This toolkit has been developed by the Let’s Play Project, a partnership of the Rick Hansen Founda瑩on and the 
Province of Bri瑩sh Columbia administered by the Rick Hansen Ins瑩tute. 
The toolkit was researched and wri瑴en by Shira Standfield MRM, MBCSLA
Eveyoneincluded, www.everyoneincluded.com
Photos are not to be used or reproduced without permission.
Creating Accessible Play Spaces 
A Toolkit for School-Based Groups 
One of the greatest joys of being a child is the ability 
to play, socialize and interact with other children. This 
toolkit has all the information and best practices your 
community needs to design an accessible play space that 
all children, including those with mobility impairments, 
can engage in and enjoy. From the development of 
new spaces to the renovation of existing playgrounds, 
my hope is that all communities will become fully 
accessible and inclusive.
- Rick Hansen
l
p
e
l
t
a
s
y
Advanced pdf compressor online - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
best way to compress pdf files; change paper size pdf
Advanced pdf compressor online - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
change font size in pdf comment box; reader compress pdf
TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION ............................................3
DESIGN .........................................................6
BEST PRACTICES ........................................10
CREATING A GREAT PLAY SPACE ............26
FAQS .............................................................30
REFERENCES ..............................................31
APPENDIX 1 ..................................................32
VB.NET Word: Word Docuemnt Compression and Decompression Guide
multiple threaded VB.NET project(s) to utilize and apply the advanced Word doc to compress Word file, and also customize your own Word compressor via changing
change font size in pdf form; best pdf compressor
LET’S PLAY
3
All children need to play. 
It’s essential for their 
physical, social and emotional 
wellbeing. 
Accessible play spaces are designed to encourage 
shared play among children of all abili瑩es. They offer a 
rich variety of play opportuni瑩es to children both with 
and without disabili瑩es, based on an overall site design 
that draws children into inclusive play experiences. 
They also allow parents and caregivers with physical 
disabili瑩es to safely supervise and play with their 
children.
This toolkit aims to raise awareness throughout the 
school community of the value and prac瑩cality of 
incorpora瑩ng accessible design and diversity into 
outdoor play spaces at schools. It is both an overview 
of best prac瑩ces and a concrete how-to guide in 
undertaking the development of a new inclusive play 
space project or the renova瑩on of an exis瑩ng play space 
at a school. The focus of this resource is accessibility 
in rela瑩on to mobility impairments. Although some 
issues related to the inclusion of children with other 
disabili瑩es are included, detailed informa瑩on falls 
outside the scope of this toolkit.
Many local examples point to successful and innova瑩ve 
outdoor schoolyards and play spaces that have been 
created by teachers, parents, students and staff. This 
toolkit includes photos and examples of successful 
natural play spaces as well as principles and guidelines 
for ensuring universal access for all students. 
Whether your school is planning a brand new play space 
or considering renova瑩ons on a limited budget, this 
toolkit presents many ways in which you can enhance 
accessibility and the quality of play opportuni瑩es at 
your site.
INTRODUCTION
Example of accessible entrace to play area. 
PHOTO 
COURTESY OF SHIRA STANDFIELD
Example of universal play equipment. 
PHOTO COURTESY OF 
COURTESY OF LANDSCAPE STRUCTURES INC.
Example of performance space/outdoor classroom. 
PHOTO COURTESY OF DOLORES ALTIN,  EVERGREEN
LET’S PLAY
4
Why is outdoor play important?
Many studies have shown that play, and especially play 
in natural spaces outdoors, is an essen瑩al component 
in child development. The more diverse the natural and 
physical surroundings, the greater the range of learning 
and developmental opportuni瑩es will be for all children 
including those with disabili瑩es (Tai, 2006).
Play is important for:
• Brain development, physical development and health
• Building social, emo瑩onal and life skills
• Helping to develop an awareness for risk 
• Encouraging children to experiment, generate ideas, 
prac瑩ce skills, role play, invent
• Allowing an opportunity for children with disabili瑩es 
to interact with their peers
• Offering opportuni瑩es for choice and decision making
• Establishing a cri瑩cal bond with nature during childhood  (Moore 1986, Tai 2006)
Studies have shown that one of the best ways to inspire stewardship for a more responsible future is “to 
ins瑩ll a love of nature during childhood” (Moore 1986, Tai 2006). A well-designed and inclusive play space 
offers these rich and forma瑩ve learning opportuni瑩es to all children at your school and in your community.
Natural features offer a great opportunity for discovery. 
Balmaha Play Landscape, Scotland
, PHOTO COURTESY OF SUE 
GUTTERIDGE
This sand table provides a great opportunity for all children regardless of 
ability to play together
. PHOTO COURTESY OF COURTESY OF LANDSCAPE STRUCTURES INC.
Accessible route throughout the playspace 
also create opportuni瑩es for play. 
PHOTO 
COURTESY OF KEN WILLIAMS, CONCORD MONITOR
LET’S PLAY
5
Why are school play spaces so important for learning and 
development?
Throughout the school year, schoolyards provide young children with daily opportuni瑩es for recrea瑩on, 
crea瑩ve play, and learning. Play areas with diverse natural and built elements enrich and expand on the 
poten瑩al for rich imagina瑩ve, social and independent play. Hands on ac瑩vi瑩es, such as plan瑩ng a tree, add 
a “real” element to biology class. Bird feeders in the schoolyard inspire observa瑩on and promote learning 
through experience.  
The emphasis of an accessible, learning based schoolyard is on diversity and inclusion, encouraging par瑩cipa瑩on 
from all students. To maximize inclusion and diversity in a schoolyard, the design should:
• appeal to the five senses
• provide children of all abili瑩es and at all developmental stages with opportuni瑩es for discovery
• create spaces that are child-scaled and rich in features that can be explored 
• provide a variety of types of play including physical and crea瑩ve play
An example of bird feeders and a weather  sta瑩on for environmental 
educa瑩on programs
PHOTO COURTESY OF JULIE STONE , BOSTON SCHOOLYARD 
INITIATIVE
Natural features and plan瑩ng incorporated into the play se瑴ng.
BOSTON SCHOOLYARD INITIATIVE
These posts 
encourage physical 
and crea瑩ve play.
PHOTO COURTESY OF 
WENDY SIMONSON, 
EVERGREEN
LET’S PLAY
6
Diversity and Inclusion 
in Play spaces
Play spaces that welcome children of 
all abili瑩es to interact and play with 
each other should be the star瑩ng point 
when thinking through the design for 
a new play space. Universal design is 
an approach that meets this goal by 
focusing on crea瑩ng a space that meets 
the needs of the greatest number of 
people. Diversity is built into the design: 
parts of a space can be used by more 
than one child at a 瑩me, in more than 
one way, with a variety of different 
circuits and ways to get up and down, 
and a variety of different ac瑩vi瑩es. 
Natural features and equipment both 
play an important role. A play space is 
more than a structure — it encompasses 
the total environment in which play 
occurs. It is the system, not the objects. 
As outlined in work by King, Goltsman 
and Brooke (2001),  “an excep瑩onal play 
environment is more than a collec瑩on 
of play equipment. The en瑩re site with 
all of its elements from vegeta瑩on to 
storage can become a play and learning 
resource for all children with and without 
disabili瑩es.” The authors iden瑩fy 17 
types of play and learning se瑴ngs that 
address a child’s developmental needs. 
Many of these se瑴ngs are described 
in this toolkit and include: entrances, 
pathways, signs and displays, enclosures, 
manufactured equipment, game areas, 
ground covers and safety surfaces, lands 
forms, trees and vegeta瑩on, gardens, 
animal habitats, water, sand and dirt, play 
props, gathering mee瑩ng and working 
places, stages, and storage areas.  
DESIGN
Real items are o晴en a favorite feature in a playspace. 
PHOTO COURTESY OF SHIRA STANDFIELD
This equipment offers a variety of ways to play.
PHOTO COURTESY 
OF ELEPHANT PLAY
LET’S PLAY
7
How do we develop a good play 
space? 
A rich play environment challenges the social, physical, 
emo瑩onal and intellectual skills of children and 
encourages construc瑩ve play which invites children to 
play, experiment and learn. The challenge is to combine 
as many of the “17 play and learning se瑴ngs” as possible 
while considering rela瑩onships between ac瑩vi瑩es, how 
features are oriented on the site and how the circula瑩on 
around the site works. The se瑴ngs included in the design 
depend on the desires and values of the school and the 
site itself. Each se瑴ng can be designed though瑦ully to 
ensure universal access to all areas of the play space.
A successful play space is specifically designed around 
the site. This means that exis瑩ng natural features are 
incorporated, play zones are well located with respect 
to entrances and connec瑩ng pathways, and sun and shade are considered. Issues such as drainage and 
maintenance are addressed as well as the opportunity 
to change and evolve the site over 瑩me.
Here are a few key principles of 
universal design:
• The majority of features and spaces are usable 
by all people, instead of having separate “accessible 
features” for people with disabili瑩es. Features like play 
equipment, planter boxes or benches are of different 
heights and sizes to meet the needs of more people. 
• Circula瑩ng around and using the play space is simple 
and easy. Accessible surfacing allows wheelchair access 
to play equipment with minimal effort. The design 
provides adequate space for all people to access and 
manoeuvre around  play equipment and features 
regardless of mobility. 
• The play space provides opportuni瑩es for challenge 
for all users but minimizes hazards.
The pathways and boardwalks that provide access to elevated 
play structures, are also a fun play feature.
PHOTO COURTESY OF 
SHIRA STANDFIELD
This play space in Richmond, BC has a diverse mix of 
equipment and natural play fea瑴ures. 
PHOTO COURTESY OF STEFIUK
LET’S PLAY
8
Help! How do we get started on 
our design?
Whether you are working with a designer, with an equipment 
supplier, or are working on the design yourself, it is important 
to develop a clear design program statement, usually by 
consul瑩ng with students, staff and the community. 
A design program statement, given to the designer/supplier, 
outlines the goals and objec瑩ves, ac瑩vi瑩es, needs and 
elements that should be considered in the design. The 
design program statement can outline what experiences 
should be offered and what it should feel like to be in the 
site. For example, a design program may include specific 
func瑩ons required in the play space, such as a quiet space 
for reading and a place for older children to climb, as well as 
details on ages and numbers of children using the space. It 
outlines the basic requirements of the play space. 
Once the design program is established, a concept design 
can be developed. In this stage, a drawing is developed 
showing what goes where and how elements relate to each 
other. It is always important to check back that the concept 
plan addresses the needs outlined in the design program 
statement.
Involving a designer with a background in landscape 
architecture/playground design in the design stage of your 
project has a major impact on the quality and accessibility of 
the play space. The quality of play is directly related to the 
quality of the play environment. The cost of having some 
professional help does not have to be prohibi瑩ve and the 
designer can tailor the design to meet the available budget. 
Completed Concept Design - Evere瑴 OC Plan. 
PHOTO COURTESY OF ROSS MILLER, KMDG 
BOSTON SCHOOLYARD INITIATIVE
Example of Preliminary Concept Design.  
PHOTO COURTESY OF 
ROSS MILLER, KMDG  BOSTON SCHOOLYARD INITIATIVE
EXAMPLE OF DESIGN 
PROGRAM STATEMENT
• place for outdoor learning
• quiet space for art projects, 
outdoor classroom
•  active area for climbing, 
sliding, swinging
• play area for 150 grade 
1-5s
• universally accessible for 
students and teachers
• natural spaces for wildlife 
and people
• cool places to hang out
LET’S PLAY
9
A designer can:
Help to create a strong design program by:
• pulling together design ideas as well as iden瑩fying site issues and challenges to help inform the 
concept design
• leading a visioning session with community members, staff and play space users 
Develop a concept design by:
• crea瑩ng a concept drawing based on the design program 
• leading the process of choosing appropriate equipment and site features 
• ensuring that safety and accessibility needs are met
Implement the design by:
• preparing a budget, drawings and construc瑩on documents
• develop a phasing plan if the PAC cannot afford to complete the whole project at once
• coordina瑩ng construc瑩on, trades people and volunteers
What should we look for in a good designer?
• Ask the designer for samples of work and call any relevant references 
• Visit some of the designer’s completed sites and ask the school staff how well the site works for the 
people using it
• Ask if the designer is familiar with universal design concepts and has experience incorpora瑩ng natural 
features into play spaces
• Ask if the designer has experience working with groups, children and stakeholders in order to be able 
to understand the needs and issues to be addressed in the design phase
• Ensure the designer is familiar with safety and accessibility standards (CSA/Annex H standards)
• Find out if the designer has experience working with contractors and overseeing the construc瑩on of 
play spaces
How much will a designer cost?
Cost will vary depending on the extent of involvement 
of the designer and his or her level of experience. A 
designer can be involved in a brief consulta瑩on early in 
the process for help with a concept plan, or he or she 
can be involved throughout the construc瑩on process. 
Input from a designer is invaluable in developing a really 
unique and inclusive play space even within a modest 
budget. A wri瑴en le瑴er/agreement between the play 
space commi瑴ee/PAC and the designer should outline 
proposed tasks and expecta瑩ons as well as fees.
Working on play space design ideas. 
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CENTER FOR WOODEN BOATS 
LET’S PLAY
10
The sec瑩ons below provide important best prac瑩ces for 
designing inclusive and accessible play spaces and are also 
helpful to recheck when reviewing completed designs. 
As you think through the individual elements of your play 
space, keep in mind the underlying value of designing a space 
that will engage children with their natural surroundings , 
provide a rich variety of sensory ac瑩vi瑩es to s瑩mulate the 
senses, and foster rich and imagina瑩ve opportuni瑩es for 
shared play.
1.0 Surfacing Materials
Surfacing is a key component in designing safe and 
accessible play spaces. Many exis瑩ng play spaces have been 
built with non-accessible surfacing materials including pea 
gravel and sand. Accessible op瑩ons include pour in place 
rubber surfacing, rubber 瑩le, engineered wood fibre, 
engineered carpet and crushed rubber products. Sand 
is not an accessible fall surface, but in combina瑩on with 
other surfacing (e.g. pour in place rubber) can provide an 
important play element for all children. Other materials 
such as asphalt paths combined with engineered wood 
fibre can improve access to equipment. 
Although more expensive, rubber surfacing can be used 
selec瑩vely to maximize access to par瑩cular pieces of 
equipment or entry points. Engineered wood fibre, although 
less expensive, requires fairly frequent maintenance to 
ensure that ruts around equipment are minimized and 
adequate depths are maintained to ensure fall safety. 
BEST PRACTICES
Pea gravel is not an accessible surface and should 
be phased out of all playspaces. 
PHOTO COURTESY OF 
SHERRY CAVES
Rubber 瑩le provides good universal access.
PHOTO COURTESY OF LUKE B, PLAYFALL NWR
Engineered wood fibre combined with asphalt 
provides good access to the play equipment. 
PHOTO 
COURTESY OF SHIRA STANDFIELD
Engineered carpet provides an accessible 
alterna瑩ve in areas with low fall heights.
PHOTO COURTESY OF MARATHON ATHLETIC SURFACES INC.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested