asp.net c# pdf viewer control : Add page break to pdf control SDK platform web page wpf asp.net web browser odlis11-part584

111 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
seriously considered for a position
. Also refers to a person taking an examination,
running for an elected office, considered for an award or degree, or destined for a 
particular purpose or fate. See alsoshort list
.
canon
In literature
, the accepted list of work
s by a given author
, considered by scholars to be
authentic
, for example, the thirty-seven play
s of William Shakespeare. Also refers to
the approved list of works included in the Christian Bible. In the most general sense,
a criterion or standard
of judgment applied for the purpose of evaluation. Compare
with apocryphal
See alsocanonical order
.
canonical order
The arrangement of heading
s, parts, divisions, or items in an order established by law 
or tradition, the classic example being the sequence of the book
s of the Christian 
Bible.
canto
A major subdivision of a long narrative
or epic
poem
, serving the same function as a 
chapter
in a novel
. Cantos are traditionally number
ed in roman numeral
s. Examples
of work
s divided in this way are Dante’s Divina Commedia, Spenser’s Faerie 
Queene, and Byron’s Don Juan.
capital expenditure
In budget
ing, an allocation
made on a one-time basis, usually for the construction of 
new facilities
, the renovation
or expansion
existing facilities, or a major upgrade
of 
automation equipment or systems, as opposed to the operating budget
allocated 
annual
ly or biennial
ly to meet ongoing expenses incurred in running a library
or 
library system
.
capital improvement
The acquisition of a long-term asset, such as a new
or renovated
facility, initial book 
stock
, or new equipment
, furnishings, or vehicle(s), funded on a one-time basis from 
budget
for capital expenditure
s, as distinct from the ongoing purchase of library
materials
, payment of salaries
and wages
, routine repair and replacement of existing 
equipment and furnishings, and regular maintenance of facilities, funded from the 
operating budget
.
capitalization
The writing or printing
of a letter
, word, or words in uppercase
, rather than lowercase
.
Also refers to the conventions in a language
with respect to words written or printed 
with certain letters in uppercase. For example, in English the first letter of the first
word of a paragraph, and of each of the parts of a proper name
, is normally 
capitalized (unless you are a cockroach and not heavy enough to depress the "Caps"
key). The general rules governing capitalization in library
catalog
entries
can be 
found in Appendix A of AACR2
.
capital letter
A large letter
of the roman alphabet
(ABC, etc.) which prior to the 4th century 
Add page break to pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
how to split pdf file by pages; break password on pdf
Add page break to pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
pdf split pages in half; pdf split file
112 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
A.D. consisted of capitals only. The name is derived from the lapidary Roman
letterform
s incised with a chisel at the top (capital) of architectural columns and on 
other stone monuments. Also, any letter written or printed
in a form larger and 
usually different from that of the corresponding small letter. Abbreviated cap.
Synonymous with uppercase
. Compare with majuscule
See alsocapitalization
cap 
line
rustic capital
small capital
, and square capital
.
cap line
In typography
, the imaginary horizontal line connecting the tops of the uppercase
letter
s of a type
font
, often, but not necessarily, the same as the ascender
line.
Compare with mean line
See also: base line
.
caps
Seecapital letter
.
capsa
A box of cylindrical shape used in ancient libraries
to store scroll
s in an upright 
position. See alsoscrinium
.
caption
From the Latin word for "capture" or "seizure." A brief title
, explanation, or 
description appearing immediately above, beneath, or adjacent to an illustration
or 
photograph
on a page
, sometimes indicating the source of the image. Synonymous in
this sense with cut line or legend
.
Also refers to a heading
printed
at the beginning of a chapter
or other section of a 
book
, and to the headline
at the beginning of the text
of a periodical
article
, or section 
of it.
In microform
s, a title
or brief line of description in a type size
large enough to enable 
the viewer to identify the photograph
ed document
without the aid of magnification. In
film
s and filmstrip
s, a line of text at the bottom of a frame
or sequence of frames, 
identifying or explaining the content
. A continuously moving line of text at the
bottom of television screen is called a crawl. Compare with subtitle
See alsoclosed 
caption
.
caption title
title
printed
at the beginning of a chapter
section
, or other major division of a 
book
, or at the beginning of the first page
of the text
, which, in the absence of a title 
page
, is sometimes used as the title of the whole in creating the bibliographic 
description
. The cataloger
usually adds "caption title" as a note
in the bibliographic 
record
to indicate its source. In a musical score
, the title that appears immediately 
above the opening bars may be used as the caption
title. Synonymous with head title.
Compare with drop-down title
.
card catalog
A list of the holdings
of a library
printed
, typed, or handwritten on catalog card
s, 
each representing a single bibliographic item
in the collection
. Catalog cards are
normally filed in a single alphabetical
sequence (dictionary catalog
), or in separate 
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Add necessary references to your C# project: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
break pdf file into parts; pdf print error no pages selected
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
Add necessary references to your C# project: a document"); default: Console.WriteLine(" Fail: unknown error"); break; }. code just convert first word page to Png
break pdf into separate pages; break pdf into multiple documents
113 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
sections by author
title
, and subject
(divided catalog
), in the long narrow drawers of a 
specially designed filing cabinet, usually constructed of wood. Most large and
medium-sized libraries in the United States have converted
their card catalogs to 
machine-readable
format. Also spelled card catalogue. Compare with online catalog
.
caricature
A deliberately distorted picture
of a person, or imitation of a performance or literary 
style, achieved by grossly exaggerating certain features or mannerisms peculiar to the 
object of satire
See also: cartoon
and lampoon
.
Carnegie library
library
facility constructed wholly or in part with grant
funds provided by the 
American steel magnate and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919) who, in his
later years, devoted his considerable wealth to the promotion of libraries and world 
peace. Between 1881 and 1917, over 2,500 Carnegie libraries were built around the
world, the majority in the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada. The libraries
of many small towns in the United States still occupy facilities built with Carnegie 
funds. Click here
to learn more about the Carnegie library formula. See also:
Carnegie Medal
.
Carnegie Medal
literary award
presented annual
ly since 1936 by the Library Association
of the 
United Kingdom to the author
of the most outstanding English-language
children’s 
book
published
in the U.K. during the preceding year. The prize is named after the
American steel magnate and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919) who 
devoted the last years of his life to the advancement of libraries
and world peace.
Click here
to view a list of Carnegie Medal winners. Compare with Greenaway 
Medal
See alsoCLA Book of the Year for Children
and Newbery Medal
.
Carolingian minuscule
The first script
to introduce small letter
s, Carolingian minuscule
was developed in the
late 8th century by Alcuin of York, Abbot of St. Martin’s at Tours, in response to 
Charlemagne’s desire for a standard alphabet
in which book
s of the Catholic Church 
could be copied
throughout his realm. It quickly became the dominant book hand
in 
Europe where it was used through the 11th century and adopted in England following
the Norman Conquest. Its letterform
s are wide and curved, with ligature
s sparingly 
used, each letter written separately. Carolingian style standardized
the practice of 
beginning each sentence with a single majuscule
and completing it in minuscules, and
formed the basis for the lowercase
letterforms developed after the invention of 
movable type
. Synonymous with Caroline minuscule.
carousel
A detachable, circular slotted container, usually made of plastic, in which dozens of 
slide
s can be queued for sequential viewing on a specially-designed slide projector.
Although carousels are bulky, they can also be used to store slides when not in use.
Compare with magazine
.
carrel
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
add page break to pdf; break apart a pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function.
pdf rotate single page; break a pdf apart
114 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
Originally a small stall or pew in a medieval cloister containing a desk for reading, 
writing, and semi-private study. In modern libraries
, a small room or alcove
in the 
stacks
designed for individual study. Also refers to a free-standing desk (or two desks
face-to-face) with low partitions at back and sides to provide some degree of privacy, 
with a shelf across the back facing the reader
. Newer study carrels have built-in
illumination and may be wired to provide network
access
for patron
s using laptop
s.
cartobibliography
A list of references to map
s and/or work
s about maps, arranged in some kind of order,
with or without annotation
s. Also, the branch of bibliography
pertaining to maps and 
mapping. See also: cartographic material
.
cartogram
A simplified map
in which the size, outline, or location of geographic features is 
altered or exaggerated to illustrate
diagram
matically a principal concept or set of 
statistical data
.
cartographic material
Any representation of part or all of the surface of the earth or any other celestial body 
(real or imaginary) on any scale
, including two- and three-dimensional map
s, atlas
es, 
globe
s, aeronautical and navigational chart
s, aerial photograph
s, section
s, cartogram
s, 
bird’s-eye views, etc. In the bibliographic record
representing a cartographic item
, the 
nature of the material is described
in the material specific details
area
(MSD). See 
alsocartography
and map library
.
cartography
The art and craft of making map
s and other cartographic material
s. A person who
makes or produces maps is a cartographer. Synonymous with mapmaking. See also:
cartobibliography
.
cartoon
symbol
ic or representational drawing in one or more panel
s, intended to caricature
a person or institution, or satirize
in a witty and imaginative way an action or situation
of current popular interest. Usually published
in a newspaper
or magazine
, cartoons 
may be caption
ed or use balloon
s to convey monologue
or dialogue
. Political
cartoons usually appear on or near the editorial page
of a newspaper. Successful
cartoonists are often syndicate
d. Click here
to see an online
exhibit
of political 
cartoons by Pat Oliphant on the Library of Congress
Web site
See also: comic book
and lampoon
.
Also refers to an animated
film
created by photograph
ing a series of drawings done as
individual cel
s, and then editing
the images into a sequence of frame
s which, when 
viewed in rapid succession, create the illusion of continuous motion.
In art, a full-sized drawing done on paper
as a preliminary draft
, to be transferred to a 
large working surface, sometimes in sections, a technique used in creating large 
frescoes, tapestries, and stained glass windows.
cartouche
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
properties using C# TWAIN image acquiring library add-on step by device. TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE)
break a pdf file into parts; break pdf password
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
are three parts on this page, including system Add the following C# demo code to device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod
c# print pdf to specific printer; pdf separate pages
115 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
An ornamental frame
in the form of a scroll
, drawn or printed
in the corner of a map
around an inscription
giving the map’s title
or subject
, name of cartographer
scale
and other descriptive information
. In older maps, the cartouche often includes
decorative elements. Sometimes seen on older book
binding
s.
case
In machine binding
, a cover
made completely before it is attached to the body
of a 
book
, consisting of two board
s and a paper
inlay
covered in book cloth
or some other 
protective material. The edition
binder
submits a specimen case to the publisher
for 
approval showing the size, boards, covering, lettering
, and squares
. The process of
attaching the case to the text block
by pasting down
the endpaper
s is called casing-in.
See alsocase binding
and recased
.
Also refers to a container used by a typesetter
to hold movable type
. The words
uppercase
and lowercase
are derived from the relative positions of the compartments 
used to store the two kinds of type
.
case binding
A form of bookbinding
in which a hard cover
, called a case
, consisting of two board
and an inlay
covered in cloth
leather
, or paper
, is manufactured separately from the 
book
and subsequently attached to it. The process of attaching the case to the sewn
and glued
section
s by pasting
the endpaper
s to the boards is called casing-inSee 
alsorecased
.
casebook
book
containing records
or descriptions of actual cases that have occurred in a 
professional discipline
(law, medicine, psychology, sociology, social work, 
counseling, etc.), selected to illustrate important principles and concepts, for the use 
of students as a textbook
and practitioners for reference
. Compare with case study
cased
Seecase binding
.
case-sensitive
A computer system or software
program
in which uppercase
letters (A, BC...) and 
lowercase
letters (abc...) are not interchangeable as input
(JAVA versus java). On 
the Internet
Web
addresses (URL
s) are case-sensitive, but e-mail
address
es and 
filename
s usually are not.
case study
In the social and medical sciences, analysis of the behavior of one individual in a 
population, or a single event in a series, based on close observation over a period of 
time. A case study may be published
as an article
in a journal
, as an essay
in a 
collection
, or in book
form. In bibliographic database
s that permit the user to limit
retrieval by type of publication, case studies may be one of the option
s (example:
PsycINFO). Compare with casebook
.
casing-in
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. acquire image to file using our C#.NET TWAIN Add-On Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
acrobat split pdf bookmark; acrobat separate pdf pages
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
be found at this tutorial page of how TWAIN image scanning control add-on owns TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
break a pdf file; pdf link to specific page
116 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
Seecase binding
.
catalog
comprehensive
list of the book
s, periodical
s, map
s, and other materials
in a given 
collection
, arranged in systematic order to facilitate retrieval
(usually alphabetical
ly 
by author
title
, and/or subject
). In most modern libraries
, the card catalog
has been 
converted
to machine-readable
bibliographic record
s and is available online
. The
purpose of a library catalog, as stated by Charles C. Cutter in Rules for a Dictionary 
Catalog (1904) later modified by Bohdan S. Wynar in Introduction to Cataloging 
and Classification (Seventh ed., 1985), is to offer the user a variety of approaches or 
access point
s to the information
contained in the collection:
Objects:
1) To enable a person to find any work, whether issue
d in print
or in 
nonprint
format
, when one of the following is known:
a) The author
b) The title
c) The subject
2) To show what the library has
d) By a given author
e) On a given and related subjects
f) In a given kind of literature
3) To assist in the choice of a work
g) As to the bibliographic edition
h) As to its character (literary
or topic
al).
The preparation of entries
for a library catalog (called cataloging
) is performed by a 
librarian
known as a cataloger
. British spelling is catalogue. Compare with
bibliography
and index
See alsoclassified catalog
dictionary catalog
divided 
catalog
, and online catalog
.
In a more general sense, any list of materials systematically prepared for a specific 
purpose, such as a publisher’s catalog
exhibition catalog
, or film
rental catalog.
catalog card
In manual cataloging
systems, a paper
card used to make a handwritten, typed, or 
printed
entry
in a card catalog
, usually of standard
size (7.5 cm high and 12.5 cm 
wide), plain or rule
d. With the conversion
of paper record
s to machine readable
format
and the use of online catalog
s, catalog
cards have fallen into disuse. British
spelling is catalogue card.
catalog code
A detailed set of rules for preparing bibliographic record
s to represent item
s added to 
library collection
, established to maintain consistency within the catalog
and 
between the catalogs of libraries
using the same code. In the United States, Great
Britain, and Canada, libraries use the Anglo-American Cataloging Rules
developed 
jointly by the American Library Association
Library Association
(UK), and Canadian
Library Association
.
117 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
cataloger
librarian
primarily responsible for preparing bibliographic record
s to represent the 
item
acquired
by a library
, including bibliographic description
subject analysis
, and 
classification
. Also refers to the librarian responsible for supervising a cataloging
department. British spelling is cataloguer. Synonymous with catalog librarian. See 
alsoAssociation for Library Collections and Technical Services
and Cataloger’s 
Desktop
.
Cataloger’s Desktop
Published
on a single CD-ROM
Cataloger’s Desktop is a product of the Library of 
Congress
that provides basic cataloging
documentation
(including MARC
format
s), 
the Library of Congress Subject Headings
list, Cutter table
, and much more, based on 
the 1998 revision of AACR2
, including all Amendments. Click here
to learn more 
about Cataloger’s Desktop.
cataloging
The process of creating entries
for a catalog
. In libraries
, this usually includes 
bibliographic description
subject analysis
, assignment of classification
notation
, and 
all the activities involved in physically preparing the item
for the shelf, tasks usually 
performed under the supervision of a librarian
trained as a cataloger
. British spelling
is cataloguing. See also: cataloging agency
cataloging-in-publication
centralized 
cataloging
collective cataloging
cooperative cataloging
copy cataloging
descriptive 
cataloging
encoding level
, and recataloging
.
cataloging agency
library
or other institution that provides authoritative
cataloging
data
in the form of 
new bibliographic record
s and modifications of existing records, for the use of other 
libraries. In the United States, the leading source of cataloging data is the Library of 
Congress
. In the MARC
record, the identity of the cataloging agency
is indicated by 
its three-letter OCLC symbol
in the cataloging source
field
(exampleDLC for 
Library of Congress).
Cataloging Distribution Service (CDS)
An agency
within the Library of Congress
that develops and markets, on a 
cost-recovery
basis, bibliographic products and services that provide access
to its 
resources for libraries
in the United States, the American public, and the international 
information
community. To accomplish its goal
s, the CDS employs librarian
s, 
product developers, systems analysts, programmers, operators, marketers, shippers, 
customer service representatives, accountants, and production staff. Click here
to 
connect to the CDS homepage
.
cataloging-in-publication (CIP)
prepublication
cataloging
program in which participating publisher
s complete a 
standardized
data
sheet
and submit it with the front matter
or entire text
of new book
(usually still in galleys
) to the Library of Congress
for use in assigning an LCCN
and 
preparing a bibliographic record
which is sent back to the publisher within ten days to
be printed
on the verso
of the title page
. The Library of Congress distributes CIP
records to large libraries, bibliographic utilities
, and book vendors on a weekly basis 
118 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
to facilitate book
processing. If incomplete, the initial record may be amended by the
Library of Congress after the U.S. Copyright Office
receives the deposit copy
of the 
published
work
. The CIP Program began at the Library of Congress
in 1971 and is 
used throughout the world. British spelling is cataloguing-in-publication. Click here
to connect to the CIP homepage
.
cataloging level
Seeencoding level
.
cataloging source
Field
(040) of the MARC
record, reserved for the three-letter
OCLC symbol
representing the cataloging agency
that created, transcribed, or modified the 
bibliographic record
(exampleDLC for Library of Congress
). If English is not the
language
of the cataloging
agency, the 040 field may also contain information
about 
the language in which the item
is cataloged.
catalog record
In the manual card catalog
, all the information
given on a library
catalog card
including a description
of the item
, the main entry
, any added entries
and subject 
heading
s, note
s, and the call number
. In the online catalog
, the screen display that 
represents most fully a specific edition
of a work
, including element
s of description 
and access point
s taken from the complete machine-readable
bibliographic record
, as 
well as information about the holdings
of the local library or library system
(copies
location
, call number, status
, etc.) taken from the item record
s attached to the 
bibliographic record. British spelling is catalogue record. Compare with entry
.
catch letters
A sequence of letter
s (usually three) printed
at the top of a page
in a dictionary
gazetteer
, or similar work
, which duplicate the first few letters of the first or last word 
on the page
. Those printed on the verso
indicate the first letters of the first word on 
the page; those on the recto
, the first letters of the last word on the page. In some
work
s, the letters appear in two groups separated by a hyphen
, representing the first 
and last words on the page. Compare with catchword
.
catch stitch
Seekettle stitch
.
catch title
Seecatchword title
.
catchword
A word or part of a word printed
in boldface
or uppercase
at the top of a column
or 
page
in a dictionary
or encyclopedia
, which repeats the first and/or last heading
appearing in the column or on the page. Synonymous with guideword. Compare in
this sense with catch letters
.
In medieval manuscript
s and early printed
book
s, a word or part of a word given 
below the last line on a page, which repeats the first word on the following page to 
119 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
enable the binder
to assemble the leaves
in correct sequence.
Also refers to a word or phrase
repeated so frequently that it has become a motto or 
slogan. Compare in this sense with cliche
.
catchword title
partial title
composed of an easily remembered word or phrase
likely to be used as 
heading
or keyword
in a search
of the library
catalog
, sometimes the same as a 
subtitle
or the alternative title
. Synonymous with catch title.
cathedral binding
cloth
or leather
binding
decorated with architectural motifs of the Gothic period, 
sometimes even including a rose window, popular in France and England from about 
1815 to 1840 when interest in Gothic art underwent a revival.
Catholic Library Association (CLA)
Established in 1921, CLA has a membership of librarian
s, teachers, and bookseller
involved with Catholic libraries
and the writing, publication
, and distribution of 
Catholic literature
CLA publishes
the quarterly
Catholic Library WorldClick here
to connect to the CLA homepage
.
CatME
OCLC
’s Cataloging Micro Enhancersoftware
that enables cataloger
s to search
the 
WorldCat
database
and OCLC Authority File interactive
ly online
, edit bibliographic
and authority record
offline
, and send update
s to OCLC in batches
to increase 
cataloging
efficiency and reduce costs. Click here
to learn more about CatME.
caucus
An interest group within a political faction or party, legislative body, or organization, 
formed (sometimes spontaneously) to address an immediate need for action on a 
given issue or series of related issues, usually by formulating policy, supporting 
candidates for political office, drafting campaign strategy, lobbying, etc. (example:
Black Caucus of the ALA
). Compare with task force
.
causal relation
Seesemantic relation
.
Caxton, William, c. 1422?-1491
England’s first printer
Caxton learned the trade relatively late in life while living in 
Cologne and Bruges. He brought the first printing press
to England and installed it in 
the Chapter House at Westminster Abbey, issuing
the first dated
book
known to have 
been printed
in England (probably his The Dictes and Sayings of the Philosophers) in 
1477. By the time he died in 1491, his press had issued approximately one hundred
work
s, including folio
edition
s of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (1478) and Mallory’s 
Morte D’Arthur (1485) which he sold to English reader
s in bound
copies
. He was an
expert editor
and translated
into English many of the works he printed. For a succinct,
informative essay
on the life and work of William Caxton, see the entry
under his 
name in Geoffrey Glaister’s Encyclopedia of the Book (Oak Knoll: 1996). See also:
120 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
Gutenberg, Johann
.
CBA
SeeC
anadian 
B
ooksellers 
A
ssociation
and C
enter for 
B
ook 
A
rts
.
CBC
SeeC
hildren’s 
B
ook 
C
ouncil
.
CBIP
SeeC
hildren’s 
B
ooks 
i
P
rint
.
CC
Seec
losed 
c
aption
and c
ommon 
c
arrier
.
CCC
SeeC
opyright 
C
learance 
C
enter
.
CCTV
Seec
losed 
c
ircuit 
t
ele
v
ision
.
CD
Seec
ompact 
d
isc
.
CD-ROM
Compact Disc-Read Only Memory (pronounced "see dee rom"), a small plastic 
optical disk
similar to an audio compact disk
, measuring 4.72 inches (12 centimeters) 
in diameter, used as a publishing
medium
and for storing information
in digital
format
. Stamped by the producer on the metallic surface, the data
encoded
on a 
CD-ROM can be search
ed and displayed on a computer screen, but not changed or
erased. The disc
is read by a small laser beam inside a device
called a CD-ROM 
drive
.
Each disc has the capacity to store 650 megabyte
s of data, the equivalent of 
250,000-300,000 page
s of text
or approximately 1,000 book
s of average length.
CD-ROMs can be used to store sound track
s, still or moving images, and computer 
file
s, as well as text. In libraries
, CD-ROMs are used primarily as a storage
medium 
for bibliographic database
s and full text
resources, mostly dictionaries
encyclopedia
and other reference work
s. Compare with WORM
See alsoCD-ROM drive
CD-ROM tower
, and CD-ROM network
.
CD-ROM changer
A computer hardware
device
designed to store a small number of CD-ROM
s or disc
modules, with carousels and robot arms to move one disc at a time to an optical or 
magnetic reader, and back to its storage
location. Colloquially known as a jukebox.
Compare with CD-ROM drive
and CD-ROM tower
.
CD-ROM drive
hardware
component designed to read data
record
ed on a CD-ROM
disc
, originally 
an external device
, but built into most newer microcomputer
s. CD-ROM drives can
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested