431 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
self-quiz at the end of each module.
Also, a library
furnishing designed to be used alone or in combination with other 
units to create a customized workspace, for example, worktables of various shapes 
that can be pushed together to form different configurations, depending on the needs 
of a particular work group. Modern furnishings for office spaces and computer
workstation
s are often modular in design.
MOLA
SeeM
ajor 
O
rchestra 
L
ibrarians’ 
A
ssociation
.
mold
A group of microscopic lower plants whose reproductive spores are abundant in most 
environments, but require certain conditions of temperature and humidity
to 
germinate and grow. In libraries
and archives
, the best way to keep molds from 
infecting materials
is to provide good air circulation and keep the relative humidity 
below 70-80%. Once established, molds can be eliminated by using a fungicide or by
fumigation
. Also spelled mould.
monaural
Sound reproduced from a single channel by an audio playback
device with one 
amplifier or speaker. The result is less realistic than stereophonic
or quadraphonic
sound recording
. Synonymous with monophonic.
monetary value
Seearchival value
.
monitor
An output
device
consisting of an electronic display screen which, when attached to a 
computer, enables the user to view text
and/or images. Computer monitors vary in
size, shape, and resolution
. A recessed monitor is mounted below the surface of a 
desk or table, usually beneath a glass panel at an angle to allow the user’s line of sight
to remain unobstructed in a classroom equipped with a wall screen and LCD
projector. Laptop
computers have a flat panel
monitor that folds down to cover the 
keyboard
. A television monitor is an analog
device designed to display signals from a 
television receiver, or signals prerecorded on videocassette
for playback
using a VCR
.
See alsoLCD
and pixel
.
Also, to check on a person or process periodically to make sure work is progressing 
smoothly.
monochrome plate
An illustration
printed
separately from the text
in a single color, usually listed by 
number
with any other plate
s in the front matter
of the book
. Compare with duotone
and color plate
.
monograph
A relatively short book
or treatise
on a single subject
, complete in one physical piece, 
usually written by a specialist
in the field
. Monographic treatment
is detailed and 
Pdf split and merge - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break apart a pdf; break apart pdf pages
Pdf split and merge - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
pdf split pages; break a pdf into multiple files
432 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
scholarly, but not extensive in scope
. The importance of monographs in scholarly 
communication
depends on the discipline
. In the humanities, monographs remain the
format
of choice for serious scholars, but in the sciences and social sciences where 
currency
is essential, journal
s are usually the preferred means of publication
.
For the purpose of library
cataloging
, any nonserial
publication
, either complete in 
one volume
or intended to be completed in a finite number of successive part
issue
at regular
or irregular
intervals, consisting of a single work
or collection
of works.
Monographs are sometimes published
in monographic series
and subseries
. Compare
with book
.
monographic series
series
of monograph
s, usually issue
d under a collective title
by a university press
or
scholarly society
. Each volume
in the series may contain more than one monograph, 
each with its own title
in addition to the series title
.
monoline
typeface
in which the strokes of which the character
s are composed, whether 
straight or curvilinear, are all of the same thickness, including any serif
s. Compare
with block letter
.
monologue
From the Greek monologos meaning "speaking alone." A play
, skit, or recitation in 
which all the lines are spoken by a single actor, or a long sequence of lines within a 
play, spoken by one of the character
s alone on the stage. In drama and narrative
fiction
, an interior monologue reveals a character’s private thoughts and feelings.
Compare with soliloquy
See alsodialogue
.
Also refers to the remarks of a person who continues to speak without interruption for
an extended period of time despite cues from listeners that the conversation is being 
monopolized.
montage
A composite image made by juxtaposing two or more images, or parts of images 
(drawings, photograph
s, picture
s, etc.), without separation lines, in a composition that 
gives new meaning to the whole but preserves the distinctiveness of the individual 
elements, a technique originally developed as an art form but now used extensively in
advertising and graphic
design. See also: photomontage
.
monthly
Issue
d once a month (twelve times per year) with the possible exception of one or two
months, usually during the summer. Many magazine
s and some journal
s are 
published
monthly (example: Monthly Labor Review). Also refers to a serial
issued 
once a month.
morality play
A form of drama popular during the Middle Ages and Renaissance in which the 
character
s are engaged in an allegorical
struggle over the condition of the human soul.
Unlike mystery play
s and miracle play
s, which were presented on mobile wagons, 
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Merge and Append PDF. VB.NET PDF - Merge PDF Document Using VB.NET. VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in VB.NET Project.
break pdf documents; can print pdf no pages selected
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Merge and Append PDF. C#.NET PDF Library - Merge PDF Documents in C#.NET. Merge PDF with byte array, fields.
pdf split; add page break to pdf
433 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
morality plays were usually performed on a stationary platform.
morgue
library
maintained by the publisher
of a newspaper
, usually consisting of back 
issue
s, reference materials
index
es and database
s, clipping
s, notes, photograph
s, 
illustration
s, and other resources needed by reporters and staff to research
, write, and 
edit
article
s for publication
. The term originally referred to the repository
of 
biographical
materials collected on persons of interest, for the purpose of writing 
obituaries
. The first newspaper library in the United States was established at the
office of the Boston Pilot in 1831.
morocco
A fine pebble-grained leather
made from goatskin
tanned with sumac, believed to 
have been introduced to Europe by the Moors. One of the most durable
leathers used 
in bookbinding
, it is strong yet flexible. Older books bound
in morocco are often rare
and valuable. Compare with calf
and pigskin
See also: levant
.
motif
term
borrowed from art and music (leitmotif) to refer to a text
ual element that 
symbol
ically represents a specific theme in a literary work
by virtue of repetition, 
usually presented in the opening verse
chapter
, or paragraphs and subsequently 
elaborated.
motion picture
A length of film
from which an unbroken sequence of still
photograph
s can be 
projected at speeds of 16 to 24 frame
s per second, producing the illusion of 
continuous motion. Motion pictures made in color or black-and-white, with or
without recorded sound
, on film 8, 16, 35, or 70 mm wide. They include
documentaries
feature film
s, and short film
s. Synonymous with cinefilm. Compare
with cinema
See also: film clip
film library
filmography
trailer
, and International 
Federation of Film Archives
.
mottled calf
Calf
skin used in bookbinding
, which has been dabbed or sprinkled with colored dye 
or tanning acid to give it a decorative spotty appearance.
mounted
An illustration
or photograph
tipped
onto a blank
page
in a book
or album
. Also, a
fragile or damaged
leaf
, illustration, map
, etc., strengthened with backing
made of 
paper
, card, or thin cloth.
Also refers to an artifact
or specimen
placed on a pedestal or inside a case, or a print
photograph
ic image, or document
protected by framing, usually against a backing 
material. Loose specimens and unframed prints and picture
s are unmounted. See also:
mat
.
mouse
A small handheld input
device
which, when rolled across a hard, flat surface, allows 
the user to direct the motion of a cursor
or pointer on a computer screen, and initiate 
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
C# PDF - Merge or Split PDF File in C#.NET. C#.NET Code Demos to Combine or Divide Source PDF Document File. Visual C#. VB.NET. Home
acrobat split pdf pages; can't cut and paste from pdf
VB.NET PDF: Use VB.NET Code to Merge and Split PDF Documents
VB.NET PDF - How to Merge and Split PDF. How to Merge and Split PDF Documents by Using VB.NET Code. Visual C#. VB.NET. Home > .NET Imaging
how to split pdf file by pages; break pdf password
434 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
an operation or select an option
displayed in a graphical user interface
by pressing 
down on one of its buttons. Because the button makes a clicking sound when pressed,
such program
s are called point-and-click application
s. In graphic
s programs, the 
mouse can be used like a pen, pencil, or paintbrush. Most mouse operations can be
executed more slowly using the keyboard
. Basic models are designed to be used by a
right- or left-handed person. Contoured models are available for either the right or left
hand. In laptop
s, the mouse is usually built-in.
mouse type
Very tiny, barely readable
type
used for the fine print
in sales contracts, coupons, 
contest entry forms, etc., to notify the reader
of legal restrictions, expiration date
s, 
and other information
that the seller is required to display but wishes to downplay.
movable type
Metal type
cast as individual units, each bearing a single character
, assembled by a 
typesetter
into words, lines, and page
s of text
, then disassembled for reuse once a 
print job is completed. Although there is evidence that printing
from wood block
originated in China, probably during the 11th century, Johann Gutenberg
is credited 
with the invention of modern movable type in Germany in the mid-15th century. See 
alsoprinting press
.
moving
The transfer of all or a portion of the contents of a library
(collection
s, equipment
furnishings, and personnel) from one facility to another, temporarily or permanently.
Most libraries hire a professional moving company
with library experience to do the 
actual work, but advance planning is required for a move to be executed smoothly.
Library literature
is available on the moving process to assist planners in avoiding 
common pitfalls.
moving company
A professional mover hired to transfer the contents of a library
from one location to 
another, usually selected in a competitive process in which the company is given the 
opportunity to inspect the sites before submitting a bid. Unless stated otherwise in the
bid specifications, the contractor determines the methods used and provides both 
personnel and equipment. Professional movers with experience moving libraries work
very methodically and quickly because, as the move slows or stops, their costs
increase.
MPEG
Moving Picture Experts Group, a standard
for compressing
full-motion video
in 
digital
format
. More efficient than JPEG
(the standard for compressing still images), 
MPEG is used to transmit a wide range of audio-video formats including DVD
motion picture
s. MPEG-2 requires bandwidth
of 4-15 MB
per second and an MPEG 
board
for playback
in most computers. Pronounced "em-peg."
MRDF
Seem
achine-
r
eadable 
d
ata 
f
ile
.
VB.NET TIFF: Merge and Split TIFF Documents with RasterEdge .NET
Merge certain pages from different TIFF documents and create a &ltsummary> ''' Split a TIFF provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
break a pdf apart; pdf split file
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Tell VB.NET users how to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy
cannot print pdf file no pages selected; break pdf password online
435 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
mull
Seecrash
.
multicast
In telecommunication
, to transmit data
simultaneously to more than one individual or 
site connected to the same network
, for example, to all who subscribe to an e-mail
mailing list
, as opposed to broadcast
ing messages to all who own the appropriate 
receiving equipment (radio and television).
multimedia
A combination of two or more digital
media (text
graphic
s, audio
animation
video
etc.) used in a computer application
, such as an online
encyclopedia
, computer game, 
or Web site
(exampleA 2 Z 4 Birders Online Guide
). Multimedia applications are
often interactive
. Synonymous in this sense with digital media.
In a more general sense, any program, presentation, or computer application
in which 
two or more communication media
are used simultaneously or in close association, 
for example, slide
s with recorded sound
Still
images accompanying text
are 
considered illustration
, rather than multimedia.
multimedia map
map
available electronically that includes audio
video
, and/or animation
, in 
addition to graphic
images and text
(example: the WildWorld
Web site
maintained by 
the National Geographic Society).
multipart volume
work
published
in two or more physically separate part
s that together constitute a 
single bibliographic volume
Reference work
s too large to be bound as a single 
volume are published in this manner (example: some volumes of Dictionary of 
Literary Biography). Compare with multivolume work
.
multiple access
More than one point of access
to a file
of data
(example: a library
catalog
or 
bibliographic database
searchable
by author
title
subject
keywords
, etc.), as opposed 
to a resource that has only one point of access (example: the headword
s in a printed
dictionary
of the words of a language
). Compare with multiple user access
.
multiple user access
file
of data
that can be used independently by more than one person at the same 
time, for example, a multi-volume
print
encyclopedia
as opposed to a single-volume 
dictionary
Access
to online catalog
s, bibliographic database
s, and full-text
electronic 
resources by more than one simultaneous user
may be governed by licensing 
agreement
. Compare with multiple access
.
multitasking
An operating system
that permits more than one application
program
to remain open 
at the same time, allowing the user to perform multiple operations through shared use 
of the central processor
(CPU), exchanging information
between applications if 
necessary.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
functions. Able to create, load, merge, and split PDF document using C#.NET code, without depending on any product from Adobe. Compatible
combine pages of pdf documents into one; c# print pdf to specific printer
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
for each of those page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how to split PDF document in
pdf rotate single page; reader split pdf
436 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
multivolume work
work
published
in two or more number
ed or unnumbered volume
s under a single 
title
(exampleOxford English Dictionary), sometimes over an extended period 
(Dictionary of American Regional English). A multivolume work is cataloged
as a 
single entity, with the volumes owned by the library
listed in a holdings note
.
Compare with multipart volume
and series
.
museum library
A type of special library
maintained by a museum or gallery, usually within its walls, 
but sometimes in a separate location, containing a collection
book
s, periodical
s, 
reproduction
s, and other materials
related to its exhibit
s and field
s of specialization
.
Access
may be by appointment only. Borrowing privileges
may be restricted
to 
museum staff and members.
museum publisher
A museum or historical society that issue
book
s, exhibit catalog
s, and other 
publication
s under its own imprint
or in cooperation with other publisher
s, for 
example, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Museum publications
are usually of fine quality, often issued in both hardcover
and softcover
edition
s to 
appeal to collectors and casual buyers. See alsoexhibit catalog
.
musical presentation statement
An optional
area
of the bibliographic record
representing a musical work
, in which 
the physical form of the music is described (full score
miniature score
piano score
etc.) as it appears on the chief source of information
. If such a statement is an integral
part of another area of bibliographic description
, and recorded as such, it is not 
repeated.
musical work
Three definition
s are recognized in AACR2
: 1) a musical composition
created as a 
single unit intended by its composer
to be performed as a whole; 2) a set of musical 
compositions with a collective title
, not necessarily intended for performance as a 
whole; and 3) a group of musical compositions assigned a single opus number
. In
cataloging
musical work
s, main entry
is under the name of the composer, with added 
entries
for arranger
librettist
, major performer
(s), etc.
music library
library
containing a collection
of materials
on music and musicians, including 
printed
and manuscript
music score
s, music periodical
s, recorded music (CD
s, 
audiocassette
s, phonograph record
s, etc.), book
s about music and musicians, program
notes
discographies
, and music reference material
s.
Music collections in public libraries
are selected
and maintained for lifelong learning
and leisure pursuits. Academic
and conservatory libraries provide resources for music
study and research
, including original
source
materials (example: Columbia 
University Music and Arts Library
). National libraries
offer unique and often rare
musical heritage collections (example: The Aaron Copland Collection
at the Library 
of Congress
). Music librarians are organized in the Music Library Association
.
437 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
Music Library Association (MLA)
Founded in 1931, MLA promotes the establishment, growth, and use of music 
libraries
and collections of music, musical instruments, music literature
, music 
recordings, and related materials in both print
and nonprint
format
. An affiliate
of the 
American Library Association
, the organization also seeks to advance music 
librarianship
, scholarship, and publishing
MLA publishes
the monthly
Music 
Cataloging BulletinClick here
to connect to the MLA homepage
.
music score
Seescore
.
mutilation
Damage, defacement, or destruction of library materials
inflicted intentionally, rather 
than accidentally, including tearing cover
s and page
s; cutting out illustration
s or 
passages of text
; marking or writing on margin
s or text; and removing label
s, 
bookplate
s, protective covers, date due slip
s, etc., all actions that drain library 
resources. The motives for such acts range from an attitude of entitlement, to
monetary concerns (libraries generally charge for photocopying
), disapproval of the 
library’s collection development
decisions, to outright malice. See also: biblioclast
.
mystery
A popular novel
story
, or drama about an unusual event or occurrence, such as a 
murder or disappearance, that remains so secret or unexplained as to excite popular 
curiosity and interest. The plot
in mystery fiction
often hinges on an attempt by a 
sleuth to uncover the truth. The Sherlock Holmes stories of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
are classic
examples. Subgenre
s include detective fiction
and suspense
Click here
to 
connect to The Mystery Reader, a Web site
devoted to mystery fiction. Compare with
true crime story
See also: gothic novel
.
mystery play
A form of medieval religious drama, popular from the 14th to the 16th century, 
usually performed on a mobile wagon from a script
based on a story from the 
Scripture
s or a sequence of episodes from biblical history. In England, the
performance of mystery plays was often financed by the local trade guilds in 
connection with important feast days, such as Corpus Christi. Compare with morality 
play
See also: miracle play
.
myth
From the classical Greek word mythos meaning "story." A narrative
rooted in the 
traditions of a specific culture, capable of being understood and appreciated in its own
right, but at the same time part of a system of stories (mythology) transmitted orally 
from one generation to the next to illustrate man’s relationship to the cosmos. In
traditional societies, myths often serve as the basis for social customs and
observances.
Many of the archetypes of classical Greek mythology recur in the literature
of 
Western culture and some have been appropriated by discipline
s outside the arts and 
humanities (example: Oedipus complex in psychology). Some scholars have argued
438 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
that mythic thinking is integral to human consciousness and that myths are simply a 
manifestation of the way culture is created by the human mind. Dictionaries
of 
mythology are available in the reference section
of public
and academic libraries
.
Compare with folktale
and legend
.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
JK
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
XYZ
|
N
NAGARA
SeeN
ational 
A
ssociation of 
G
overnment 
A
rchives and 
R
ecords 
A
dministrators
.
NAICS
SeeN
orth 
A
merican 
I
ndustry 
C
lassification 
S
ystem
.
NAL
SeeN
ational 
A
gricultural 
L
ibrary
.
name authority file
An authorized list giving the preferred
form of entry
for names (personal
corporate
and geographic
) used as heading
s in a library
catalog
, and any cross-reference
s from 
variant forms.
name index
A list of the personal name
s appearing of a work
, arranged alphabetical
ly by surname
with reference to the page number
(s) on which each name can be found in the text
.
Not all book
s have a separate name index--personal names may be included in a 
general index
or in the subject index
. When present in a single-volume
work, the 
name index is part of the back matter
. In a a multi-volume work, it is usually found at
the end of the last volume. Compare with author index
.
nameplate
Seeflag
.
name-title added entry
In AACR2
, an added entry
in a library
catalog
that gives the name of a person (or 
corporate body
) and the title
of a work
, to identify: 1) a work that is included in or the
subject of the work being cataloged
; 2) a larger work of which the work being 
cataloged is part
; or 3) another work to which the work being cataloged is in some 
way related.
NAMTC
SeeN
ational 
A
ssociation of 
M
edia & 
T
echnology 
C
enters
.
NAP
439 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
Seen
ormal 
a
dministrative 
p
ractice
.
NARA
SeeN
ational 
A
rchives and 
R
ecords 
A
dministration
.
narration
The telling of a story or account of events, in speech or writing, usually in the first or 
third person. Most documentary
film
s and television programs include a script
ed 
narration, with the name of the narrator given in the credit
s. Celebrity narrators may
be employed to enhance the appeal of a work
.
narrative
A written or spoken work
in the form of a story or account (real or imagined) told by 
one or more narrators as a continuous, episodic
, or broken series of related events, 
usually in the first or third person. Narratives can be short, as in a brief anecdote, or
as long as a full-length novel
. A narrative poem
is one that relates a story (ballad
epic
, etc.). The narrative structure of a work is the sequence and voice in which the 
author
unfolds events, for example, in a series of flashbacks.
narrow
The shape of a book
in which the width
of the cover
is less than two-thirds its height
format
commonly used in the design of field guide
s and travel guide
s. Compare
with square
See alsoportrait
and oblong
.
narrowcast
Selective use of communication media
to target a highly specialized
audience
, in 
contrast to a mass media
broadcast
intended to reach as many listeners or viewers as 
possible.
narrower term (NT or N)
In a hierarchical
classification system
, a subject heading
or descriptor
representing a 
subclass
of a class
indicated by another term
(example: "Music librarianship" under
"Librarianship"). A subject heading or descriptor may have more than one narrower
term (also "Comparative librarianship" under "Librarianship"). Compare with broader
term
(BT) and related term 
(RT). See alsohyponym
.
NASIG
SeeN
orth 
A
merican 
S
erials 
I
nterest 
G
roup
.
NASLIN
SeeN
orth 
A
merican 
S
port 
L
ibrary 
N
etwork
.
National Agricultural Library (NAL)
Established as a federal library
in 1862 under legislation signed by President Lincoln, 
NAL is part of the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) of the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture (USDA). With a collection
of over 3.3 million item
s, NAL is the primary 
source of agricultural information
in the United States and the largest agricultural 
library
in the world. Located in Beltsville, Maryland, NAL works closely with 
libraries at land-grant universities to improve access
to, and utilization of, agricultural 
440 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
information by researcher
s, policy-makers, educators, farmers, consumers of 
agricultural products, and the general public. Click here
to connect to the NAL
homepage
.
national archives
The central archives
of a nation, charged with collecting and preserving document
and records
of historical significance to its citizens and government. The first national
archives was established in France in 1790. In the United States, the National 
Archives and Records Administration
(NARA) has statutory responsibility for the 
preservation
of archival information
of national importance. Compare with national 
library
.
National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)
The national archives
of the United States, a federal agency
established by Congress 
in 1934 to oversee the management of all federal records
, including the public’s right 
of access
to document
s and information
not specifically exempted under the Freedom 
of Information Act
NARA’s 33 facilities house approximately 21.5 million cubic feet
of original text
ual materials collected from the executive, legislative, and judicial 
branches. It also includes nonprint
materials, such as motion picture
s, sound
and 
videorecording
s, map
s and chart
s, aerial photograph
s, architectural drawing
s, 
computer data
sets, poster
s, etc. NARA is administered by an Archivist
of the United 
States appointed by the President with the approval of Congress, and advised by a 
National Archives Council. Click here
to connect to the NARA homepage
See also:
NAGARA
.
National Association of Government Archives and Records Administrators 
(NAGARA)
Founded in 1984, NAGARA is a nationwide association
of local, state, and federal 
archivist
s and records
administrators, and individuals with an interest in improving 
the management of government records. Its members are local, state, and federal
archival and records management
agencies
NAGARA publishes
the quarterly
newsletter
NAGARA Clearinghouse
Click here
to connect to the NAGARA
homepage
See alsoNARA
.
National Association of Media & Technology Centers (NAMTC) 
A nonprofit association
devoted to assisting specialists responsible for managing 
media
and technology centers, through networking, advocacy, and support activities 
intended to enhance equitable access
to nonprint
media
, technology, and information
services to educational communities. Membership in NAMTC is open to regional, 
K-12, and higher education media and technology centers, as well as commercial 
media vendor
s. Click here
to connect to the NAMTC homepage
.
national bibliography
An ongoing list of the book
s and other printed
materials published
or distributed
in a 
specific country, especially work
s written about the country and its inhabitants, or in 
its national language
, for example, the British National Bibliography which has 
provided, since 1950, a weekly list of new works published in Great Britain.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested