.Pdf printing in thumbnail size - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
best online pdf compressor; change font size pdf
.Pdf printing in thumbnail size - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
best pdf compressor online; change font size in pdf file
Page
4
LIFETIME
What Kids Can Do
ENLACE Florida
On the cover:Vincent Evans, 20, a senior at Florida A&M University, has his mind set on a career
in politics, in part because of his involvement with the student advocacy group ENLACE Florida.
14
Page
Page
22
:    
Writing:Patricia L. Brennan    Editing:David S. Powell  
Editorial assistance:Gloria Ackerson and Jeanna Keller
Photography: Pages 16 and 17: Greet Van Belle; Page 28: provided by ENLACE Florida;
all other photos: Shawn Spence Photography  
Design: IronGate Creative    Printing: Mossberg & Company, Inc.
Create Thumbnail Winforms | Online Tutorials
For information about saving & printing images in Create Thumbnail; Generate Barcodes on Your Documents; Read Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode
pdf page size; adjust size of pdf in preview
VB.NET Image: Visual Basic .NET Guide to Draw Text on Image in .
can adjust the text font, font size, font type System.IO Imports System.Drawing.Printing Imports RasterEdge & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change font size in pdf; acrobat compress pdf
PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE
Networks can multiply
the power of change
Lumina Foundation Lessonsis an occasional publica-
tion in which we share the results of our grantees’
work. By thoughtfully assessing the programs and
organizations we fund and then sharing what we learn
from those efforts,we hope to broaden and deepen
the impact of Lumina’s
grant making. Also, we
hope publications such
as this can help boost
the effectiveness of the
organizations and indi-
viduals who do the
front-line work of increasing college access and success.
That work is vital as we seek to achieve our Big Goal:
that, by 2025,60 percent of Americans will hold high-
qualitypostsecondary degrees and credentials.
If you’re at all familiar with Lumina Foundation for Education, you know that we
are committed to a specific national goal for college success. Our “Big Goal” is this:
By 2025, we want 60 percent of Americans to hold high-quality postsecondary
degrees or credentials.
Also, if you have any knowledge of current college-completion rates, you can see
that our Big Goal is aptly named. Today, only about 40 percent of Americans have
at least a two-year degree — a percentage that has been essentially unchanged for
nearly half a century. We understand that it will be a huge challenge for the nation
to reach a 60 percent completion rate in the next 15 years.
Still, my Lumina colleagues and I are confident the Big Goal can be reached, in
part because we have seen the tremendous potential of collaborative action. When
organizations and individuals work in productive partnership — that is, when they
establish and maintain effective networks — imposing barriers can be overcome and
ambitious goals achieved.
For us, the term “network” has particular meaning. In
fact, largely as a result of our work in a national college
awareness and action campaign called KnowHow2GO, we
have come to define networks in a specific way — and we
ask our KnowHow2GO grantees and partners to form net-
works that fit that definition.
For us, a strong and sustainable network for increasing
college access and success must be built on five dimensions:
1.An infrastructure that enables members to identify and 
achieve a shared purpose.
2.Service system cohesion, improvement and sustainability.
3.Data-based decision making about priorities, policies 
and practices.
4.Expertise in college access and success issues and advocacy for supportive public policies.
5.Creation and dissemination of knowledge within the network and beyond.
Already, such networks are leading the KnowHow2GO effort in 16 states. We’re
also working hard to establish networks in additional states by bringing together
community-based pre-college advising programs; local education funds; colleges
and universities; and existing programs such as TRIO, GEAR-UP and other univer-
sity-based efforts.
Of course, the KnowHow2GO campaign isn’t the only example of networks in
action. In fact, the principles of effective networks — principles articulated elo-
quently by Paul Vandeventer, president and CEO of Community Partners, in his
book Networks that Work— are being embraced by any number of Lumina grantees
and partner organizations.
This issue of Lumina Foundation Lessonsmagazine highlights three such organizations,
all of which are working tirelessly to promote college success among low-income
and minority students.
In this issue of Lessons, you’ll learn about the LIFETIME program, which assists
welfare mothers in their quest for college attainment in California. You’ll read about
the Providence, R.I.-based organization What Kids Can Do, which empowers stu-
dents to tell their own stories as a means of boosting postsecondary success. Finally,
in Florida, you’ll meet the organizers — and especially the students — who are
involved in the policy-advocacy group ENLACE. 
We at Lumina are proud to support these organizations and to share the lessons
they have learned. After all, dissemination of knowledge is one of the hallmarks of
any successful network, and we certainly want ournetwork — the one dedicated to
achieving the Big Goal — to succeed.
Jamie P. Merisotis
President and CEO
Lumina Foundation for Education
XImage.Raster for .NET, Comprehensive .NET RasterImage SDK
resolution printing; More about Image Saving & Printing Create thumbnail directly in image. provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
adjust size of pdf file; pdf compress
VB.NET Image: How to Create Visual Basic .NET Windows Image Viewer
image, rotating and flipping an image, printing & saving including png, jpeg, gif, tiff, bmp, PDF, and Word You can accurately define the size and location of
best way to compress pdf; reader shrink pdf
VB.NET Image: How to Draw Annotation on Doc Images with Image SDK
and bmp) or documents (like multi-page TIFF, Microsoft Office Word and PDF file You can freely control the annotation shapes, the outline size (width and height
pdf change page size; pdf compression
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Create Watermark on Images in .NET
font type "Times New Roman", size "16", and style System.IO Imports System.Drawing. Printing Imports RasterEdge & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf markup text size; change page size pdf acrobat
California’s LIFETIME program
      
    
 -- 
 L
UMINA
F
OUNDATION
L
ESSONS
I
S
PRING
2010
D
iana Spatz’s motto for living is simple: You have to dream big.
Spatz knows firsthand the power of her affirmation. She’s been
dreaming big and thinking outside the box for most of her life.
Her story begins in 1986, when Spatz — pregnant, homeless and
suffering from depression — found the courage to break free from
an abusive relationship. To survive, she relied on public assistance
and took a minimum-wage job cleaning houses for $4.75 an hour.
Spatz, now 48, says the birth of her daughter inspired her to
build a better future. Armed with a newfound sense of purpose,
she set her sights on college.
C# Image: How to Draw Text on Images within Rasteredge .NET Image
such as adjusting text font size, color, style and System.IO; using System.Drawing. Printing; using RasterEdge & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
change paper size in pdf; best way to compress pdf file
VB.NET Image: How to Create New Images Using VB.NET Codes in .NET
the complete VB.NET sample codes for printing a high settings like image color and size according to powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
change paper size in pdf document; change pdf page size
That enthusiasm was almost derailed,
however, when the county welfare
department sanctioned Spatz, essen-
tially labeling her as a welfare cheat.
She later learned that her caseworker
had mistakenly counted a Pell grant as
part of her income. 
“Even though I was getting help
through Expanded Opportunity Pro-
gram and Services, the Latino Service
Center and the Re-entry Program, no
one seemed to know how the welfare
rules applied to higher education. I was
pretty much left on my own to figure it
out,” Spatz says. 
A legal aid attorney helped Spatz win
her appeal, getting her welfare benefits
reinstated. But the experience left
Spatz frustrated. 
“I was close to quitting school. The
intersection of these two systems —
higher education and welfare — didn’t
work. Welfare mothers didn’t have the
information, connections or resources
they needed,” Spatz says.         
Grassroots beginning
Spatz set out to help low-income sin-
gle mothers overcome the procedural
hurdles barring the way to higher edu-
cation. She began organizing in the
Oakland area and on college campuses,
creating fliers and holding workshops
to inform parents about their education
rights under welfare laws. It was after
she received a scholarship to the Uni-
versity of California-Berkeley — where
she graduated with honors — that
LIFETIME was officially born.
In 1996, LIFETIME (Low-Income
Families’ Empowerment through Educa-
tion) was a fledgling organization that
Spatz ran out of her home. “Employees”
consisted of five single mothers who
had completed college while on welfare
and who now volunteered their time to
help others do the same. 
Despite its small staff, LIFETIME had
lofty goals: To equip thousands of low-
income parents with information and
access to social networks so that they
could enter and complete college and
escape poverty for good.
With a service learning class she
developed at UC-Berkeley as a model,
Spatz started training low-income parent-
students on welfare laws and policy-
making. The goal was to build a local
and state network of parent advocates —
people who could speak out on welfare
reform, provide personal testimony to
government officials and, most impor-
tant, become empowered to serve as
community leaders.
“If you want to know what a poor
family needs, ask them. Parents need to
be at the table when policies about
their future are created,” Spatz says.
“LIFETIME came together because a
group of welfare mothers were forced
to fight the system to become edu-
cated. We got a second chance, and we
want to make sure others get their sec-
ond chance as well.”
Today, Spatz is a widely respected
advocate on welfare reform and poverty.
LIFETIME has grown from a grassroots
organization into a movement of par-
ent-student advocates who work to
help welfare mothers share the message
that higher education is their path to
economic freedom.
Every year, more than 2,000 parents
benefit directly from LIFETIME’s serv-
ices. The group provides financial aid
counseling, peer mentoring, work-
shops, a speakers’ bureau, and a Student
Parent Action Network (SPAN) that
engages low-income parents and their
children in policy education and com-
munity organizing.
LIFETIME also maintains a statewide
Parent Leadership Committee, which
involves welfare parents in policy
discussions concerning the reauthoriza-
tionof Temporary Assistance for Needy
Families (TANF) and its implementa-
tion in California. Since 2001, more
than 400 student-parents — individuals
who attend college while receiving
benefits from the California Work
Opportunities and Responsibility to
Kids (CalWORKs) program — have
joined the committee. 
In addition to awareness and out-
reach efforts, the group has testified at
numerous Congressional briefings, state
hearings, and state and national confer-
ences on issues of welfare reform, family
poverty and education. 
LIFETIME’s motivation to train wel-
fare mothers as policy advocates is
rooted in the overhaul of the welfare
system under President Bill Clinton.
The Aid to Families with Dependent
Children (AFDC) Act was replaced by
the 1996 Personal Responsibility and
Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act
(PRWORA). As part of PRWORA,
Congress created the TANF block
grant program. 
New welfare rules
TANF created several new rules for
welfare, including: 
Mandatory work requirements. 
A 60-month federal lifetime limit on 
benefits, education and training 
programs.
An emphasis on quickly moving from
welfare to work.
Limitations on participation in higher
education. 
Critics of TANF say the program has
created more barriers than opportuni-
ties for recipients, especially with
regard to college access and success.
As originally implemented in 1997,
TANF required 20 hours of work partic-
ipation per week. By 2002, the required
number of hours had increased to 35.
Postsecondary education was not
specifically listed as an allowable work
activity. It was up to the states to deter-
mine the kinds of educational opportu-
nities available to welfare participants.
Spatz says most states allowed less than
one year of postsecondary education
before cutting benefits.
TANF had an immediate chilling
effect on college participation among
“I was close to 
quitting school. The
intersection of these
two systems—higher
education and 
welfare—didn’t work.”
Diana Spatz, 
LIFETIME (Low-Income Families’
Empowerment through Education)
 L
UMINA
F
OUNDATION
L
ESSONS
I
S
PRING
2010
Continued on Page 8
VB.NET Image: Web Image and Document Viewer Creation & Design
document pages with zero footprint and thumbnail preview support Basic project is capable of printing current image toolkit to print bitonal images, PDF, and so
change font size pdf text box; pdf files optimized
VB.NET Image: Compress & Decompress Document Image; RasterEdge .
System.IO Imports System.Drawing.Printing Imports RasterEdge decompressing: reduce Word document size according to Scanned PDF encoding and decoding: compress a
adjust file size of pdf; adjust size of pdf
LIFETIME founder Diana Spatz, a welfare
mother herself in the late 1980s in Oakland,
Calif., fought hard to attend college and
wound up graduating with honors from UC-
Berkeley. She now works to make sure that
other low-income single moms “get their
second chance” at a college education.
welfare recipients. According to a
Center for Law and Social Policy study,
State Opportunities to Provide Access to Post-
secondary Education under TANF, the num-
ber of AFDC/TANF families reporting
participation in postsecondary educa-
tion or training fell from 172,176 in
1996 to 58,055 in 1998. Studies in sev-
eral states reflected similar findings.
Enrollment of welfare recipients at the
City University of New York dropped
by 77 percent — from 22,000 in 1996
to 5,000 in 2000. And in Massachu-
setts, welfare recipients’ enrollment in
the state’s 15 community colleges
dropped by an average of 46 percent
between 1995 and 1997, according to a
2002 study by the Center for Women
Policy Studies.
Education and training are instru-
mental in improving individuals’ eco-
nomic circumstances, particularly
among low-income populations. Many
welfare recipients say TANF’s work
requirements make it difficult to bal-
ance work, child care and school.
Requirements vary by state, and some
states have stiffer requirements than
others. In California, CalWORKs
requires 32 hours of weekly work or
participation in “welfare to work” activi-
ties for single parents and 35 hours for
two-parent families. 
TANF is a federal program, but states
are responsible for designing their
TANF programs and determining
income eligibility and benefit levels.
While some states enacted model legis-
lation and programs to promote access
to higher education and other educa-
tion supports, most did not. Even
today, many states limit postsecondary
education as an allowable work activity
for welfare recipients.  
Spatz argues that TANF should do
much more to invest in poor families.
Among her suggestions:
Temporarily stop the 60-month fed-
eral lifetime limit on welfare payments
for college-bound recipients.
Strengthen the focus on outcomes, 
such as education and career-path 
employment. 
Allow greater flexibility for countable
work activities.
Provide additional subsidies for child 
care and textbooks.
Continued from Page 6
Giving up is not an option for Dawn Love — even though
she’s had plenty of reasons to do just that. Love became a single
parent in 2000, after the father of her daughter was jailed. With
rent due and the bills piling up, Love says she did what she had
to do: She turned to welfare.
“I was out of options,” Love explains. “I had a child to clothe
and feed and bills to pay.”
“There are a lot of misperceptions about welfare,” says Love,
now 37. “People look at you and say you’re lazy, just collecting a
check from the government. But every story is a different situation.”
Love had just enrolled in Chabot College, seeking the skills
she needed to make a better life for herself and her daughter. She
now feared those plans were in jeopardy. Her welfare caseworker
couldn’t — or wouldn’t —
help, Love says. She then
learned about a workshop
that LIFETIME was con-
ducting at a nearby Cal-
WORKs office.
Love attended the meet-
ing, which she now calls a
“transformative moment”
in her life.
“My caseworker wasn’t
helping, and I didn’t know
where to turn. LIFETIME
showed me how to navigate
the (welfare) system and get my questions answered,” says Love.
Grateful for the help she got from LIFETIME, Love became
an intern for the organization in 2001 and later a peer advocate.
Among her responsibilities, Love works with low-income parents
to educate them about welfare rules that allow them to pursue
postsecondary education and training as a welfare-to-work activity.
“It’s sad, but some caseworkers simply don’t care,” she says.
“Their message is: ‘You shouldn’t go to school; you need to go
to work.’ In other instances, parents don’t know the right ques-
tions to ask about higher education,” Love says.
Love reached her own higher education milestone in 2009, when
she earned an associate’s degree in human services. Next year,
she plans to begin her bachelor’s degree in human development.
Love is no longer on welfare. In addition to conducting workshops
for California community colleges and local organizations, she pro-
videsone-on-one mentoring to welfare parents. The work is both
informational and inspirational, and it’s become her “passion,” she says.
“In my own life, I’ve come full circle. I have a learning disabil-
ity, and there were many, many times I wanted to give up. But I
didn’t.  LIFETIME put me on the path to college. Today, I am
paying it forward,” Love says.
Once ‘out of options,’
ex-welfare mother
is now giving back
 L
UMINA
F
OUNDAT ION
L
ESSONS
I
S
PRING
2010
“There are a lot of
misperceptionsabout
welfare...but every
story is a different
situation.”
LIFETIME peer advocate Dawn Love
Continued on Page 10
Dawn Love, a former welfare mom in 
Oakland, Calif., says her life has ”come
full circle.” In her work wih LIFETIME, she
now serves as a peer advocate, helping
low-income parents pursue postsecondary
training as a welfare-to-work activity.
 L
UMINA
F
OUNDAT ION
L
ESSONS
I
S
PRING
2010
Former welfare mom Melissa Johnson and daughter Brooklyn shared an important moment in 2008, when Johnson
accepted her nursing degree from Woodland Community College. “It was important that my daughter was there,”
Johnson recalls. “She’s the reason for my determination.”
“We were told that the issue of count-
ing education as a welfare-to-work
activity was dead, that we were too
articulate to be welfare moms. That
didn’t bode well for my idea of bringing
parents together to create policies that
could make a difference,” Spatz says.
Create partnerships between higher 
education and advocacy groups to 
inform welfare recipients about how 
to take advantage of postsecondary 
opportunities.
“We believe that higher education
should be a priority and a requirement
for everystate,” says Spatz. “Not an
option, but a requirement.”
In 1997, LIFETIME took that message
to Sacramento, where the California
Legislature was developing its TANF/
CalWORKs program. The meeting did
not go well, Spatz recalls.  
10  L
UMINA
F
OUNDATION
L
ESSONS
I
S
PRING
2010
Continued from Page 8
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested