asp.net c# pdf viewer control : Break pdf password online SDK Library API .net asp.net windows sharepoint odlis30-part606

301 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
government archives
government agency
authorized by legislation to provide centralized archival
services for all, or a portion of, the agencies or units that administer a country’s 
government (legislative, executive, and judicial). For the federal government of the
United States, that agency is the National Archives and Records Administration
(NARA). Each of the 50 U.S. state governments maintains its own state archives,
sometimes as a unit of the state library
.
government documents
Publication
s of the U.S. federal government, including hearings
bill
s, resolution
s, 
charter
s, statutes, report
s, treaties
periodical
s (example: Monthly Labor Review), and 
statistics (U.S. Census
). In libraries
, federal document
s are usually shelved in a 
separate section by SuDocs number
See also: depository library
GPO
, and 
GODORT
.
Government Documents Round Table (GODORT)
A permanent round table
within the American Library Association
GODORT has a 
membership of government documents
librarian
s and others who have an interest in 
government document
collection
s and librarianship
GODORT publishes
the 
quarterly
journal
DttP: Documents to the PeopleClick here
to connect to the 
GODORT homepage
.
government library
library
maintained by a unit of government at the local, state, or federal level, 
containing collection
s for the use of its staff. Some government libraries have a wider
mandate that includes accessibility
to the general public (example: Smithsonian 
Libraries & Archives
). Government librarian
s are organized in the Government 
Documents Round Table
(GODORT) of the American Library Association
See also:
federal library
military library
national library
, and state library
.
GPO
The U.S. Government Printing Office, the government agency
responsible for 
collecting, publishing
, and distributing federal government information
. The GPO
publishes a printed
index
to government document
s under the title
Monthly Catalog 
of U.S. Government Publications. Its online
equivalent is GPO Access
, funded by the 
Federal Depository Library Program
. The British counterpart is Her Majesty’s 
Stationery Office
Click here
to learn more about GPO.
GPO Access
A service of the U.S. Government Printing Office
that provides free electronic access
to over 1,500 database
s of government information
, including the Federal Register
Code of Federal Regulations, and Congressional RecordGPO Access is funded by 
the Federal Depository Library Program
under the Government Printing Electronic 
Information Enhancement Act of 1993 (Public Law 103-40). Click here
to learn more
about GPO Access.
grace period
A designated period of time following the due date
during which a borrower
may 
Break pdf password online - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
cannot print pdf no pages selected; split pdf files
Break pdf password online - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
combine pages of pdf documents into one; break up pdf file
302 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
renew
an overdue
item
or return it to the library
without incurring a fine
. To
encourage the return of long overdue materials
, some libraries also set aside one day 
(or several days) each year during which overdue items may be returned without
penalty. Not all libraries provide a grace period. Synonymous with amnesty period
and fine-free period.
graduate library
The academic library
at a university that maintains separate collection
s (and usually 
facilities) for undergraduates
and graduate students, containing the major research
collection
s, staff
ed and equipped to meet the information need
s of graduate students 
and faculty.
grain
In a sheet
of machine-made paper
or board
, the direction in which most of the fibers 
lie, determined by forward movement of the papermaking
machine in manufacture.
Book
s are printed
with the grain parallel to the spine
because paper bends more 
readily with the grain than against it. One way to determine the grain in a sheet
of 
paper is to do a tear test--paper tears more cleanly with the grain than across it. There
is little or no grain in a sheet of handmade paper. Woven material used as covering
material in bookbinding
also has grain--as a general rule, the warp threads run parallel
to the spine. Grain in leather
depends on the direction in which the hairs lay before 
removal, indicated by tiny puncture marks on the surface. See alsoagainst the grain
and cross-grain
.
gramophone record
Seephonograph record
.
grangerized
An edition
into which illustration
s, letters
, and/or other matter
is insert
ed after 
publication
. The practice began in 1769, when James Granger (1723-1776) published
A Biographical History of England containing blank
leaves
for the insertion of 
portrait
engraving
s after printing
. Synonymous with privately illustratedSee also:
extra-illustrated
.
grant
Funds received from a private foundation (example: Council on Library and 
Information Resources
) or government sponsored organization (exampleNational 
Endowment for the Humanities
) by an individual, group, or institution, in support of a 
worthy project or cause. In most cases, the recipient must compete for such funds by
submitting a proposal
. The art of obtaining grants is called grantsmanship
. Guides for
proposal writing are available in academic libraries
and large public libraries
.
Information
on funding sources can be found in the Annual Register of Grant 
Support published
by R. R. Bowker
and The Foundation Directory published 
annual
ly by The Foundation Center. See alsomatching grant
.
grant-in-aid
Funds received by a library
or library system
from a state or federal government 
agency
in support of regular operations, or a special project or program, as opposed to
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
break pdf file into parts; break pdf into pages
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. FileType.IMG_JPEG); switch (result) { case ConvertResult. NO_ERROR: Console.WriteLine("Success"); break; case ConvertResult
pdf file specification; acrobat separate pdf pages
303 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
funds derived from the community or district served. In most cases, the library must
apply in a competitive process by submitting a proposal
(example: certain LSTA
funds).
grantsmanship
The art of successfully obtaining and administering grant
s and grants-in-aid
including the ability to recognize when an idea is fundable, locate funding sources, 
research
the information
necessary to fill out the application, establish a realistic 
timetable, write the proposal
, and manage the grant process once funding is approved.
When grant funding is a high priority, a college or university usually employs a
trained and experienced grants administrator to help teaching faculty and librarian
negotiate the process.
granularity
The level of descriptive
detail in a record
created to represent a document
or 
information
resource for the purpose of retrieval
, for example, whether the record 
structure
in a bibliographic database
allows the author
’s name to be parsed into given 
name
and surname
.
graph
diagram
that shows 1) quantity in relation to a whole (pie graph), 2) the distribution
of separate values of a variable in relation to another (scatter graph), or 3) change in 
the value of a variable in relation to another, for example, the change in the average 
price
of a journal
subscription
over time (coordinate graph, histogram
, etc.).
The suffix -graph, derived from the Greek word graphos ("writing"), refers to 
something written, as in autograph
or monograph
, or something that writes or 
records, as in photograph
.
graphic
Any two-dimensional nontext
ual, still representation. Graphics can be opaque
(illustration
s, photograph
s, diagram
s, map
s, chart
s, graph
s, etc.) or designed to be 
viewed or projected with the aid of optical equipment (slide
s, filmstrip
s, etc.).
Magazine
s and art book
s usually contain a high proportion of graphic material. The
graphic design of the dust jacket
is important in marketing new book
s. Computer
graphics are created with the aid of graphic design software
See also: animated 
graphics
graphical user interface (GUI)
thumbnail
, and American Institute of 
Graphic Design
.
In printing
, a typeface
that appears to have been drawn, rather than derived from a 
calligraphic
hand or lapidary precursor.
graphic novel
term
coined by Will Eisner to describe his semi-autobiographical
novel
A Contract 
with God (1978), written and illustrated
in comic book
style, the first work
in a new 
genre
that presents an extended narrative
as a continuous sequence of pictorial
images
printed
in color and arranged in panel
-to-panel format
, with dialogue
enclosed in 
balloon
s. A precursor can be found in the picture story album
s of the 19th century 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET source code. Offer PDF page break inserting function.
cannot print pdf no pages selected; break a pdf into multiple files
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
can't select text in pdf file; pdf format specification
304 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
Swiss writer Rodolphe Topffer, who also wrote novels in conventional form. This
new literary form is viewed with suspicion by traditionalists who regard it as a 
marketing ploy aimed at attracting adult
reader
s to comic books by removing the 
stigma attached to them.
graphical user interface (GUI)
A computer interface
that allows the user to provide input
and receive output
interactively by manipulating menu bar
s, icon
s, and movable, resizable window
s by 
means of a keyboard
or pointing device such as a mouse
. GUIs are used in Web 
browser
s and in most word processing
spreadsheet
, and graphic
application
s. The
quality of a GUI depends on its functionality
and usability
. Pronounced "gooey."
Synonymous with graphic user interface and WIMPS
See alsoMacintosh
and 
Windows
.
graticule
grid
composed of horizontal and vertical lines printed
over an image, such as a 
map
, to assist the viewer in locating specific features. In an atlas
, the grids are usually 
keyed to a gazetteer
of place names giving page number
and grid coordinates for each
entry
.
gray literature
Printed
work
s such as report
s, internal document
s, PhD dissertation
s, master’s theses
and conference
proceedings
, not usually available through regular market channels 
because they were never commercially published
list
ed, or priced. Alternative
methods of supply and bibliographic control
have evolved in response to the need of 
libraries
to preserve
and provide access
to such material. In the United States, the gray
literature of science and technology is index
ed in the NTIS
database
. Theses and
dissertations are indexed
and abstracted
in Dissertation Abstracts International
and 
are available in hard copy
via Dissertation Express. Also spelled grey literature.
Compare with ephemera
See also: semipublished
.
gray scale
Variations in the density of black, arranged in sequence (usually from 10% to 90%) 
for use in printing
and film
developing.
Greenaway Medal
literary award
presented annually since 1956 by the Library Association
(UK) to 
the artist judged to have produced the most distinguished work
in the illustration
of 
children’s book
published
in the United Kingdom during the preceding calendar 
year
Click here
to view a list of Greenaway Medal winners. Compare with Carnegie 
Medal
See alsoAmelia Frances Howard-Gibbon Illustrator’s Award
and Caldecott 
Medal
.
Greenaway Plan
A form of blanket order
plan in which a large library
or library system
agrees to 
receive from a publisher
for a nominal price one advance copy
of all the trade book
it publishes
, to encourage acquisitions
librarian
s to order selected
title
s in advance of 
publication
. The publisher relies on the probability that enough titles will be ordered
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
For VB.NET online guide, please refer to Query & device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod
break a pdf into parts; pdf split file
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
Online C# Guide for XImage.Twain Installation, Deployment RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod
break apart a pdf in reader; pdf specification
305 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
in multiple copies
to cover its costs. The plan is named after Emerson Greenaway, the
librarian at the Philadelphia Free Library who conceived the idea in 1958.
green paper
printed
document
issue
d in green paper
cover
s by a ministry or department of the 
British government to elicit public comment and debate on a proposed new policy (or 
change in an existing one). The practice began in 1967. Compare with white paper
.
grey literature
Seegray literature
.
grid
Two sets of parallel lines intersecting at right angles, usually at regular intervals, 
which when superimposed on a map
or other two-dimensional surface, can be used to
locate specific points by means of coordinate
s, usually a sequence of number
s or 
letter
printed
across the top and/or bottom margin
, with a second sequence along one
or both sides.
grievance
In the workplace, a formal complaint concerning a specific action or policy, set of 
circumstances, or persistent condition, addressed by an employee or group of 
employees to management, to a special committee established to hear grievances, or 
to some other appropriate authority, to protest its unfairness and request a remedy.
Most organizations have an established procedure for filing grievances and 
negotiating their settlement. In library
employment governed by collective bargaining
agreement
, the grievance procedure and conditions under which it applies may be 
explicitly stated in the contract
.
groupware
Computer software
designed to support more than one user connected to a LAN
usually colleagues working together on related tasks whose offices are not in the same
location. Although groupware is an evolving concept, most products include a
messaging system, document
sharing and management software, a calendar
ing and 
scheduling system for coordinating meetings and tracking the progress of group 
projects, electronic conferencing, and an electronic newsletter
(exampleLotus 
Notes).
guard
A flexible strip of cloth or strong paper
inserted along the inner margin
between two 
leaves
prior to sewing
the section
s of a book
, used to mount
plate
or insert
too stiff 
to turn like a normal page
. Synonymous in this sense with hinge. Also, a strip of
paper or other material added to reinforce a signature
in a book. See also: security 
guard
.
GUI
Seeg
raphical 
u
ser 
i
nterface
.
guide
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
are a VB.NET developer, you may see online tutorial for frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
break pdf into smaller files; break pdf into multiple pages
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. if (device.Compression != TwainCompressionMode.Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
a pdf page cut; acrobat split pdf into multiple files
306 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
Information
provided by a library
, usually in the form of a printed
handout
or leaflet
that 1) explains how to use a library service (online catalog
interlibrary loan
, etc.); 2) 
describes important resources on a subject
(World War II), in a discipline
(history), 
or of a specific form (periodical
article
s, government documents
biography
, etc.); or 
3) explains how to accomplish something (compile
an annotated bibliography
cite
source
s in a particular bibliographical
style, etc.).
In archives
, a type of finding aid
that provides a summary
or general description of 
the contents of an archival collection
, or that describes archival holdings
related to a 
specific subject
, geographic area, period in history, etc., or of a certain type of 
material (diaries
letters
photograph
s, etc.).
guidebook
handbook
that provides useful current information
for travellers to a city, state, 
region, country, or other geographic area, or for visitors to a museum, park, historical 
site, etc.
guideword
Seecatchword
.
guillemets
French quotation
marks printed
<< like this >>, also seen in some German text
s.
Synonymous with duck-foot quotes.
guillotine
A power-driven or hand-operated machine with a long, sharp-edged blade, used in 
binding
to cut and trim
large numbers of flat or folded sheet
s to the desired 
dimensions.
Gutenberg Bible
The earliest known book
to have been produced from movable type
, probably printed
between 1450 and 1455 at Mainz, Germany by Johann Gutenberg
and his associate 
Peter Schoffer, with the financial assistance of a merchant named Johann Fust. Also
known as the Mazarin Bible because a copy
was found by a French bookseller
in the 
private library
of the bibliophile
Cardinal Mazarin (1602-1661) one hundred years 
after his death. It is a Latin bible printed in black ink
in gothic
type
set
in two 42-line 
column
s per page
. Of approximately 180 copies printed, only forty-eight copies are
known to have survived, which makes them very rare
and valuable. Twelve are
printed on vellum
and thirty-six on paper
. The British Library
owns two copies, and 
the Bibliotheque nationale de France
one. In the United States, there are thirteen
copies, one each at the Library of Congress
, the New York Public Library
, the 
Huntington Library
in California, and libraries
at Harvard, Princeton, and Yale. The
Pierpont Morgan Library
in New York City owns three copies. Click here
to see 
digital images
of the beautifully illuminated
copies in the British Library collection
.
See alsoincunabula
.
Gutenberg, Johann, c. 1399-1468
A goldsmith by trade, Johann Gensfleisch zum Gutenberg is credited with the 
307 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
invention printing
from movable type
, probably at Mainz in Germany. His first
printed work
was a 42-line Bible
set
in gothic
type
probably printed no later than
1456. Uncertainty regarding Gutenberg’s accomplishment arises from the lack of
record
ed information
about his life and the fact that no extant work bears his name, 
nor have any of his presses survived. The printing press
spread rapidly to the 
Netherlands, Italy, France, and England, becoming well-established in Europe by the 
1480’s. The Gutenberg Museum was established in Mainz in 1900 as a center for the
study of Gutenberg’s life and work, and early history of typography
.
gutter
The blank
space formed by the inner margin
s of facing page
s in an open book
, from 
the binding edge
to the area that bears printed
matter
. The width of the gutter is an
important factor in determining whether a book can be rebound
.
gutter press
Tabloid
newspaper
s and magazine
s that publish
salacious gossip, usually of a 
personal nature concerning the lives of prominent people. Synonymous with yellow 
press
.
gutting
The practice, abhorred by publisher
s, of review
ing a book
, not by critically evaluating 
its strengths and/or weaknesses, but by revealing the main lines of its plot
, ruining the 
experience of first-time reader
s. Also refers to the practice in publishing
of carefully 
quoting
out of context
, in the blurb
on the dust jacket
and in advertising, only the 
most complimentary passages from reviews which, in their entirety, expressed mixed 
or even negative opinions of the work
.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
JK
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
XYZ
|
H
hachure
A series of short lines drawn or printed
on a land map
to indicate gradient: long thin,
widely-spaced lines indicating a moderate grade and short, thick, closely-spaced lines 
a steep grade, with direction of slope indicated by direction of line. Hachuring is 
common on maps produced by the National Geographic Society and the U.S. Forest
Service.
hacker
slang
term
for a person with extensive knowledge
of computers and computing, 
who uses his skills to access
supposedly secure
computer systems for the intellectual 
challenge such activities provide. The best hackers take pride in leaving no "tracks" to
reveal their presence. Compare with cracker
See alsosecurity
.
hagiography
308 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
A form of biography
, widespread during the Middle Ages and Renaissance, in which 
the life described is that of a saint. Also refers to a book
containing such writing, 
often a collective biography
covering the lives of two or more saints. An author
who 
writes about the lives (and legend
s) of saints is a hagiographer.
half-binding
A style of bookbinding
in which the spine
and corner
s are covered in a different 
material than the sides, usually selected for greater durability
. Compare with full 
binding
quarter binding
, and three-quarter binding
See alsohalf cloth
and half 
leather
.
half cloth
book
bound
in a cloth
spine
and paper
-covered board
s. Synonymous with half 
linen.
half-duplex
Seeduplex
.
half leather
book
with spine
and corner
s covered in leather
and the rest of the binding
in paper
or cloth
. Compare with quarter leather
.
half-title
The title
of a book
as printed
, in full or in brief, on the recto
of a leaf
preceding the 
title page
, usually in a smaller size
of the font
used to print the title on the title page.
In books published
in series
, the series title page
often appears on the verso
of the leaf 
bearing the half-title.
The use of half-titles dates from the 17th century and may have evolved from the 
practice of including a blank
leaf
to protect the title page
from wear. In modern
printing, the half-title helps the printer
identify the work
to which the first sheet
belongs. In some edition
s, the half-title also appears on the recto of a leaf separating 
the front matter
from the first page
of the text
. Also spelled half title. Synonymous
with bastard title and fly-title.
halftone
Art
made ready for printing
by photograph
ing the image through the fine, diagonally 
crossed lines of a screen made of glass or film, converting it into a field of tiny graded
dots that reproduce by optical illusion the tonal values of the original
. Halftone
screens range from 50-200 ruling
s per inch. The finer the screen, the greater the range
of tonal values. Printing paper
s with a smooth finish
require a finer screen than coarse
papers. Also refers to a print
made by this process. Also spelled half-tone. Compare
with line art
.
half uncial
The stage in the development of Latin calligraphic
letterform
s at which cursive
characteristics and ligature
s were added to the uncial
style, and ascender
s and 
descender
s introduced. A transitional phase on the path to Roman minuscule
s, 
half-uncial script
was used as a book hand
in Europe from the 7th to the 9th century.
309 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
Synonymous with semi-uncialSee also: Carolingian minuscule
.
half yearly
Seesemiannual
.
handbill
A small notice or advertisement printed
on a single unfolded sheet
, intended for 
distribution by hand, but also used as a poster
See also: broadside
.
hand-binding
The art and craft of binding
book
s by hand without the aid of mechanization.
Medieval manuscript
s and early printed
books were hand-bound in wooden board
cover
ed in leather
. Today, trade edition
s are case bound
and hand-binding is limited 
to fine book
s.
handbook
A single-volume
reference book
of compact size that provides concise factual 
information
on a specific subject
, organized systematically for quick and easy access.
Statistical information is often published
in handbook form (example: Statistical 
Handbook on the American Family). Some handbooks are published serial
ly (CRC 
Handbook of Chemistry and Physics). Synonymous with vade mecum
See also:
manual
.
handheld computer
Seepersonal digital assistant (PDA)
.
handout
printed
sheet
, or group of sheets, usually stapled together at one corner, intended 
for distribution during an oral presentation or instruction session to give the attendees 
a record of content
covered (summary
outline
hard copy
of PowerPoint slide
s, etc.) 
or provide supplementary or complementary information
(supporting data
, examples, 
suggestions for further reading
, contact information, etc.).
hands-on
library instruction
session or one-on-one reference transaction
in which the student 
or patron
has the opportunity to practice, usually at a computer workstation
research
techniques demonstrated by the instructor or reference librarian
.
hang
Having a computer freeze during a session so that it does not respond to user input
usually with no indication of the probable cause. Download
ing a very large data
file
can create the appearance of a hang-up. Closing the application
or reboot
ing will 
usually get the system unstuck, but unsave
d data will be lost in the process.
hanging indention
A form of indention
in which the opening line is flush
with the left-hand margin
and 
subsequent lines are indented one or more spaces
. Used in typed and printed
catalog 
card
s and in some styles of bibliographic
entry
. Hanging indention is used for the
terms and definition
s in this online
dictionary
.
310 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
hard copy
printed
copy
of a document
or record
that exists in machine-readable
format
(digital
microform
, etc.). Also used in a more general sense to refer to printed matter
as opposed to its nonprint
equivalent. Compare with printout
.
hardcover
book
bound
in an inflexible board
case
or cover
, usually covered in cloth
paper
plastic, leather
, or some other durable
material, as distinct from a book bound in a 
cover made of flexible material. In modern publishing
, a new trade title
is usually 
issue
d first in hardcover, then in a paperback
edition
after sales in hardcover decline.
Synonymous with cloth boundhardback, and hard bound. Compare with softcover
.
hard disk
A magnetic medium
capable of storing
a large quantity of data
, which resides 
permanently within a computer, as opposed to a portable disk (floppy
Zip
, etc.) that 
can be inserted in a disk drive
by the user whenever a data file
needs to be opened or 
save
d, and removed once the operation is completed. In microcomputer
s, the hard 
disk is usually the c:/ drive. In network
ed systems, users may also have access
to a 
portion of the hard drive on a shared server
.
hardware
Mechanical, electrical, electronic, or other physical equipment and machinery 
associated with a computer system, or necessary for the playback
or projection of 
nonprint
media
. Basic microcomputer
hardware includes a central processing unit
(CPU), keyboard
, and monitor
. The TechEncyclopedia
describes the distinction 
between hardware and software
as the difference between "storage and transmission" 
and "logic and language." See also: peripheral
.
hardwired
term
that originally referred to a computer device
containing unalterable circuitry 
designed to perform a specific task, as opposed to circuits that are program
mable or 
controlled by a switch. However, the meaning has broadened to include constants
built into computer software
. Synonymous in this sense with hard-coded. In a more
general sense, hardware
or software that cannot be modified.
hash
Seehashmark
.
hashmark
The symbol
# used to represent the word "number" in lists and street addresses, in 
touch-tone telephone systems that allow the caller to key input
, in Web
addresses 
(URL
s) to create a link
to another location in the same document
, etc. Abbreviated
hash.
head
The top edge of a book
. Also refers to the margin
at the top of a page
, as opposed to 
the margin at the tail
or foot
of the page. Also, a word or phrase
used as a brief 
headline
in a book or periodical
.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested