asp. net mvc pdf viewer : Split pdf into individual pages Library control component asp.net azure wpf mvc NSCA%27s%20Performance%20Training%20Journal0-part338

NSCA’s
T
raining
J
ournal
P
erformance
Features
Female Athlete Triad
Juan Gonzalez PhD, 
CSCS and Aaron James
Where Do Vegetarians 
Get Their Protein?
Juan Gonzalez PhD, 
CSCS and
Ashley Eubanks
Metabolic Rate:
How It Plays an
Important Role In the
Outcome of Your 
Client’s Goals
Dawn Weatherwax-Fall, 
RD, CSSD, LD, ATC, 
LAT, CSCS
Sports Nutrition
Issue 8.6
Nov.
/
Dec. 09
www.nsca-lift.org
Split pdf into individual pages - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
cannot select text in pdf file; can't select text in pdf file
Split pdf into individual pages - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
pdf splitter; break pdf password
NSCA’s Performance Train-
ing Journal is a publication 
of the National Strength and 
Conditioning 
Association 
(
NSCA
)
. Articles can be ac-
cessed online at www.nsca-lift.
org/perform.
All material in this publica-
tion is copyrighted by NSCA. 
Permission is granted for 
free redistribution of each is-
sue or article in its entirety. 
Reprinted articles or articles 
redistributed online should be 
accompanied by the follow-
ing credit line: “This article 
originally appeared in NSCA’s 
Performance Training Journal, a 
publication of the National 
Strength and Conditioning 
Association. For a free sub-
scription to the journal, browse 
to www.nsca-lift.org/perform.” 
Permission to reprint or redis-
tribute altered or excerpted 
material will be granted on a 
case by case basis; all requests 
must be made in writing to the 
editorial offi ce.
NSCA Mission
As the worldwide authority on 
strength and conditioning, we 
support and disseminate re-
search–based knowledge and 
its practical application, to im-
prove athletic performance and 
fi tness.
Talk to us…
Share your questions and com-
ments. We want to hear from 
you. Write to NSCA’s Perfor-
mance Training Journal Edi-
tor, NSCA, 1885 Bob Johnson 
Drive, Colorado Springs, CO 
80906, or send email to kcin-
ea
@
nsca-lift.org.
The views stated in the NSCA’s 
Performance Training Journal 
are those of the authors, and 
do not necessarily refl ect the 
positions of the NSCA.
nsca’s performance training journal  •  www.nsca-lift.org  •  volume 8 issue 6
about this
PUBLICATION
NSCA’s
P
erformance
T
raining
J
ournal
Editorial Offi ce
1885 Bob Johnson Drive
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80906
Phone:  +1 719-632-6722
Editor
Keith Cinea, MA, CSCS,*D, 
NSCA-CPT,*D
email: kcinea
@
nsca-lift.org
Sponsorship Information 
Richard Irwin
email: rirwin
@
nsca-lift.org
Editorial Review Panel
Scott Cheatham DPT, OCS, ATC, 
CSCS, NSCA-CPT 
Jay Dawes, MS, CSCS,*D,
NSCA-CPT,*D, FNSCA
Greg Frounfelter, DPT, ATC, CSCS 
Meredith Hale-Griffi n, MS, CSCS 
Michael Hartman, PhD, CSCS 
Mark S. Kovacs, MEd, CSCS 
David Pollitt, CSCS,*D 
Matthew Rhea, PhD, CSCS 
David Sandler, MS, CSCS,*D 
Brian K. Schilling, PhD, CSCS 
Mark Stephenson, ATC, CSCS,*D 
David J Szymanski, PhD, CSCS 
Chad D. Touchberry, MS, CSCS 
Randall Walton, CSCS
Joseph M. Warpeha, MA, CSCS,*D, 
NSCA-CPT,*D
2
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
the ability to inserting a new PDF page into existing PDF PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how to split PDF document in
acrobat split pdf pages; acrobat split pdf into multiple files
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class.
pdf no pages selected; c# print pdf to specific printer
table of
CONTENTS
3
nsca’s performance training journal  •  www.nsca-lift.org  •  volume 8 issue 6
departments
8
Female Athlete Triad
Juan Gonzalez, PhD, CSCS
and Aaron James
Learn about the disorders associated with 
the Female Athlete Triad and gain knowl-
edge on how to stay informed on relevant 
issues that may affect performance and 
health.
Where Do Vegetarians
Get Their Protein?
Juan Gonzalez, PhD, CSCS
and Ashley Eubanks
This article discusses the proper measures 
one should take to perform at a high level 
while fulfi lling all of the nutritional de-
mands of your body.
Metabolic Rate: How 
I
t Plays an 
I
mportant Role 
I
n the Outcome of 
Your Client’s Goals
Dawn Weatherwax-Fall, RD, CSSD, LD, 
ATC, LAT, CSCS
Discusses and explains how to properly 
assess a person’s resting metabolic rate 
and describes why it is an important factor 
to consider when creating a workout plan.
sports nutrition
FitnessFrontlines
G. Gregory Haff, PhD, CSCS,*D, FNSCA
The latest news from the fi eld on static 
versus dynamic warm-ups, the effects of 
warm-ups on performance, and an exami-
nation of the combination of whey protein 
and leucine in anabolic response times. 
I
n the Gym
Eating for Your Health
Kyle Brown, CSCS
This column offers tips to help change 
your diet to help reduce your risk of 
disease while exploring the link between 
specifi c foods and health risks.
Training Table: Caffeine and Athletes
Debra Wein, MS, RD, LDN, CSSD, 
NSCA-CPT,*D 
The benefi ts and positive effects of caf-
feine are examined and compared to 
the detrimental side-effects on exercise 
performance.  
Ounce Of Prevention
Post-Workout Recovery Nutrition
Jason Brumitt, MSPT, SCS,
ATC/R, CSCS,*D
The importance of post-workout recovery 
for your body is examined after address-
ing the top six concerns you should have 
when selecting a post-workout recovery 
drink.
Mind Games
Keep the Fire Burning
Suzie Tuffey-Riewald, PhD, NSCA-CPT
This column explores some strategies to 
increase motivation during the cold winter 
months and how reinforcement plays a 
role in successfully completing goals.
10
12
4
6
14
16
18
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value. value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
pdf rotate single page; how to split pdf file by pages
VB.NET TWAIN: Scanning Multiple Pages into PDF & TIFF File Using
those scanned individual image files need to be combined into one convenient multi-page document file, like PDF and TIFF. This VB.NET TWAIN pages scanning
break up pdf file; split pdf by bookmark
G. Gregory Haff, PhD, CSCS, FNSCA
about the
AUTHOR
G. Gregory Haff is an 
assistant professor 
in the Division of 
Exercise Physiology at 
the Medical School at 
West Virginia University 
in Morgantown, WV. 
He is a member of 
the National Strength 
and Conditioning 
Association’s Board 
of Directors. He 
is a Fellow of the 
National Strength 
and Conditioning 
Association. Dr. 
Haff received the 
National Strength 
and Conditioning 
Association’s Young 
Investigator Award 
in 2001. 
fi tness
frontlines
nsca’s performance training journal  •  www.nsca-lift.org  •  volume 8 issue 6
4
If you must use static 
stretching in a warm-up 
it should be immediately 
followed by a sport-specific 
dynamic warm-up.
It is widely accepted that static stretching inhibits perfor-
mance in strength and power activities. While it is clear 
that static stretching causes these negative aff ects, many 
coaches still employ their use as part of pre-training or 
competition preparations. Researchers from the Austra-
lian Institute of Sport recently examined the eff ects of 
combining static stretching with a sport-speci c dynamic 
warm-up in order to determine if performance decre-
ments could be prevented.  Thirteen netball players per-
formed either a submaximal run followed by 15 minutes 
of static stretching and a netball-speci c warm-up or a 
dynamic stretching routine followed by an identical net-
ball-speci c warm-up as part of a pre-training/competi-
tion protocol. Performance was assessed with the use of a 
vertical jump test and a 20m sprint test after the dynamic 
or static stretching portion of the warm-up and after the 
netball-speci c warm-up. Results indicated that the static 
stretching protocol resulted in a signi cant reduction in 
vertical jump performance (-4.2%) and 20m sprint time 
(+1.4%) when compared to the dynamic stretching pro-
tocol. However, after the netball-speci c warm-up there 
was no diff erence in vertical jump heights or sprint times 
between the two groups regardless of if static or dynamic 
stretching was performed as part of the whole warm-up 
protocol. Based upon these  ndings, it was concluded 
that if a static stretching regime is used, it should be im-
mediately followed by a sport-speci c warm-up protocol 
in order to prevent any of the harmful eff ects associated 
with static stretching. While the  ndings of the investiga-
tion are interesting, more research is warranted to deter-
mine if this phenomenon consistently occurs.
Taylor, KL, Sheppard, JM, Lee, H, and Plummer, N. 
Negative effect of static stretching restored when 
combined with a sport specifi c warm-up component. J Sci 
Med Sport. 12: 657 – 661. 2009.
The effects of a neuromuscular 
warm-up programme on 
muscle power, balance, speed, 
and agility in female floorball 
players.
It is well established in the literature that the warm-up 
protocol utilized can have an impact on the ability to 
express rapid movements. Recently, researchers from 
Finland examined the eff ects of a neuromuscular warm-
up protocol which included sport-speci c running tech-
nique, balance, jumping, and strengthening exercises on 
markers of performance. The neuromuscular warm-up 
protocol was assessed to 119  oorball players while 103 
women were placed into a control group. The intervention 
was performed 1 – 3 times per week and took roughly 25 
minutes to complete. The eff ects of the protocol were as-
sessed by measuring static and countermovement jump 
height, jumping over a bar, balancing on a bar, and dur-
ing a “ gure 8” running test. After six months, it was deter-
mined that the intervention group was able to jump over 
the bar a greater number of times in 15 seconds and was 
able to balance on a bar for a longer time period. Based 
upon these  ndings, it was concluded that integrating 
speci c activities into the warm-up which target running 
technique, balance, and jumping ability can result in an 
enhancement in performance characteristics.  
Pasanen, K, Parkkari, J, Pasanen, M and Kannus, P. Effect 
of a neuromuscular warm-up programme on muscle power, 
balance, speed and agility- A randomised controlled study. 
Br J Sports Med. 2009.
Strength and Power 
Parameters Predict Sprinting 
Performance.
It is commonly accepted that stronger athletes have an 
advantage in performing sprinting-based activities as a 
result of their enhanced ability to apply vertical forces. 
Because of this relationship it may be warranted to exam-
ine the ability of markers of strength and power to pre-
dict sprinting performance capacity. Recently researchers 
from Greece examined the strength-power performance 
characteristics and sprinting ability in 25 male sprinters. 
Subjects were tested for squat jump height, countermove-
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into another PDF file. C#.NET Sample Code: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File in C#.NET.
break a pdf file; pdf specification
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET File: Merge PDF; VB.NET File: Split PDF; VB.NET Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word
can't cut and paste from pdf; break a pdf apart
fi tness frontlines
nsca’s performance training journal  •  www.nsca-lift.org  •  volume 8 issue 6
5
ment jump height, drop jump height, repeated jump capacity and 100m 
sprint time. The 100m sprint was assessed for reaction time and speed at 
10 m, 30 m, 60m and 100m. The times collected were then used to cal-
culate mean velocities at 0 – 10 m, 10 – 30 m, 30 – 60 m, and 60 – 100 
m. The reactive strength index was calculated as the diff erence between 
the countermovement and squat jump heights. It was determined that 
strength-power parameters and reaction time as assessed in the present 
study explained 89.6% of the total variance seen in sprint time. Static jump, 
reactive jump, drop jump, and reactive strength index performance were 
highly correlated with mean velocities at all points throughout the 100m 
sprint. Based upon these  ndings, it is recommended to use squat jump, 
countermovement jump, reactive jump, and/or drop jump heights as per-
formance assessments in order to determine the sprinters overall eff ec-
tiveness in sprinting activities.  
Smirniotou, A, Katsikas, C, Paradisis, G, Argeitaki, P, Zacharogiannis, E, 
and Tziortzis, S. Strength-power parameters as predictors of sprinting 
performance. J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 48: 447 – 454. 2008.
Combining leucine with whey protein 
does not result in a greater anabolic 
response post exercise when compared 
to whey protein alone.
It is well accepted in the literature that leucine supplementation can re-
sult in an increase in muscle protein synthesis and anabolism. While it is 
clear that leucine is important in stimulating this response, it is less clear 
whether adding leucine to a whey protein supplement will result in greater 
anabolic eff ects when combined with a resistance training bout. Recently, 
researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston ex-
amined the eff ects of whey protein plus leucine on net protein balance in 
post-resistance training. Subjects performed an intense bout of resistance 
training which targeted the legs following the consumption of either a 
placebo ( avored water) or whey protein and leucine (16.6g whey + 3.4g 
leucine) drink. The arteriovenous amino acid balance across the leg was 
measured in order to determine the anabolic responses to the two treat-
ment conditions. The arterial amino acid concentrations were signi cantly 
higher after the consumption of the treatment beverage. These values 
peaked between 60 – 120 minutes post-consumption. The treatment bev-
erage stimulated signi cant increases in leucine, threonine, and phenyl-
alanine which remained elevated for 90 – 120 minutes following inges-
tion. Additionally, the uptake of leucine, threonine, and phenylalanine was 
elevated during the 5.5 hours of post-treatment consumption. When the 
results of this study were compared to previous investigations, it was de-
termined that the combination of whey and leucine supplements did not 
result in signi cantly more anabolic responses then whey protein alone. 
Therefore, it appears that whey protein, on its own, is su  cient for induc-
ing an increased anabolic response to resistance training. 
Tipton, KD, Elliott, TA, Ferrando, AA, Aarsland, AA, and Wolfe, RR. 
Stimulation of muscle anabolism by resistance exercise and ingestion of 
leucine plus protein. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 34: 151 – 161. 2009.
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
PDF file. Ability to copy PDF pages and paste into another PDF file. outputFilePath). VB.NET: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File. You
break a pdf; break apart a pdf in reader
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field.
break a pdf into multiple files; acrobat split pdf
Kyle Brown, CSCS
about the
AUTHOR
in the gym
nsca’s performance training journal  •  www.nsca-lift.org  •  volume 8 issue 6
6
Kyle Brown is a health 
and fi tness expert 
whose portfolio 
includes everything 
from leading 
workshops for Fortune 
500 companies and 
publishing nutrition 
articles in top-ranked 
fi tness journals, to 
training celebrity 
clientele—from pro 
athletes to CEOs 
to multiplatinum 
recording artists. Kyle’s 
unique approach to 
health and fi tness 
emphasizes nutrition 
and supplementation 
as the foundation for 
optimal wellness. After 
playing water polo 
for Indiana University, 
as well as in London, 
Kyle became involved 
in bodybuilding and 
fi tness for sport-
specifi c training. Kyle 
is the creator and Chief 
Operating Offi cer for 
FIT 365—Complete 
Nutritional Shake 
(
www.fi t365.com
)
.
Many athletes and weekend warriors alike give it their all 
in the gym with dreams of building muscle and burning 
fat—yet, their naiveté leads to self-sabotage by neglect-
ing the most vital component. Muscle is not built and fat 
is not lost in the gym; these changes are made when you 
leave the gym by applying proper nutritional choices. 
Many athletes ruin their program by poorly refueling. 
They either rationalize that exercise will allow them to 
eat whatever they want or they neglect one of the most 
important meals of the day—the post-workout recovery.
Within the  rst 30 minutes to an hour of working out, your 
body has an anabolic (muscle building) and anti-catabolic 
(muscle sparing) window where you can capitalize on op-
timal gains. In order to achieve the highest yield on your 
workout investment, your body requires many diff erent 
nutrients but there are six that are especially important: 
quality protein, quality carbohydrates and dietary oils, 
quality water, electrolytes, and enzymes.
Top 6 concerns in a post 
workout recovery drink:
1. Quality Protein
Biological Value (BV) refers to how well and how quickly 
your body can actually use the protein you consume. 
It is becoming common knowledge that whey is superior 
to other proteins for post-workout recovery drinks. Yet 
not all whey protein is the same. The adage, “you are what 
you eat” needs to be modi ed to “you are what you eat, 
eats.” In the case of whey protein, grass-fed whey protein 
trumps commercial whey protein isolates and concen-
trates. Nearly all whey protein products are a processed, 
isolated or concentrated byproduct from grain and soy-
fed cows that are pumped full of hormones and antibiot-
ics. Instead, chose a native whey protein from a grass-fed 
cow, as it will be more bene cial for rapid tissue repair, 
muscle building, and immune support. It is glutamine rich 
and high in Branch Chain Amino Acids (BCAAs) and fat-
burning CLA (2). 
2. Quality Carbohydrates 
Your muscles are the most susceptible to storing glyco-
gen during post-exercise. Yet still, any carbohydrates you 
ingest that are not burned as fuel or stored in the muscle 
cells will be stored as body fat. Small amounts of carbo-
hydrates from fruit are the best choice and will also add 
more  ber to your shakes. On the other hand, standard 
recommendations like maltodextrin (grain-based starch) 
or 75 grams of dextrose are poor choices if you are trying 
to lose body fat while gaining muscle.
3. Quality Oils
Healthy dietary oils work better than carbohydrates for 
fuel and the cholesterol is needed as a precursor to all 
your natural anabolic hormones.Without cholesterol, we 
can’t make many hormones including testosterone, es-
trogen, pregnenolone, or DHEA in our bodies. You need 
to have high enough levels of cholesterol in your body to 
manufacture optimal quantities of these fat and muscle-
building hormones.
Post Workout Recovery 
Nutrition: It’s Not What You 
Digest But What You Absorb 
That Counts
in the gym
nsca’s performance training journal  •  www.nsca-lift.org  •  volume 8 issue 6
7
Post Workout Recovery Nutrition
4. Quality Water
Proper hydration is essential for post-exercise 
recovery. The beauty of a post-workout recovery 
drink is that you are able to ingest quality nu-
trients and properly rehydrate simultaneously. 
You should drink roughly 1 quart for every 50 
pounds of bodyweight and ideally that water 
should be alkaline.
5. Electrolytes
Vital minerals like potassium and sodium are 
essential for post-workout recovery as they are 
lost while sweating during prolonged workouts. 
Many sea salts are rich in minerals like sodium, 
potassium, calcium, magnesium, and more.  
6. Enzymes
It is not what you digest but what you absorb 
that counts. Digestive enzymes will break down 
the ingredients into nutrients that your body can 
readily digest and more e  ciently absorb.  
References
1. Droge W, and Breitkreutz R. Glutathione and 
immune function. Proceedings of the Nutritional 
Society. 59
(
4
)
: 595 – 600. 2000.
Coaching Performance
Come learn ground based explosive 
movements at a Fly Solo Camp and 
demonstrate your ability to implement 
the principles into your program.
After camp, purchase an Index Test 
License so your athletes can compete 
with athletes from around the world. 
To learn more about the NSCA Coaching 
Performance Program please visit…
www.nsca-lift.org
or call 800-815-6826
endorsed by
feature
about the
AUTHOR
nsca’s performance training journal  •  www.nsca-lift.org  •  volume 8 issue 6
8
sports nutrition
Juan Gonzalez is an 
Associate Professor of 
Exercise Science and 
Director of the Gordon 
G. Tucker Exercise 
Physiology Laboratory 
at Schreiner University. 
He recently published 
a book entitled, “The 
Athlete Whisperer: 
What It Takes to 
Make Her Great.”  
All research and 
article publications in 
Exercise Science come 
out of the Gordon 
G. Tucker Exercise 
Physiology Laboratory. 
Aaron James is 
a senior Exercise 
Science Major at 
Schreiner University.
Juan Gonzalez, PhD, CSCS and Aaron James
Female Athlete Triad
Running Head: Female Athlete 
Triad, Eating Disorders
The drive to excel in college athletics is so powerful that 
many young women forego their health in hopes of dem-
onstrating improvements. One prevalent and potentially 
dangerous example of this is with the desire for weight 
loss. Many female athletes are told that losing weight 
will increase their athletic performance. Some of these 
athletes have taken this to extremes, participating in dis-
ordered eating practices such as Anorexia Nervosa and 
Bulimia Nervosa. These disorders can lead to dangerously 
low body weights resulting in the syndrome known as the 
Female Athlete Triad.   
The Female Athlete Triad refers to the relationships among 
energy availability, menstrual function, and bone mineral 
density that may have clinical manifestations including 
eating disorders, functional hypothalamic amenorrhea, 
and osteoporosis (1). This is a serious condition that has 
aff ected many female athletes in the United States. This 
condition was  rst de ned in a special American College 
of Sports Medicine conference in Washington, D.C. in June 
of 1992.  It is believed that up to  fty percent of elite fe-
male athletes exhibit some kind of eating disorder.  Quan-
tifying the exact number of female athletes who may have 
this condition is di  cult.   
What many researchers have discovered is that there is a 
lack of knowledge about the Female Athlete Triad among 
female athletes and how it relates to sports performance. 
It is believed that this lack of knowledge may hinder the 
performance in their respective sports through recurring 
stress fractures and decreased bone densities. This knowl-
edge among female athletes is mixed regarding eating 
disorders, amenorrhea, osteoporosis, and performance. 
Athletes and strength and conditioning professionals are 
faced with these issues daily; therefore, eff orts must be 
made to make certain that athletes have complete and 
accurate information regarding the Female Athlete Triad. 
Failure to do so may leave at-risk athletes vulnerable to 
eating disorders, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis.
Much of the literature has focused on de ning eating 
disorders and its eff ect on the human body (1,2,3,4). This 
research seems to concentrate on general health and risk 
behaviors of collegiate athletes. It is believed that at-risk 
behaviors make some athletes more susceptible than oth-
ers to eating disorders. Nattiv et al (1) investigated general 
risk behaviors in an athletic population.  Speci cally, this 
survey illustrated that female athletes in lacrosse dem-
onstrated a signi cant correlation between amenorrhea 
and stress fractures. Additionally, a correlation between 
pathogenic weight control and irregular menses or amen-
orrhea was found (2). Such research has determined that 
athletes are more at risk for unhealthy behaviors. This and 
others investigations report a higher incidence of irregular 
menses and decreased bone densities in the female ath-
lete (1,3,4,5,6,7). Given the high incidence of such condi-
tions suggests that female athletes still do not completely 
understand the complexities of the Female Athlete Triad 
and how it impacts their athletic performances. 
Female athletes seem to be informed on some issues re-
garding eating disorders and its impact on athletic perfor-
mance but fail to completely understand its overall impact 
on their health. Athletes may not completely understand 
that recurring stress fractures may be associated with de-
creased bone densities (2,4,6,7). Furthermore, female ath-
letes may not understand that decreased bone densities 
may be associated with decreased estrogen production. 
Decreased estrogen production has been associated with 
athletic amenorrhea, energy de cit disorders (not eating 
enough calories), and low percent body fat (1,3,4).
Female athletes seem to have some knowledge regard-
ing eating disorders, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis. What 
these athletes fail to understand is how the Female Ath-
lete Triad aff ects their training or conditioning programs. 
Perhaps these athletes do understand the relationship 
but feel a sense of invincibility or sense of control in what 
they are attempting to accomplish. Coaches, athletic 
trainers and strength and conditioning specialists are in a 
position to identify risky behaviors and help educate the 
athlete in how the Female Athlete Triad may aff ect athletic 
performance. 
nsca’s performance training journal  •  www.nsca-lift.org  •  volume 8 issue 6
9
Female Athlete Triad
References
1. Nattiv A et al. American college of sports 
medicine’s position stand: the female athlete 
triad. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. 
39: 10, 1,867 – 1,882. October 2007.
2. Nattiv A, Puffer JC, and Green GA. Lifestyles 
and health risks of collegiate athletes: multi-
center study. Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine
7: 262 – 272. 1991.
3. Bonci CM et al. National athletic trainers’ 
association position statement: preventing, 
detecting, and managing disordered eating in 
athletes. Journal of Athletic Training. 43: l. 80 – 
108. 2008.
4. Thompson SH. Characteristics of the female 
athlete triad in collegiate cross-country runners. 
Journal of American College Health.  56: 2, 129 
– 136. 2007.
5. Nichols DL, Sanborn CF, and Esseryev. Bone 
density and young athletic women. Sports 
Medicine. 37: 11, 1,001 – 1,014. 2007.
6. Mudd LM, Fornetti W, and Pavarnik JM. Bone 
mineral density in collegiate female athletes: 
comparisons among sports. Journal of Athletic 
Training. 42: 3, 403 – 408. July 2007.
7. Warren MP and Chua AT.  Exercise-induced 
amenorrhea and bone health in the adolescent 
athlete. Annals of the New York Academy of 
Sciences. 1,135: 244 – 252. June 2008.
Make Strength Gains in the Off Season
Test Equipment - Evaluate your athletes
n
n
n
n
nnnnnn
n
n
Li
Linemen
m
LLLnneeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
eme
e
m
mmmmmmmmm
m
m
m
mmmmm
m
m
n
n
nnnn
n
n
e
e
eeeeee
e
e
e
e
e
eeeeee
e
e
e
n
n
nnnnnnnnn
n
n
n
m
m
mmmmmmmmmmmm
m
n
n
nnnnnnnnnnnn
n
n
n
i
i
iiiiiiii
i
L
L
LLLLLLLLL
L
e
e
e
e
e
e
e
e
m
m
i
i
n
n
n
n
n
n
e
e
e
e
e
e
e
e
m
m
m
m
m
m
e
e
e
e
e
e
e
e
n
n
n
n
n
n
i
i
i
i
LLLLL
L
L
L
L
e
e
e
e
e
e
e
e
iii
i
i
By
Boyd Epley
Building
Books and Software - Motivate your athletes
“Combine Training” presents the 
fastest way to improve combine 
test scores plus in-depth reference 
program information showing  
recommended exercises and drills 
in detail.
“Building Linemen”, is a program 
guaranteed to help linemen gain 
muscle mass. Lifting exercises, 
drills, and tips on nutrition will help 
your linemen experience significant 
gains in power, strength and speed.
“Strength Disk” allows you to create 
individual workouts for an unlimited 
number of athletes. Comes with 
a recommended program already 
loaded but you can add or delete 
exercises as you wish.
Measure power, agility and speed 
with innovative and accurate test 
equipment. Measures vertical 
jumps to 1/4” and pro-agility and 
10 yard dash to .001.
Purchase as a 
package or  
separately.  
The Combine 
Package (shown) 
includes:
• Jump Station
•  Agility Timer
• 10 or 40 Timer
For more information go to www.epicindex.com
feature
about the
AUTHOR
nsca’s performance training journal  •  www.nsca-lift.org  •  volume 8 issue 6
10
sports nutrition
Juan Gonzalez is an 
Associate Professor of 
Exercise Science and 
Director of the Gordon 
G. Tucker Exercise 
Physiology Laboratory 
at Schreiner University. 
He recently published 
a book entitled, “The 
Athlete Whisperer: 
What It Takes to 
Make Her Great.”  
All research and 
article publications in 
Exercise Science come 
out of the Gordon 
G. Tucker Exercise 
Physiology Laboratory.
Ashley Eubanks is 
a senior Exercise 
Science Pre-Physical 
Therapy Major at 
Schreiner University.  
She has already 
published one article 
entitled “Periodization 
Training in Acrobatic 
Gymnastics.” This was 
published through USA 
Gymnastics last spring. 
Juan Gonzalez PhD, CSCS and Ashley Eubanks
Where Do Vegetarian
Athletes Get Their Protein?
Achieving optimum nutrition is something every serious 
athlete strives for every day.  Many people believe that 
maintaining the appropriate level of nutrition is harder for 
vegetarian athletes than it is for their omnivorous coun-
terparts. As this article will explain, a vegetarian athlete 
can be energized well enough to perform maximally with 
a diet which is diverse and well-rounded.
A vegetarian is one who does not consume meat or any 
products containing meat. Vegetarians can range from 
the very strict vegan who, in addition to not eating meat, 
does not eat any animal products (including dairy, egg, 
and honey), to the lacto-ovo-vegetarian who will add 
dairy, egg, and other common animal products to their 
otherwise non-animal based diet.  Vegetarian athletes 
that include eggs in their diet but not dairy would be 
classi ed as ovo-vegetarian. Whereas, vegetarian athletes 
that include dairy in their diet but not eggs would be clas-
si ed as lacto-vegetarian.  
For most athletes, a high-carbohydrate, low-fat diet is rec-
ommended to maintain a healthy body weight and also to 
promote a high-quality sports performance (2). This is no 
diff erent for the vegetarian athlete. Constructing meals 
which meet this general recommendation is not particu-
larly di  cult for the vegetarian. For instance, most fresh 
fruits, vegetables, and grains are by nature high-carb, 
low-fat foods. It is these foods that are the staple of any 
proper vegetarian diet. So if  nding foods that are high 
in carbs and low in fats is not a problem, where is it that 
a vegetarian athlete needs to be more attentive? The an-
swer lies within the amino acid building blocks of the pro-
tein. This macronutrient takes a little more consideration 
and knowledge for vegetarians to ensure appropriate 
amounts in the daily diet. 
Essential amino acids are those that the body is not able 
to produce, and so must be consumed through the diet. 
The essential amino acids are: isoleucine, leucine, lysine, 
methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan, and 
valine. It is commonly thought that plant-based sources 
of protein are de cient in one or more of the essential 
amino acids (termed an incomplete protein). According 
to some studies, plant-based sources are complete, the 
issue is that some sources have amounts too low to be 
considered adequate sources on their own (3). Therefore, 
a vegetarian needs to become knowledgeable about pro-
tein sources. For instance, even though some plant-based 
sources have reduced amounts of particular amino acids, 
one can combine foods to  ll in these “amino acid gaps.” 
If one food is low in lysine for example, then it should be 
combined with a food that is high in lysine. Some exam-
ples of appropriate combinations are:
• Grains and legumes (beans, peas, and lentils)
• Legumes and seeds (sun ower and sesame) 
• Grains and dairy products
Previously, it was believed that complementary proteins 
needed to be included in the same meal. It has been real-
ized that as long as the foods are consumed in the same 
day, one will receive the same bene ts (3). By including 
complementary proteins as a part of the daily diet, a veg-
etarian can be con dent that they are obtaining all of the 
essential amino acids. Research indicates that a diet con-
taining diverse plant foods can provide all essential amino 
acids (1,3). To make things a little easier on vegetarian ath-
letes, there are a couple of sources which will by them-
selves off er a complete protein. These sources are egg and 
soy protein. Egg protein is the most complete source of 
protein. 
Vegetarians may require a slightly higher amount of pro-
tein than the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA), be-
cause some plant-based sources of protein are harder to 
digest than those from animal sources (1). Whey and soy 
smoothies are a great addition to the diet of a vegetar-
ian athlete. These easy-to-make drinks are a great source 
of protein for any athlete, as most off er higher protein 
content than found in a single serving of other foods. Soy 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested