21  L
UMINA
F
OUNDATION
L
ESSONS
I
S
PRING
2010
San Francisco City College student Luisa
Sicairos, 18, is committed to “making
positive change” — and she’s inspired
by her sister Viridiana, a frequent cell-
phone confidant. Viri, 15, is autistic.
Change font size pdf form - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
adjust size of pdf; change font size on pdf text box
Change font size pdf form - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
change font size in fillable pdf form; can a pdf be compressed
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
best way to compress pdf file; can a pdf file be compressed
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C#.NET class. Support to change font size in PDF form. Able to delete form fields from adobe PDF file.
advanced pdf compressor; change font size in pdf form field
E
dwin Estevez has fond memories of playing catch with his
father in the Dominican Republic, but the recollections aren’t
merely nostalgic. Even today, Estevez draws on those childhood
experiences for valuable life lessons.
“My father would throw the baseball very fast,” Estevez recalls.
“He was trying to teach me to stay on task — even when it
appeared harder than my abilities would allow me to perform.”
Today, Estevez is the one who’s bringing the heat in his work as a
senior researcher for ENLACE Florida. The organization, created in
2007, is a statewide network that promotes college readiness, access
and success for Latinos and other underrepresented students.
ENLACE Florida
      
      
  
23  L
UMINA
F
OUNDATION
L
ESSONS
I
S
PRING
2010
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color. Abilities to draw markups on PDF document or stamp on PDF file.
change pdf page size; best compression pdf
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
change font size pdf text box; acrobat compress pdf
“Network” is a key word in that descrip-
tion.ENLACE (pronounced en-LAH-say)
is derived from the Spanish word enlazar,
which means to weave a connection so
that the whole is stronger than its parts —
and the group depends on intercon-
nectedness as it tackles the important
work of increasing college completion.
The push to enroll and graduate
more students from college is sup-
ported by workforce trends. Labor
economists and other experts say that,
in coming years, the vast majority of
well-paying jobs will require education
or training beyond high school.
Already, the business sector is calling
for more college-educated workers: A
survey released early this year by the
Business Roundtable reports that 65
percent of employers require an associ-
ate’s degree or higher for the majority
of available jobs.
A talent gap looms
Unfortunately, millions of young
people run the risk of never qualifying
for the 21st century workforce.
In Florida, this reality has become
increasingly palpable. Closing the Talent
Gap, A Business Perspective— a January
2010 report from the Florida Council of
100 — forecasts a severe “talent gap”
for Florida. For the state to reach the
education level of the 10 most produc-
tive states within the next two decades,
it will need 4.5 million adults with bac-
calaureate degrees. That’s 1.3 million
more than are expected at current
attainment rates, the report says.
Florida’s looming human capital crisis
is reflected in the following statistics:
Of every 100 Florida students today, 
76 will graduate from high school, 51
will attend college, and 32 will earn a
bachelor’s degree within six years. 
(Closing the Talent Gap, Florida Council 
of 100, January 2010.)
More than 55 percent of all students 
entering Florida’s public postsecondary
institutions require remediation in 
math, reading, and/or writing. Ninety-
four percent of students who need 
remediation attend community colleges.
(Half of College Students Needing Remediation
Drop Out, Office of Program Policy 
Analysis and Government Accounta-
bility, May 2007.)
At Miami Dade College, 80 percent 
of incoming students need remedial 
courses before they can begin college-
level coursework. About 25 percent 
need remediation in all three basic skills
areas — reading, writing, and math. 
(Assessing and Improving Student Outcomes:
What We Are Learning at Miami Dade 
College, Community College Research
Center/Achieving the Dream,
January 2008)
ENLACE Florida is committed to
improving the higher education pathway
for Florida’s students. The organization,
which has received funding from the
W.K. Kellogg Foundation as well as
Lumina Foundation, pursues several
strategies to advance its college-access
and success agenda, including policy
research, advocacy and student support.
ENLACE — an acronym forENgaging
Latino, African-American andother
Communities for Education — makes a
point of enlisting students in its activities.
“Students are the foot soldiers for
many of our policy efforts,” explains
Paul Dosal, ENLACE’s executive direc-
tor. “They represent a valuable compo-
nent of the policy conversations that
are taking place.”
Two years ago, ENLACE Florida cre-
ated a policy/advocacy model for student
leadership development called the
Florida Student Education Policy con-
ference (FSEP). The effort, which is the
first of its kind in the state, immerses
students in the process of policymaking.
“We’re giving students — the individ-
uals most affected by higher education
policy decisions — a voice in the
process,” Estevez says. “The idea is to
open up a channel of communication
between students and policy leaders —
one that can lead to meaningful
improvements in college readiness,
access and success.”
The conference is structured in five
phases, beginning in the fall with a
competitive recruitment process for
student delegates. Once selected, stu-
dents do research on their assigned
education theme. They gather data;
interview community members, policy-
makers, higher education leaders and
others; develop and write policy analy-
ses; interact with students from other
delegations and, finally, prepare their
presentations for the conference.
Networks that last
Students also collaborate with other
delegations. Communicating with the
help of digital tools such as Facebook,
Twitter, YouTube and Blackboard, stu-
dents build their own networks of stu-
dent advocates — networks that remain
active once the conference has ended.
During the conference, students par-
ticipate in a mock legislative process to
debate and discuss the policy recom-
mendations developed by each of the
delegations. Using data and other
research to challenge each other, they
eventually reach consensus and then
craft their final policy recommenda-
tions. This year, the conference themes
included financial aid and high school
curriculum reform.
The effort culminates with ENLACE
Florida Day at Florida’s State Capitol,
where students present their policy
recommendations to legislators. Among
the suggestions students made this year:
Higher curriculum standards in K-12,
tougher graduation requirements in
high school and a change in the way
Florida disburses its financial aid.
Paul Dosal, executive director of
ENLACE Florida, understands the
power of youth. “Students are the
foot soldiers for many of our policy
efforts,” he says.
24  L
UMINA
F
OUNDATION
L
ESSONS
I
S
PRING
2010
Continued on Page 27
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links
pdf font size change; 300 dpi pdf file size
Generate Barcodes in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
Select "Generate" to process barcode generation; Change Barcode Properties. Select "Font" to choose human-readable text font style, color, size and effects;
adjust pdf size preview; reader pdf reduce file size
Edwin Estevez, a senior researcher for ENLACE Florida,
meets with students during their visit to the Capitol to meet
with Florida lawmakers. “We’re giving students...a voice in
the process,” he says, “one that can lead to meaningful
improvements in college readiness, access and success.”
VB.NET Image: Visual Basic .NET Guide to Draw Text on Image in .
Please note that you can change some of the example, you can adjust the text font, font size, font type (regular LoadImage) Dim DrawFont As New Font("Arial", 16
pdf page size may not be reduced; change page size pdf
Generate Image in .NET Winforms Imaging Viewer| Online Tutorials
Click "Generate" to process barcode generation; Change Barcode Properties. Click "Font" to choose human-readable text font style, color, size and effects.
best pdf compression tool; batch pdf compression
Students from campuses across Florida gather at
the Historic Capitol in Tallahassee prior to their
visit with legislators. The event, held in March,
demonstrated ENLACE’s hands-on approach to
policymaking and leadership development.
Students also share their personal
stories with Florida’s lawmakers, offer-
ing insight on the challenges facing
first-generation college students and
suggesting steps policymakers might
take to minimize those barriers.
ENLACE’s hands-on approach to
policymaking generates real interest
and enthusiasm among students for
higher education reform. It enhances
students’ understanding of policy analy-
sis and advocacy, and at the same time
it allows students to offer input on
issues affecting their college education
and that of future generations.
“Students leave the conference feel-
ing that they actually have a voice
worth hearing in the 21st century,” says
Linda Goudy, an ENLACE adviser from
the Florida Institute of Education. “This
alone goes a long way in helping stu-
dents develop a sense of self as some-
one who has something worthy to say.
And now they’ve learned a way in
which they can say it and in which
many people of influence will hear them.”
“Florida students want to be heard,”
Estevez says. “If we empower them by
giving them a voice in the process,
ENLACE is better positioned to help
advocate for policies that truly reflect
the needs of students.”
‘Incredibly articulate’
And policymakers are listening.
Florida’s state senators and representa-
tives are overwhelmingly positive in
their reactions to students’ comments.
“The ENLACE students were incredi-
bly articulate, well-informed and sur-
prisingly objective when they met with
legislators to present their policy rec-
ommendations,” recalls Democrat State
Sen. Nan H. Rich. “I was so impressed
by what they had to say that I used
some of their arguments when I spoke
about higher education on the floor last
year. Our legislators need to listen more
at the grassroots level,” Rich insists.
“As a former high school teacher, it’s
gratifying to see students involved at a
young age in advocacy work,” adds
State Rep. Dwight M. Bullard, also a
Democrat. “Even more important, at
the end of the day, ENLACE and its
work with students remind those of us
who are 20 or 30 years removed from
27  L
UMINA
F
OUNDATION
L
ESSONS
I
S
PRING
2010
Continued from Page 24
college of why we are here and the
impact that our legislative decisions
have on the future.”
Republican State Rep. Anitere
Flores agrees.
“Sometimes we tend to focus a lot on
the negative things that may be hap-
pening in higher education,” she says.
“But this experience shows us something
very good that’s going on in our univer-
sities and with our students, particularly
with many of our minority students.”
This year marked the second year
for the student conference. Sixty-eight
students — ranging from freshmen to
seniors and representing 10 Florida
universities — participated in the 2010
program. Sixty-five percent of students
were women, 55 percent African
American and 40 percent Latino.
Approximately 70 percent were first-
generation students.
When students make their confer-
ence presentations, a serious tone per-
vades the room; students are poised,
prepared and focused. Christina
Restrepo, 20, says there’s no doubt that
the conference is a “big deal.”
Restrepo, a first-generation college
student, was raised by a single mom
who worked two janitorial jobs, morn-
ings and nights, to support the family.
The hardships that dogged her family
made Restrepo determined to follow a
different path, one that included college.
“I love learning, especially science,”
she says. “When I was in high school,
I wasn’t prepared the way I should have
been. When I first got to college, I had
difficulty. That’s why I am so passionate
about the ENLACE conference. It
focuses on policy, making changes and
giving us, the students, a chance to
speak out on issues that affect our edu-
cation,” Restrepo says.
A rare opportunity
Stanford Taylor, 21, is a junior at 
the University of North Florida. Like
Restrepo, he believes participation in
the conference instilled in him a sense
of ownership for his college education.
Just as important, Stanford says the
experience gave him the opportunity 
to make real a difference for younger
students.
“People don’t get this kind of oppor-
tunity every day — the chance to make
policy recommendations affecting the
entire state of Florida. It’s gratifying to
know that you, as a student, are being
listened to by people of influence. At
the same time, you’re doing something
right for your community,” Taylor says.
“I’ve been involved in mentoring since
the fifth grade. For me, the chance to
work with ENLACE takes this concept
to a whole new level; it allows students
to get involved in something that could
produce large-scale change for the stu-
dents of tomorrow,” he adds.
Nancy Kason Poulson, professor of
Spanish and Latin American Studies at
Florida Atlantic University, is one of the
advisers for the FSEP conference. She
firmly believes that students’ policymak-
ing efforts are resonating with Florida
lawmakers. In 2009, after students rec-
ommended tougher high school gradua-
tion requirements, the Florida Legislature
passed House Bill 1293, which echoed
several of the students’ suggestions.
“The comments that students give
make an impact with these elected offi-
cials because the students are the ones
Florida Atlantic University Professor
Nancy Poulson, an adviser for the
Florida Student Education Policy con-
ference, says the event “unites stu-
dents around a common purpose.”
living the repercussions of the policies
being made,” Poulson says.
“These students are the true face of
policymaking,” adds Gloria Laureano,
an assistant vice president at the Uni-
versity of Central Florida. “Whenever
legislators make a decision, they need
to remember that student’s face.”
More than offering students firsthand
experience in policymaking or giving
legislators the opportunity to meet
their young constituents, ENLACE
exposes students to formalized net-
works and their potential to effect
large-scale change in higher education.
“One of the most important elements
of the conference is that it unites students
around a common purpose, which then
becomes a lesson on shared goals and
how collaboration can make a mean-
ingful difference,” Poulson says.
Heather Monroe-Ossi, an ENLACE
adviser at the Florida Institute of Educa-
tion, agrees.
“The conference is a win-win,” she says.
“Elected officials see real people for
whom their policies have impact. Col-
lege students, many of whom are first-
generation students, get the opportunity to
witness what government in action looks
like. This has been transformational.”
Frank Hernandez wants a say in how Florida’s higher education
policies are created, and he’s intent on making sure his voice is heard.
Hernandez discovered his interest in advocacy at the University
of South Florida (USF), where he met Paul Dosal, executive direc-
tor of ENLACE Florida. Based in Tampa, the organization’s goal is
to prepare minority students for college. 
Hernandez signed on as a mentor for an ENLACE program
focusing on increasing college awareness among middle school
students. The experience opened his eyes to the rewards of com-
munity advocacy. It also set in motion what would become a passion
for higher education policy, Hernandez says.
“When I heard about the application process for ENLACE’s con-
ference, I was intrigued. I soon realized it was something thatcould
take advocacy to a whole other level,” Hernandez recalls. 
What Hernandez discovered was an intense six-month study in
policy and advocacy. 
“Not only are we creating this network of college students from
across the state to focus on higher education, but we’re also shar-
ing knowledge with each other,” explains Hernandez, who served
as the chair of the USF delegation in 2010. “To me, this is the
most crucial aspect of the conference.”
The network also provides a mechanism that helps Hernandez
and other conference participants share their knowledge with the
local community. Specifically, Hernandez and other students meet
regularly with organizations in Hillsborough Countyto conduct
presentations on the lessons learned from the conference.
“People are blown away because they see that younger students
are interested in policy issues and that it’s more than just talk. We’re
backing up our words with solutions and evidence,” Hernandez says.
“What I like about the conference is that you don’t have just
three or four people sitting in a room and trying to dissect a pol-
icy. It’s taking the message to the community and getting people
to understand how these policies affect them,” he adds. “It’s not just
about numbers. Policy is something that affects people’s lives.”
It’s that message that Hernandez hopes students can continue to
shape and deliver. 
“We’re making a difference,” Hernandez says. “We’re empower-
ing certain communities that may not have had the tools to speak
up for themselves.”
Mentor says program
takes advocacy to
‘a whole other level’
28  L
UMINA
F
OUNDATION
L
ESSONS
I
S
PRING
2010
Frank Hernandez (left), a graduate student at the University of
South Florida (USF), talks with ENLACE’s Paul Dosal. Hernan-
dez, who led the USF delegation to the March conference, says
such events have real impact. “People are blown away because
they see that younger students are interested in policy issues,
and that it’s more than just talk,” he says.
First-generation college student
Christina Restrepo says the Florida
education policy conference was
“a big deal.”
29  L
UMINA
F
OUNDATION
L
ESSONS
I
S
PRING
2010
30  L
UMINA
F
OUNDATION
L
ESSONS
I
S
PRING
2010
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested