asp.net c# view pdf : Break pdf into smaller files control SDK system web page wpf azure console NewTek_LiveText2_Users_Guide1-part89

2.2.3 STEP 3 
If you wish to have a convenient Desktop 
or Quick Launch icon to launch LiveText, 
click the appropriate switches and click 
Next. 
2.2.4 STEP 4 
Review your previous selection, and then 
press Install
Figure 3
Figure 4
Break pdf into smaller files - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
reader split pdf; pdf splitter
Break pdf into smaller files - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
c# split pdf; pdf specification
2.2.5 STEP 5 
With Launch NewTek LiveText check-marked, 
click Finish to proceed to the Registration 
pane. 
2.2.6 STEP 6 
If your LiveText system is connected 
to Internet, you can click the ͞ ͞ lick 
here͟ button to perform your 
LiveText registration online. 
Otherwise, note the Product ID 
shown in this panel and visit the 
registration web page as shown to 
register your software and receive 
your unlock code. 
At this point, you can begin to work 
with LiveText! 
Figure 5
Figure 6 
2.3 MAKING THE CONNECTION 
LiveText is designed to play an important role as an integral component in a live production suite.  
In this configuration, the LiveText workstation is connected to the live switching unit (such as a 
Tri aster™) across a network. 
A peer-to-peer network connection can be established between the two units using a crossover 
cable.  Often though, the LiveText workstation will be a client on a larger LAN (local area 
network), which network also includes the live production system.  (In this configuration, displays 
from additional networked systems may also be available to the live production system as video 
sources via NewTek͛s iVGA utility.) 
Naturally, the existence of the network connection is critical if you wish to use LiveText in a 
͚direct-to-air͛ application.  A ͚hard-wired͛ Ethernet connection is preferred – and ͚the faster the 
better͛ (Gigabit networking is strongly recommended, especially for more demanding use such as 
long animated scrolls or crawls. For HD sessions, it should be considered mandatory.)  
Note that the LiveText host and networked live production system must be on the same local 
subnet.  Also, if your LiveText host is protected by a firewall, you will need to either disable the 
firewall, or configure it to allow LiveText access to the network. 
Network throughput can be quite variable in some environments (such as a corporate or 
tradeshow network.)  To the extent you can ensure non-essential network traffic does 
not interfere with LiveText operation during live production, you will enjoy more peace of 
mind. 
In most cases, at this point your network connection is correctly established and you are ͚good to 
go.͛  (If you should happen to run into a connection issue, see Appendix B – Networking Notes for 
information on diagnosing network problems).  
Otherwise, you can skip right to the next chapter – Titling Tools. 
Performance Note: Realtime playback depends on several factors. For example, 
previewing a scroll in the edit window could cause another scroll playing Live to skip on 
some systems. To be safe, it’s always wise to test prior to important live events. 
2.4 A SIMPLE EXAMPLE 
Let͛s try creating a simple title page: 
Figure 7 
1. Click the T in Text and Drawing, then click in the Canvas to set the insertion point 
2. Type ͞LiveText͟, press Enter, then type ͞Productions͟ 
Figure 8 
3. Click the Arrow (Select) button, and drag out a box (marquee) to surround both lines of 
text on the Canvas, selecting them (Figure 8). 
Figure 9 
4. Click the Style tab (below the Canvas), and then click thumbnail number 4 in the Styles 
bin area.  This will immediately add color and beveling to the (selected) text you entered 
previously. 
Figure 10 
10 
5. Click the View tab, and turn on Safe Area, to help compose your page 
Figure 11 
6. Next, click both the Vertical and Horizontal Center buttons in the Alignment section of 
the Tool Panel, centering the text on the Canvas. 
Figure 12 
7. With both lines of text still selected, click Group (in the Alignment section) to link them 
together 
8. Then drag a corner point of the grouped text to make it larger (use your judgment, using 
the Safe Area overlay as a guide – the inner rectangle denotes the traditional ͚text safe͛ 
margin.) 
11 
Figure 13 
9. Click the Filled Rectangle button in Text and Drawing 
Figure 14 
10. Click thumbnail number 6 in the Styles tab, and drag out a rectangle in the Canvas that 
completely covers your text. 
Figure 15 
12 
Figure 16 
11. Select the rectangle (using the Arrow tool), and click Send Backward in the Alignment 
section 
Figure 17 
12. Go on to adjust Tracking, Leading in the tabbed Text and Drawing controls beneath the 
Canvas, and finish up by adding a Shadow to your text 
Figure 18
13 
2.5 USING PAGE TEMPLATES 
A large number of gorgeous and very useful Page Templates are included with LiveText, to speed 
you on your way.  You can easily modify these to suit your own production designs. 
Figure 19 
1. Select Add Page from the drop-down menu in the Pages panel at right (Figure 19). 
2. As you slide your mouse down the list, notice that a thumbnail fly-out keeps pace 
showing a preview for each template. 
14 
3. Select Emerald 1, loading that template into the Canvas for modifications 
Figure 20 
4. Click the T button (Text)  in the Text and Drawing control panel at upper-left, and 
slide you mouse around over the text fields in the Canvas 
5. Notice that a black outline surrounds each text line in turn.  Select the text inside 
one of these outlines, and change it to suit your need. 
Figure 21 
ongratulations, with LiveText you͛re a G artist.  Could it be any easier?  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested