asp.net c# pdf viewer control : Break pdf into multiple files application Library tool html .net windows online odlis12-part585

121 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
also be used to play audio compact disc
s when attached to a sound card via cable.
Compare with CD-ROM changer
and CD-ROM tower
.
CD-ROM LAN
SeeCD-ROM network
.
CD-ROM network
client-server
system that makes multiple CD-ROM
disc
s stored in a CD-ROM 
tower
accessible
to users authorized
to log on
to a computer network
. Most
bibliographic database
s available on CD-ROM require special licensing
for network 
access. Synonymous with CD-ROM LAN
.
CD-ROM tower
A computer hardware
device
designed to store a large number of CD-ROM
disc
s, 
usually connected to a server
program
med to handle network
access
. Compare with
CD-ROM drive
and CD-ROM changer
.
CDS
SeeC
ataloging 
D
istribution 
S
ervice
.
ceased publication
Said of a periodical
no longer published
Publication
may start up again under the 
same title
or an altered title. Also said of a work
published in more than one volume
which was never completed. Library
holdings
are indicated in a closed entry
.
Compare with canceled
and discontinued
See also: cessation
.
cel
A thin sheet
of transparent material of standard
size (usually acetate), having the same
proportions as a frame
of motion picture
film
, on which is drawn or painted a single 
image in a sequence of animation
Original
cels from early animated films may have 
independent value as work
s of art. Also refers to a transparent sheet used as an
overlay against an opaque background, as in textbook
s on anatomy to show in layers 
the various systems of the human body (circulatory, nervous, skeletal, etc.).
cell
Seealcove
.
cellulose
The fibrous vegetable material used in papermaking
, derived primarily from wood 
pulp, but formerly from cotton or linen rag
s. The cellulose in paper
and board
made 
from wood pulp is weakened over time by the presence of acid
unless lignin
is 
removed in manufacture and an alkaline
buffer
added.
cellulose nitrate film
Seenitrate film
.
censorship
Prohibition of the production, distribution, circulation, or display of a work
by a 
governing authority on grounds that it contains objectionable or dangerous material.
Break pdf into multiple files - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf split and merge; break pdf into multiple files
Break pdf into multiple files - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf; split pdf into individual pages
122 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
The person who decides what is to be prohibited is called a censor. Commonly used
methods include decree and confiscation, legislation, repressive taxation, and 
licensing to grant or restrict the right to publish
.
The ALA Code of Ethics
places an ethical responsibility on its members to resist 
censorship of library materials
and programs in any form, and to support librarian
and other staff
who put their careers at risk by defending library
policies against 
censorship. Compare with suppressed
See alsobanned book
book burning
challenge
Comstock
expurgated
filtering
intellectual freedom
, and Index Librorum 
Prohibitorum
.
census
An official count and statistical analysis of the population of a given geographic 
entity (city, county, state, province, country, etc.) taken at a particular point in time.
The earliest known census of taxpaying households was recorded in China in the 3rd 
century B.C. More complete enumerations were conducted for military and tax
purposes in ancient Rome by special magistrates called censors. The development of
the modern census began in Europe in the 17th century and today includes questions 
concerning age, gender, ethnicity, income, housing, etc., formulated to generate data
used in social planning, political redistricting, business marketing, etc. In most
countries, participation in the census is compulsory and the information
collected on 
individual households and businesses is confidential
.
In the United States, the national census is conducted every tenth year by the U.S. 
Census Bureau
which reports the detailed results in statistical form by state. Census
data
is available in the government documents
collection
s of larger libraries
and 
online at: www.census.gov
Summary
table
s are published
in the Statistical Abstract 
of the United States
, prepared annual
ly since 1879 by the Bureau of Statistics (Dept. 
of U.S. Treasury), available in the reference section
of most libraries in the United 
States. See also: census tract
.
census tract
One of many small geographic areas into which a state or country is divided for the 
purpose of gathering and reporting census
data
. In the United States, the average tract
contains 4,000 residents or approximately 1,200 households. Census tract outline
map
s are available from the U.S. Census Bureau
.
Center for Book Arts (CBA)
Founded in 1974, CBA is a non-profit organization with headquarters in New York 
City, dedicated to preserving the traditional craft of bookmaking and encouraging 
contemporary interpretations of the book
as an art object, through exhibit
ions, 
lectures, publication
s, and services to artists, including courses, workshop
s, and 
seminars on all aspects of the book arts
Click here
to connect to the CBA homepage
.
Center for Research Libraries (CRL)
Founded in 1949, CRL’s members are large research libraries
that seek to improve 
access
to scholarly collection
s. CRL publishes
bimonthly
newsletter
and serves as a
depository
for infrequently used research
materials
which its members may use 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Offer PDF page break inserting function. the ability to inserting a new PDF page into existing PDF processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files
pdf split; reader split pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class.
break pdf password online; break pdf into single pages
123 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
cooperatively. Click here
to connect to the CRL homepage
.
Center for the Book
An educational outreach
program established in 1977 by the Library of Congress
to 
stimulate public interest in and awareness of book
s, reading, and libraries
, and to 
encourage the study of books and the printed
word. The Center is a public-private 
partnership between the Library of Congress, 35 affiliated state centers, and over 50 
national and civic groups. Click here
to connect to the homepage
of the Center for 
the Book.
centerpiece
In bookbinding
of the late 16th and early 17th centuries, an ornamental design such as
an arabesque
, stamped on the center of the front and/or back cover
, usually 
accompanied by matching cornerpiece
s. Also refers to a piece of embossed
or 
engraved
metal attached to the center of the front cover of a book
. Also spelled
centrepieceSee alsocameo binding
.
centralized cataloging
The preparation of bibliographic record
s for book
s and other library materials
by a 
central cataloging agency
which distributes them in printed
and/or machine-readable
form to participating libraries, usually for a modest fee
. Also refers to the cataloging
of materials
for an entire library system
at one of its facilities, usually the central 
library
, to achieve uniformity and economies of scale. Also spelled centralized 
cataloguing.
centralized processing
The practice of concentrating in a single location all the functions involved in 
preparing materials
for library
use, as opposed to technical processing
carried out at 
multiple locations within a library or library system
. Centralization allows processing
methods to be standardized
, but increased efficiency may be offset by the cost of 
distributing materials to the units where they will be used.
central library
The administrative center of a library system
, where system-wide management 
decisions are made, centralized
technical processing
is conducted, and principal 
collection
s are located. Synonymous with main library. See also: branch library
.
central processing unit (CPU)
The hardware
component of a computer that houses the circuitry for storing
and 
processing data
according to instructions contained in the program
s installed on it, 
including the operating system
utilities
to run peripheral
device
s, and application
software
. Generally speaking, the more memory
and disk
storage
a CPU has, the more
processing it can handle within a given amount of time, and the faster it can 
accomplish a task.
cerf
Seekerf
.
124 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
certificate of issue
In a limited edition
, the statement in each copy
giving the total number
of copies 
printed
and the copy number
. In an autographed edition
, the certificate may also bear 
the signature
of the author
editor
, or illustrator
.
certification
In archives
, the formal act of attesting to the official identity and nature of an original
document
or its reproduction
. Compare with authentication
.
Also, the process by which a state agency
, or a nongovernmental agency
or 
organization authorized by a state government, evaluates the qualifications of an 
individual, organization, or institution to perform a specific service or function, for 
the purpose of granting a credential. Compare with accreditation
See alsoapproved 
library school
.
cessation
serial
or annual
that has ceased publication
. Cessations are listed alphabetical
ly by 
title
in a separate section of Ulrich’s International Periodicals Directory
published
annual
ly by R. R. Bowker
, and in The Serials Directory
published by EBSCO
. In
library
cataloging
, the holdings
of a serial that has ceased publication
are indicated in 
closed entry
(examplev. 1-26, 1950-76).
cf.
An abbreviation
of the Latin confer meaning "compare."
CGI
SeeC
ommon 
G
ateway 
I
nterface
.
challenge
A complaint lodged by a library
user acting as an individual or representing a group, 
concerning the inclusion of a specific item
(or items) in a library collection
, usually 
followed by a demand that the material
be removed. Library programs may also be
targeted. Public libraries
are challenged far more frequently than other types of 
libraries
because they are supported by public funds and must provide resources and 
services for a highly diverse clientele
("this library has something to offend
everyone"). An unambiguously worded collection development policy
is a library
’s 
best defense against such objections. See alsobanned book
censorship
, and 
intellectual freedom
.
changed title
The title proper
of a publication
that has undergone a change of title
from the one 
under which it was previously published
. Title changes occur most frequently in
periodical
s, compounding the work of serial
librarian
s and complicating access
for 
users. In library
cataloging
, a note
(Continues:) is included in the bibliographic record
representing the new title, and a similar note (Continued by:) is added to the record 
for the previously published title. Synonymous with title change. See alsoretitled 
edition
.
125 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
channel
A pathway along which data
is transmitted electronically from one computer, 
terminal
, or device
to another. The term
also refers to the physical medium
carrying 
the signal (optical fiber
coaxial cable
, etc.) and to the properties that distinguish a 
specific channel from others. In data storage
, a track
on a specific storage medium 
(magnetic tape
, magnetic disk
CD-ROM
DVD
, etc.) on which electrical signals are 
recorded.
In communications
, a band of frequencies
assigned by the Federal Communications 
Commission (FCC) to a radio or television transmitting station for its exclusive use.
Also refers to the blank
space dividing column
s of text
written or printed
on a page
.
chapbook
From the Anglo-Saxon root ceap. A small inexpensive paperbound
book
or pamphlet
containing a popular legend
tale
poem
, or ballad
, or a collection
of prose
or verse
hawked in the streets of London from the 16th to the 18th century by traveling 
peddlers called chapmen. The content
was usually sensational (abduction, murder, 
witchcraft etc.), educational (travel), or moral. Chapbooks were typically of small size
(6 x 4 inches), containing up to 24 page
illustrated
with woodcut
s, usually with a 
decorated cover title
. Also refers to a modern pamphlet
of the same type. Also spelled
chap-book.
chapter
One of two ore more major divisions of a book
or other work
, each complete in itself, 
but related in theme or plot
to the division preceding and/or following it. In works of
nonfiction
, chapters are usually given a chapter title
, but in works of fiction
they may 
simply be number
ed, usually in roman numeral
s. Chapters are listed in order of
appearance by title and/or number in the table of contents
in the front matter
of a 
book. Compare with canto
See alsochapter drop
chapter heading
, and run on 
chapter
.
Also, one of over 50 independent state and regional library association
s closely 
affiliated with the American Library Association
. Each has a separate budget and
dues
structure, elects its own officers, and sponsors an annual
conference
. The 53
state chapters are each represented in the ALA’s governing assembly by an elected 
chapter councilor. The ALA also has student chapters in over 25 states. Within the
ALA, chapter interests are represented by the Chapter Relations Committee and the 
Chapter Relations Office
.
chapter drop
The position below the chapter heading
at which the text
of a chapter
begins--lower 
than on succeeding page
s of the text and, in most book
s, the same for all chapters.
chapter heading
A display heading
in a book
or manuscript
, usually consisting of a roman numeral
indicating the chapter
number
, followed by the chapter title
, written or printed
on the 
first page
of the chapter in uniform style
and position above the first paragraph of the 
126 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
text
. Set in a type
size
larger than the text and running head
s, chapter headings are 
sometimes embellished with an illustration
or head-piece
in older edition
s. See also:
chapter drop
.
chapter title
The title
that appears at the beginning of a chapter
in a book
, usually bearing some 
relation to the content
of the division of the work
. Chapters may simply be number
ed 
(usually in roman numeral
s), or given a number and a title. They are listed in order of
appearance by number and/or title in the table of contents
in the front matter
See 
alsochapter heading
.
character
Any mark, sign, or symbol
conventionally used in writing or printing
, including 
letter
s of the alphabet
numeral
s, punctuation
marks, and reference mark
s. In
indexing
, the smallest unit used in the arrangement
of heading
s. See also: loan 
character
and nonsorting character
.
In data processing
, a sequence of eight binary
digits (one byte
) representing a letter of 
the alphabet
, numeral, punctuation mark, or other symbol.
Also, a fiction
al person in a novel
play
short story
, or other literary work
. A
character study is a work
in which the primary theme is the inner development of a 
person or group of persons (exampleHamlet). In Library of Congress subject 
headings
, "Characters" is a standard subdivision
used in personal name
heading
s for 
writers of fiction
, particularly playwright
s (example: Shakespeare, William, 
1546-1616 - Characters - Falstaff). Well-known characters may be given a separate
heading, followed by a parenthetical qualifier
, as in Jeeves (Fictitious character).
characteristic
An attribute, property, or quality that forms the basis for dividing a class
into clearly 
differentiated subclass
es, for example, the characteristic "period" dividing the class 
"European literature
" into the subclasses "classical," "medieval," "renaissance," 
"modern," and "contemporary," as opposed to the characteristic "form" dividing the 
same class into "drama
," "essay
," "novel
," "poetry
," "short story
," etc.
character masking
Seetruncation
.
character set
A group of symbol
s in a specific font
, used for printing
and/or electronic display.
Character
set
s for language
s written in the roman alphabet
usually contain 256 
symbols of which the first 128 are the same. See also: ASCII
.
charge
To record the loan of a book
or other item
from the circulating collection
of a library
to a borrower
. In modern libraries, this task involves the use of a computer. Also
refers to the library’s record
of such a transaction, including the identity of the 
borrower, the title
and call number
of the item, and its due date
. Compare with
127 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
discharge
See also: item record
and patron record
.
Also refers to a fee
or payment required of a library patron
, usually for the use of 
nontraditional services, such as rental collection
s and certain methods of document 
delivery
.
chart
map
designed to meet the requirements of navigation, or one showing 
meteorological phenomena or heavenly bodies. A nautical chart indicates soundings, 
currents, coastlines, and other important maritime features. An aeronautical chart
shows features of interest to aircraft pilots. Also refers to an opaque sheet
on which 
data
are displayed in the form of graph
s or table
s, or by other graphic
techniques. See 
alsoflip chart
.
charter
A legal document
recording the franchise or granting of specific rights to an 
individual or corporate body
by a governmental authority such as a legislature or 
sovereign (example: the Charter of the United Nations). The text
s of important 
charters are usually available in the government document
s or reference section
of 
large libraries
. The original
s are preserved by the institutions that own them, usually 
in archives
or special collections
.
Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP)
A new professional association
formed in April 2002 by the unification of the 
Institute of Information Scientists (IIS) and the Library Association
(UK). Click here
to connect to the CILIP homepage
which includes information
about the mission
goal
s, and action plan of this new organization.
chase
In letterpress
, the portable rectangular metal frame in which assembled type
and 
display matter
composed
into page
s, is firmly locked
into position. The resulting
forme
is then ready to be transferred to the bed of the press
for printing
. The
expression in chase means "ready for printing."
chased edges
A small wavy or crimped repeating pattern impressed as decoration on the gilt edges
of a book
, using heated finishing
tools called gauffering irons, popular in 16th and 
17th century ornamental binding
s. Synonymous with gauffering and goffered edges.
chat
real time
computer conferencing capability between two or more users of a network
(LAN
WAN
Internet
) by means of a keyboard
rather than voice transmission. Most
Internet service provider
s offer a chat room to their subscriber
s. See alsolurk
.
check digit
A digit added to a sequence of digits, related arithmetically to the sequence in such a 
way that input
errors can be automatically detected whenever the sequence is entered 
as data
into a computer (example: last digit of the ISBN
).
128 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
checked out
The circulation status
of an item
that has been charged
to a borrower account
and is 
not due back in the library
until the end of the loan period
. In the online catalog
, the 
due date
is usually displayed as a status code in the catalog record
to indicate that the 
item is currently not available for circulation
. Synonymous with on loanSee also:
overdue
recall
, and renew
.
check-in record
A separate record attached to the full bibliographic record
for a serial
publication
, in 
which the receipt by the library
of individual issue
s or part
s is entered, usually by an 
assistant working in the serials department. Most online catalog
s allow users to view 
the check-in record to determine if a specific issue has arrived. The check-in record
may also indicate whether an issue is missing
claim
ed, or at the bindery
. Compare
with item record
.
checklist
comprehensive
list of book
s, periodical
s, or other document
s, which provides the 
minimum amount of description
or annotation
necessary to identify each 
work
--briefer than a bibliography
. Also, the log kept by a library
to record the receipt 
of each number
of a serial
publication
, or part
of a work in progress
. Also refers to a
list of item
s required, or procedures to be followed, such as the steps in a library’s 
opening
or closing
routine. Also spelled check-list.
checkout period
Seeloan period
.
chef-d’oeuvre
Seemagnum opus
and masterpiece
.
chemise
A loose leather
or cloth cover
designed with pockets to fit over the wooden board
s of 
hand-bound
book
, sometimes secured to the boards with boss
es, used in Europe 
from the 12th to 15th century as a substitute for full binding
.
Chief Information Officer (CIO)
The title
of the person in a commercial company or nonprofit organization who is 
responsible for managing the flow of official information
, including computing and 
any library
services--a relatively new position
in companies and organizations that 
recognize the need for such a management function.
chief source of information
The source of bibliographic data
preferred by cataloger
s in preparing the 
bibliographic description
of an item
, usually the title page
or a substitute, for 
example, the title frame
at the beginning of a filmstrip
or motion picture
, or the title 
screen
of a Web page
See alsosupplied title
.
chiffon silk
Extra-thin but strong silk tissue used to mend
or strengthen a leaf
in a book
or other 
129 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
document
printed
on paper
.
children’s book
book
written and illustrated
specifically for children up to the age of 12-13.
Included in this category are juvenile fiction
and nonfiction
board book
s, nursery 
rhyme
s, alphabet book
s, counting book
s, picture book
s, easy book
s, beginning 
reader
s, picture storybook
s, and storybook
s. Children’s books are shelved in the
juvenile collection
of most public libraries
and in the curriculum room
in most 
academic libraries
. Currently available children’s title
s are index
ed in Children’s 
Books in Print
published
by R. R. Bowker
Click here
to view a sample of 19th 
century children’s books. See also: children’s book award
children’s literature
, and 
Children’s Book Council
.
children’s book award
literary award
or prize given to the author
or illustrator
of a book
published
specifically for children. In the United States, the two best-known awards are the
Caldecott Medal
and the Newbery Medal
Click here
to connect to an international 
list of children’s book
awards. See alsoAmelia Frances Howard-Gibbon Illustrator’s 
ward
Carnegie Medal
CLA Book of the Year for Children
, and Greenaway Medal
.
Children’s Book Council (CBC)
Established in 1945, the CBC is a nonprofit trade association
dedicated to 
encouraging literacy
and the use and enjoyment of children’s book
s. Its membership
includes publisher
s and packagers of children’s trade book
s, and producers of 
book
-related multimedia
for children. The CBC sponsors Children’s Book Week
celebrated in schools, libraries
, and bookstore
s throughout the United States each 
November, and Young People’s Poetry Week celebrated in April in conjunction 
with National Poetry
Month. Click here
to connect to the CBC homepage
.
Children’s Books in Print
An author
title
, and illustrator
index
to currently available books for children
and 
young adult
s, published
annual
ly by R. R. Bowker
. The separately published Subject 
Guide to Children’s Books in Print includes indexes by publisher
wholesaler
, and 
distributor
See also: El-Hi Textbooks & Serials in Print
.
Children’s Book Week
Sponsored since 1919 by the Children’s Book Council
Children’s Book Week is a 
local and national celebration held each November in which librarian
s, bookseller
s, 
publisher
s, and educators schedule book
exhibit
s, read-a-thon
s, story hour
s, swap 
sessions, contests, book raffles, an other activities to stimulate interest in books and 
reading among young people. Synonymous with Book Week. Click here
to connect to 
the Children’s Book Week homepage
.
children’s collection
Seejuvenile collection
.
Children’s Internet Protection Act of 1999 (CIPA)
Legislation passed by Congress in 1999 that makes discounted Internet
access
and 
130 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
internal connection services for schools and libraries
under the E-rate
provisions of 
the 1996 Telecommunications Reform Act contingent on certification
that certain 
"Internet safety policies" have been put in place, most notably technology that filter
and blocks access to visual depictions considered obscene
or harmful to minors.
Implemented by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), CIPA was 
strongly opposed by the education/library lobby and civil liberties groups, and 
remains controversial. Click here
to read the text
of the Children’s Internet 
Protection Act.
children’s librarian
librarian
who specializes in services
and collection
s for children up to the age of 
12-13. Most children’s librarians have extensive knowledge of children’s literature
and are trained in the art of storytelling
See also: children’s room
.
children’s literature
Literary work
s created specifically for children, as distinct from work
s written for 
adult
s and young adult
s, including poetry
and prose
fiction
and nonfiction
. Children’s
literature
began with the oral transmission of nursery rhyme
s, songs, poems, fairy 
tale
s, and stories. During the early 17th century, the horn book
came into widespread 
use in Britain and the American colonies, but it was not until the late 17th century 
with the publication
of the popular Tales of Mother Goose by Charles Perrault 
(1628-1703) that written literature for children emerged as a separate genre.
By the mid-18th century, the British writer, printer
, and publisher
John Newbery 
(1713-1767) perceived that a market existed for children’s book
s and began 
publishing
illustrated
works intended to be morally instructional (Little Goody 
Two-Shoes). Not until the 19th century did children’s literature break away from
didacticism, first with the publication of the fairy tales of Hans Christian Anderson 
(1805-1875) and the brothers Grimm, and later with Edward Lear’s Book of Nonsense
(1846), Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and the sequel
Through the Looking
Glass (1871).
The illustrations in most early children’s books were printed
in black and white, but 
by the 1860’s the English printer Edmund Evans (1826-1905) began issuing
picture 
book
s in color, illustrated by artists such as Walter Crane (1845-1915), Kate 
Greenaway (1846-1901), and Randolph Caldecott (1846-1886). The publication of
the children’s classic
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott in 1868 and The 
Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain in 1876 marked the beginning of realism 
in juvenile fiction
. Today, children’s literature has earned a place in the hearts of
millions of reader
s, and a worldwide market exists for book
s and periodical
s for 
children of all ages.
Recently published children’s books are review
ed in Booklist
The Bulletin of the 
Center for Children’s Books
Horn Book Magazine
The Lion and the Unicorn
, and 
School Library Journal, and reviews are excerpt
ed in Children’s Literature Review
, a 
reference serial
published by the Gale Group
Click here
to view a sample of 19th 
century children’s literature. See also: children’s book award
and juvenile collection
.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested