271 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
first published edition
An edition
issue
d for sale to the general public after it has been distributed to a 
restricted audience
, for example, a motion picture
release
d for public viewing after it 
has been preview
ed by a limited audience usually selected by the producer
and 
director
.
firsts
Seefirst edition
.
FirstSearch (FS)
A service of OCLC
that provides access
to over fifty online
bibliographic database
s in 
a wide range of discipline
s via a proprietary
interface
, on a per search
or subscription
basis, by licensing agreement
. Some of the database
s in FirstSearch include full-text
.
WorldCat
, the largest union catalog
in the world, is available in FS. Click here
to 
learn more about OCLC FirstSearch.
fiscal value
Seearchival value
.
fiscal year
A period of twelve months, not necessarily coincident with the calendar year, used by 
library
or library system
for financial accounting purposes. In the United States,
most public
and academic libraries
that depend on public funding use a fiscal year 
beginning on July 1 and ending on June 30. Academic libraries at privately funded
colleges and universities may use a fiscal year that coincides with the academic
calendar. In federally libraries
, the fiscal year may begin on October 1 and end on 
September 30. In special libraries
, the fiscal year usually corresponds with that of the 
parent organization. Synonymous with accounting year.
fist
Printer
’s slang
for a symbol
in the form of a closed hand with the index finger 
extended, used to draw attention to something on a printed
page
, and in signage
to 
indicate direction. Also called a digit or hand.
Five Laws of Library Science
SeeRanganathan, S. R.
fixed field
field
in the MARC
record
containing a fixed number of character
s, for example, the 
24-character leader
or the 005, 007, and 009 fields, as opposed to a field of variable 
length
. Because the function of each character in a fixed field is defined by its relative
position, subfield code
s are not required to distinguish data
element
s. Cataloging
software
usually provides prompt
s or window
s to assist cataloger
s in entering data in 
fixed fields.
fixed length data elements
Field
008 of the MARC
record
, containing 40 character
s used to encode
information
that allows records meeting certain criteria to be identified and retrieved
, for example, 
Pdf insert page break - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
a pdf page cut; acrobat split pdf bookmark
Pdf insert page break - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
combine pages of pdf documents into one; break up pdf into individual pages
272 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
materials
in large print
format
published
in a specific language
or country, or 
intended for a juvenile
audience
.
fixed location
A specific physical location to which an item
in a library collection
is permanently 
assigned, for example, a dictionary stand
on which a large dictionary
is displayed or 
an atlas case
in which several large atlas
es are stored for ease of access
. In medieval
libraries
manuscript book
s were sometimes chained to a shelf, table, or carrel
to 
prevent removal. In most modern libraries, items have a relative location determined 
by the classification
notation
assigned in cataloging
, their actual physical position on 
the shelf changing as other items are acquired or withdrawn
, or when the collection is 
shifted
. Synonymous with absolute location).
fixed shelving
Shelving in which each shelf is permanently attached to the uprights in a range
, or to 
the vertical side of a bookcase
, as opposed to adjustable shelving in which the shelves
are detachable and can easily be moved up or down to accommodate materials
of 
variable height.
flag
The title
of a newspaper
exactly as printed
across the top of the front page
, including 
any design elements on either side, called ear
s. Synonymous with nameplateSee 
alsomasthead
.
Also refers to a long, narrow strip cut with the grain
from a sheet
of stiff paper
or thin 
pasteboard
, inserted in a book
or other item
to alert library staff
to the existence of 
special characteristics, status, or instructions, usually in technical processing
or 
shelving. The strips may be color-coded to communicate specific information
to the 
person doing the processing or shelving. Acid-free
paper or board should be used for 
this purpose.
In data processing
, a special character
used to mark the occurrence of a condition 
specified in advance.
flame
To communicate via e-mail
in an angry, sarcastic, or critical tone. A protracted
dispute in a newsgroup
or mailing list
discussion is known as a flame war. Such
disputes are usually mediated or terminated by the other participants or by the
moderator. See alsonetiquette
and shouting
.
flannel board
A large square or rectangular board covered in felt, used in storytelling
and 
instruction to display letter
s, symbol
s, and shapes cut from fabric or some other 
textured material that sticks to the felt surface when the board is held in an upright 
position. Synonymous with feltboard and cloth board.
flap
One of the two ends of the paper
dust jacket
wrapped around the cover
of a book
bound
in hardcover
. The list price
and the publisher
’s promotional blurb
are usually 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Offer PDF page break inserting function. This demo will help you to insert a PDF page to a PDFDocument object at specified position in VB.NET program.
split pdf by bookmark; break a pdf into smaller files
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Offer PDF page break inserting function. NET PDF document editor library control, RasterEdge XDoc.PDF, offers easy APIs for developers to add & insert an (empty
break a pdf apart; break pdf into separate pages
273 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
printed
on the front flap. The back flap provides brief biographical
information
about 
the author
and/or illustrator
, usually with a small portrait
photograph
of each person.
flash card
A small stiff, opaque card bearing a letter
, word, phrase
numeral
symbol
picture
, or 
combination of character
s and images, for rapid display in mnemonic drill and 
recognition training, usually part of a set
. Flash cards are also used in presentations to
provide visual cues to the audience. Libraries
that include flash cards in their 
collection
s usually make them available in the curriculum room
or children’s room
.
flat back
A type of binding
in which the back
of a book
is not rounded
or backed
after gluing
leaving the front and back cover
s to meet the spine
at a right angle. Synonymous with
square backSee alsohollow back
and tight back
.
flat panel
A computer peripheral
device
in the form of a thin, flat screen that uses LCD
or 
plasma technology, rather than a cathode ray tube, to display output
. In laptop
s, the 
flat panel folds down to cover the keyboard
.
flat shelving
Storing book
s stacked flat on the shelf, one on top of another with the lower edges 
(tail
s) facing outward, used mainly for large set
s and series
such as law books. The
volume number
may be written large on the lower edge to facilitate retrieval. This
method of shelving can increase shelf capacity
by as much as 28%, but it makes 
browsing
more difficult because the spine
s are not visible. See alsodouble shelving
fore-edge shelving
, and shelving by size
.
fleuron
Seeprinter’s flower
.
flex-cover
Seeflexible binding
.
flexible binding
cloth
or leather
covered book
bound
in a material that bends easily, rather than the 
rigid board
s used in most hardcover
edition
s. Synonymous with flex-cover. Compare
with limp binding
and softcover
See alsoBible style
.
flextime
Time worked in excess of the maximum number
of hours per day, week, or month 
specified under the terms governing employment, for which the employee is granted 
time off at a later date. Synonymous with comp time. Compare with overtime
.
FLICC
SeeF
ederal 
L
ibrary and 
I
nformation 
C
enter 
C
ommittee
.
flicker book
A type of toy book
published
during the 19th century, containing a sequence of 
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
reader split pdf; cannot select text in pdf
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. is not a document"); default: Console.WriteLine("Fail: unknown error"); break; }. This demo code just convert first word page to Png
add page break to pdf; pdf split file
274 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
closely-related cartoon
-style illustration
s designed to give the impression of 
animation when the page
s are fanned from cover
to cover, similar to the visual effect 
created by the rapid projection of frame
s in a motion picture
.
flier
An inexpensive, widely distributed handbill
or circular
of small size (usually 8 1/2 x 
11 inches), used flat or folded for advertising and announcements. Also spelled flyer.
Synonymous in the U.K. with leaflet. See alsoephemera
.
flip chart
A large-sized pad of paper
designed to be mounted on an easel
, to display information
in graphic
or tabular
format
during a presentation. As the session proceeds, page
s can 
either be torn off or turned over the top. Unlike slide
projection or presentation 
software
, a flip chart
allows the presenter to manipulate information
content
manually
as it is presented, sometimes in response to feedback
from the audience
.
Transparencies
are visible to a larger audience but require overhead projection
equipment. Also spelled flipchart.
floor plan
A drawing of the layout of a library
building, showing the location of collection
s, 
services, and facilities on each floor, helpful to first-time users, sometimes displayed 
on the library’s Web site
with link
s to descriptive text
.
floppy
Seefloppy disk
.
floppy disk
A 3 1/2-inch external metallic disk
encased in a rigid plastic envelope, designed for 
use in a personal computer
as a portable storage
medium
for data
in digital
format
.
The most commonly used sizes are 720K
(double-density) and 1.44MB
(high-density). Before 1987, most PCs used flexible 5 1/4-inch floppies. To conserve
paper
library
users are encouraged to save
the results of a search
of an online catalog
or bibliographic database
to floppy disk (or export
output
to an e-mail
account), 
instead of printing
it. In microcomputer
s, the floppy disk drive
is the a:/ drive.
Synonymous with diskette. Compare with hard disk
.
floret
Seeprinter’s flower
.
flourish
A decorative tail or ornamental extension on a swash letter
, usually in the form of one 
or more curves, used in older signature
s as a mark of distinction and to render forgery
more difficult. See also: paraph
.
flowchart
diagram
showing the complete series of steps in a process, such as a computer 
program
, or the sequence in which the components of a system function, usually in 
the form of symbol
s of various shapes, each representing a specific type of operation 
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's not supported tell stop.
acrobat split pdf pages; split pdf into multiple files
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
are three parts on this page, including system RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device. TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE
acrobat split pdf bookmark; can't select text in pdf file
275 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
or component, connected by directional lines indicating movement.
flow map
Seedynamic map
.
flush
Said of a line of type
aligned
along a right or left margin
without indention
.
flush binding
binding
in which the cover
s are trimmed
even with the leaves
after having been 
attached to the section
s. Most paperback
book
s have flush covers. Compare with
extended binding
See asocut flush
.
flush cover
Seeflush binding
.
flyer
Seeflier
.
flyleaf
The half of an endpaper
not pasted
to the inside of one of the board
s of the cover
. The
term is also used for one or more blank
leaves
at the beginning of a book
following 
the front free endpaper, or at the end preceding the back free endpaper, when the text
does not fill the last few page
s. The purpose of the flyleaves is to protect the first and
last leaves of the text block
from damage. Also spelled fly leaf.
fly-title
title
printed
on an otherwise blank
leaf
indicating the beginning of a chapter
or 
other major division of a book
, such as an essay
in a collection
, or a story
play
, or 
poem
published
in an anthology
. In England, a synonym
for half title
or bastard title.
fog index
A numeric formula used in publishing
to gauge the degree of readability (clarity) of a 
piece of writing, based on average sentence length and number
of words of three or 
more syllables per sentence. The higher the index number, the less intelligible the
writing, an important consideration in judging the sales potential of a work
. The
measure is imprecise because it does not take into consideration the writer’s style, 
which may break long sentences into phrases and make difficult words easier to 
comprehend from the context
.
FOIA
SeeF
reedom 
o
I
nformation 
A
ct
.
FOL
SeeF
riends 
o
f the 
L
ibrary
.
fold
Seebolt
.
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
connection can be found at this tutorial page of how in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
pdf split pages in half; pdf splitter
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. if (device.Compression != TwainCompressionMode.Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
break a pdf; break a pdf into separate pages
276 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
folded book
A novelty book
format
consisting of one long strip of paper
folded accordion-style, 
with one or both ends attached to separate rigid cover
s, and no back
. Used for
pictorial
display of wide-angle panoramas, particularly in China. More complex
folded books have been created by contemporary artists for whom the book is a form 
of visual art (see art book
). Synonymous with folding book.
folder
publication
consisting of a single sheet
of paper
folded, usually down the center, 
into two or more leaves
, not cut or stitched
. Examples include performance programs,
restaurant menus, etc. Also refers to a sheet of heavy paper such as manila
, folded 
once, sometimes with a flap across the bottom and a projecting tab for label
ing, used 
to file loose
papers. Standard sizes in the U.S. are 9 x 11 3/4 and 9 x 17 3/4 inches.
In software
application
s, a heading created by the user under which data
file
s, e-mail
messages, Web
bookmark
s, and other information
in digital
format
can be filed and 
stored
for future retrieval
.
fold-out
Seethrow-out
.
fold sewn
binding
in which the gathered
section
s are attached to each other by sewing
through the back fold
, with a kettle stitch
linking adjacent sections at the end of each 
pass of the thread
. Hand fold sewing can be all along
two on
, or three on
. Compare
with side sewing
.
Folger Shakespeare Library
Founded in 1932, the Folger Library in Washington D.C. is an independent research
center for Shakespeare scholars containing the largest collection
of printed
materials 
in the world on "The Bard" and his work
s. The Folger also collects research materials
on British civilization and culture of the Renaissance, including rare book
s and 
manuscript
s. A substantial gift
from the private library
of Henry and Emily Folger 
forms the nucleus of the collection. The Folgers also established an endowment
in 
support of the library
, administered by the Trustees of Amherst College. The library
includes a small theater in which Shakespeare’s play
s are publicly performed. Poetry
readings and concerts of early music are also scheduled. The Folger Library is 
housed in a building listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Click here
to 
connect to the Folger homepage
.
foliate initial
initial letter
in an illuminated
manuscript
embellished with a design consisting of 
vines, leaves, fruit, flowers, and/or other foliage. Compare with figure initial
See 
alsohistoriated initial
inhabited initial
, and rustic capital
.
foliation
The precursor of pagination
in which the leaves
, rather than the individual page
s, of a 
manuscript
or early printed
book
were number
ed consecutively on the recto
only, 
277 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
usually in roman numeral
s following the word "Folio
" or the abbreviation
F.f.fo.
or fol. Foliation in arabic numeral
s was introduced in Italy during the late 15th 
century. Pagination in arabic numeral
s began about one hundred years later, but did 
not become widespread until the 18th century. Also refers to the total number of
leaves in a manuscript or book, number
ed or unnumbered. See also: blind folio
.
folio
The Latin word for "leaf," abbreviated
F.f.fo., or fol. The paper
or parchment
leaf
of a book or manuscript
number
ed at the top or bottom on the recto
only, said to be 
foliated
rather than paginated
. The term also refers to a blank
sheet
of printing
paper
in its full, unfolded size, and to a single sheet of a writer’s manuscript or typescript
with writing or printed matter
on one side only.
Also refers to the size of book
, approximately 15 inches in height
, made by folding a 
full sheet of book paper in half once to form signature
s of two leaves
(four page
s).
The precise size of each leaf in a folio edition
depends on the size of the original
sheet. Some early editions are known by the number of leaves in their section
s, as in 
the first folio
edition of Shakespeare’s plays. Compare with quarto
octavo
duodecimo
, and sextodecimo
.
folio number
Seefoliation
.
folklore
A collective term
applied since the mid-19th century to the traditions, beliefs, 
narrative
s, etc., passed from one generation to the next within a community by word 
of mouth, without being written down. Folklore includes legend
s, folktale
s, songs, 
nursery rhyme
s, riddle
s, superstitions, proverb
s, customs, and forms of dance and 
drama performed at traditional celebrations. Because folklore flourishes in
communities with a low literacy
rate, it is disappearing in many parts of the world.
Dictionaries
of folklore are available in the reference section
of most large libraries
.
Compare with myth
.
folktale
A short narrative
rooted in the oral tradition of a particular culture, which may 
include improbable or supernatural elements. The category includes a range of forms,
from fairy tale
to myth
. Some have historical roots (example: John Henry), others are 
purely imaginative (Pecos Bill). Folktales are usually published
in collection
s. In
libraries
, they are shelved in either the adult
or juvenile collection
, depending on 
reading level
and format
. Also spelled folk tale.
follow through
Seeletter-by-letter
.
FOLUSA
SeeF
riends 
o
L
ibraries 
USA
.
font
From the French word fondre meaning "to cast." In printing
, all the character
s of a 
278 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
specific typeface
in a given size
, including uppercase
and lowercase
small capital
s, 
numeral
s, punctuation
marks, reference mark
s, and any special characters, as opposed
to a type family
that includes different variations and sizes of the same type style
(roman
italic
boldface
, etc.). In book
s, the text
is set
in a single font, with any long 
quotation
s and note
s in a smaller size of the same font. Older spelling: fount.
In computers, fonts come built into the printer
, usually in the form of exchangeable 
plug-in cartridges or as "soft" fonts residing on the computer’s hard disk
or on a hard 
disk built into the printer. By embedding fonts in a document
before it is transmitted, 
document exchange software
such as Adobe Acrobat
allows text
to be displayed and 
printed in its original form without having to install fonts on the receiving machine.
foolscap
Formerly, a sheet
of printing
paper
of standard
size, which varied from 13 x 15 to 13 
1/2 x 17 inches, producing two leaves
of roughly 13 x 8 inches when folded once 
down the center. The word is derived from the watermark
traditionally used by 
papermaker
s, showing the distinctive multi-pointed cap with bells worn by medieval 
jesters. Abbreviated
fcap or fcp.
foot
The bottom edge of a book
or page
in a bound
publication
. The opposite of head. 
Synonymous with tail.
footage
A length or quantity expressed in feet, for example, the number
of running feet in a 
segment of film
joined to other segments in editing
to create a motion picture
.
footer
A line or lines at the bottom of a Web page
, giving the name of the person (or 
persons) responsible for creating and maintaining the site
, and its host
. The footer
may also include the date of last update
, a copyright
notice, and a contact link
or 
Internet address
. Also refers to the lines at the bottom of an e-mail
message indicating
the name, title
, and affiliation of the sender, and any contact information
, as distinct 
from the header
at the beginning of the message and the body
containing the text
.
Also used synonymously in printed
document
s with running foot
.
footline
Seerunning foot
.
footnote
A brief note at the bottom of a page
explaining or expanding upon a point in the text
or indicating the source of a quotation
or idea attributed by the author
to another 
person. Footnotes are indicated in the text by an arabic numeral
in superscript
, or a 
reference mark
, and are usually printed
in a smaller size
of the font
used for the text.
When number
ed, the sequence usually starts with 1 at the beginning of each chapter
but may occasionally start with 1 at the beginning of each page. Compare with
endnote
See alsomarginalia
.
In a more general sense, any afterthought or minor but related comment on, or 
279 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
confirmation of, a primary statement, in writing or in speech.
footprint
The amount of surface area on a desktop or table required to accommodate a 
computer or peripheral
device, less for a laptop
than for a conventional PC
, an 
important consideration in designing and equipping library
instruction lab
s.
Also refers to the geographic area in which the signal transmitted by a 
telecommunication
satellite can be received.
fore-edge
The outer edge of a leaf
in a bound
publication
, or of the section
s of a book
or its 
cover
, opposite the spine
or binding edge
, the others being the head
and tail
.
Synonymous with front edgeSee alsofore-edge painting
and fore-edge title
.
fore-edge painting
The practice of painting a picture
on the fore-edge
of a medieval manuscript
with its 
leaves
closed. In late 18th and early 19th century England, the technique was refined
to make the picture visible only when the leaves
of a printed
book
were slightly 
fanned. In double fore-edge painting, two different images can be seen by fanning the
leaves first in one direction, then in the other.
fore-edge shelving
Storing book
s with their spine
s parallel with the surface of the shelf, rather than 
perpendicular to it. To prevent the force of gravity from causing the book block
to 
pull away from the case
or cover
, the spine should rest on the shelf with the fore-edge
up. This method preserves call number
sequence and adds at least two shelves to a 
standard 90-inch high section
when space is limited, but makes browsing
and locating
a specific item
difficult because the spines are not visible. For this reason, it is usually
restricted to portions of the collection
that are not heavily used. See also: double 
shelving
flat shelving
, and shelving by size
.
fore-edge title
The title
hand-lettered
on the fore-edge
of a volume
, to facilitate identification when 
it was standard practice to shelve book
s fore-edge out.
foreign book
term
used in acquisitions
to refer to a book
published
outside the United States.
Certain vendor
s specialize in supplying libraries
and bookstore
s with title
s published 
in specific countries (exampleChina Books & Periodicals, Inc.
of San Francisco).
foreign subsidiary
publisher
wholly or partially owned by a company that has its headquarters in 
another country (example: Random House owned by Bertelsmann AG of Germany).
The trend toward globalization of corporate ownership has profoundly affected the 
media
, including publishing
.
forename
A name preceding a person’s surname
(family name), given at birth to distinguish him
280 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
or her from others of the same family or clan. Synonymous with given name. See 
alsofirst name
.
forename entry
An personal name
entry
made in a library
catalog
index
, or bibliographic database
under a person’s given name (forename
). In AACR2
, this practice is reserved for 
names that do not include a surname
(examplePlato), names that include a 
patronymic
(Isaac ben Aaron), and names of royal persons (Eleanor, of Aquitaine).
Any word or phrase
commonly associated with the name in work
s by the person, or in 
reference sources, such as place of origin, domicile, occupation, etc., is added 
following a comma (Ezekiel, Biblical Prophet).
foreword
Introductory remarks preceding the text
of a work
, usually written by a person other 
than the author
. When written by the author, introductory remarks constitute the
preface
. The foreword differs from the preface in remaining unchanged from one
edition
to the next. In the front matter
of a book
, the foreword or preface usually 
follows the dedication
and precedes the introduction
Abbreviated
fwd.
forgery
The deliberate counterfeit or imitation of a signature
, or fabrication or alteration of a 
document
or other work
, with intent to deceive or harm the interests of another person
or persons. The creation of fake first edition
s of rare
and valuable book
s is considered 
forgery. In most countries, the act of forgery, or the sale of a forged work with intent
to deceive, is a crime. Also refers to that which is forged. See also: authenticity
.
form
A term used in library
cataloging
to refer to the manner in which the text
in a book
is 
arranged (dictionary
encyclopedia
directory
anthology
), the genre
in which a 
literary work
is written (novel
poetry
, drama, etc.), or the structure of a musical 
composition
(concerto, symphony, opera, etc.). See alsoform heading
and form 
subdivision
.
format
A general indication of the size of a book
, based on the number of times the printed
sheet
s are folded in binding
(folio
quarto
octavo
duodecimo
sextodecimo
, etc.).
Also refers to the overall physical presentation of a bibliographic item
. For printed
publication
s, format includes size, proportions, quality of paper
typeface
illustration
layout
, and style of binding
. Synonymous in American usage
with get up (books). In a
more general sense, the physical medium
in which information
is record
ed, including 
print
and nonprint
document
s. See also: reformat
.
In data processing
, the manner in which data
is arranged in a medium of input
output
, or storage
, including the code and instructions determining the arrangement 
(see file type
). Also, to prepare a floppy disk
for the recording of data (most floppies 
are sold preformatted), and to arrange text
on a computer screen in the form in which 
it will be printed on paper
(font
margin
s, alignment
type size
italic
boldface
, etc.).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested