asp.net c# pdf viewer control : Break pdf into pages software Library project winforms .net asp.net UWP odlis32-part608

321 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
The organization in which a special library
functions as an administrative unit, for 
example, a museum that maintains a library
on its premises for the use of curator
s, 
researcher
s, and members, or a corporation that maintains a library for the use of 
employees in their work.
hot-melt
A tough, flexible chemical adhesive
used in commercial bookbinding
. Solid at room
temperatures, hot-melt adhesive liquifies under high heat. In perfect binding
, it is 
applied to the binding edge
of a book
in a single shot
at temperatures of 135-175 
degrees C. Unlike the adhesives used in sewn
binding
s which take time to dry, 
hot-melt adhesive sets up in seconds as it cools, significantly reducing production
costs. Unfortunately, it has a clamping effect which reduces openability
, and it is not 
resistant to cold-crack
which makes it unsuitable for bindings marketed in countries 
where winter temperatures are severe. Also spelled hotmelt. See also: Otabind
.
hot spot
An icon
of any size, or portion of a larger image displayed on a computer screen, that 
functions as a live link
to another file
or document
available on the same or a 
different server
. When it is clicked with a pointing device such as a mouse
, a coded 
instruction is executed to retrieve
and display the linked material. Also refers to the
precise pixel
s within a clickable icon or image which are sensitive to selection by the 
user.
hours
The times during a day, week, and year that a library
is open to its users, usually 
posted near the front entrance and available by phone or via the library’s Web site
including any days the library is not open, usually holidays. A library’s hours are
determined by the needs of its users and by budget
ary constraints. Also refers to the
times during which a specific service is available from a library, which may be shorter
(or longer) than the hours the facility is open.
housekeeping
Routine chores that must be performed methodically in a library
to maintain manual 
or automated systems in good order, usually delegated to a trained assistant, for 
example, the task of checking in serial
parts in a timely manner to make them 
available to users and identify missing issue
s that need to to be claim
ed.
house organ
periodical
issue
d by a commercial or industrial organization for distribution 
internally to its employees and/or externally to its customers, not intended for wider 
publication
. Synonymous with house journal. Compare with trade journal
.
house style
The uniform standards
of a publisher
printer
, company, or organization with 
reference to writing style (grammar, syntax
usage
punctuation
, etc.) and presentation 
(spelling, abbreviation
uppercase
/lowercase
citation
format, etc.) to be followed, in 
the absence of contrary instructions, in publication
issue
d in its name, usually 
explained in a style sheet
.
Break pdf into pages - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break password on pdf; can't cut and paste from pdf
Break pdf into pages - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
reader split pdf; cannot select text in pdf
322 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
how-to publication
book
pamphlet
, or videocassette
that provides practical information
and advice 
about how to accomplish a task, acquire a skill, or achieve a desired result, usually in 
the form of step-by-step instructions accompanied by diagram
s (example: home
improvement and auto repair manual
s). How-to title
s are available in public libraries
shelved by call number
in the nonfiction
section. Compare with self-help publication
.
HTML
SeeH
yper
T
ext 
M
arkup 
L
anguage
.
HTML editor
Computer software
designed to facilitate the creation of Web page
s by relieving the 
designer of the necessity of typing the required HTML
code from scratch (examples:
DreamweaverFrontPage, and Netscape Composer).
http://
HyperText Transfer Protocol, the communications
protocol
used in Web browser
software
to establish the connection between a client
computer and a remote Web 
server
, making it possible for data
file
s in HTML
format
to be transmitted over the 
Internet
from the server
to the client machine on which the browser is installed. Most
Web
browsers are designed to default
to the prefix
http:// whenever a user enters a 
Web address (URL
) without the prefix.
humanistic script
In 15th century Europe, the renaissance of interest in classical art and culture had a 
profound effect on calligraphy
, producing a script
that abandoned many 
characteristics of gothic
letterform
s and embraced some of features of the earlier 
Carolingian
script
, but in a more compressed form. Appearing concurrently with the
invention of movable type
scrittura umanistica was quickly adapted by type
founders, particularly the lowercase
letter
s which are very close to the forms used in 
modern printing
. According to Warren Chappell in A Short History of the Printed 
Word (1970), chancery script, from which italic
developed, was a direct descendant 
of scrittura umanistica.
human resources
A collective term for all the people employed by a company, agency
, organization, or 
institution. Also, the administrative department responsible for matters pertaining to
employment (hiring, evaluation, promotion
, termination, etc.). Large independent
libraries
and library system
s usually have their own human resources office. Libraries
that function as a unit within a larger organization may rely on the parent organization
for such services. Synonymous with personnel.
humidify
Seehumidity
.
humidity
The amount of water vapor held in air. Absolute humidity is the weight (mass) of 
water vapor in a given volume of air, usually expressed as grams of water per cubic 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class.
acrobat split pdf pages; break pdf into single pages
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Offer PDF page break inserting function. PDF document editor library control, RasterEdge XDoc.PDF, offers easy to add & insert an (empty) page into an existing
break a pdf file into parts; how to split pdf file by pages
323 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
meter of air. Relative humidity is the ratio of the amount of water vapor present in a 
given volume of air to the amount required to reach saturation (condensation into 
droplets) at the same temperature, expressed as a percentage. Relative humidity varies
with temperature and air pressure--warm air can hold more water vapor than cooler
air. Forty percent relative humidity is considered ideal for permanent storage of
library
and archival
materials
made from paper
Mold
can become a serious problem 
when relative humidity exceeds 70%.
To humidify is to put moisture into the atmosphere, usually done with a device called 
humidifier to prevent paper document
s from becoming brittle
Dehumidification
takes moisture out of the atmosphere. It is done with desiccant
s or a dehumidifier to 
prevent mildew
warping
, etc. Measured by an instrument called a hygrometer
humidity is carefully controlled in areas where archival and special collections
are 
stored and used.
Huntington Library
Located in San Marino, California, the Huntington Library is one of the world’s 
leading libraries
of Americana
and English literature
, surpassed only by the British 
Library
and the Bodleian
. Its collection
s include over five million manuscript
s, rare 
book
s, reference work
s, and other materials
on Anglo-American history, literature 
and the arts, the history of science, and maritime history. The library includes a
conservation
center, exhibit
ion hall, art collection, and botanical gardens. Click here
to connect to the homepage
of the Huntington Library.
H. W. Wilson
A commercial company that began publishing
reference serial
s for libraries
and 
researcher
s (especially periodical index
es) long before library finding tool
s were 
automated. Most of its publication
s are now available on CD-ROM
and online
. Some
of its bibliographic database
s include full-text
Click here
to connect to the H. W. 
Wilson homepage
.
hybrid journal
periodical
that functions as both a magazine
and a journal
by including features 
typical of both. A prime example is Analytical Chemistry published
by the American 
Chemical Society, which includes a magazine section in the front of each issue
followed by a longer section of research
article
s with its own table of contents
and 
separate pagination
.
hydrologic map
map
showing the drainage of surface waters (streams, rivers, etc.) and other 
features related to hydrology in a geographic area (lakes, reservoirs, glaciers, ground 
water, springs, wetlands, water quality, etc.).
hygrometer
Any one of several meteorological instruments designed to measure atmospheric 
humidity
. Hygrometers are used to monitor conditions in facilities such as libraries
and museums that house materials easily damaged
by water vapor (rare book
s, 
manuscript
s, specimen
s, film
, etc.). See also: preservation
.
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
split pdf by bookmark; pdf rotate single page
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. is not a document"); default: Console.WriteLine("Fail: unknown error"); break; }. This demo code convert word file all pages to Jpeg
pdf print error no pages selected; break a pdf
324 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
hype
An abbreviation
of hyperbolePublisher
’s slang
for advertising copy
written in an 
exaggerated style to attract attention to a new publication
, not intended to be taken 
literally by prospective customers. Objective review
s are the best antidote. Compare
with puff
.
hyperlink
See link
.
hypermedia
hypertext
document
in which text
is combined with graphic
s, audio
animation
and/or full-motion video
(exampleNational Geographic Channel
).
hyperonym
Seebroader term
.
hypertext
A method of presenting digital
information
that allows related file
s and elements of 
data
to be interlinked, rather than viewed in linear sequence. Text
link
s and icon
embedded in a document
written in HTML
script allow information
to be browse
d in 
nonlinear, associative fashion similar to the way the human mind functions, by 
selecting with a pointing device or using a computer keyboard
. Hypertext is the basic
organizing principle of the World Wide Web
. This dictionary
, with its web of 
interconnected hyperlinks, is an example of such a document
See alsohypermedia
and Web browser
.
Hypertext Markup Language (HTML)
Used to create the hypertext
document
accessible
on the World Wide Web
and via 
intranet
s, HTML script is a cross-platform
presentation language that allows the 
author
to incorporate into a Web page
text
frame
s, graphic
s, audio
video
, and link
to other documents and application
s. Formatting
is controlled by "tags" embedded in 
the text. To see the HTML code in which a Web page is written, click on "View" or 
its equivalent in the toolbar
of your Web browser
, then select "Document source" or 
"Page source." See also: HTML editor
and SGML
.
hyphen
In printing
, the shortest rule
used as punctuation
. Also used to join the parts of a
compound name
(Jean-Pierre) or compound word (dog-eared
), and to divide a long 
word at the end of a line of written or printed
text
. Compare with dash
.
hyphenation
Use of the hyphen
to divide a word (co-opt), to compound two or more words 
(son-in-law), to give the impression of stuttering or faltering speech (n-n-no), or to 
indicate that a word is to be spelled out (h-y-p-h-e-n-a-t-e).
hyponym
A word or phrase
that can be replaced without exception by another, without 
changing the meaning of a sentence, but not vice versa, for example, azure by blue or 
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
can set and integrate this duplex scanning feature into your C# device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device
add page break to pdf; pdf splitter
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
how to install XImage.Twain into visual studio RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device. TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE
break a pdf apart; break apart a pdf
325 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
sparrow by birdSee alsonarrower term
.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
JK
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
XYZ
|
I
IATUL
SeeI
nternational 
A
ssociation of 
T
echnological 
U
niversity 
L
ibraries
.
ibid.
An abbreviation
of the Latin ibidem meaning "in the same place" used with a page 
number
(or numbers) in footnote
s, endnote
s, and bibliographies
to indicate a source
that has been cite
d fully in a preceding note
or entry
.
ICIC
SeeI
nternational 
C
opyright 
I
nformation 
C
entre
.
icon
A small graphic
element or symbol
displayed on a computer screen, which the user 
can select with a pointing device
such as a mouse
to summon a menu
of option
s, 
access
data
file
, or initiate a process or operation in an application
program
that uses 
graphical user interface
, for example, a small image of a trash can or recycle bin to 
which unwanted document
s can be moved for disposal.
Also refers to a picture
, image, figure, or representation. In Eastern Orthodox
religious imagery, a picture of Jesus, Mary, or an apostle or saint. Also spelled ikon or 
eikon.
iconic document
publication
or other document
in which the content
is presented in predominantly 
graphic
or pictorial
form. Examples include atlas
es, children’s
picture book
s, exhibit 
catalog
s, visual dictionaries
poster
s, postcard
s, etc.
iconography
The art of illustration
or representation by means of picture
s, figure
s, or images, 
developed to a high degree in the artistic tradition of the Eastern Orthodox faith. Also
refers to the study of the pictorial representation of objects or people, in portrait
s, 
paintings, photograph
s, sculpture, coins, etc., and to the result of such study, 
especially when it takes the form of detailed lists of representations.
ideal copy
In analytical bibliography
, a detailed description of the most perfect copy of the first 
impression
of an edition
, based on close inspection of as many copies
as possible, to 
which all other copies of the same impression, and any subsequent impressions, are 
compared in determining issue
and state
(adapted from The ALA Glossary of Library 
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
you want to acquire an image directly into the C# RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
break a pdf into separate pages; pdf no pages selected to print
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
foreach (TwainStaticFrameSizeType frame in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
break pdf password online; break a pdf into smaller files
326 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
and Information Science).
identifier
keyword
or indexable concept assigned to a document
to add depth to subject
indexing
, not listed in the thesaurus
of indexing term
s because it either represents a 
proper name
(geographic name
personal name
, test or program name, piece of 
legislation, etc.) or a concept not yet approved as an authorized descriptor
. Identifiers
are usually listed in a separate field
of the index
entry
or bibliographic record
immediately following the descriptors. Major
identifiers may be marked with an 
asterisk
or distinguished in some other manner. Form of entry
may be subject to 
authority control
. In some indexing systems, identifiers are periodically reviewed for
suitability as new descriptors. Not all indexing systems use identifiers. Compare with
provisional term
.
ideogram
picture
or symbol
that represents an object or idea without expressing phonetically 
the sounds of its name, for example, the character
s used in Chinese and Japanese 
writing systems. Also refers to a symbol that represents an idea, for example, the
equal sign = or the plus sign +. Synonymous with ideograph. Compare with
phonogram
.
ideograph
Seeideogram
.
idiom
A well-known expression that has a different meaning than the literal interpretation of
its words (example: holy terror). Idioms are sometimes coined from the lexicon
of a 
particular occupation or pastime (example: Monday morning quarterback).
Because idioms are specific to a given language
, they can be difficult to translate
.
Dictionaries
of idioms are usually shelved in the reference section
of a library
.
Also refers to a characteristic style, particularly in the arts, or to the language
or 
dialect peculiar to a specific people, geographic region, or social class.
idyl
From the Greek word meaning "little picture"--a short poem
describing the simplicity 
and innocence of rural, pastoral, or domestic life. The origin of this literary form can
be traced to Theocritus, who described pastoral life in Sicily for readers in Alexandria
during the 3rd century BC. An eclogue
is a type of idyl. Compare with idyll
.
idyll
narrative
poem
based on a romantic, epic
, or tragic
theme, for example, Idylls of 
the King (1859) by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, an episodic
retelling of the fable
s of the 
Holy Grail, Camelot, Round Table, and Morte d’Arthur. Compare with idyl
.
i.e.
An abbreviation
of the Latin phrase id est meaning "that is."
IFCS
327 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
SeeI
nternational 
F
ederation of 
C
lassification 
S
ocieties
.
IFLA
SeeI
nternational 
F
ederation of 
L
ibrary 
A
ssociations and Institutions
.
IFRT
SeeI
ntellectual 
F
reedom 
R
ound 
T
able
.
III
SeeI
nnovative 
I
nterfaces 
I
nc
.
ILAB
SeeI
nternational 
L
eague of 
A
ntiquarian 
B
ooksellers
.
ILL
Seei
nter
l
ibrary 
l
oan
.
illiteracy
Seeliteracy
.
illuminate
To decorate an initial letter
or word in a manuscript
with designs or tracings in bright 
colors and gold
or silver, or to decorate a border
or an entire page
with initial letter
s, 
hand-painted miniature
s, and/or colorful designs highlighted in gold or silver, 
techniques commonly used in medieval manuscripts and incunabula
. An artist who
decorates book
s by hand is an illuminator. See alsoilluminated
and rubric
.
illuminated
From the Latin luminaire meaning "to give light." A manuscript
or incunabulum
richly decorated by hand with ornamental polychrome letter
s, designs, and/or 
illustration
s highlighted in gold
or silver. Illumination flourished during the medieval
period when book
s were hand-copied
on parchment
and vellum
, mainly by Catholic 
monks who produced book
s for devotional use and for exchange with other 
monasteries (example: Book of Kells
).
Beginning in the 14th century, traveling artists traded on their skill as illuminators, 
working mainly for wealthy patron
s who filled their private libraries
with fine book
(exampleTres Riches Heures du Duc de Berry
). The Pierpont Morgan Library
in 
New York City holds one of the largest collection
s of illuminated books and 
manuscripts in the United States. For an online
collection of manuscript 
illuminations, please see The Age of Charles V (1338-1380)
compliments of the 
Bibliotheque Nationale de France
Abbreviated
illumSee alsochrysography
and 
rubric
.
illuminated initial
An initial letter
in a illuminated
manuscript
decorated in bright colors and highlighted
in gold
or silver. Compare with rubric
See also: foliate initial
historiated initial
, and 
inhabited initial
.
328 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
illumination
Seeilluminated
.
illustration
picture
plate
diagram
plan
chart
map
, design, or other graphic
image printed
with or inserted in the text
of book
or other publication
as an embellishment or to 
complement or elucidate the text. Also refers to the fine art of creating such visual
work
s.
The earliest examples of illustrated texts date from the second millennium BC.
Medieval manuscript
s were illustrated with illuminated
miniature
s. Early printed
book
s were illustrated with woodcut
s or wood engraving
s. In modern books,
illustrations are often number
ed and listed by number in the front matter
Photograph
or plate
s may be printed on a different grade of paper
than the text and added to the 
section
s of a book in one or more groups. Maps, table
s, and genealogies
are 
sometimes printed on the endpaper
s. Magazine
s, art book
s, and books for young 
children are usually heavily illustrated. The use of illustration in work
s of general 
fiction
has declined since the early 20th century. Abbreviated
ill. or illus. See also:
artwork
.
illustrator
An artist who creates drawings, paintings, or designs to elucidate or embellish the text
of a book
or other printed
publication
. The illustrator of a children’s
picture book
may
receive higher honors than the author
of the text
. In AACR2
, when illustration
is 
added to the text of a work
main entry
is made under the heading
appropriate to the 
text, with an added entry
for the illustrator if appropriate. However, if the work
is the 
result of a collaboration
between author and illustrator, main entry is under the person
named first on the chief source of information
unless greater prominence is given to 
the other by typography
or some other means. See also: Caldecott Medal
and 
Greenaway Medal
.
ILMP
SeeI
nternational 
L
iterary 
M
arket 
P
lace
.
IM
Seei
nstant 
m
essaging
.
imbrication
In the book arts
, a decorative pattern designed to give the impression of overlapping 
scales, tiles, shingles, leaves, etc.
imitation binding
A contemporary binding
executed in a style intended to closely resemble that of an 
earlier period.
imitation leather
A synthetic or partly synthetic binding
material manufactured to resemble leather
, for 
example, a fabric base given a textured coating, usually more washable than real 
329 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
leather
. Synonymous with artificial leather.
IMLS
SeeI
nstitute of 
M
useum and 
L
ibrary 
S
ervices
.
impensis
Latin for "at the expense of," a word appearing in an imprint
or colophon
at the end of 
work
printed
prior to the end of the 17th century, followed by the name of the 
person or entity responsible for financing the publication
, usually the publisher
, or a 
bookseller
or patron
.
imperfect
Said of a book
discovered upon examination to have page
s or section
s missing, 
duplicated, or bound
out of order or upside-down. The publisher
will usually 
exchange or perfect copies
containing binding errors, and reimburse the purchaser for
shipping
costs. Compare with imperfections
.
imperfections
Printed
sheet
s rejected in the binding
process because they contain defects or errors 
that require replacement sheets.
Also refers to copies
of a book
that contain printing or binding
defects, for example, 
the accidental omission or duplication of a signature
or insert
. The publisher
will 
usually exchange or perfect such copies and reimburse shipping
costs when 
bookseller
s or retail purchasers return them, but only for defective make-up
, not the 
insertion of errata
slips (corrigenda). See also: out
.
import
publication
produced and issue
d in one country and brought into another for sale in
the same unaltered form. The name of the importer may be printed
on the title page
in
addition to, or in place of, the original publisher
, or indicated on a label
added to the 
title page after printing. Compare with co-publishing
.
In computing, to read or receive data
from a different application
or computer system,
which may require that it be converted
into a compatible format
. Popular applications
are usually equipped to convert a variety of formats. Compare with export
.
impression
All the copies
of a book
or other publication
printed
in the same press run
from the 
same setting of type
or plate
s. An edition
may comprise several impressions in which 
the typesetting
remains unchanged. Compare with reprint
See also: issue
.
Also refers to the result of the transfer of wet ink
under pressure from type
or plate
s to 
the surface of a sheet
or roll of paper
, as in printing, engraving
etching
, etc.
imprimatur
A Latin phrase
meaning "let it be printed." The license for publication
granted by an 
ecclesiastical or secular authority, usually printed
on the verso
of the title page
of a 
book
, indicating the name of the licenser and the date on which it was granted. Found
330 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
most often in books printed during the 16th and 17th centuries, imprimatur is still 
used in the doctrinal publications of the Roman Catholic Church to indicate official 
approval (example: New Catholic Encyclopedia). See alsocum privilegio
and nihil 
obstat
.
imprint
The statement in a book
that identifies the publisher
and/or printer
. The publisher’s 
imprint consists of the official name of the publishing
company and the date
and 
place of publication
. It usually appears at the foot
of the title page
, and more 
completely on the verso
of the title page. The printer’s imprint, indicating the name of
the printing company and the place of printing
, usually appears on the verso of the 
title page, at the foot of the last page
of text
, or on the page following the text.
Synonymous with biblioSee alsocolophon
distribution imprint
, and joint imprint
.
In binding
, the name of the publisher and/or the publisher’s device
stamped at the 
base of the spine
, or the name of the binder
stamped on the inside of the back board
of the cover
, usually near the bottom.
imprint date
Seepublication date
.
inactive records
Records
no longer required by an agency
or individual in the daily conduct of 
business or affairs, which may be placed in intermediate storage
transfer
red to 
archival
custody
destroyed
, or disposed
of in some other way without affecting 
normal operations. The opposite of active records
. Synonymous with nonactive 
recordsSee alsointermediate records
.
incipit
Latin for "here begins," a word used to indicate the point at which the text
commences in a medieval manuscript
or incunabulum
that lacks a title page
, usually 
written or printed in majuscule
s or in a distinguishing color, often including the name 
of the author
and the title
of the work. Compare with explicit
and colophon
.
incomplete
Seecompleteness
.
incunabula
From the Latin word cunae meaning "cradle." Book
s, pamphlet
s, calendar
s, and 
indulgences printed in Europe from movable type
prior to 1500 during the earliest 
years (infancy) of printing
. A prime example is the Gutenberg Bible
believed to have 
been printed in Mainz before 1456 , Germany by Johann Gutenberg
who is credited 
with the invention of printing from movable metal type. Singular: incunabulum.
Synonymous with cradle books and incunables.
in-cut note
Seecut-in note
.
indent
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested