491 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
are academic libraries
, with nearly as many public libraries
, one state library
, and a 
special library
devoted to research
See also: Patent and Trademark Depository 
Library Association
.
Patent and Trademark Depository Library Association (PTDLA)
An affiliate
of the American Library Association
PTDLA is dedicated to advising 
the United States Patent
and Trademark
Office (PTO) on the interests, needs, 
opinions, and goals of patent and trademark depository libraries
(PTLs) and their 
users, and to assisting the PTO in planning and implementing appropriate services. 
Click here
to connect to the PTDLA homepage
.
patent file
collection
of drawings and specifications
for patent
s, index
ed by country and patent
number, name of patentee, or subject
, usually maintained in a patent and trademark 
depository library
.
patent number
Seepatent
.
pathfinder
subject bibliography
designed to lead the user through the process of research
ing a 
specific topic
, or any topic in a given field
or discipline
, usually in a systematic, 
step-by-step way, making use of the best finding tool
s the library
has to offer.
Pathfinders may be print
ed or available online
See also: topical guide
.
patron
Any person who uses the resources and services of a library
, not necessarily a 
registered borrower
. Synonymous with user. Compare with client
See also: patron 
ID
patron record
patron type
, and problem patron
.
Also, a person who helps sponsor the creation, copy
ing, or printing
of an original
work
. During the 16th and 17th centuries, when returns from the fees paid by
printer
/publisher
s were meager, many writers could not have flourished without the 
patronage of wealthy individuals and institutions. It was not unusual for a sponsored
work to be formally dedicated
to the benefactor, in gratitude and hope of further 
financial assistance. In a more general sense, any person or group that encourages or
supports an activity or project, especially by providing necessary funds.
patron ID
The means by which staff
at the circulation desk
of a library
ascertain that a patron
is 
a registered borrower
, usually the person’s library card
, student ID card, security
badge, or a substitute. Also refers to the number used in most library circulation 
system
s to identify the borrower. Sometimes it is the library card number, but in
academic libraries
it may be the student ID number or the social security number. In
special libraries
, patron ID may be linked to the employee identification system used 
by the parent organization. Each library or library system
adopts its own method of 
patron identification. See alsopatron record
.
Break pdf password online - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break a pdf into separate pages; pdf split pages
Break pdf password online - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
pdf separate pages; can print pdf no pages selected
492 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
patron record
confidential
record in a library
circulation system
, containing data
pertaining to a 
borrower account
(full name, street address, telephone number, patron ID
patron 
type
, items on loan, hold
s, unpaid fines
, etc.). In electronic circulation systems, an
authorized
member of the library staff
is permitted to access
the patron
record by 
scanning
the barcode
on the library card
, or by using a keyboard
to enter the patron’s 
name or library card number as input
. Some online catalog
s allow registered 
borrowers to view thir own patron records with proper authorization
. Synonymous
with circulation recordSee also: blocked
.
patron type
In library
circulation system
s, a code entered in the patron record
to indicate a 
specific category of borrower
, which in conjunction with item type
determines the 
loan rule
applied when an item
is checked out
Academic libraries
usually 
differentiate faculty, student, alumni, and staff by patron type. Most public libraries
distinguish between nonresidents and patron
s who reside in the service area, and 
between adult
and juvenile users. In special libraries
, patron type may reflect 
hierarchical rank within the parent organization, levels of security
clearance, etc.
patronymic
personal name
derived from the given name
of the father or a more distant paternal 
ancestor, usually by the addition of a prefix (ben Jacob, MacArthur, O’Brien) or suffix
(Donaldson, Petrovich).
payment date
The date by which an outstanding bill for goods and/or services must be paid, usually 
printed
on the seller’s invoice
, after which the account is delinquent. A penalty may
be charged for late payment.
pay-out
In marketing, an expenditure of funds that produces a return greater than the
investment. When return equals investment, the result is known as break-even.
pay period
The interval at which an employee is paid, usually weekly, biweekly, or monthly, 
depending on the payroll
system of the employer. Hours worked are usually reported
to the payroll
department on a timesheet signed by the employee.
payphone
A telephone located in a public area from which anyone may make calls in exchange 
for payment in cash or by calling card. Most libraries
that open their doors to the 
public provide at least one payphone as a courtesy to their users.
payroll
The list of employees who are paid salaries
and wages
by an employer, usually by 
check or direct deposit on a weekly, biweekly, or monthly basis. Library
employees 
may be required to sign a timesheet for each pay period
, stating the hours they 
worked.
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
split pdf into individual pages; break pdf into smaller files
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. FileType.IMG_JPEG); switch (result) { case ConvertResult. NO_ERROR: Console.WriteLine("Success"); break; case ConvertResult
break pdf; break apart a pdf file
493 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
PBS
Seepublic television
.
PC
Seep
ersonal 
c
omputer
and p
olitical 
c
orrectness
.
PCC
SeeP
rogram for 
C
ooperatrive 
C
ataloging
.
PDA
Seep
ersonal 
d
igitial 
a
ssistant
.
PDF
SeeP
ortable 
D
ocument 
F
ormat
.
peak use
The period(s) in a day, week, month, and year during which the services and 
resources of a library
or computer system are most heavily used. Transaction log
s, 
circulation statistics
, and gate count
s can be compiled and analyzed to reveal 
recurrent periods of peak use. The results are useful in establishing library hour
s, 
anticipating staff
ing needs, scheduling maintenance, etc.
peer evaluation
The process in which the job performance of a librarian
or other library staff
member 
is assessed by the individual’s colleagues and a recommendation made concerning 
contract renewal or promotion
. In academic libraries
at institutions that grant 
librarians faculty status
tenure
decisions may also be based on peer evaluation. In
libraries
in which employment is governed by a collective bargaining agreement
, the 
method of peer evaluation may be determined by contract
.
peer review
The process in which the author
of a book
article
software
program
, etc., submits his 
or her work
to experts in the field
for critical evaluation, usually prior to publication
a standard procedure in scholarly publishing
. In computer program
ming, source code 
may be certified by its owner or licenser as open source
to encourage development 
through peer review.
peer-reviewed
Said of a scholarly journal
that requires an article
to be submitted to a process of 
critical evaluation by one or more experts on the subject
, known as referee
s, 
responsible for determining if the subject
of the article falls within the scope
of the 
publication
, and for evaluating originality, quality of research, clarity of presentation, 
etc. Changes may be suggested to the author
(s) before an article is finally accepted for 
publication. In evaluation for tenure
and promotion
academic
librarian
s may be given
publishing
credit only for articles accepted by peer-reviewed journals. Some
bibliographic database
s allow search
results to be limited
to peer-review
ed journal
s.
Synonymous with juried and refereed.
pendant
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET source code. Offer PDF page break inserting function.
split pdf; cannot print pdf no pages selected
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
break a pdf file into parts; can't select text in pdf file
494 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
An additional narrative
, statement, or composition
that completes or complements 
another work
, but is independent of it, for example, an essay
illuminating the 
historical basis of a satirical
work.
pending file
paper
or electronic file
in which document
s pertaining to matters that cannot be 
immediately resolved are allowed to accumulate until circumstances are more 
favorable for their disposition. A rapidly growing pending file may be a sign of
overwork or a bottleneck in workflow
.
pending request
In the OCLC Interlibrary Loan
system, a loan request sent by a borrowing library
that 
appears in the message file of a potential lending library
.
pen name
A name used by an author
other than his or her real name, usually adopted to conceal 
identity. A pen name can be an allonym
(name of an actual person other than the 
author), a fictitious pseudonym
(exampleAvi for Edward Irving Wortis), a 
pseudonym based on the author’s real name (Dr. Seuss for Theodor Seuss Geisel), or 
a word or phrase
that is not a personal name
(Spy for Sir Leslie Ward). Pen names
were used more commonly during the 19th century when writing was not as 
respectable as it is today and therefore considered an unsuitable occupation for
women. Some authors write under more than one pen name, adopting a different
name when writing in a new genre
or introducing a new lead character
(or set of 
characters) in a series
Click here
to connect to a.k.a., an online
dictionary
of 
pseudonyms and pen names. Synonymous with nom de plume. Compare with
autonym
See alsoeponym
and pseudandry
.
penny dreadful
A sensational melodrama
in the form of a novel
or novelette
of mystery
, crime, or 
adventure, printed
in cheap paperback
edition
, the equivalent in England of the dime 
novel
.
per diem
The rate at which a product or service is billed on a daily basis. Also refers to the
maximum amount allowed by an employer for travel expenses (meals, lodging, etc.), 
usually calculated on the basis of average cost for a given geographic area.
perfect binding
A quick and comparatively inexpensive method of adhesive binding
in which the 
binding edge
of the text block
is milled
to produce a block of leaves
and then 
roughened. Fast-drying adhesive
is applied to the uneven surface and the case
or 
cover
attached without sewing
and backing
. Nearly all book
published
in paperback
are bound by this method, which is also used for some hardcover
special edition
s, for 
example, book club
edition
s. Durability
depends on the strength of the adhesive and 
its capacity to remain flexible over time, usually not as long-lasting as a sewn or 
stitched
binding
. Compare with Otabind
See also: double-fan adhesive binding
hot-melt
, and notched binding
.
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
For VB.NET online guide, please refer to Query & device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod
break pdf into single pages; cannot select text in pdf file
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
Online C# Guide for XImage.Twain Installation, Deployment RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod
pdf split file; break up pdf into individual pages
495 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
perfecting
The process of printing
the second side of a sheet
. On a perfecting press, both sides 
are printed in a single pass. Synonymous with backing upSee alsoregister
.
perforating stamp
A mechanical device designed to produce a permanent mark on a sheet
of paper
or 
page
in a book
by punching a pattern of tiny holes in the fibers, once used by libraries
to mark ownership
, but now largely replaced by the rubber stamp
. Notaries still use
this tool to validate their signature
s.
perforation
Cutting or punching a line of small, closely-spaced holes or slits along the inner 
margin
of a page
, or around matter
printed
on a sheet
, to make a page or portion of a 
page easier to tear out or off. Also refers to the line of holes produced for that
purpose. See alsoperforating stamp
.
performance evaluation
The process of judging the competence with which an employee has performed the 
duties and responsibilities associated with the position
for which the person was hired
by a company or organization, usually for the purpose of contract renewal or 
promotion
. In libraries
, job performance may be evaluated entirely by management or
in a process of peer evaluation
. Synonymous with performance measurement. See 
alsoaccountability
.
performance indicator
A measure of how well an employee, department, organization, or institution is 
meeting its goal
s and objective
s, for example, the percentage of borrowing requests 
received by the interlibrary loan
department of a library
that are successfully filled 
within a given period of time.
performance measurement
Sedeperformance evaluation
.
performer
An individual who plays a visible part in a work
created for a medium
of performance
(play
motion picture
, musical composition
, dance, etc.). In library
cataloging
, the 
names of leading performers may be included as added entries
(MARC
field
700) in 
the bibliographic description
of a recorded performance (film
videocassette
audiocassette
CD
, etc.). See also: composer
and director
.
Pergamum
An ancient city on the west coast of Asia Minor near the modern town of Bergama, 
Turkey, the location of a magnificent royal library
and museum built during the 
Hellenistic period by Eumenes II of the Attalid dynasty to rival the great center of 
learning at Alexandria
in Egypt. The use of parchment
as a writing surface is believed
to have originated at Pergamum.
period
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
are a VB.NET developer, you may see online tutorial for frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
pdf insert page break; break a pdf file
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. if (device.Compression != TwainCompressionMode.Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
break pdf password; add page break to pdf
496 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
The punctuation
mark that indicates the end of an ordinary sentence, also used as a 
mark of abbreviation
. Synonymous with full point
and full stop
See alsodot
.
In history and literature
, an interval of time, usually of indefinite beginning and/or 
ending date(s), characterized by certain events, conditions, or characteristics of style, 
such as the Romantic period (early 19th century in Europe), or the Victorian period 
(late 19th century in Britain).
period bibliography
bibliography
limited to work
s covering a specific period of time, for example, 
American history of the colonial period or the progressive era.
periodical
publication
with its own distinctive title
, containing article
s, stories
, or other short 
work
s usually written by different contributor
s, issued in softcover
more than once, 
usually at regular
stated intervals without prior decision as to when the final issue
will 
appear. Although each issue is complete in itself, its relationship to preceding issues
is indicated by an issue number
and volume number
printed
on the front cover
.
Content
is controlled by an editor
or editorial board
. The category includes
newspaper
s, newsletter
s, magazine
s, and journal
s, sold at newsstands and by 
subscription
. Libraries usually bind
all the issues published
during a specific 
publication year
in one or more physical volume
s, with the bibliographic volumes 
number
ed consecutively, starting with number one for the first year in which the 
periodical was issued. Compare with serial
.
Periodicals are published by scholarly societies
university press
es, government 
agencies
, commercial publishing house
s, private corporations, trade and professional 
association
s, and nonprofit organizations. The most comprehensive
periodical 
directories
are Ulrich’s International Periodicals Directory
published by R. R. 
Bowker
and The Serials Directory
published by EBSCO
, available in the reference 
section
of large libraries
in the United States. The content of periodicals is indexed
in 
finding tool
s called periodical index
es and abstracting service
s, usually by subject
and
author
.
Periodicals are usually shelved alphabetical
ly by title in a separate section of the 
library stacks
. In some libraries, current issue
s are shelved in a different location than 
back file
s, which may be converted to microfiche
or microfilm
to conserve space.
Microform
reader-printer
machines are provided for viewing and making hard copies
.
Periodicals published by the U.S. federal government may be shelved by SuDocs 
number
in a separate section of the stacks reserved for government documents
See 
alsofrequency
holdings note
one shot
, and periodical stand
.
periodical index
cumulative
list of periodical
article
s in which the citation
s are entered by subject
(or in classified
arrangement) and sometimes under the author
’s last name, separately 
or in a single alphabetic
sequence. Periodical indexes may be general (example:
Reader’s Guide to Periodical Literature), devoted to a specific academic discipline
(Education Index) or group of disciplines (Humanities Index), or limited to a 
497 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
particular type of publication
(Alternative Press Index). In libraries
, periodical 
indexes are available in print
and as bibliographic database
s, online
or on CD-ROM
.
See alsoabstracting service
and H. W. Wilson
.
periodical stand
A piece of display furniture with sloping shelves, used in libraries
to display current 
issue
s of periodical
face out
, not as compact as conventional shelving, but more 
accessible
to browser
s. The sloping shelf may be hinged to allow a limited number
of 
back issue
s to be stored on a flat shelf behind it.
period printing
The production of book
s or other printed
publication
s in a style appropriate to the 
period of time in which the material was originally issue
d. Compare with facsimile
.
Also, the production of a book in a style resembling that of an earlier period, although
the text
may have been written by a contemporary author
, usually conceived by the 
publisher
as a promotion
al device.
period subdivision
subdivision
added to a class
or subject heading
in library
cataloging
to limit its 
application to a specific period of time (example: American poetry--20th century or
France--History--1789-1815).
peripheral
device
used in conjunction with a computer, which is not an indispensable or 
inseparable part of it. Microcomputer
peripherals are used for input
(keyboard
mouse
scanner
), output
(printer
monitor
, audio speakers), storage
(floppy disk
CD-ROM
), and communication (modem
). The trend has been to build peripherals
into PC
s, especially laptop
s. Synonymous with auxiliary equipmentSee alsoCPU
.
periphrasis
Saying something in a less direct, more roundabout way. Synonymous in this sense
with circumlocution. Also refers to speech or writing that uses an excess of words to
convey an idea or concept that could be expressed more succinctly. Compare with
paraphrase
.
perk
An advantage enjoyed by an employee over and above the normal benefits
to which 
the position
is entitled, for example, exemption from overdue
fine
s for the staff
of 
some libraries
.
permanence
The quality of library materials
designed to last indefinitely without significant 
deterioration
, defined by preservation
librarian
s as a change of one percent or less in 
100 years. See alsopermanent paper
.
permanent ink
A type of visible ink
used in applying ownership mark
s to library
materials
because it 
cannot be easily removed.
498 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
permanent paper
Paper
manufactured to resist chemical deterioration
that occurs as a result of aging.
The most important factor in permanence
is a minimum pH
of 7.0 (neutral). Acid-free
paper is preferred in library
and archival
materials
because it contains low levels of 
lignin
, an acidic
substance that causes document
s made of paper to yellow
and 
become brittle
over time. The acid paper
used to print
book
s and other publication
s in 
the 19th and early 20th centuries has created a major preservation
imperative for 
research libraries
and special collections
. Some permanent papers are buffered
with 
an alkaline
substance to counteract acids that develop after manufacture or are 
introduced from an outside source.
ANSI
and NISO
have established a set of standards
(Z39.48) for the permanence
of 
paper used in materials for libraries and archives. Degrees of permanence for paper
are based on specifications
for acidity, fiber content
, fold endurance, and the residual 
amount of certain substances used in manufacture (rosin, chlorine, etc.). Under
normal use and storage conditions, paper that meets ANSI criteria should last for 
several hundred years without significant deterioration. Synonymous with acid-free 
paperdurable paper, and non-acidic paper.
permission
Authorization, usually granted in writing by the copyright
holder, to quote
or excerpt
passages of text
or reproduce
illustration
s from a work
legally protected by copyright.
Failure to obtain permission may constitute infringement
See alsoCopyright 
Clearance Center
.
permissions copy
copy
of a book
containing quoted
or excerpt
ed material, sent to the copyright
holder at first publication
to confirm that passages were used in accordance with the 
permission
s granted.
permuted index
A type of subject index
in which a string of significant words or phrase
s, usually 
extracted from the title
of a work
or assigned as content
descriptor
s by an indexer, are
rotated to bring each word or phrase into first-word position in the alphabetical
sequence of entries
. For example, in the subject
index
to America: History and Life, 
the string of descriptors assigned to the article
title
d "Library Services and the 
African-American Intelligentsia before 1960" (Libraries & Culture 33: 91-97) is 
rotated to produce the following index entries:
Blacks. Higher Education. Intellectuals. Libraries. 1900-1960.
Higher education. Intellectuals. Libraries. Blacks. 1900-1960.
Intellectuals. Libraries. Blacks. Higher education. 1900-1960.
Libraries. Blacks. Higher education. Intellectuals. 1900-1960.
per search
database
for which access
is billed by the search
, rather than by subscription
. The
charge may be a fixed amount per search as in OCLC
FirstSearch
, or based on 
connect time
.
499 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
personal archives
A category of collecting archives
devoted to preserving
the personal papers
and 
memorabilia
of one or more persons, or of a family or group of families. In the United
States, the presidential libraries
function as archives
for the papers
of the Presidents.
personal author
The person primarily responsible for the literary, musical, artistic, or intellectual 
content
of a creative work
, whose full name
is entered in the statement of 
responsibility
area
of the bibliographic description
when the item
is catalog
ed.
Compare with corporate author
See alsojoint author
and pseudonym
.
personal computer (PC)
Any microcomputer
designed for individual use, usually in a personal workspace, 
consisting of a CPU
and associated peripheral
device
s. The term
is often restricted to 
IBM-compatible
microcomputers in which the hardware
is controlled by Intel and the
operating system
by Microsoft. A PC may function as a stand-alone
workstation
or be 
connected to a network
. In a LAN
PCs may function as client
workstations or as file
server
s. See also: laptop
.
personal digital assistant (PDA)
A computer small enough to fit in the palm of the hand or in a small pocket. Some
models accept handwritten input
, others are equipped with a small keyboard
. Because
of their small size, most PDAs do not include a disk drive
. Their capabilities are 
therefore limited to scheduling, note-taking, simple calculations, and storing 
addresses and phone numbers, but some models include slots into which disk drives, 
modem
s, and other peripheral
device
s can be inserted to allow users to exchange 
e-mail
and access
information
on the Web
. Synonymous with handheld computer, 
palmtop, and pocket computer.
personal name
The name given to an animate being, real or imaginary. In the case of a human being,
usually a forename
and surname
or family name, but sometimes a single name 
(Moses, Socrates, etc.), used as the main entry
when work
s by the person are listed in 
the library
catalog
. In a subject heading
, the name may be followed by a parenthetical 
qualifier
for clarification, as in Tarzan (Fictitious character). A qualifier is also
added to the personal name of a nonhuman being to indicate species, as in Dolly 
(Sheep). Compare with corporate name
and geographic name
See also: nickname
and pseudonym
.
personal papers
In archives
, the private document
s and related materials accumulated by an individual
in the course of a lifetime (letters
diaries
, legal document
s, etc.). Personal papers are
subject to the owner’s disposition, in contrast to official papers which may be subject 
to the disposition of an employer or government. See alsopapers
.
personal Web page
Web page
maintained by or for an individual for the purpose of acquainting other 
Internet
users with the views, activities, or work
s of the person whose name is 
500 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
identified with it, sometimes installed at the author
’s expense on a server
maintained 
by a commercial Internet service provider
(ISP). Synonymous with personal 
homepage.
personnel
Seehuman resources
.
pertinence
In information retrieval
, the extent to which a document
retrieved
in response to a 
query
actually satisfies the information need
, based on the user’s current state of 
knowledge
--a narrower concept than relevance
. Although a document may be
relevant to the subject
of the search
, it may already be known to the searcher, written 
in a language
the user does not read, or available in a format
the user is unable or 
unwilling to use.
pest management
Physical and chemical methods employed by a library
or archive
to control or 
eliminate living organisms that infest collection
s (mildew
mold
, insects, rodents, 
etc.), for example, freezing or fumigation
Integrated pest management (IPM) 
strategies begin with careful identification of the nature and habits of the offender(s), 
then rely on nonchemical preventive methods as the first line of defense (control of 
climate, entry points, food sources, etc.). Chemical treatment
s are usually reserved for 
infestations of crisis proportions and pests that do not succumb to less toxic 
alternatives. Click here
to connect to the pest management section of the 
Conservation OnLine (CoOL) Web site
.
pH
A chemical symbol
representing the concentration of hydrogen ions in a given 
substance in aqueous solution, a standard measure of its acidity
or alkalinity
(basicity) 
on a scale of 0-14, with 0=strongly acidic and 14=strongly alkaline, used in 
preservation
to detect acid paper
board
, etc. Since pH is a logarithmic measure, each
unit on the scale represents a factor of 10, with 7.0 (the pH of pure water) the neutral 
point.
pharmacopoeia
book
or online
resource that lists drugs, chemical compounds, and biological 
substances, providing information
on molecular structure and properties, therapeutic 
uses, derivatives, and sometimes formulas for manufacture, and tests for establishing 
identity, purity, strength, etc. (example: The Merck Index or PDR: Physicians’ Desk 
Reference). Most libraries
keep the current
edition
of at least one modern 
pharmacopoeia in the reference section
.
philatelic library
library
devoted to the history of postage stamps and stamp collecting, with a 
collection
consisting of book
s and periodical
s on philately
, auction catalog
s, 
government documents
map
s, clipping
s, etc., for example, the American Philatelic 
Research Library
in State College, Pennsylvania.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested