Section 6 
Page 7 of 10 
Let's Practice! Logic Model Review Exercise 
Assess the logic model that you created in the previous section.  
Use this checklist to review how good it is: 
Logic Model Quality Criteria Checklist
Print this and keep for future use.
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
151
Change font size pdf form - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
adjust file size of pdf; change font size pdf
Change font size pdf form - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
adjusting page size in pdf; advanced pdf compressor online
L
OGIC 
M
ODEL 
Q
UALITY 
C
RITERIA 
C
HECKLIST
Q
UALITY 
C
RITERIA
L
OW
H
IGH
C
OMMENTS
Is the logic model meaningful
• Outcome a meaningful benefit? 
• Program purpose represented? 
• Potential negative effects examined? 
• Communicates well? 
Is it plausible
• Research based? 
• All outcomes included? 
• Relationships make sense? 
• Assumptions and external factors identified? 
Is it doable
• Resources available, realistic? 
• Control of external factors? 
• Stakeholders involved? 
Is it testable
• Clear, specific and complete? 
• How will you know? 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
152
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
change font size in pdf file; change font size in pdf text box
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C#.NET class. Support to change font size in PDF form. Able to delete form fields from adobe PDF file.
change font size pdf document; change page size of pdf document
Section 6 
Page 8 of 10 
Common Pitfalls in Creating and Using Logic Models 
People may get hung up on the language
People may work in columns and forget the connections 
People may confuse it for evaluation
People may see it as an academic exercise
People may complain that it is linear 
People may struggle with the level of detail 
People may not narrow the function/purpose 
People may view it as a panacea 
People may only want a paper product 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
153
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color. Abilities to draw markups on PDF document or stamp on PDF file.
change font size pdf text box; adjust size of pdf
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
pdf edit text size; change paper size in pdf document
Section 6   Page 8 of 10 
Common pitfalls in creating and using logic models 
People may get hung up on the language 
People can be averse to the terms used--inputs-outputs-outcomes--and focus too much on 
the terminology. We find value in having a common language (and terms that have meaning 
across organizations and regions) even though it may take time for all to appreciate and 
understand the terminology.  
People may work in columns and forget the connections 
Understanding and distinguishing inputs, outputs, outcomes, and impacts is fundamental to 
logic modeling. Logic models are often lists of items within columns or "bins." To design, 
implement, and test a program's theory of action, however, it is necessary to depict all the 
linkages and relationships including those with the external environment. Herein lies the 
opportunity for improving program practice and generating new knowledge about what 
works and what doesn't under different circumstances. 
People may confuse it for evaluation 
Because the logic model has been and is being used extensively by evaluators, it has been 
erroneously called an "evaluation model." It may be thought of only when evaluation is 
undertaken. We find it equally useful for program planning and management. 
People may see it as an academic exercise 
When logic models are mandated or are required without adequate preparation and 
participation, they can become paper work and just an "academic exercise."  
People may complain that it is linear 
The common graphical depiction of logic models as boxes and arrows on a two-dimensional 
surface leads to complaints of linearity and irrelevance. This aspect can be an obstacle for 
some individuals and groups, so effort is needed to create representations that are 
meaningful and culturally relevant. 
People may struggle with the level of detail 
The level of detail that is depicted in a logic model needs to conform to what it is to be used 
for and by whom. A logic model that is dense with words and lines may be difficult to 
understand. We want to strive for simplicity but don't want to oversimplify. 
People may not narrow the function/purpose 
Often, we try to make a single logic model be "all things." Being clear about the purpose and 
function of the logic model--who will use it and for what--will help improve its usefulness. 
People may view it as a panacea 
As we rush to find ways to better account for investments and improve programming, we 
have the tendency to think the latest "bandwagon" will be a panacea. Logic models are only 
a framework, a way of thinking, a process to help with planning, implementing, and 
evaluating. 
People may only want a paper product 
When we focus too much on just the concrete paper product, we can lose sight of the value 
of the process--that creating and modifying logic models builds understanding, consensus, 
and knowledge and opens our eyes to new possibilities. 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
154
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links
pdf compress; change file size of pdf
Generate Barcodes in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
Select "Generate" to process barcode generation; Change Barcode Properties. Select "Font" to choose human-readable text font style, color, size and effects;
change font size in pdf fillable form; adjust pdf size
Section 6 
Page 9 of 10 
Limitations of Logic Models 
Listen to description of the limitations of logic models
Audio transcript
A logic model only represents reality; it is not reality.  
Programs are not linear. 
Programs are dynamic interrelationships that rarely follow 
sequential order. 
A logic model focuses on expected outcomes. We also need to 
pay attention to unintended or unexpected outcomes: positive, 
negative, or neutral. 
A logic model faces the challenge of causal attribution. 
A logic model depicts assumed causal connections, not 
direct cause-effect relationships. It does not "prove" that the 
program caused the effect. These are working assumptions, 
not "truth." 
The program is likely to be just one of many factors 
influencing outcomes. 
Other factors that may be affecting observed outcomes must 
be considered. 
A logic model doesn't address the questions: "Are we doing the 
right thing?" "Should we do this program?"
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
155
VB.NET Image: Visual Basic .NET Guide to Draw Text on Image in .
Please note that you can change some of the example, you can adjust the text font, font size, font type (regular LoadImage) Dim DrawFont As New Font("Arial", 16
change page size pdf acrobat; pdf markup text size
Generate Image in .NET Winforms Imaging Viewer| Online Tutorials
Click "Generate" to process barcode generation; Change Barcode Properties. Click "Font" to choose human-readable text font style, color, size and effects.
change paper size pdf; pdf change font size
Section 6   Page 9 of 10 
Audio Transcript  
We have spent a lot of time learning about logic models and understanding their use and their 
value. Unfortunately, as with everything, logic models do have limitations. Let's not think of them as 
a panacea or a cookie cutter to apply wholesale.  
First, remember, as we've said before, a logic models is just that - a model. It is an attempt to 
represent reality - it is not reality. It's representation will only be as good as our understanding of the 
situation, the environment, the theory we are expressing, and our assumptions. Programs rarely are 
neat and orderly. The unexpected often happens. A logic model does give us a road map. It does 
help us articulate assumed causal linkages. It does help build consensus about what our program is 
and what our program can accomplish. It does help identify what and when to evaluate.  
Second, as you've seen, the logic model focuses on expected outcomes. We have talked about this 
throughout the course. But what about the unexpected or unintended outcomes that often occur; 
either positive, negative or neutral. To the extent possible, we encourage you to think about 
alternative pathways of change; alternative outcomes that may occur and keep your eyes and ears 
open for the unintended and unexpected.  
The third limitation that we want to mention is the challenge of causal attribution. A logic model 
depicts assumed causal connections and associations; the reasoning behind a program; not direct 
cause -effect relationships. The emphasis is on "reasonable, not definitive conclusions or absolute 
proof" in the words of Michael Patton in his book, Utilization-Focused Evaluation (1997:217). Some 
colleagues, researchers and academics may find this uncomfortable, but we work in the context of 
real programs. What actually is attributed to an effect will vary. There are likely to be many factors 
that influence observed outcomes. 
Finally, and perhaps, most importantly, we always want to ask: are we doing the right thing? We 
can spend time and effort creating a logic model, but is the program the right thing to be doing? Is it 
worth doing? A logic model does not answer the question: Are we doing the right thing?  
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
156
Section 6 
Page 10 of 10 
Section Summary
Always check your logic model 
against the following quality 
criteria: 
Is it meaningful? 
Is it plausible? 
Is it doable? 
Is it testable? 
Involve others in this review as 
appropriate. 
Logic models are not a cure-all. 
There are a number of pitfalls we 
need to pay attention to and 
some limitations. In particular, 
remember a logic model is only a 
"model"--it is not reality. 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
157
Section 7 
Page 1 of 20 
Section 7: Using Logic Models in Evaluation - 
Indicators and Measures 
Section Overview
Listen to description of this 
section
Audio transcript
Section Goal
On completion of this section, 
you will see how the logic 
model helps in evaluation. 
More specifically you will:
1. See how the logic model helps determine what you 
will evaluate - the focus of your evaluation.  
2. See how the logic model helps you determine 
meaningful and useful evaluation questions - know 
what to measure.  
3. Understand indicators and know what information 
best answers your evaluation questions.  
4. Be able to identify appropriate timing for data 
collection. 
Section Outline
The section outline will help you track your progress 
through this section.
Printable outline
Outline with links to each page of this section
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
158
Section 7   Page 1 of 20 
Audio Transcript 
Welcome to Module 7. And, CONGRATULATIONS ! for working your way through this entire 
course. We are finally at the last section in Module 1.  
Upon completion of this section, you will better understand how the logic model helps in evaluation. 
Many of you may have come to this course because you want to improve your evaluation practice 
or need to measure outcomes. In this section you will see how the logic model helps with several 
key aspects of evaluation: determining what to evaluate; identifying appropriate questions for the 
evaluation; selecting indicators; knowing when to collect data; and what data collection methods 
might be most appropriate.  
Section 7 presents the logic model as fundamental for these aspects of evaluation planning: two 
other parts of evaluation planning -- data analysis and interpretation, and use of results -- are not 
covered here. They are part of a comprehensive evaluation plan. We will direct you to a variety of 
other resources for help with those aspects of evaluation.  
Please realize that this section is not an evaluation primer. Its purpose is to show how the logic 
model can facilitate more effective and efficient evaluation. You will be directed to other resources 
that address the technical aspects of measurement, instrument construction. This section covers 
evaluation issues that the logic model can help you with. It does not cover the many technical 
aspects of evaluation - measurement, instrument construction, sampling design, etc. For those, 
many other sources exist and will be referenced.  
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
159
Section 7  
Using Logic Models in Evaluation: Indicators and Measures 
Print a copy of this outline to track your progress through this section. 
Outline  
Page # 
Completed? 
Section Overview 
Where Does Evaluation Fit in a Logic Model? 
How Do Logic Models Help in Evaluation? 
What to Evaluate?—The Focus 
The Questions 
What Will the Evaluation Seek to Answer? 
Example of a Logic Model with Evaluation Questions 
Common Categories of Questions 
Clarifying the Evaluation Question(s) 
The Indicators 
How Will You Know It? 
Logic Models and Indicators 
10 
Selecting Meaningful Indicators  
11 
Properties of Indicators 
12 
Timing 
13 
Evaluation Designs  
14 
Data Collection  
Sources  
15 
Methods 
16 
Sampling 
17 
Instrumentation 
18 
WRAP UP:  A Complete Evaluation Plan 
19 
Section Summary 
20 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
160
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested