asp.net c# pdf viewer control : Break pdf password online software SDK cloud windows winforms web page class odlis7-part650

71 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
bibliographic service center
A regional broker in the business of handling access
, communication, training, 
billing, and other services for libraries
located within a given geographic area which 
are connected to an online
bibliographic network
, for example, Nelinet
which 
provides access to and support for OCLC
and a variety of bibliographic database
s to 
libraries in the northeastern U.S. Compare with bibliographic utility
.
bibliographic utility
An organization that provides access
to and support for machine-readable
bibliographic database
s directly to member libraries
or through a network
of regional 
bibliographic service center
s, usually via a proprietary
interface
. The largest
bibliographic utility in the United States is OCLC
.
bibliography
Strictly speaking, a systematic list or enumeration
of written work
s by a specific 
author
or on a given subject
, or which share one or more common characteristics 
(language
, form, period, place of publication
, etc.). When a bibliography is about a
person, the subject is called the bibliographee
. A bibliography may be comprehensive
or selective
. Long bibliographies may be published
serial
ly or in book
form. The
person responsible for compiling
a bibliography is the bibliographer
. Bibliographies
are index
ed by subject in Bibliographic Index: A Cumulative Bibliography of 
Bibliographies published
by H. W. Wilson
. Compare with catalog
See also:
discography
filmography
, and Bibliographical Society of America
.
In the context of scholarly publication
, a list of references to source
cite
d in the text
of an article
or book, or suggested by the author for further reading
, usually given at 
the end of the work. Style manual
s describing citation
format for the various 
discipline
s (APA
MLA
, etc.) are available in the reference section
of most academic 
libraries
and online
via the World Wide Web
.
Also refers to the art and practice of describing books, with particular reference to 
their authorship
publication
, physical form, and literary content
See alsoanalytical 
bibliography
annotated bibliography
biobibliography
current bibliography
national 
bibliography
period bibliography
retrospective bibliography
, and selective 
bibliography
,
biblioholism
An addiction to book
s and book collecting
, a lesser affliction than bibliomania
, but 
more intense than bibliophily
. A term coined by Tom Raabe which appears in the title
of his book Biblioholism: The Literary Addiction (Fulcrum Pub., 1991). Raabe
provides a 25-point quiz for self-diagnosis. Compare with bibliolatry
.
biblioklept
A thief who steals book
s. A bibliokleptomaniac is a person suffering from a 
compulsion to steal books. When library
collection
s are targeted, biblioklepts are 
considered problem patron
s. See alsobibliomania
.
bibliolatry
Break pdf password online - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
c# split pdf; pdf no pages selected to print
Break pdf password online - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
pdf splitter; break a pdf apart
72 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
Excessive reverence for book
s, carried to the point of emotional dependence on them.
A person who is an habitual bookworm
may be at risk of becoming a bibliolater.
Compare with bibliophile
and biblioholism
.
Also refers to excessive devotion to a literal
interpretation of the Bible.
bibliology
The historical and scientific study and description of book
s as physical objects, from 
their origins in human society to the present, including knowledge
of the processes 
and materials (booklore) involved in making them. Compare with codicology
.
bibliomancy
The art of divination through the use of book
s or verse
s of the Bible or some other 
sacred text
. Also, the practice of opening the Bible, or a book of verses or aphorism
such as the I Ching, without previously marking the page
, to discover meaning or 
significance in the passage found.
bibliomania
An obsession or mania for collecting and possessing book
s, especially rare book
s and 
edition
s. In the International Encyclopedia of Information and Library Science
(Routledge: 1997), the origin of the term is attributed to Thomas Frognall Dibdin 
(1776-1845), a writer and bibliographer
who helped establish book collecting
as a 
popular pursuit among English aristocracy of the 19th century.
Some bibliomaniacs are driven by apparent obsession to become biblioklept
s. In a
recent case, Stephen C. Blumberg was convicted on four felony counts, sentenced to 
five years and eleven months in prison, and fined $200,000 after a collection of 
21,000 rare books was found in his home in Iowa, stolen over a period of years from 
approximately 140 libraries
in the United States and Canada. The fact that Mr.
Blumberg had a very comfortable independent income from family trusts suggests 
that his larceny was motivated by the desire to possess rather than profit from his 
illegal activities. Compare with bibliophile
and biblioholism
.
bibliometrics
The use of mathematical and statistical methods to study and identify patterns in the 
usage
of materials
and services within a library
, or to analyze the historical 
development of a specific body of literature
, especially its authorship
publication
and use. Prior to the mid-20th century, the quantitative study of bibliographic
data
and usage was known as statistical bibliographySee alsocitation analysis
.
bibliopegy
The fine art of binding
book
s by hand, performed by a bibliopegist (bookbinder).
bibliophilately
The collection and study of library
-related postage stamps, usually as a hobby (see 
"Bibliophilately Revisited" by Larry Nix in the February 2000 issue
of American 
Libraries
).
bibliophile
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
pdf file specification; cannot print pdf file no pages selected
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. FileType.IMG_JPEG); switch (result) { case ConvertResult. NO_ERROR: Console.WriteLine("Success"); break; case ConvertResult
a pdf page cut; pdf specification
73 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
A person who loves and treasures book
s (especially their physical form), and is 
sufficiently knowledgeable to be able to distinguish edition
s by their characteristics 
and qualities. Most bibliophiles are book collector
s. The opposite of bibliophobe
.
Synonymous with booklover and bibliophilist. Compare with biblioholism
and 
bibliomania
.
bibliophilist
Seebibliophile
.
bibliophobia
An irrational fear or dread of book
s, so intense that the afflicted person, known as a 
bibliophobe, avoids them whenever possible. The opposite of bibliophily
.
bibliopole
bookseller
, especially one who deals in rare book
s and edition
s. See also:
antiquarian bookseller
.
bibliotaph
A person who hoards book
s and hides them from others, even to the extent of keeping
them under lock and key.
bibliotheca
From the Greek biblion ("book") and theke ("to place"). A library
or collection
of 
book
s. Also refers to a list or catalog
of books, especially one prepared by a 
bibliographer
.
Bibliotheque nationale de France (BnF)
The national library
of France, located in Paris. The history of the BnF spans five 
centuries. King Charles V ("The Wise") made the initial gift
of his private library
in 
1368, but continuity in collection development
did not begin until the reign of Louis 
XI (1461-1483). Francis I established the legal depository
in 1537, and the collection
was first classified
in 1670 by Nicolas Clement. During the French Revolution, the
royal library was proclaimed a national library. After the rise of Napoleon Bonparte in
1799, it became an imperial library until the Republic was re-established in 1870. The
creation of a Master Catalog
of Printed
Book
s was initiated in 1874 by Leopold 
Delisle, a medievalist who served as administrator general of the library
from 1874 
until 1905.
In 1994, the Bibliotheque Nationale (BN) and the newly built Bibliotheque de France 
(BDF) merged to form a single entity, the Bibliotheque nationale de France, one of 
the leading libraries in the world. The collections have been brought together in two
locations, the "Site Richelieu" and the "Site Francois Mitterand." The latter welcomes
both scholars (2,000 seats) and the general public (1,700 seats). Click here
to connect 
to the homepage
of the BnF. The Library of Congress
currently host
s the online
exhibit
Creating French Culture: Treasures from the Bibliotheque Nationale de 
France
.
bibliotherapy
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET source code. Offer PDF page break inserting function.
break pdf password online; pdf format specification
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
break pdf documents; break pdf file into parts
74 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
The use of book
s selected on the basis of content
in a planned reading program 
designed to facilitate the recovery of patients suffering from mental illness or 
emotional disturbance. Ideally, the process occurs in three phases: personal
identification of the reader
with a particular character
in the recommended work
resulting in psychological catharsis, which leads to rational insight concerning the 
relevance
of the solution suggested in the text
to the reader’s own experience.
Assistance of a trained psychotherapist is advised. See also: readers’ advisory
.
biennial
Issue
d every two years. Also refers to a serial
publication
issued every two years. See 
alsoannual
triennial
quadrennial
quinquennial
sexennial
septennial
, and 
decennial
.
bifolium
In bookbinding
, a pair of conjoint leaves
(as opposed to a single leaf
), forming four 
page
s when folded. Plural: bifolia.
Bildungsroman
From the German word Bildung (meaning education, culture) and the French word 
roman (novel). A novel
in which the author
traces the maturation of the hero or 
heroine, from the subjectivity of childhood and early adolescence through the 
development of objective self-awareness (examplesThe Magic Mountain by 
Thomas Mann and The Tin Drum by Gunter Grass). Compare with Kuntslerroman
.
bilingual edition
book
or periodical
published
in two language
s, usually because both languages are 
spoken in the country in which the work
was published
(example: English and French
in Canada) or because the work was co-published
in countries with different national 
languages.
bill
A law proposed during a formal session of a legislative body. In AACR2
, bills and 
draft
s of legislation are cataloged
under the heading
for the appropriate legislative 
body.
Example:
A bill to give the consent of Congress to the removal by the 
legislature of the State of Washington of the restrictions upon the 
power of alienation of their lands by the Puyallup Indians : 52d 
Congress, 1st session, S.2306
Main entry
is under the heading for the Senate of the United States.
Also refers to a written statement of the amount owed for goods or services rendered, 
sent by the seller to the purchaser in expectation of prompt payment. In library
acquisitions
, the term invoice
is preferred.
billed
A code used in library
catalog
s and circulation system
s to indicate the circulation 
status
of an item
unavailable due to loss or damage, for which a previous borrower
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
For VB.NET online guide, please refer to Query & device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod
a pdf page cut; break pdf into multiple pages
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
Online C# Guide for XImage.Twain Installation, Deployment RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod
pdf insert page break; break up pdf file
75 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
has been charged an amount usually based on the cost of replacement
. Most libraries
make an effort to replace lost
and damaged
items, even if the patron
fails to pay the 
bill, provided demand
exists and a reasonably priced edition
is still in print
.
bimonthly
Issue
d in alternate months (six times per year). Also refers to a serial
issued every 
other month.
binary
Literally, two. Data
used as input
in a digital
computer must be converted
into code 
made up of the digits 0 and 1, called bit
s. Binary code is transmitted as a series of 
electrical pulses (0 bits at low voltage and 1 bits at higher voltage), stored
as memory
cells. When data file
s in digital format
are displayed as output
, the binary signals are 
translated back into character
s or images. In binary notation, value is indicated by the 
position of the two digits:
0 0 0 0 position
8 4 2 1 value
Thus the decimal number 15 is expressed in binary as 1111. See also: ASCII
.
bind
To fasten the leaves
of a book
together and enclose them in a protective cover
, a 
process known as binding
, originally done by hand
, but in modern book production, 
almost entirely by machine.
binder
A removable cover
used for filing and storing loose
sheet
s, pamphlet
s, and issue
s of 
periodical
s. Commercially-made binders used in libraries
to protect current issue
s of 
magazine
s usually have a transparent front cover to facilitate browsing
See also:
loose-leaf
.
Also refers to a person trained in the art and craft of binding
book
s and other 
publication
s, usually employed in a bindery
. Also used synonymously with bindery.
See alsolibrary binder
.
binder’s board
A stiff, sturdy board
made from pulp
ed fiber derived from rope, wood, or recycled 
paper
, used since the early 18th century to give rigidity to the cover
s of book
published
in hardcover
, and preferred in hand-binding
. Modern high-quality binder’s
board is single-ply
, made by pressing pulp between heavy rollers to achieve the 
desired thickness and smoothness. Synonymous in the U.K. with millboard. Compare
with pasteboard
.
binder’s title
The title
stamped or lettered
on the spine
of a volume
by the binder
, as distinct from 
the cover title
on the publisher
’s edition
or the title printed
on the title page
. Compare
with side title
.
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
are a VB.NET developer, you may see online tutorial for frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
break pdf into multiple files; break a pdf file into parts
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. if (device.Compression != TwainCompressionMode.Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
break a pdf apart; c# split pdf
76 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
bindery
An establishment that performs one or more of the various types of binding
. Some
large libraries
and library system
s have an in-house
bindery usually associated with 
centralized
technical processing
. In smaller libraries, materials
in need of binding or 
rebinding
(back issue
s of periodical
s, paperback
edition
s, etc.) are sent to a 
commercial bindery. See also: library binder
.
binding
The outside covering on a volume
of printed
or blank
leaves
. Books published
in 
hardcover
are bound in board
s covered in cloth
or some other durable
material.
Leather
was used to bind manuscript
s and incunabula
, but is now used mainly in 
hand-binding
Book
s bound in paper
cover
s are called paperback
s. Also refers to the
process of fastening the leaves
or section
s of a publication
together by sewing
or 
stitching
, or by applying adhesive
to the back
, and then attaching a cover by hand or 
by machine under the supervision of a skilled binder. In large libraries
, binding may 
be done in-house
. Smaller libraries usually send materials
to a commercial bindery
. In
any case, most libraries follow an established binding policy
Abbreviated
bdg.
See alsoadhesive binding
antique binding
architectural binding
case binding
cathedral binding
cloisonne
conservation binding
cottage binding
custom binding
easel binding
extended binding
flexible binding
flush binding
imitation binding
jewelled binding
library binding
limp binding
mechanical binding
papier mache 
binding
prelibrary binding
publisher’s binding
rebinding
reinforced binding
, and 
relievo binding
.
binding copy
A worn book
in such poor condition
that it needs to be rebound, provided it is worth 
the expense of rebinding
.
binding edge
The edge at which the leaves
of a book
are attached to one another, usually by sewing
the folded and gathered
section
s together and gluing them to a lining
, or by trimming
away the back fold
and applying strong adhesive
to the loose
leaves. The three outer
edges of a book are the head
foot
or tail, and fore-edge
. Compare with spine
.
binding error
A mistake made in binding
publication
. Common errors include the incorrect
folding of signature
s; leaves
or an entire section
omitted, gathered
in incorrect 
sequence, or bound in upside down; application of the wrong cover
to the body
of the
book
; etc. Under most circumstances, the publisher
will replace such copies
at no 
charge. See also: aberrant copy
.
binding margin
The unprinted space between the binding edge
of a printed
page
and the area that 
bears print
. The width of the inner margin
often determines whether rebinding
is 
possible. Synonymous with back, gutter, and inside margin.
binding policy
77 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
Guidelines established by a library
or library system
concerning the manner in which 
materials
not purchased in permanent binding
are to be bound. Cataloged
monograph
s are usually bound (except for loose-leaf
and spiral bound
materials
), 
pamphlet
s may be placed in pamphlet covers, and serial
s permanently retained are 
usually bound unless converted microform
. Large library systems sometimes have an
in-house
bindery
, but most small and medium-size libraries use a commercial
bindery.
binding slip
A set of written instructions sent by a library
to the bindery
with each volume
or set
of volumes, giving the specifications
by which the item
is to be bound
. A form in
multiple copies
allows the library to maintain a record
of the instructions given.
biobibliography
A list of work
s written by and about an author
, including biographical
sources 
devoted to the author’s life and work.
biographical dictionary
A single-volume
reference work
or set
of reference book
s containing biographical
essay
s about the lives of actual people, sometimes limited to biographees who are 
deceased. Biographical dictionaries may be general (example: Webster’s 
Biographical Dictionary), subject
-specific (Biographical Dictionary of the History 
of Technology), or limited to persons of a specific nationality (American National 
Biography), race (Contemporary Black Biography), field
or profession 
(International Dictionary of Anthropologists), or period or gender (Biographical 
Dictionary of Ancient Greek and Roman Women). Some are published
serial
ly 
(Current Biography Yearbook). Compare with collective biography
.
biography
A carefully research
ed, relatively full narrative
account of the life of a specific person 
or closely related group of people, written by another. The biographer selects the 
most interesting and important events with the intention of elucidating the character 
and personality of the biographee, and placing the subject
’s life in social, cultural, and 
historical context.
The literary form was pioneered by the Roman historians Plutarch, Tacitus, and
Suetonius. English literary biography began with James Boswell’s Life of Samuel 
Johnson published
in 1791. Modern biographers tend to be objective in approach,
but classical
and medieval biographers often wrote to confirm a thesis
or illustrate a 
moral principle. An authorized biography
, written with the consent and sometimes the
cooperation of its subject, may be less critical than an unauthorized biography
.
Biographical work
s are index
ed annual
ly in Biography Index published
by H. W. 
Wilson
and in Biography and Genealogy Master Index published by the Gale Group
.
Also refers to the branch of literature
and history in which the lives of actual people 
are described and analyzed. Compare with autobiography
and memoirs
Abbreviated
biogSee alsobiobibliography
biographical dictionary
collective biography
, and 
hagiography
.
78 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
BIP
SeeB
ooks 
I
P
rint
.
birth and death dates
The dates on which a person was born and died. In library
cataloging
, birth and death 
dates are given immediately following the name in a personal name
heading
, to 
distinguish the person from others of the same name. If the person is still living, the
birth date is given, followed by a hyphen
, and the death date is added later. If the birth
or death date is unknown, the abbreviation
c. (circa
) is used before the estimated date 
to mean "approximately." Birth and death dates are also included in the entries
in 
biographical
reference work
s. See alsofalse date
.
birthday book
A type of book
popular during the Victorian period in which a quotation
from a work
by a well-known writer (usually a poet) is given for each day of the year, with blank
space for autograph
s.
bit
contraction
of binary digit, either of the two values (0 and 1) used in the binary
number system and as the smallest unit of storage
in digital
computers. In personal 
computer
s, data
is stored and processed in 8-bit units called byte
s. In ASCII
code, 
each alphanumeric
character
is represented by a unique sequence of seven bits.
Although bits are used to measure digital transmission speed (bit rate), the capacity of 
storage
(disk
s, file
s, database
s, etc.) is measured in bytes.
bitmap
digital
representation composed of dots arranged in rows and columns, each 
represented by a single bit
of data
that determines the value of a pixel
in a 
monochrome image on a computer screen. In a gray scale or color image, each dot is
composed of a set
of bits that determine the individual values of a group of pixels 
which in combination create the visual impression of a specific shade or hue. The
greater the number of bits per dot, the wider the range of possible shades or hues.
The number of dots per square inch (density) determines the resolution
of a 
bitmapped image. Resolution may also be expressed as the number of rows multiplied
by the number of columns in the map. When document
s are scanned
into a computer, 
the image on the page
is automatically converted
into a bitmapped image that can be 
viewed on a monitor
. Also spelled bit mapSee alsodigital imaging
.
biweekly
Issue
d twice each month. Also refers to a serial
issued twice a month. Synonymous
with semimonthly
.
Black Caucus of the American Library Association (BCALA)
Founded in 1970, BCALA has a membership of black librarian
s and black persons 
interested in promoting librarianship
and encouraging active participation by 
African-Americans in library association
s and at all levels of the profession. BCALA
publishes
the bimonthly
BCALA NewsletterClick here
to connect to the BCALA
79 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
homepage
.
black face
Seeboldface
.
black letter
Seegothic
.
Blackwell
A commercial company that supplies book
s and bibliographic support products and 
systems to academic
research
, and public libraries
worldwide. Click here
to connect 
to the Blackwell homepage
.
blank
leaf
intentionally left unprinted in a book
, usually preceding the half-title
and/or 
following the back matter
. Also refers to any page
or sheet
of paper
(or other writing 
surface) that does not bear written or printed
matter
. Compare with white space
.
blankbook
book
consisting of clean or rule
leaves
for writing or making entries, with printing
limited to page
heading
s and/or divisions. Examples include diaries
album
s, 
scrapbook
s, account books, exercise books, etc. Because the information
record
ed in 
official blankbooks may be of permanent value, good quality paper
and durable
binding
s are commonly used.
blanket order
An agreement in which a publisher
or dealer
supplies to a library
or library system
one copy
of each title
as issue
d, on the basis of a profile
established in advance by the
purchaser. Blanket order plans are used mainly by large academic
and public libraries
to reduce the amount of time required for selection
and acquisition
, and to speed the 
process of getting new titles into circulation
. Unlike approval plan
s, most blanket 
order plans do not allow returns
. One of the best-known examples in the United
States is the Greenaway Plan
. Synonymous with gathering planSee alsobook lease 
plan
.
blanking
In binding
, the application of a heated brass stamp
to the cloth
cover
of a book
to 
create a glossy impression to serve as a base for lettering
or for a stamped decoration.
bleed
In printing
, to run an illustration
off the trimmed
edge of the page
without leaving 
space for a margin
. A page can bleed in more than one direction depending on how
many edges are touched by the image printed on it. Also refers to text
cropped
too 
closely in binding
.
blind
In bookbinding
, a procedure done without further embellishment, for example, 
tooling
stamped on a leather binding
without the addition of ink
or gold leaf
to 
highlight the design. See alsoblind page
.
80 of 733
31.1.2004 14:55
Also refers to a person whose vision is severely impaired
, eligible to receive library
services through the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically 
Handicapped (NLS)
.
blind folio
leaf
in a manuscript
or book
, included in the foliation
but not given a folio
number.
Compare with blind page
.
blind page
page
in a book
, usually the half-title
title page
dedication
, or a blank
page, 
included in the pagination
but not given a page number
. Compare with blind folio
.
blind reference
cross-reference
in an index
or catalog
, directing the reader
to a heading
that does 
not exist in the same index or catalog.
block book
A form of book
containing text
alone, or text with picture
s, printed
entirely from 
woodcut
s on only one side of each leaf
. Block books originated in Europe during the
15th century at the same time as printing from movable type
and may have been an 
inexpensive alternative to books produced on a printing press
. The best known
example is the Biblia Pauperum
(Bible of the Poor) printed in large quantities during 
the second half of the 15th century. Fewer than two dozen copies
are known to have 
survived. See alsoxylography
.
blockbuster
slang
term
for a new book
for which the sale of a very large number
of copies
is 
virtually guaranteed, usually due to the reputation or popularity of the author
(Mary 
Higgins Clark, Stephen King, Danielle Steel, etc.). Public libraries
often order such 
title
s in multiple copies to satisfy initial demand
. Also refers to the willingness of
publisher
s to repeatedly sign such authors and promote their work
s, sometimes to the 
neglect of writers of lesser fame whose works deserve to be read. Synonymous with
megabook. Compare with bestseller
.
blocked
The status of the borrower account
of a patron
who is barred from checking out
materials
from the library
, usually because fines
for overdue
item
s remain unpaid.
Most electronic circulation system
s are designed to automatically block a patron 
record
under conditions prescribed by the library.
blocking
The process of impressing letter
s or a decorative design on the cover
of a book
in ink
metal foil/leaf
, or blind
, using an engraved
plate
called a brass (binder’s die) mounted
on a blocking press. Synonymous in the U.S. with stamping.
Also refers to the tendency of the leaves
of a book
or other bound
publication
to stick 
together, forming a solid block after they have been exposed to water, a problem that 
can be mitigated by standing the wet item
on end with the leaves fanned open to 
allow them to air dry. Leaves of coated
paper
can be difficult to separate without 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested