asp.net c# pdf viewer control : Break a pdf into multiple files Library application component asp.net windows azure mvc odlis26-part601

261 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
(or organization) achieved distinction. The contributor
s are often friends, colleagues, 
and former students of the person (or entity) honored. Plural: Festschriften.
FIAF
SeeInternational Federation of Film Archives
.
fiberboard
A very rigid form of paperboard made from heavily pressed sheets of pulp
ed 
vegetable fiber, laminated together.
fiber content
A statement of the various kinds of fiber present in a material manufactured from 
fiber (paper
board
cloth
thread
), usually expressed in percentages to indicate 
relative proportions, important information
because type of fiber affects the properties
of a product, for example, its color, chemical stability, strength, and durability
.
Synonymous with fiber composition. See alsopulp
.
fiber optics
The high-speed transmission of data
encoded
in pulses of laser light via cable 
constructed of optical fiber
, a technology that revolutionized the telecommunication
industry in the late 20th century, making it possible to interconnect computers large 
and small in a worldwide network
.
fiche
Seemicrofiche
.
fiction
From the Latin fictio meaning to "make" or "counterfeit." Literary work
s in prose
portraying character
s and events created in the imagination of the writer, intended to 
entertain and vicariously expand the reader
’s experience of life. In historical fiction
character
s and events usually bear some relationship to what actually happened, but 
any dialogue
is reconstructed or imagined by the author
. All fiction is fictitious in the
sense of being invented, but good fiction remains "true to life." In the Western
tradition, the traditional forms of literary fiction include the novel
novelette
, and 
short story
. Compare with nonfiction
See also: genre
popular fiction
, and pulp 
fiction
.
In libraries
that use Library of Congress Classification
, fiction is shelved in the P’s, 
the section for language
and literature
, subdivided by language. To locate a specific
work
of fiction in the stacks
, the patron
must first look up the LC call number
in the 
catalog
. In libraries that use Dewey Decimal Classification
, long fiction is shelved 
separately from nonfiction
alphabetical
ly by last name of author
, to facilitate 
browsing
. In some public libraries
genre
fiction is shelved separately from general 
fiction, usually by category (mystery
science fiction
, etc.), sometimes indicated by a 
graphic
label
on the spine
.
fictitious imprint
An imprint
that has no real existence, usually invented to evade legal or other 
restrictions, avoid charges of copyright piracy
, or conceal the identity of the author
. In
Break a pdf into multiple files - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
reader split pdf; split pdf
Break a pdf into multiple files - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break a pdf into multiple files; break pdf into single pages
262 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
library
cataloging
, the real imprint, when known, is given following the fictitious one 
as an interpolation
inside square bracket
s [] in the bibliographic description
.
Synonymous with false imprint.
field
In library
cataloging
, a relative location of fixed
or variable
length in a 
machine-readable
record
, reserved for a specific data
element
or group of elements 
that constitute a single logical category of bibliographic description
, for example, the 
area
of physical description
reserved for information
about the physical characteristics
of an item
. In the MARC
record, each field is indicated by a three-digit tag
, but in the 
catalog
display, textual field label
s are provided to assist users in identifying the 
various categories of description.
Repeatable
fields (R) may appear more than once in the same record, for example, 
there is no restriction on the number of topical subject heading
s (MARC field 650) 
that may be assigned to a work
Nonrepeatable
(NR) fields can be used only once and 
may be mutually exclusive, for example, the personal name
main entry
(field 100) 
and uniform title
main entry (field 130). Fields for area
s of description containing 
more than one data element are divided into subfield
s. Only about ten percent of
available MARC fields are used in most bibliographic record
s. The other ninety
percent are used infrequently. See also: directory
leader
variable control field
, and 
variable data field
.
In a more general sense, a logical unit of data which, together with other units, 
comprises a record in a database
or other system of recordkeeping
, for example, the 
name, address, or phone number field of each patron record
in a library’s patron
database.
In research
, a subject
or group of related subjects studied in depth, for example, 
"anthropometry" in the subdiscipline "physical anthropology" within the discipline
of 
anthropology.
field guide
handbook
designed to help readers identify and learn about the flora and/or fauna 
of a specific geographic area, often published
as part of a series
. The content
of a field 
guide is usually arranged according to biological classification
, with each entry
describing a single species (or group of closely related species). Entries typically
include the Latin species name, descriptive text
, at least one illustration
to facilitate 
identification, and one or more map
s showing geographic distribution. Field guides
are shelved in the reference section
or the circulating
collection
, depending on local 
library
policy.
field label
An abbreviation
or descriptive word or phrase
appearing in the record
display in an 
online catalog
or bibliographic database
, usually in italic
s or distinguished 
typographically
in some other way, aligned with the left-hand margin
to indicate the 
category of data
that follows, for example, Source used in periodical
database
s to 
indicate the journal
title
volume number
publication date
, and page number
s of the 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Offer PDF page break inserting function. the ability to inserting a new PDF page into existing PDF processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files
split pdf into individual pages; break pdf password online
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class.
break apart a pdf in reader; pdf print error no pages selected
263 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
article
indexed
. In the MARC
record, a numeric tag
is used instead of a textual label
to indicate a specific field
of the record.
fieldwork
The gathering of information
or scientific data
about a subject
through observation, 
interviewing, and other methods of direct investigation, usually conducted in a 
location closely associated with the topic
, as opposed to research
ing the subject in 
book
s and other publication
s, conducting experiments in a laboratory setting, 
administering mail survey
s, etc.
In archives
, the process of locating, identifying, and securing materials for an archival
collection
, including any negotiations required to acquire custody
if the materials 
have monetary value. Also spelled field work.
figure
Illustrative
matter
printed
with the text
, rather than separately in the form of plate
s.
Figures are usually fairly simple line drawing
s, numbered consecutively in arabic 
numeral
s in order of appearance to facilitate reference. Figures not individually
caption
ed may be listed with captions on a separate page
, usually in the front matter
of a book
Abbreviated
fig. Also, synonymous in printing with numeral.
figure initial
An initial letter
in an illuminated
manuscript
, elaborately decorated with colorful 
images of animals, humans, or imaginary beings. Compare with historiated initial
and
inhabited initial
See alsofoliate initial
.
figure of speech
A form of expression employed mainly in rhetoric and literary writing, in which 
words or entire sentences are used in a way that deviates from conventional order or 
literal meaning, to achieve an unusual or unexpected poetic
or aesthetic effect. See 
alsometaphor
.
file
collection
of document
s, usually related in some way, stored together and arranged
in a systematic order. In computing, a collection of structured data
element
stored
as 
a single entity, or a collection of record
s related by source and/or purpose, stored on a
magnetic medium
(floppy disk
hard disk
Zip disk
, etc.). File type
, indicated by an 
extension
on the end of the filename
, depends on the code in which the data is written
(example.html for HTML
script).
In manual data
systems, the contents of a manila
file folder
or other physical 
container used to organize documents, usually of a size and shape designed to fit 
inside the drawer of a standard-size filing cabinet or other storage space. Also refers
to a collection of information
about a specific subject
or person, for example, a 
personnel file kept by an employer.
file copy
copy
of a document
report
periodical
article
, etc., kept on file
, usually with related 
items, for reference or future use.
264 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
filename
A brief name assigned by a programmer or computer user to a data
file
to identify it 
for future retrieval. Filenames usually provide a clue to the content
of the file 
(exampleresume.txt or home.html). The three- or four-letter
extension
added to the 
end of a filename indicates file type
(example.txt for a file in ASCII
or .html for a 
file in Hypertext Markup Language
). Also spelled file name.
file name
Seefilename
.
file server
Seeserver
.
file type
In electronic data processing
, the type of code in which a data
file
is written, indicated 
by a three- or four-letter
extension
at the end of the filename
(example
dictionary.html for a file in HTML
script). Synonymous with file format. Common
file types and their extensions:
File Type
Extension
Plain ASCII
text
.txt
Document
in Hypertext Markup Language
.htm or .html
Document in Standard Generalized Markup Language
.sgml
Document in Extensible Markup Language
.xml
GIF
image
.gif
JPEG
image
.jpg or .jpeg
TIFF
image
.tif or .tiff
Bitmap
.bmp
PostScript file
.ps
AIFF sound file
.aif or .aiff
AU sound file
.au
WAV sound file
.wav
QuickTime movie
.mov
MPEG
movie
.mpg or .mpeg
For a more complete list of file format
s, see Every File Format in the World
from 
Whatis.com.
filigree
An elegant style of decoration used in manuscript
s and fine printing
, in which an 
initial letter
or border
is edged with a delicate tracery of curved lines resembling 
lacework.
filigree letter
An initial letter
in a manuscript
or printed
book
, given a decorative outline or 
265 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
background of delicately interlaced lines resembling lacework.
filing rule
A guide established to determinine how a specific type of decision is to be made 
concerning the order in which entries
are file
d in a library
catalog
Published
in 1942, 
the first edition
of the A.L.A. Rules for Filing Catalog Cards was revised in 1967 to 
correlate with Anglo-American Cataloging Rules
. New ALA Filing Rules
published in
1980 apply to all bibliographic display format
s (print
microform
digital
, etc.). Under
the current guidelines, filing is character
-by-character to the end of each word, and 
word-by-word to the end of each filing element. Numeral
s precede letter
s and letters 
of the English alphabet
precede those of nonroman alphabets.
filing title
Seeuniform title
.
filing word
Seeentry word
.
filler
Blank
unnumbered leaves
added at the end of a publication
to increase its bulk
when 
bound
, known in the book trade
as padding.
fillet
In bookbinding
, a fine band or line impressed on the sides and/or spine
of a book
cover
for decorative effect. Also refers to the rolling tool used, when heated, to apply
such lines. A French fillet consists of three unevenly-spaced lines to which gilding
is 
added.
fill rate
In acquisitions
, the percentage of materials
ordered which is actually shipped
by a 
publisher
jobber
, or other vendor
over a fixed period of time. See alsocanceled
.
film
A thin strip or sheet of flexible, transparent or translucent material (usually plastic) 
coated with a light-sensitive emulsion
which, when exposed to light, can be used to 
develop photograph
ic images. The instability and flammability of the cellulose nitrate
used as a film base prior to 1950 has created a preservation
imperative of massive 
proportions. To prevent deterioration
, older films must be copied
onto a more 
permanent base such as acetate or polyester, a time-consuming and expensive
process.
Also refers to commercial and educational motion picture
s in widths of 8, 16, 35, or 
70 millimeters, including documentaries
feature film
s, and short film
s. See also: film 
archives
film library
filmography
filmstrip
microfilm
International Federation of 
Film Archives
, and National Film Registry
.
film archives
An organization or unit within a larger organization or institution responsible for 
maintaining a permanent film
collection
, usually of motion picture
s, documentaries
266 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
cartoon
s, and associated materials. Environmental control is essential in film archives
to prevent deterioration
of the medium
. The UCLA Film & Television Archive
maintains the largest university-held moving-image collection in the world. For an
international list of film archives, see the directory
of the International Federation of 
Film Archives
(FIAF). See alsoNational Film Preservation Foundation
.
film clip
A short piece of motion picture
footage
taken from a longer work
, usually for 
promotional use or for review
purposes, to give viewers a brief impression of the
whole. Compare with trailer
See also: video clip
.
film library
A type of special library
containing a collection
of 8, 16, 35, or 70 mm motion 
picture
s, videorecording
s, DVD
s, and materials
related to film
-making and film 
studies, classified
for ease of access
and retrieval. Borrowing privileges
may be 
restricted to registered members or subscriber
s required to pay a rental
fee
per item
.
See alsofilm archives
.
filmography
A list of motion picture
s, usually limited to work
s by a specific director
or performer
in a particular genre
, of a specific time period or country, or on a given subject
usually listed alphabetical
ly by title
or chronological
ly by release date
. The entries
in 
a filmography include some or all of the following elements of description
producer
distributor
director
, cast, release date, running time
language
, color or 
black-and-white, etc. Compare with discography
.
filmslip
A very short filmstrip
mounted
like a slide
in a rigid holder, instead of stored in a 
short flexible roll.
filmstrip
A length of 35 mm or 16 mm black-and-white or color film
consisting of a sequence 
of related still images, with or without text
or caption
s, intended to be projected one 
at a time at slow speed using a filmstrip projector. Filmstrips are of variable length,
usually no longer than fifty frame
s. Some include a signal that automatically advances
the projector in synchrony with a recorded narration
. Compare with filmslip
.
filmstrip projector
Seefilmstrip
.
filter
computer program
designed to allow only selected data
to pass through to the user, 
for example, an e-mail
system that alerts the recipient to selected incoming messages, 
or software
that blocks access
to Web site
s containing certain types of content, 
usually violent or sexually explicit material considered unsuitable for young children.
In the United States, filtering
has become the focus of a national debate over 
intellectual freedom
and censorship
Click here
to learn more about filters and 
filtering from the American Library Association
See also: V-chip
and Children’s 
267 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
Internet Protection Act
.
filtering
In computing, the use of specially designed software
to prevent the user of a specific 
computer, network
, or system from viewing certain types of content
by blocking 
access
Filter
s are used primarily to prevent children from viewing violent and/or 
sexually explicit material, and by employers to prevent employees from engaging in 
nonwork-related activities on the job. In libraries
, the passage by Congress of the 
Children’s Internet Protection Act
has made filtering a controversial issue. Click here
to learn more about filters and filtering from the American Library Association
See 
alsointellectual freedom
and censorship
.
finding aid
published
or unpublished
guide
inventory
index
register
calendar
, list, or other 
system for retrieving archival
primary source
materials, providing more detailed 
description of each item than is customary in a library
catalog record
. Finding aids
also exist in nonprint
format
s (ASCII
HTML
, etc.). In partnership with the Society of 
American Archivists
, the Library of Congress
maintains a standard
known as 
Encoded Archival Description
(EAD) for encoding
archival finding aids in Standard 
Generalized Markup Language
(SGML). Click here
to connect to a list of online
finding aids for the Library of Congress collection
s.
finding list
A list of a library
’s holdings
in which each item
is represented by a very brief entry
containing incomplete bibliographic
information
(usually just the author
’s name, the 
title
, and its location within the library
). Compare with catalog
.
findings
Information
or evidence uncovered as a result of systematic research
or investigation.
Also, the conclusions of an official inquiry or hearing
on a particular topic
or issue, 
usually presented in the form of a report
which may be preserved as a legal document
.
finding tool
A general term
for a resource designed to be used in a library
to locate sources of 
information
, usually in a search
by author
title
subject
, or keywords
. The category
includes catalog
s, bibliographies
index
es, abstracting service
s, bibliographic 
database
s, etc. The corresponding term in archives
is finding aid.
fine book
book
of exceptional quality with respect to its design, printing
illustration
, and 
binding
, often a copy
of a deluxe edition
. Very fine books are usually sold by
antiquarian bookseller
s and at book auction
s. Libraries
preserve them in special 
collections
. Compare with rare book
.
fine copy
In the used book
trade, a copy
in clean, crisp condition
that surpasses "good" but falls 
short of mint
.
fine edition
268 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
Seedeluxe edition
.
fine-free period
Seegrace period
.
fine print
Information
printed
in very small type
, usually at the end of a document
or in an 
inconspicuous place within it, containing details of which the reader
must be 
informed, but to which the source or publisher
may not wish to call attention. Failure
to read fine print can have serious consequences for the person signing
a legal 
document. See also: mouse type
.
fines
To encourage borrower
s to return materials
promptly, most libraries
charge a small 
amount for each day that a circulating
item
is kept past its due date
. The amount may
vary depending on the format
of the material checked out
Overdue
fines for items on 
reserve
may be charged by the hour. Fines can be avoided by renew
ing items on or 
before the due date. Most automated circulation system
s are program
med to block
borrower account
if unpaid fines accumulate beyond a certain amount. See also: grace 
period
.
fingerprint
A unique identifier constructed according to formula, used in historical bibliography
to identify copies
of early printed
book
s as belonging to a specific edition
or issue
.
Fingerprint formulas are usually in two parts: the year in which the edition appeared
plus size of book
(example157504 for a quarto
edition of the year 1575), followed 
by three groups of character
s transcribed from the line of text
immediately above the 
signature
marks printed at the foot
of certain page
s in the front matter
, main text, and 
back matter
to assist the binder
in assembling the gathering
s in correct sequence.
Even when a text is reprint
ed exactly as it appeared in a preceding edition, the 
signature marks added after the text is composed
rarely fall in the same place, 
creating a variance that can be used for identification. Synonymous with signature 
position.
For more information
, please see Fingerprints = Empreintes = Impronte (Paris: 
Institut de Recherche et d’Histoire des Textes, 1984) and the critique by Ben J. P. 
Salemans of the technique in the June, 1994 issue of the journal
Computers and the 
Humanities.
finis
A French word printed
at the end of an old book
, or appearing at the end of an early 
motion picture
, meaning "the end" or "conclusion." Compare with explicit
.
finish
A general term
for the texture of the surface of a grade of paper
, determined by the 
materials and techniques used in manufacture (fiber content, sizing
calender
ing, 
coating
, drying, etc.). The terms used to describe finish are descriptive: antique
cockle
eggshell
glossy
matte
stipple
, etc.
269 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
In binding
, to apply lettering
and/or ornamentation to the cover
of a book
in a process
known as finishing
.
finishing
In hand-binding
, the process of applying lettering
and/or decorative elements to a 
book
cover
by tooling
inlay
ing, or onlay
ing, done by a person known as a finisher.
Also, a general term for the final steps in the processing of type
matter
once it has 
been printed
, including cutting, folding, machine binding
, stamping, laminating
application of the dust jacket
, etc.
firewall
dedicated
computer that functions as a security
boundary, blocking traffic from one
part of a network
to another, usually the transmission of data
from a larger network to
local area network
. Firewalls are installed to restrict access
to private computer 
network
(s) and proprietary
file
s, by screening incoming traffic and denying access to 
unauthorized
users. They also help prevent confidential
information
from passing out.
firm order
In acquisitions
, an order placed with a publisher
jobber
, or dealer
that specifies a 
maximum price and time limit for delivery, not to be exceeded without prior approval
of the ordering library
. Firm orders are placed for materials
requested by the 
individual selector
s responsible for collection development
. Compare with
continuation order
.
First Amendment
Amendment I to the United States Constitution, ratified in 1791, which guarantees 
freedom of speech: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of
religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, 
or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the 
government for a redress of grievances." The Freedom to Read Statement
and the 
Library Bill of Rights
of the American Library Association
are based on this 
constitutional protection.
first American edition
The first edition
published
in the United States of a work
previously published in 
another country.
first appearance
term
used in the book trade
to mean: 1) an author
’s initial appearance in print
; 2) 
the first time a given work
by an author appears in print, especially a short work 
(essay
poem
, or short story
); or 3) the first treatment
of a subject
to be published
in 
book
form. See also: first book
.
first book
In publishing
, the first appearance in print
of a book
-length work
written entirely by 
the author
. The initial books of many well-known writers remain relatively obscure
(exampleFanshawe: A Tale by Nathaniel Hawthorne).
first edition
270 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
All the copies
of the edition
of a book
or other publication
printed
and issue
d at the 
same time, before any other printings. Subsequent printings from the same set of type
are considered new impression
s but are still part of the first edition. The second 
edition is printed from a new setting
of type or includes significant changes in text
or 
format
. Also refers to an individual copy of a work
printed from the initial setting of 
type. In the antiquarian
book trade
, first editions are usually more valuable than later 
editions. Synonymous with princeps edition and edito princeps. Compare with reprint
and revised edition
See also: all firsts
.
Also refers to the first printing of a newspaper
on a specific date, when two or more 
editions are issue
d each day.
first folio
The common name for the first collected
edition
of Shakespeare’s dramatic work
s.
Published
in 1623, it is one of the most famous and valuable printed
book
s in the 
world. See alsoFolger Library
.
first impression
All the copies
of a book
made at the first printing
, before any alterations in the text
.
Subsequent impression
s made from the same setting
of type
soon after the first are 
number
ed sequentially and may contain slight changes to correct errors detected after 
the first printing. Compare with first edition
.
first issue
The first installment of a newly published
periodical
(issue number
one of volume
one). Also refers to the first installment received by a library
in response to a new 
periodical subscription
, not necessarily the first issue published. See alsocurrent 
issue
and back issue
.
first-line index
An index
in which the opening lines of poems
(songs, hymns, etc.) are listed in 
alphabetical
order, each entry
giving the title
of the work
and the name of the poet, 
usually shelved in the reference section
of a library
. In The Columbia Granger’s 
Index to Poetry in Anthologies, poems are indexed by first-line, last-line, and title in 
a single alphabetical sequence.
first name
The first of one or more given name
s or Christian names, as distinct from the surname
identifying members of the same family. In AACR2
personal name
heading
s for 
persons known by their initials begin with the surname, followed by a comma, then 
the initials, followed by the full given names (example: Eliot, T. S. Thomas 
Stearns).
first-of-two
The instruction in Dewey Decimal Classification
that work
s found to be about two 
mutually exclusive subject
s are given the class number
that appears first in the 
schedule
s, whether the subjects are close in the list of class
es or widely separated. See 
alsorule of three
.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested