asp.net c# pdf viewer control : Break pdf into smaller files control SDK system azure wpf .net console odlis29-part604

291 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
G
Gale Group
publisher
of major reference
serial
s (Contemporary Authors, Encyclopedia of 
Associations
Market Share Reporter, etc.), in print
and online
, for libraries
educational institutions, and businesses worldwide. Gale is also one of the three 
leading aggregator
s of journal
s in electronic format
, providing online access
to a 
range of bibliographic
and full-text
database
s. Click here
to connect to the Gale
homepage
See alsoEBSCO
and ProQuest
.
galley
In printing
, a long narrow tray open at one end, into which assembled lines of type
are 
transferred by the compositor
from a manual composing stick
, or from a typesetting
machine, to await make-up
into page
s. Galleys were originally about 10 x 6 inches in
size and made of wood, but in the early 19th century, metal trays came into use and 
their length was extended to about 22 inches to accommodate several pages of type.
Also used as a shortened form of galley proof
.
galley proof
An impression
taken from type
composed
in long columns, arranged in trays called 
galley
s, before it has been made up
into page
s, to allow the author
and proofreader
to 
inspect the text
and make any corrections before the work
goes to press
. Although
galley proof
s usually do not include illustration
s and index
es, review
s may be written 
from them. Synonymous with galleys and slip proof.
galleys
Seegalley proof
.
game
A set of materials designed for play according to an established set of rules, usually 
housed in a container
to keep the pieces together. Educational games are usually
stored in the curriculum room
or children’s room
of a library
. Compare with kit
.
gap
In the record
representing a serial
in a library
catalog
or union catalog
, an indication 
that item
issue
d are missing from the sequence held
by the library. This happens
when a subscription
is canceled
and later resumed, or when issues or volume
s are lost
due to damage
or theft
. Most libraries make an effort to fill gaps in periodical
subscriptions with microfilm
or microfiche
if online
full-text
is not available.
Compare with nongap break
.
garland
A type of anthology
containing a collection
of prose
extract
s or short literary 
composition
s, usually ballad
s or poems
(exampleA Little Garland of Celtic Verse
published
in 1905 by T. B. Mosher).
Break pdf into smaller files - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break pdf into pages; pdf format specification
Break pdf into smaller files - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
pdf print error no pages selected; break a pdf file
292 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
gate count
The number of times a counting device, attached to or located near the security gate
at 
the entrance to or exit
from a library
, is activated during a designated period of time 
(day, week, or month). Gate counts provide statistical information
on traffic patterns 
which can be helpful in establishing library hours
and anticipating staff
ing needs.
gatefold
An illustration
map
, or other insert
, larger than the volume
in which it is bound
which must be unfolded horizontally to the left or right to be fully viewed. Also, a
method of folding a sheet
of paper
into three sections in which the two ends are 
folded toward each other over the center, like a triptych
, used in advertising, 
performance programs, restaurant menus, etc.
gateway
Computer software
that allows a user to access
data
stored on a host
computer via a 
network
. Also refers to the hardware
device
that interconnects two separate networks,
providing a pathway for the transfer of data and any protocol
conversion required, for
example, between the messaging protocols of two different e-mail
systems.
gathering
In binding
, the process of assembling and arranging in correct sequence the folded 
section
s of a book
prior to sewing
them through the back fold
, or before milling
the 
clamped back folds and gluing
the sections to the cover
in adhesive binding
.
Sometimes used synonymously with signature
and quire
.
gauffering
Seechased edges
.
gauze
Seecrash
.
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgendered Round Table (GLBTRT)
Founded in 1970 as the Task Force on Gay Liberation of the American Library 
Association
GLBTRT is a permanent round table
that serves as an advocate for 
gays, lesbians, and bisexuals employed in libraries
, and for the inclusion of materials
on gay, lesbian, and bisexual issues in library collection
s. GLBTRT hosts the 
electronic mailing list
GLBTRT-L, sponsors annual
literary award
s in fiction
and 
nonfiction
, and publishes
the quarterly
GLBTRT NewsletterClick here
to connect to 
the GLBTRT homepage
See also: Lambda Book Report
.
Gaylord
library
supplier
that provides office and library supplies
, furniture, security 
system
s, and automation software
to libraries
, schools, and other educational 
institutions largely through its trade catalog
Click here
to connect to the Gaylord
homepage
.
gazette
A news sheet
in which current
events, legal notices, public appointments, etc., are 
293 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
record
ed on a regular basis. Formerly, a journal
devoted to current news. Also, a
journal officially issue
d by a government, particularly in Great Britain. The word is 
derived from the name of an Italian coin that was equivalent at one point in time to 
the price of a news sheet.
gazetteer
separately published
dictionary
of geographic name
s that gives the location of each 
entry
(exampleThe Columbia Gazetteer of the World). Also, an index
of the names 
of the places and geographic features shown in an atlas
, usually printed
in a separate 
section following the map
s, with locations indicated by page number
or map number 
and grid
coordinate
s. Some book
-length gazetteers include basic information
about 
major geographic features such as rivers, lakes, mountains, cities, etc. Abbreviated
gazClick here
to connect to the online
U.S. Gazetteer provided by the U.S. Census
Bureau.
Also refers to person who writes or publishes
gazette
.
genealogical table
diagram
, usually in the form of an inverted tree, with branches showing the lineage 
of a person or group of persons who share a common ancestor, sometimes printed
on 
the endpaper
s of biographical
or historical work
s, particularly those concerning the 
reigns of sovereigns or the lives of title
d nobility.
genealogy
The study of the descent from a common ancestor (or ancestors) of a specific 
individual, family, or group of persons. Genealogical research
often requires the use 
of archival
materials. Genealogical resources are increasingly available in digital
form
(exampleUS GenWeb Archives
).
Also refers to an enumeration of ancestors and their descendants in natural order of 
succession, usually in the form of a "family tree." In work
s of history and biography
genealogical table
s are sometimes printed
on the endpaper
s or at the beginning of the 
text
See also: National Genealogical Society
.
general encyclopedia
An encyclopedia
that provides basic information
on a broad range of subject
s, but 
treats no single subject in depth (example: Encyclopedia Americana), as distinct from 
subject encyclopedia
that provides greater depth of coverage within a limited scope
(exampleEncyclopedia of 20th Century American Humor).
generalia
Work
s that cannot be assigned to a particular class
on the basis of subject
, theme, or 
treatment
because their nonspecialized
or diverse nature defies specific classification
for example, general encyclopedia
s and world almanac
s. In library
classification and 
bibliography
, a separate category is reserved for general works, usually appearing at 
the beginning of the schedule
or list. Synonymous with generalities.
general interest magazine
magazine
of interest to a wide audience
(exampleReader’s Digest). Most public 
294 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
libraries
make an effort to subscribe
to the most popular general interest magazines, 
but are more selective in subscribing to special interest magazine
s. Compare with
news magazine
.
general material designation (GMD)
An optional term
added in square bracket
s to the bibliographic description
of a 
nonbook
item
following the title proper
to indicate type of material, for example, 
[videorecording]. Separate lists of general material designations are provided in
AACR2
for British and North American libraries
. In some categories, the British list is
more general (object includes diorama
game
microscope slide
model
, and realia
).
The Library of Congress
does not to include the GMD in catalog
record
s for 
manuscript
s, map
s, music, and text
. Compare with material type
See also: specific 
material designation
.
generation
In reprography
, the degree to which a copy
is removed from the original
document
. In
microfilm
, the master negative
developed from film
taken of the original image is 
first-generationprint master
s made from the master
negative
are second-generation
and service copies
made from a print master for use in libraries
are third-generation.
Sharpness of image usually declines with each succeeding generation.
generic relation
Seesemantic relation
.
genre
A type, class, or style of literature
, music, film
, or art. Genre criticism
originated with 
Aristotle who divided literature into three basic categories: dramatic, epic
, and lyric.
In fiction
, genre are based on form (novel
short story
, etc.), theme (Christian
fantasy
horror
mystery
romance
science fiction
western
, etc.), or format
(graphic novel
).
See alsosubgenre
.
Also, a painting in which the subject
is a person (as in a portrait
), an object (as in a 
still-life), or a scene from daily life, rather than a theme derived from history, 
mythology, imagination, etc. By extension, a genre piece is a literary work
that has as 
its subject people and incidents from everyday life.
geographic index
An index
in which the entries
are listed by their geographic location (city, state, 
country, etc.). Also refers to an index that lists the geographic locations mentioned in
the text
of a document
. Synonymous with place index. See also: gazetteer
.
geographic information system (GIS)
A computer-based system (hardware
and software
) designed to facilitate the 
mathematical manipulation and analysis of spatially distributed data
(geographic 
phenomena, geologic resources, etc.), which provides an automated link between the 
data and its location in space, usually in relation to a system of coordinates. The data
can be on any scale
, from microscopic to global. A GIS differs from a map
in being a 
digital
, rather than an analog
, representation. Each spatial feature is stored as a
295 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
separate layer of data which can be easily altered using techniques of quantitative 
analysis. A map can be input
or output
in a GIS, but the output may also be one or 
more data sets. In the plural, the term
refers to the field
within the earth sciences, 
which is devoted to the study of computer-based systems for analyzing spatial data.
geographic name
The name most commonly used to identify a specific geographic location, feature, or 
area, preferred by cataloger
s in establishing the correct form of entry
, not necessarily 
the same as the political name
(exampleFrance instead of Republique francaise).
Click here
to connect to Geographic Names and the World Wide Web, a Web page
host
ed by the Cataloging
Policy and Support Office of the Library of Congress
.
Synonymous with place name. See also: corporate name
personal name
, and Getty 
Thesaurus of Geographic Names
.
geographic subdivision
In library
classification
, the subdivision
of a class
by geographic location (region, 
country, state, city, etc.). For example, in Library of Congress Classification
the 
subdivision of the class P (literature
) into PR (English literature), PS (American 
literature), etc. Also, the extension of an existing subject heading
by the addition of a 
subheading
indicating the place or geographic unit to which it applies (example:
School violence--United States). In the Library of Congress subject headings
list, the 
option to subdivide geographically is indicated by the note (May Subd Geog) or (Not 
Subd Geog)). Synonymous with local subdivision and place subdivision.
geological survey
An organization that prepares and publishes
map
s, chart
s, and other cartographic 
material
concerning the geography of a specific nation and its territories, usually with 
government approval or sponsorship (example: U.S. Geological Survey
). In libraries
without a separate map section, publication
s of the USGS may be shelved in the 
government documents
collection
.
geologic map
map
that shows the distribution of the different types of rock and sediment lying 
beneath the surface of a specific region, usually by means of color, shading, and/or 
printed
symbol
s. Major fault lines, mineral deposits, fossils, and the age of rock
formations may also be indicated.
German Library Association (DBV)
Founded in 1949 with headquarters in Berlin, the Deutscher Bibliotheksverband e. 
V. promotes library
services and professional librarianship
in Germany, and publishes
the journal
BibliotheksdienstClick here
to connect to the DBV homepage
.
Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names (TGN)
searchable
database
of controlled vocabulary
, containing over one million names 
and other details concerning places, maintained on the Internet
by the Getty Research 
Institute in Los Angeles, California. Although the terms are not link
ed to map
s, 
longitude and latitude are given in each entry
, with the place name’s position in a 
hierarchy of geographic name
s. Click here
to connect to TGN.
296 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
ghost
work
or edition
of a work record
ed in bibliographies
catalog
s, or other source
s, of 
whose actual existence there is no conclusive evidence. Synonymous with
bibliographical ghost.
ghost writer
A person who writes or prepares a work
for, and in the name of, another person who 
may be famous but is usually not a writer by profession. Autobiographies
and 
memoirs
are often written in this way. A ghost writer is normally paid for his or her
services, and may or may not be listed on the title page
as joint author
.
GIF
An acronym
for Graphics Interchange Format, one of the two most commonly used 
file
format
s for storing graphic
images displayed on the World Wide Web
(the other 
being JPEG
). An algorithm
developed by Unisys
GIF is protected by patent
, but in 
practice the company has not required users to obtain a license
. The most recent
version of GIF supports color, animation, and data compression
. Pronounced jiff or 
giff (with a hard g).
gift
One or more book
s or other item
s donated to a library
, usually by an individual, but 
sometimes by a group, organization, estate, or other library. In academic libraries
desk copies
and review copies
are sometimes received as gifts from members of the 
teaching faculty. Donated items are usually evaluated in accordance with the library’s
collection development policy
, and either added to the collection
or disposed of, 
usually in a book sale
or exchange
with another library. Compare with donation
.
gift book
An elaborately printed
, expensively illustrated
, ornately bound
book
of poetry
or 
prose
, usually published
annual
ly, popular as a gift item during the early part of the 
19th century. Also known as a keepsake. In modern usage, a book purchased as a gift
for another person (or persons). Coffee table book
s are often purchased for this 
purpose. Also spelled giftbook.
gigabyte (GB)
Seebyte
.
GIGO
In computing, an initialism
that stands for "garbage in, garbage out," a slang
expression for the axiom that the quality of output
a user receives from a computer is 
directly proportional to the quality of the input
submitted.
gilt edges
In deluxe edition
s, gold leaf
is sometimes applied to the head
tail
, and/or fore-edge
of 
each copy
, then burnish
ed to create an especially luxurious appearance. In the book 
trade
, the abbreviation
"ge" means gilt edges, "aeg" means all edges gilt, "gt" means 
gilt top, and "teg" means top edge gilt. Left unburnished, a gilt edge is called antique.
297 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
GIS
Seeg
eographic 
i
nformation 
s
ystem
.
given name
One or more names chosen for a person, usually by the parents at birth or christening 
(exampleEmily), sometimes the same as that of a living relative or ancestor, but 
distinct from the surname
identifying members of the same family (example:
Dickinson). Given names can be compound
(exampleMarie-Louise). Compare with
first name
.
glair
An adhesive
preparation made from egg whites, used in edge gilding
and tooling
to 
permanently fix silver and gold leaf
. Glair is usually purchased dry as albumen and
mixed with water or vinegar prior to use. It melts with the application of heat and sets
up quickly as soon as the hot finishing
tool is removed, securing the leaf firmly to the 
surface. Also spelled glaire.
glaire
Seeglair
.
glassine
A type of thin, dense, translucent glazed paper
sometimes used to protect the cover
of new book
s. Also used for panels in window-envelopes and as wrapping material
because it is resistant to the passage of air, water, grease, etc.
GLBTRT
SeeG
ay, 
L
esbian, 
B
isexual, and 
T
ransgendered 
R
ound 
T
able
.
glitch
A malfunction in the hardware
of a computer system, usually temporary or random, 
sometimes difficult to distinguish from a bug
in the software
. In a more general sense,
any unanticipated problem that brings a process to a halt. Also spelled glytch.
globe
A representation of the surface of the earth, or of another celestial body, on a 
relatively permanent spherical object. A globe is usually more accurate than a map
because it is free of the distortion inherent in a two-dimensional representation of a 
three-dimensional object. Globes are made of heavy paper
papier-mache
, cardboard, 
plastic, metal, or glass, mounted on a full- or half-meridian axel, in a free cradle, or 
with gyroscopic support. Expensive models may be illuminated and/or animated for
special effect. In the United States, the most common sizes are 12 inches and 16
inches in diameter.
gloss
In old manuscript
s, an explanation, definition
, or interpretation of a word or phrase
sometimes in a more familiar language
, written on a margin
, above the line of text
to 
which it refers, or in a special appendix
called a glossary
compile
d by a person 
known as a glossator, glossographer, or glossarist. In modern printing
, a note on the 
298 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
left- or right-hand margin is called a side note
and is usually set in a type size
smaller 
than that of the text to which it refers. Compare with interlinear
matter.
Also refers to a deliberately misleading interpretation.
glossarial concordance
Seeconcordance
.
glossarial index
An index
at the end of a book
(or set
of books) that includes in each entry
definition
or description of the term
indexed, as well as the page number
(s) referenced.
glossary
An alphabetical
list of the specialized
term
s related to a specific subject
or field
of 
study, with brief definition
s, often appearing at the end of a book
or at the beginning 
of a long entry
in a technical reference work
. Long glossaries may be separately 
published
, for example, The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science
(1983). Compare with dictionary
lexicon
, and vocabulary
See alsogloss
.
Also refers to a list of equivalent synonym
s in more than one language
.
gloss ink
Printing
ink
that appears shiny even when dry because it contains a higher than 
normal proportion of varnish
, used mainly in display work.
glossy
finish
in which the surface of paper
or board
is given a smooth, shiny coat of 
varnish
to enhance the appearance of visual material (illustration
s, poster
s, etc.). Most
magazine
s are printed
on glossy paper to attract readership
, as are dust jacket
s to 
heighten the sales appeal of new book
s. In publishing
, the term also refers to a 
photograph printed on smooth, shiny paper, the format preferred by printer
s in 
reproduction
work.
glue
A type of adhesive
made from protein derived from the collagen in animal 
by-products (bone, hooves, hides, etc.) boiled to form a brownish gelatin that can be 
thinned with water. Most glues are not suitable for use in binding
because they 
become brittle
with age. Compare with paste
.
gluing off
In bookbinding
, the application of adhesive
to the binding edge
of a book
, after the 
section
s have been sewn
and before the steps called rounding
and backing
. The
adhesive
is forced between the sections to help hold them together. Compare with
pasting down
.
glyphic
In printing
, a typeface
derived from a carved or chiseled form, rather than from a 
calligraphic
hand.
299 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
GMD
Seeg
eneral 
m
aterial 
d
esignation
.
gnawed
book
that shows signs of having been chewed by an animal on at least one edge or 
corner
, a condition
that reduces its value considerably in the used book
market, and 
makes it a candidate for weeding
in libraries
.
goal
In strategic planning
, a general direction or aim that an organization commits iself to 
attaining, in order to further its mission
. Goals are usually expressed in abstract terms,
with no time-limit for realization. The specific means by which they are to be attained
is also left open. Compare with objective
.
goatskin
Leather
made from the skin of a goat, used extensively in hand
bookbinding
. Older
book
bound
in fine-quality goatskin, known in the antiquarian
book trade
as 
morocco
, can be very valuable. The names of the various types of goatskin reflect
their place of origin (Levant
, Niger, etc.).
GODORT
SeeGO
vernment 
DO
cuments 
R
ound 
T
able
.
goffered edges
Seechased edges
.
gold foil
An inexpensive substitute for gold leaf
, made by spraying a thin deposit of gold or a 
look-alike substitute onto an adhesive
backing, used extensively to decorate edition 
binding
s and library binding
s, and also in hand-binding
when economy is desired.
Syonymous with blocking foil.
gold leaf
Gold beaten by hand or mechanical means into very thin sheets, used in bookbinding
to embellish lettering
tooling
, and the edges
of the section
s. The gold leaf used in
bookbinding
is sold in sheets 3 1/2 inch square, made from an alloy of 23 carat gold, 
and 1 carat silver and copper, beaten to a thinness of 1/200,000-1/250,000 of an inch.
Silver is used less often for the same purpose. Compare with gold foil
See also:
burnish
.
gone to press
term
used in printing
to indicate that the process of preparing the final plate
s for a 
work
has commenced. Subsequent changes or corrections must be added as errata
after printing is completed. In newspaper
publishing
, the corresponding term is gone 
to bed.
Gopher
Before the World Wide Web
was developed, file
s and resources available on the 
Internet
were access
ed by means of a hierarchical menu
system installed on a Gopher 
300 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
server (named after the mascot of the University of Minnesota where the software
was developed). Although they have fallen into disuse since the introduction of
graphical Web browser
s, Gopher server
s have two advantages over Web search 
engine
s: they list Internet resources of all types (FTP
files, Usenet newsgroup
s, etc.), 
not just Web site
s, and they present resources in a logical hierarchy of directories
created by a human being, rather than relying on an automated Web crawler
("spider") to locate information
. The tools developed for searching Gopher file
directories are named Veronica and Jughead. Gopher address
es begin with the prefix
gopher://Click here
to connect to a list of Gopher servers maintained by the 
University of Minnesota.
gothic
A style of dark, angular script
executed with a broad-nib pen, widely used as a book 
hand
in northern Europe during the late medieval period and adapted as a typeface
in 
early printed
book
s, particularly Bibles and other devotional work
s. Also refers to any
modern typeface resembling gothic script, characterized by compressed letterform
s, 
broad main strokes, fine hair strokes, regular verticals, uniform counter
s, diagonal 
couplings, and a lack of curves. The first book
printed in Europe from movable type
(the Gutenberg Bible
) was set
in gothic type
. Synonymous with black letter and lettre 
de forme. Compare with roman
and white letter
See alsorotunda
and textura
.
gothic novel
Originally, a type of novel
in which a medieval castle formed the setting
for a plot
with chillingly sinister overtones, intended to evoke irrational fear in the heart of the 
reader
. Horace Walpole’s Castle of Otranto, A Gothic Story (1764) established this 
genre
. In modern usage
, a subgenre
of romance
fiction
, popular during the 18th and 
early 19th centuries, in which the setting is dark and gloomy, the action grotesque or 
violent, the character
s strange or malevolent, the plot mysterious, and the mood often 
one of decadence or degeneration (exampleWuthering Heights by Emily Bronte).
Synonymous with roman noirSee alsomystery
.
gouge
A nick or hole made accidentally in the cover
or spine
of a book
. Also refers to a
finishing
tool used in bookbinding
to make curved lines on a book cover.
governance
The arrangements by which the faculty and administration of an academic institution 
control and direct institutional affairs (bylaws, elective offices, committees, etc.). In
some academic libraries
, participation in governance may be a factor in tenure
and 
promotion
decisions affecting librarian
s who have faculty status
.
government agency
A unit of government authorized by law or regulation to perform a specific function, 
for example, the U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO
) authorized to collect, 
publish
, and distribute
government documents
to the American public. Each agency
of the U.S. federal government normally maintains its own records
, which may or 
may not be publicly accessible
depending on whether its activities are exempted from 
public disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)
.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested