asp.net mvc create pdf from view : Reduce pdf file size control SDK system web page wpf azure console lmcourseall16-part1116

Section 7 
Page 2 of 20  
Where Does Evaluation Fit in a Logic Model? 
The logic model describes your program or initiative: what it is expected to 
achieve and how. Evaluation helps you know how well that program or 
initiative actually works. "What worked, what didn't, why?" "How can we make 
it better?" 
For our purposes we define evaluation as: 
Think 
about 
evaluation 
as 
integrated 
across 
your 
whole 
logic 
model  
as 
depicted 
in this 
graphic. 
The systematic collection of information to make judgements, improve 
program effectiveness and/or generate knowledge to inform decisions 
about future programs. 
(Patton, 1997)
Learn more... 
View the glossary listing of common evaluation terms at
the end of this document 
Selected references on evaluation
About Evaluation Standards
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
161
Reduce pdf file size - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
change font size pdf comment box; pdf file size limit
Reduce pdf file size - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
pdf form change font size; pdf reduce file size
Section 7   Page 2 of 20 
Selected Program Evaluation References 
Americorps. Project STAR. Retrieved February 18, 2003, from 
http://www.projectstar.org/star/Library/toolkit.html
Hatry, H. (1999). Performance measurement: Getting results. Washington, D.C.: The Urban 
Instititute. 
Horizon Research, Inc. Taking Stock: A Practical Guide to Evaluating Your Own Programs. 
1997. Retrieved February 18, 2003, from http://www.horizon-
research.com/publications/stock.pdf
Mohr, L. (1995). Impact analysis for program evaluation. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 
Patton, M. (1997). Utilization-focused evaluation: The new century text. 3d ed. Thousand Oaks, 
CA: Sage. 
Reisman, J., & Clegg, J.. (1999). Outcomes for success! The Evaluation Forum. Seattle, WA: 
Organizational Research Services, Inc. and Clegg and Associates. 
Rossi, P., & Freeman, H. (1993). Evaluation: A systematic approach. Newbury Park: Sage 
Publications. 
University of Kansas. Community tool box. Evaluation section. Retrieved September 6, 2002, 
from http://ctb.lsi.ukans.edu/tools/tools.htm
University of Wisconsin - Extension. Program Development and Evaluation. Retrieved February 
18, 2003, from http://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/evaluation/index.html
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 
CDC Evaluation Working Group: Resources. Retrieved February 18, 2003, from 
http://www.cdc.gov/eval/resources.htm#manuals
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 
CDC Evaluation Working Group: Framework. Retrieved February 18, 2003, from 
http://www.cdc.gov/eval/framework.htm
Weiss, C. (1998). Evaluation: Methods for studying programs and policies. Englewood Cliffs, 
NJ: Prentice-Hall. 
Wholey, J., Hatry, H., & Newcomer, K. (Eds.). (1994). Handbook of practical program 
evaluation. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall. 
Worthen, B., & Sanders, J. (1987). Educational evaluation: Alternative approaches and practical 
guidelines. New York: Longman. 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
162
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
easy and developers can shrink or reduce source image NET Image SDK supported image file formats, including & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf page size dimensions; pdf text box font size
C# Image: Zoom Image and Document Page in C#.NET Web Viewer
jpeg), gif, bmp (bitmap), tiff / multi-page tiff, PDF, etc so you can zoom any image or file page with Out" functionality is aimed to help users reduce the size
best compression pdf; change font size on pdf text box
Section 7   Page 2 of 20 
Evaluation Standards 
We can't omit the Evaluation Standards. These represent the agreed upon criteria for shaping 
and assessing our evaluation practice.  
"A standard is a principle mutually agreed by people engaged in a professional practice, 
that, if met, will enhance the quality and fairness of that professional practice, for 
example, evaluation." 
--- Joint Committee on Education Evaluation 
These standards provide guidance for the conduct of practical evaluation that is sound and fair. 
They are to be applied while planning and implementing an evaluation, as well as to assess the 
quality of a completed evaluation. The standards fall into four major categories: 
• 
Utility: Serve the information needs of intended users.  
• 
Feasibility: Be realistic, prudent, diplomatic, and frugal.  
• 
Propriety: Act legally, ethically, and with regard for the welfare of those involved and those 
affected.  
• 
Accuracy: Reveal and convey technically accurate information.  
Please review and use the full list of standards as you plan and implement evaluation: 
Joint Committee on Standards for Educational Evaluation 
http://www.wmich.edu/evalctr/jc/
(For an abbreviated version see  
"Ways to Improve the Quality of Your Program Evaluations, Quick Tips 9" 
http://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/resources/pdf/Tipsheet9.pdf
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
163
.NET JBIG 2 SDK | Encode & Decode JBIG 2 Images
Highly-efficient data/image compression, 2-5 times than CCITT G3, CCITT G4; Simple to reduce PDF file size using JBIG2 compression within PDF;
change font size fillable pdf; pdf page size limit
How to C#: Special Effects
filter will be applied to the image to reduce the noise. LinearStretch. Level the pixel between the black point and white point. Magnify. Double the image size.
change font size pdf form reader; reader compress pdf
Section 7 
Page 3 of 20  
How Do Logic Models Help in Evaluation?
Perhaps you are wondering:  
"Why spend so much time on logic models when all I need to do is…
evaluate?" "…measure outcomes and tell my story." 
First: Expending evaluation resources on a poorly designed program is a 
poor use of resources. "You can't do 'good' evaluation if you have a 
poorly planned program."
(Beverly Anderson Parsons in WKKF, 2001, p. 4)
Logic models can help improve program design so that evaluation is 
more useful and effective. 
Second:Expending evaluation resources on programs that are not ready to be 
evaluated or aren't being implemented is also a waste of resources. 
Logic models can help determine if a program is ready, what data will 
be useful and when data collection is most timely.
Third: In order to organize an evaluation to reasonably test the program 
theory, you need a clear depiction of the theoretical base
. (Weiss, 1998)
A logic model provides that description.
More specifically logic models help with: 
The rest of this section will explore these five areas in more detail. They are 
key aspects of a comprehensive evaluation plan.
Print the "Evaluation Plan Worksheet
" and use Page 1 as a guide as 
you proceed through this section.
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
164
VB.NET Image: Compress & Decompress Document Image; RasterEdge .
reduce Word document size according to specific requirements in VB.NET; Scanned PDF encoding and decoding: compress a large size PDF document file for easier
adjust size of pdf file; change font size pdf form
VB.NET Image: How to Zoom Web Images in Visual Basic .NET Imaging
out" functionality allows VB developers to easily reduce the size gif, tiff and bmp) or document (PDF, multi-page you want to view your document file or image
pdf file compression; best pdf compressor
E
VALUATION 
P
LAN 
W
ORKSHEET
1. F
OCUS
What will we evaluate (which 
program or aspect of a program)? 
2. Q
UESTIONS
What do you want to 
know?  
3.
I
NDICATORS
-
E
VIDENCE
How will we know it?   
4.
T
IMING
When should we collect 
data? 
5.
D
ATA 
C
OLLECTION
S
OURCES
Who will 
have this 
information? 
M
ETHODS
How will we 
gather the 
information?    
S
AMPLE
Who will we 
question? 
I
NSTRUMENTS
What tools 
shall we use? 
1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
1. a 
2. a 
3. a 
4. a 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
165
View Images & Documents in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
document or image file, like Word, PDF or TIFF View Image File via ZoomIn or ZoomOut Function. This ASP to help developers to decrease and reduce current zooming
change font size in fillable pdf; batch reduce pdf file size
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
Compact rich image editing functions into several small-size libraries that are VB.NET programmers the API to scale source image file (reduce or enlarge image
best pdf compressor online; pdf page size may not be reduced
6. How will the data be 
analyzed? 
7. How will the data be 
interpreted? 
8. How will the results be communicated? 
To Whom 
When? Where? How? 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
166
Section 7 
Page 4 of 20 
What to Evaluate? -The 
Focus 
The logic model describes the program. One of the greatest benefits of 
the logic model is that it clarifies what the program is. Understanding 
what the program is, is the first step in any evaluation. 
What, in particular, do you want to evaluate? Is the focus of the 
evaluation the whole program or a component of the program? Perhaps 
you want to focus on the media campaign of your outreach program or 
one particular target group.  
Programs are often complex. You may not have the resources or the 
need to examine everything. Use the logic model to select the particular 
aspect, depth, component, or parts you will evaluate.  
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
167
Section 7 
Page 5 of 20  
What Will the Evaluation Seek to 
Answer? 
- The Questions 
Evaluation is about asking questions 
(good, critical questions to help us learn 
and be accountable). Identifying "good" 
questions is an important aspect of 
creating useful evaluations.
What is important to measure? What will you spend time and 
resources on?
You can't and won't measure everything. Answering a few questions well is 
better than answering many questions poorly  
Often an evaluation takes on a life of its own. We think we need more and 
more data. We need to keep the evaluation focused and as simple as 
possible. Otherwise, we run the risk of trying to do too much and end up with 
not very useful information or with many confounding variables.  
What we decide to measure depends on time, money, and expertise. 
What we decide to measure depends on who will use the results and for what 
purpose.  
Remember that evaluation must fit the program and its stage of development. For 
example: 
It may be inappropriate to measure behavioral change when the program 
only consists of a single workshop or limited media effort; or to measure 
nutrition practices of the elderly when your program only reached seniors 
living in one apartment complex. 
It may be inappropriate to measure social norm change in the first year of a 
multiyear effort.  
Because these issues are a critical part of evaluation, we will discuss them in 
greater detail in the following pages.
Learn more about... 
Use and Users
Who wants to know what
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
168
Section 7   Page 5 of 20 
Use and Users 
All evaluation begins with questions raised by persons or groups. 
• 
Who are these users, and what do they want to know? 
• 
Who might be interested in the evaluation?  
It is best to involve potential evaluation users in the construction of the logic model. This group 
exercise builds commitment and consensus. Those same and/or other stakeholders help shape the 
evaluation. 
Think about: 
• 
Who cares about the program? 
• 
What do they care about? 
• 
What questions are they asking about the program? 
• 
Who are the supporters and the skeptics? 
Who are some of the possible users?  
Check our suggested answers: 
• 
People affected in some way by the program (either directly or indirectly) such as 
program participants, nonparticipants, critics  
• 
Program staff  
• 
Administrators  
• 
Fund providers  
• 
Elected and appointed officials  
• 
Board members  
• 
Community residents  
• 
Colleagues  
• 
Volunteers  
• 
Collaborators, partners  
• 
Media·  
• 
Agencies, associations, foundations  
• 
Businesses, companies  
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
169
Section 7   Page 5 of 20 
Who Wants to Know What? How Will the Information Be Used?  
Who  
might use the 
evaluation? 
What  
do they want to know? 
How  
will they use the results? 
Program  
staff 
To what extent are we, the program 
staff, reaching the individuals we 
targeted? 
To what extent and in what ways is the 
program making a difference? 
To report to fund providers 
To change the strategy if it isn't 
working 
Participants 
How are we, the participants, 
benefiting? 
How am I, an individual participant, 
doing compared to others?  
To decide about continued 
participation 
To share with others/tell others 
about the program 
Public  
officials 
Is the program achieving its goals? 
Who are the partners? 
Who is the program serving? 
Is it worth the cost? 
To decide about support 
To inform policy decision making 
and receive knowledge about 
what works and doesn't work  
Partners  
Are participants making the expected 
changes? Why? Why not? 
Are they satisfied? 
What are we, the partners, getting out 
of this?  
Are all partners carrying out their role? 
To decide if and how to continue 
the partnership  
Fund  
providers 
Are program staff doing what they said 
they'd do?  
Is the program worth the cost? 
To determine funding allocation 
decisions 
To inform future grant-making 
efforts 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
170
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested