asp.net c# pdf viewer control : Break pdf documents Library control class asp.net web page .net ajax odlis20-part595

201 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
desk dictionary
A single-volume
dictionary
of approximately 150,000 words, intended for use by an 
individual sitting at a desk or in a workspace (exampleWebster’s New World 
Dictionary of the American Language). Entries
usually indicate orthography
syllabication
, pronunciation, etymology
, and definition
Synonym
s, antonym
s, and 
brief biographical
and gazetteer
information
are included in some edition
s.
Synonymous with college dictionaryClick here
to connect to the online
version of 
Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary and Thesaurus. Compare with pocket 
dictionary
and unabridged dictionary
.
desk schedule
A list of the hours during which librarian
s and other public services
staff
are regularly 
assigned to assist users at the circulation desk
reference desk
information desk
, or 
other public service point
in a library
, usually prepared by the staff member 
responsible for supervising the operations performed at the location. See also:
rotation
.
desktop computer
Seepersonal computer
.
desktop publishing (DTP)
The use of microcomputer
hardware
and software
for page
layout
graphic
design, 
and printing
to produce professional quality camera-ready copy
for commercial 
printing
at a fraction of the cost of using the services of a commercial publisher
. Used
extensively to produce in-house brochure
s, flier
s, newsletter
s, poster
s, etc., DTP
requires desktop publishing software
and a high-speed PC
equipped with a large 
monitor
and high-resolution laser printer
to produce text
and graphics in WYSIWYG
format
See also: self-publishing
.
destruction
In archives
, the process of physically doing away with records
that are no longer of 
value
, but remain too sensitive to be simply discarded as trash. For paper
records, the 
most common methods are shredding and pulp
ing. Incineration is used for records in
all other format
s.
detective fiction
novel
or short story
in which the details of a crime (or suspected crime) are 
uncovered by an amateur or professional sleuth who looks for clues and interprets 
them, sometimes using ingenious methods, to solve the mystery of who-done-it. The
modern detective story began with Edgar Allan Poe’s Murders in the Rue Morgue
and has since become a popular subgenre
of mystery
fiction
. Some detective stories
qualify as historical fiction
(examplechronicle
s of Brother Cadfael by Ellis Peters).
See alsosuspense
.
deterioration
Damage that occurs to an item by physical, chemical, or biological means after it has 
been produced, usually over a period of time. Examples include binding
s weakened 
by adhesive
s that dry out and crack, printing
paper
s embrittle
d by acid
, and paper 
Break pdf documents - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break pdf file into multiple files; cannot select text in pdf
Break pdf documents - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break apart pdf; pdf split and merge
202 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
document
s discolored by the growth of mildew
under damp conditions. See also:
inherent vice
and stabilization
.
Deutscher Bibliogtheksverband e. V.
SeeGerman Library Association (DBV)
.
device
An ornament or symbol
used in printing
, such as the north pointer
used on map
s to 
indicate compass orientation. Also refers to an insignia used as a publisher
’s 
identifying mark, for example, the small design of a house stamped on the spine
and 
printed on the title page
of book
published
by Random House. Synonymous in this
sense with colophon
.
Also refers to any electronic or electromagnetic machine or hardware
component.
Computer peripheral
s (printer
scanner
disk drive
s, etc.) require a program
routine
called a device driver
to connect to the operating system
.
Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC)
hierarchical
system for classifying
book
s and other library materials
by subject
first published
in 1876 by the librarian
and educator Melvil Dewey
who divided 
human knowledge
into ten main class
es, each of which is divided into ten division
s, 
and so on. In Dewey Decimal call number
s, arabic numeral
s and decimal
fractions are 
used in the class notation
(example: 996.9). An alphanumeric
book number
is added 
to subarrange work
s of the same classification by author
, and by title
and edition
(996.9 B3262h).
Developed and updated
continuously for the past 125 years, most recently by a 
10-member international Editorial Policy Committee (EPC), DDC is the most widely 
used classification system
in the world. According to OCLC
, it has been translated
into 30 language
s and is used by 200,000 libraries
in 135 countries. The national 
bibliographies
of 60 countries are organized according to DDC.
In the United States, public
and school libraries
use DDC, but most academic
and 
research libraries
use Library of Congress Classification
because it is more hospitable
.
Abridged Decimal Classification
is available for use in small libraries, and OCLC has
developed WebDewey
for classifying Web page
s and other electronic resources. Click 
here
to connect to the DDC Web site
maintained by OCLC. See also: Universal 
Decimal Classification
.
Dewey, Melvil, 1851-1931
One of the founders of the American Library Association
, Melvil Dewey served as 
editor
of Library Journal
from 1876 to 1881, published
the Dewey Decimal 
Classification
system in 1876, and served as librarian
at Columbia University from 
1883 to 1888 where he founded the first professional library school
in 1887. He
became the director
of the New York State Library
in Albany in 1888, taking the 
library school with him. Dewey was also a spokesman for professionalism
in 
librarianship
, for library education
, and for equality of opportunity for women in the 
profession. A dynamic man, he also advocated standardization
of library education, 
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
RasterEdge.com is specializing in documents and images conversion WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
break pdf into multiple files; break pdf
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Office Excel to Adobe PDF
sheet size will keep unchanged for conversion among documents. WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
cannot print pdf file no pages selected; acrobat split pdf
203 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
methods, tools, equipment
, and supplies
.
diacritical mark
A mark written or printed
above or below an alphabet
ic character
, to indicate a 
change in its pronunciation, for example, the cedilla used in French under the letter c
when it is pronounced like ts or s, instead of k.
diagnostics
Software
designed to automatically test hardware
components (disk
s, keyboard
memory
, etc.) whenever a computer session begins, to determine if they are 
functioning properly. If a component fails on startup, a warning message appears on
the screen.
diagram
figure
chart
, or graphic
design intended to explain or illustrate
a principle, concept,
or set of statistical data
. Also, a drawing, sketch
, or plan
that shows the steps in a 
process, or the relationship of the parts of an object or structure to the whole, usually 
simplified for the sake of clarity. A diagram is usually accompanied by a line or two
of explanation, or by explanatory text
in the document
in which it appears.
DIALOG
vendor
that provides per-search
access
to a wide selection of online
database
s via a 
proprietary
interface
. Established in 1972, DIALOG led the market for many years in
online information retrieval
, and remains strong in business, science, and technology.
The company also provides technical support for Internet
users and e-commerce. In
most libraries
DIALOG search
es are mediated
by a specially trained librarian
to 
keep costs down. Click here
to connect to the DIALOG homepage
.
dialog box
A small square or rectangular area that opens in a graphical user interface
in response 
to a selection made by the user, usually providing additional information
or listing 
other option
s and/or settings available at that point in the program
. A dialog box
differs from a window
in being neither movable nor resizable
. Some application
s are 
designed to open a dialog box automatically when certain operations are selected, but 
this feature can usually be set "off" when not desired.
dialogue
Conversation, real or imagined, between two or more persons, especially the 
exchange of ideas and opinions between individuals who do not share the same point 
of view. Also refers to a written work
in the form of a conversation between two or 
more people, or to the portions of a work of fiction
(novel
short story
play
, etc.) 
consisting of words spoken by the character
s, as opposed to passages of narrative
or 
description. In the text
of a narrative work, dialogue is set apart by the use of 
quotation mark
s. Compare with monologue
.
dial-up access
Connection to a network
online
service, or computer system from a terminal
or 
workstation
via a telephone line, usually in exchange for payment of a monthly fee
to 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Forms. Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free SDK library for Visual Studio .NET. Independent
pdf link to specific page; split pdf by bookmark
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
pdf file specification; break apart pdf pages
204 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
service provider
, as opposed to access
via a dedicated line
. Dial-up access requires a
modem
to convert the digital
signals produced by a computer into the analog signals 
used in voice transmission, and vice versa.
diary
A private written record
of day-to-day thoughts, feelings, and experiences, kept by a 
person who does not expect them to be published
. Also refers to the blankbook
or 
notebook
in which such experiences are recorded. Diaries are sometimes published
posthumous
ly and some have become famous literary
and historical work
s, for 
example, the Diary of Samuel Pepys and more recently that of Anne Frank. Compare
with journal
and memoirs
.
Also refers to a small notebook
in which the consecutive dates of the year are listed, 
with blank
space for scheduling appointments, meetings, important deadlines, etc.
dictionary
A single-volume
or multi-volume reference work
containing brief explanatory entries
for term
s and topic
s related to a specific subject
or field
of inquiry, usually arranged
alphabetical
ly (example: Dictionary of Neuropsychology). The entries in a dictionary
are usually shorter than those contained in an encyclopedia
on the same subject, but it
is not uncommon for the word "dictionary" to be used in the title
of works that should
more appropriately be called encyclopedias (example: Dictionary of the Middle Ages
in 13 volume
s). See alsobiographical dictionary
.
Also refers to a work
listing the words of a language
in alphabetical order, with 
orthography
syllabication
, pronunciation, etymology
, and definition
(s). Some
dictionaries also include synonym
s, antonym
s, and brief biographical
and gazetteer
information
. An unabridged dictionary
is comprehensive
in the number of words and 
definitions included (example: Webster’s Third New International Dictionary). An
abridged
dictionary provides a more limited selection of terms and less information in
each entry (Webster’s New College Dictionary). In a visual dictionary
, the terms are
illustrated
See also: desk dictionary
and pocket dictionary
.
Dictionaries are known to have developed from Latin glossaries
as early as the 13th 
century. Dictionaries of the English language, limited to difficult words, were first
compiled
in the 17th century. The most famous is the Oxford English Dictionary
(1989), conceived in Britain in 1857 by the Philological Society. Some English
dictionaries are limited to a specialized
vocabulary (example: Dictionary of 
American Slang). In libraries
, at least one large printed
dictionary is usually 
displayed open on a dictionary stand
. Smaller portable edition
s are shelved in the 
reference section
Abbreviated
dict. Compare with concordance
See alsolanguage 
dictionary
polyglot dictionary
, and rhyming dictionary
.
This Web site
is an example of an electronic dictionary. Click here
to connect to the 
online
version of Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary and Thesaurus.
dictionary catalog
A type of catalog
, widely used in the United States before the conversion
of the card 
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's not supported tell stop.
acrobat split pdf pages; pdf split pages in half
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's
add page break to pdf; break a pdf into parts
205 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
catalog
to machine-readable
form, in which all the entries
(main
added
subject
) and 
cross-reference
s are interfiled in a single alphabetic
sequence, as opposed to one 
divided
into separate sections by type of entry (author
title
, subject). Compare with
classified catalog
.
dictionary stand
A free-standing piece of display furniture usually made of wood, at least waist-high 
with a sloping top and a book stop
, used in libraries
to display an open dictionary
or 
other large reference work
. A dictionary stand is narrower than an atlas case
and may 
contain shelves for storing other volume
s. Small revolving table-top models are also
available from library supplier
s.
differential pricing
The controversial practice of charging libraries
a substantially higher price
for 
periodical
subscription
s than the amount an individual subscriber
is required to pay, 
which some journal
publisher
s claim is justified because a library subscription
makes 
the publication
available to more reader
s, an effect known in the publishing
trade as 
pass-along
. Also refers to the practice in Europe of charging North American
subscribers a rate substantially higher than normal, presumably because they can 
afford to pay more.
diffuse authorship
work
created by four or more persons or corporate bodies
in which no single 
individual or body can be identified as the primary author
. In libraries
, such works are 
cataloged
under the title
, with an added entry
for the first-named person or body.
Under AACR2
, if three or fewer persons or bodies are primarily responsible for a 
work, the main entry
is under the heading
for first-named author, with added entries 
for the other principal authors. Compare with unknown authorship
See alsomixed 
responsibility
and shared responsibility
.
digest
An orderly, comprehensive
abridgment
or condensation of a written work
(legal, 
scientific, historical, or literary
), broader in scope
than a synopsis
, usually prepared by
a person other than the author
of the original
Heading
s and subheading
s may be 
added to facilitate reference. Also refers to a periodical
or index
containing excerpt
or condensations of works from various sources, usually arranged in some kind of 
order (example: Book Review Digest).
digital
Data
recorded or transmitted as discrete, discontinuous voltage pulses represented by 
the binary
digits 0 and 1, called bit
s. In digitized
text
, each alphanumeric
character
is 
represented by a specific eight-bit sequence called a byte
. The computers used in
libraries
transmit data in digital format
. Compare with analog
See alsoborn digital
.
The term
is also used in a general sense to refer to the wave of information 
technology
generated by the invention of the microcomputer
in the second half of the 
20th century, as in the expression "digital divide
" and "digital library
."
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
foreach (TwainStaticFrameSizeType frame in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
reader split pdf; split pdf files
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. if (device.Compression != TwainCompressionMode.Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
break pdf file into parts; break pdf into smaller files
206 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
digital archives
Archival
materials that have been converted
to machine-readable
format
, usually for 
the sake of preservation
or to make them more accessible
to users. A prime example
is American Memory
, a project undertaken by the Library of Congress
to make digital 
collection
s of primary source
s on the history and culture of the United States 
available over the Internet
.
digital collection
collection
of library
or archival
materials
converted
to machine-readable
format
for 
preservation
, or to provide access
electronically (exampleThomas Jefferson Digital 
Archive
, a project of the Electronic Text Center, University of Virginia Library). In
the United States, the Digital Library Federation
is developing standards
and best 
practice
s for digital
collections and network
access.
digital divide
term
coined by former Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Telecommunication
and Communication, Larry Irving, Jr., to focus public awareness on the gap in access
to information
resources and services between those with the means to purchase the 
computer hardware
and software
necessary to connect to the Internet
, and low-income
families and communities that cannot afford network
access. Public libraries
are 
helping to bridge the gap between information "haves" and "have-nots" with the 
assistance of substantial grant
s from industry leaders such as Microsoft’s Bill Gates.
The E-rate
established by the Telecommunications Act of 1996 (TCA) has helped 
schools, public libraries
, and rural health care institutions bridge the gap. Digital 
Divide Network
is a Web site
devoted to the issue. Synonymous with information 
gap.
digital imaging
The field
within computer science covering all aspects of the capture, storage
manipulation, transmission, and display of images in digital
format
, including digital 
photograph
y, scanning
, and bitmap
ped graphic
s. In libraries
, images of text
document
s are created for electronic reserve
collection
s and digital archives
. They are
also available in full-text
bibliographic database
s and reference resources. Click here
to connect to the Digital Imaging & Media Technology Initiative at the University of 
Illinois Library.
Digitial Libraries Initiative (DLI)
A multi-agency
interdisciplinary
research
program of the National Science 
Foundation (NSF), that provides grant
s to facilitate the creation of large knowledge
bases, develop the information technology
to access
them effectively, and improve 
their usability
in a wide range of contexts. Click here
to see a list of DLI-funded 
projects.
digital library
library
in which a significant proportion of the resources are available in 
machine-readable
format
, rather than in print
or on microform
. In libraries, the
process of digitization
began with the catalog
, moved to periodical index
es and 
abstracting service
s, then to periodical
s and large reference work
s, and finally book
207 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
publishing
Abbreviated
d-lib. Compare with virtual library
See also: Digital Library 
Federation
and D-Lib Forum
.
Digital Library Federation (DLF)
consortium
of major libraries
and library-related agencies
dedicated to promoting 
the use of electronic technologies to extend collection
s and services, DLF is 
committed to identifying standards
and best practice
s for digital collection
s and 
network
access
, coordinating research
-and-development in the use of information 
technology
by libraries, and assisting in the initiation of projects/services that 
individual libraries lack the means to develop on their own. Click here
to connect to 
the homepage
of the DLF.
digital media
Seemultimedia
.
Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998 (DMCA)
Legislation passed by Congress and signed into law in October, 1998 to prepare the 
United States for the ratification of international treaties
protecting rights to 
intellectual property
in digital
form, drafted in 1996 at a conference
of the World 
Intellectual Property Organization
(WIPO). The bill
was supported by the software
and entertainment industries, and opposed by the library
research
, and education 
communities. Click here
to learn more about the DMCA.
digital preservation
The process of maintaining, in a condition
suitable for use, materials produced in 
digital
format
s. Problems of physical preservation
are compounded by the 
obsolescence of computer equipment, software
, and storage
media
. Also refers to the
practice of digitizing
materials
originally produced in nondigital formats (print
film
etc.) to prevent permanent loss due to deterioration
of the physical medium
.
Synonymous with e-preservation and electronic preservation. See alsodata 
conversion
and digital archives
.
digital reference
Seeelectronic reference
.
digital thesis
A master’s thesis
or Ph.D. dissertation
created in electronic form ("born digital
").
Most universities require a paper
or microform
copy
for archival
purposes, but for 
some hypermedia
theses, a print
version may not be an accurate representation of the 
original (or even possible). Preservation
dilemmas posed by the rapid obsolescence of
digital
equipment and format
s underscore the need for standards
.
digital videodisc
SeeDVD
.
digitization
The process of converting data
to digital
format
for processing
by a computer. In
information
systems, digitization usually refers to the conversion
of printed
text
or 
208 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
images (photograph
s, illustration
s, map
s, etc.) into digital signals using some kind of 
scanning device
that enables the result to be displayed on a computer screen. In
telecommunication
, digitization refers to the conversion of continuous analog
signals 
into pulsating digital signals.
dime novel
melodrama
tic fiction
al narrative
of adventure, romance, and action, published
in 
inexpensive paperback
edition
in the United States during the second half of the 19th 
century, sold mainly at news stands for 10-25 cents a copy
. The term originated with
the Dime Novel
Library
introduced in 1860 by Beadle and Adams of New York.
Hundreds of thousands of title
s, written according to formula, were issue
d before this 
form of pulp fiction
waned in the early 20th century. Among of the most popular was
Buffalo Bill, King of the Border Men (1869) by E. Z. C. Judson, writing under the 
pseudonym
Ned Buntline. His other works included Bigfoot Wallace, the Giant Hero 
of the Border (1891) and The Red Warrior, or, Stella DeLorme’s Comanche Lover: A 
Romance of Savage Chivalry (1869). The influence of this genre
on popular culture is
studied by literary historians. Compare with penny dreadful
and yellowback
.
dimensions
The actual physical size of a bibliographic item
, given in centimeters the physical 
description
area
of the bibliographic description
unless some other unit of 
measurement is more appropriate. See alsoheight
and width
.
diorama
A museum exhibit
or display on any scale
in which inanimate objects and life-like 
figures representing animate beings are carefully placed in front of a background 
scene drawn or painted in perspective on a flat or curved surface to create the illusion 
of greater depth of field than actually exists. Special lighting and recorded sound
effects are sometimes added to make the impression more realistic. Small portable
examples are made for traveling exhibits.
diptych
A portable hinged tablet consisting of two pieces of wood, ivory, or metal covered 
with wax on the inside surface, on which the ancient Greeks and Romans wrote with 
stylus
. Also, a picture
or design painted or carved on the inside surfaces of two 
hinged tablets. In medieval Europe, three tablets called a triptych were also used for 
the same purpose, hinged in such a way that the outer tablets folded over the center 
panel. Compare with pugillaria
.
direct delivery
Putting library materials
directly into the hands of the patron
who requests them, 
without requiring a trip to the library
to pick them up, for example, through a 
books-by-mail
program. Direct delivery is practical for special libraries
located on the
premises of the host organization
. It is also used by public libraries
on a limited scale 
to serve homebound
users.
direct edition
An edition
of a work
for which the author
provides the publisher
with camera-ready 
209 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
copy
produced on a computer with the aid of word processing
software
. Used mainly
for work
s that cannot be produced economically from type
.
direct entry
The principle in indexing
that a concept describing the content
of an bibliographic 
item
should be entered under the subject heading
or descriptor
that names it, rather 
than as a subdivision
of a broader term
, thus a book
about "academic libraries" would 
be assigned the heading Academic libraries, not Libraries--Academic.
directional
Said of a question that can be answered at the information desk
or reference desk
by 
directing the patron
to the location of specific resources, services, or facilities within 
the library
, as opposed to a question requiring substantive information
instruction
in 
the use of library resources, or referral
to an outside agency
or authority. See also:
signage
.
director
The person who has overall responsibility for directing the performance of a work
written for stage or screen. The director’s name appears in the credit
s at the beginning 
or end of a motion picture
videorecording
, or television program, and is indicated in 
the note area
of the bibliographic record
created to represent the work in the library
catalog
. Compare with producer
, and screenwriter
See also: library director
.
direct order
An order for materials
placed by an acquisitions
librarian
directly with the publisher
rather than through a jobber
or subscription agency
. The percentage of orders placed
in this manner has declined as wholesalers and subscription agents have positioned 
themselves to offer economies of scale to their customers and provide services that 
add value. Some publishers no longer accept direct orders and sell only to wholesalers
(exampleRandom House).
directory
A list of people, companies, institutions, organizations, etc., in alphabetical
or 
classified
order, providing contact information
(names, addresses, phone/FAX
numbers, etc.) and other pertinent details (affiliations, conference
s, publication
s, 
membership, etc.) in brief format
, often published
serial
ly (example: American 
Library Directory
). In most libraries
current
directories are shelved in ready 
reference
or in the reference stacks
See also: city directory
telephone directory
, and 
trade directory
.
In data
storage
and retrieval, a catalog of the file
s stored on the hard disk
of a 
computer, or on some other storage medium
, usually organized for ease of access
in a 
hierarchical tree of subdirectories. The topmost directory is called the root directory.
See alsoFTP
.
In library
cataloging
, the portion of the MARC
record following the leader
, which 
serves as an index
to the tag
s included in the record, normally hidden from view of 
cataloger
and catalog
user. Constructed by the cataloging software
from the 
210 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
bibliographic record
at the time the record is created, the directory indicates the tag, 
length, and starting location of each variable field
. Whenever a change is made in the
record, the directory is automatically reconstructed.
dirty proof
In printing
, a proof
of typeset
copy
containing many errors, or one returned to the 
printer
heavily corrected. A clean proof contains no errors or corrections.
disaster plan
A set of written procedures prepared in advance by the staff
of a library
to deal with 
an unexpected occurrence that has the potential to cause injury to personnel or 
damage to equipment, collection
s, and/or facilities sufficient to warrant temporary 
suspension of services (flood, fire, earthquake, etc.). In archival
records management
securing vital record
s in the event of disaster is one of the highest priorities. An
effective disaster plan begins with a thorough risk assessment to identify the areas 
most susceptible to various kinds of damage and evaluate measures that can be taken 
in advance to ensure preparedness
. Both an initial action plan and a recovery plan
should be included. Compare with contingency plan
and emergency plan
.
disaster preparedness
Steps taken by a library
or archives
to prepare for serious damage to facilities, 
collection
s, and/or personnel in the event of a major occurrence such as a fire, flood, 
or earthquake, including preventive measures, formulation of an effective disaster 
plan
, maintenance of adequate insurance, etc. Click here
to connect to the disaster 
preparedness section of the Conservation OnLine (CoOL) Web site
.
disbound
book
or other printed
publication
from which a previous binding
has been 
removed, usually in preparation for rebinding
, part of the process called pulling
.
Compare with unbound
.
disc
A generic term
for a direct-access magnetic storage
medium
that is read-only
, as 
distinct from rewritable
, including audio compact disc
s, CD-ROM
s, videodisc
s, etc.
Compare with disk
.
discard
To officially withdraw
an item
from a library collection
for disposal, a process that 
includes removing from the catalog
all references to it. Also refers to any item
withdrawn for disposal, usually stamped "discard" to avoid confusion. Materials
are 
usually withdrawn when they become outdated
, cease to circulate
, wear out, or are 
damaged
beyond repair
. When shelf space is limited, duplicate
s may be discarded to 
make room for new acquisitions
. Withdrawn items may be exchange
d or given as 
gift
s to other libraries
, but the most common method of disposal is in a book sale
.
Unsold items may be given to a thrift store or thrown away as trash, depending on the
policy of the library. See alsoweeding
.
discharge
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested