Mapping is composed of four member orga-
nizations, each representing a specific seg-
ment of surveying and mapping in America.  
Under the new structure of ACSM, three of 
the four member organizations of ACSM 
participate in FIG activities. These organiza-
tions have formed the ACSM FIG Forum to 
coordinate their FIG activities. The fourth 
member organization, the Cartography and 
Geographic Information Society (CaGIS), is 
the ACSM representative to the International 
Cartographic Association (ICA).
The ACSM FIG Forum has two delegates 
from each of the three participating member 
organizations. The ACSM Executive Director 
and the Head of the ACSM FIG Delegation 
are non-voting members of the Forum. The 
current ACSM FIG Forum includes:
American Association for Geodetic 
Surveying (AAGS)
Daniel Martin
Wesley Parks
Geographic and Land Information 
Society (GLIS)
Francis Derby
Joshua Greenfeld
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested