asp.net mvc create pdf from view : Best online pdf compressor Library software class asp.net windows azure ajax lmcourseall17-part1117

Section 7 
Page 6 of 20  
Example of a Logic Model with Evaluation 
Questions 
The logic model can help you determine appropriate 
questions for your evaluation. 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
171
Best online pdf compressor - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
apple compress pdf; compress pdf
Best online pdf compressor - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
adjust size of pdf in preview; pdf compressor
Section 7 
Page 7 of 20  
Common Categories of Evaluation 
Questions 
Most questions raised about programs are questions 
about: 
needs, process, outcomes or impact. 
View possible questions in each category:
Needs
Process 
Outcomes
Impact
This graphic shows how these questions fit with the logic model: 
Learn more about... 
Four major types of evaluation 
-
needs assessment, process evaluation, outcome 
evaluation and impact evaluation; and the role of "satisfaction"
Formative and summative evaluation questions
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
172
Section 7   Page 7 of 20 
Questions about needs 
• 
Who has what need(s)?  
• 
What is the level of concern/interest--among whom?  
• 
What currently exists to address the identified need(s)?·  
• 
What changes do people see as possible or important?  
• 
What does research/experience say about the need(s)?  
• 
Is there sufficient political support for addressing the need?  
• 
How did the need(s) get identified--whose voices were heard? Whose weren't?  
• 
What assumptions are we making?  
Questions about process 
• 
What does the program actually consist of? How effective is the program design?  
• 
Whom are we reaching? How does that compare to whom we targeted?  
• 
Who participates in what activities? Who doesn't? Does everyone have equal access?  
• 
What teaching/learning strategies are used? What seems to work--for whom?  
• 
How effective are the staff?  
• 
How is the program operating? What internal programmatic or organizational factors are 
affecting program performance?  
• 
What resources are invested? Are resources sufficient/adequate?  
• 
How many volunteers are involved? What do they do? Strengths? Weaknesses?  
• 
Which activities/methods are more effective for which participants?  
• 
How much does the program cost per unit of service?  
• 
To what extent are participants, community members, volunteers, partners, donors 
satisfied?·  
• 
To what extent is the program being implemented as planned? Why? Why not?  
• 
Are our assumptions about program process correct?  
• 
What external factors are affecting the way the program is operating?  
Questions about outcomes 
• 
What difference does the program make?  
• 
To what extent was the program successful, in what ways, for whom?  
• 
Who benefits and how?  
• 
What learning, action, and/or conditions have changed/improved as a result of the program? 
At what cost?  
• 
Did we accomplish what we promised? What didn't we accomplish?  
• 
What, if any, are unintended or negative consequences?  
• 
What did we learn?  
Questions about impact 
• 
What difference does the program make?  
• 
Who benefits and how?  
• 
What learning, action, and/or conditions have changed/improved as a result of the program? 
At what cost?  
• 
Did we accomplish what we promised? What didn't we accomplish?  
• 
What, if any, are unintended or negative consequences?  
• 
What did we learn?  
• 
What is the net impact?  
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
173
Section 7   Page 7 of 20 
Four Major Types of Evaluation 
The questions on the preceding page also relate to the four major types of evaluation: 
1. Needs assessment 
A type of evaluation that determines what is essential for existence or performance (needs 
versus wants) and to help set priorities (e.g., is more money needed to support day care). 
2. Process evaluation 
A type of evaluation that examines what goes on while a program is in progress. The 
evaluation assesses what the program is, how it is working, whom it is reaching and how 
(e.g., are participants attending as anticipated). 
3. Outcome evaluation 
A type of evaluation to determine what results from a program and its consequences for 
people (e.g., increased knowledge; changes in attitudes, behavior, etc.)  
4. Impact evaluation 
A type of evaluation that determines the net causal effects of the program beyond its 
immediate results. Impact evaluation often involves a comparison of what appeared after the 
program with what would have appeared without the program (e.g., mortality rates).  
What about participant/customer/client satisfaction? 
As you notice in the graphic on the preceding screen, satisfaction falls within the outputs 
component of our logic model. In contrast, within Total Quality Management (TQM), customer or 
client satisfaction is the apex of performance. 
In theories of change, client satisfaction may be necessary, but it is not sufficient for outcomes to 
occur. For example, a participant may be satisfied with the program and express positive reactions 
such as "I liked the program," "It fit my needs," "I will come again." But, such satisfaction does not 
mean that the person learned anything or can do anything differently, or that life has improved for 
the person as a result of the program. 
Satisfaction may indicate that a person is likely to fully participate in and complete a program. The 
learning environment can be an important factor contributing to changes in knowledge, attitudes, 
motivation, etc. Satisfaction, however, does not measure the results achieved.  
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
174
Section 7   Page 7 of 20 
Formative and Summative Questions 
As we learned earlier in this section, a program can be evaluated at any time. Questions that can 
be asked in a program's life cycle fall into formative and summative categories. Formative and 
summative are common words in evaluation.  
Formative Questions 
Formative questions are asked during the program--while the program is operating. They may 
be asked on an ongoing basis or at periodic times over the course of the program's life. The 
questions are usually asked for the purpose of program improvement--to receive immediate 
feedback and input in order to know how things are going and what improvements--corrections 
and/or additions--might be needed.  
Examples of formative evaluation questions 
• 
To what extent are the parents that we targeted for this program attending? Are they 
completing the program?  
• 
Are all youth participating in all sessions? If not, why not?  
• 
Are the mentors spending the expected amount of time with the students?  
• 
Do people appear to be learning?  
• 
What seems to be working, not working? For whom? Why?  
Summative Questions  
Summative questions ask about what resulted, what was effective. These questions are 
asked at or after completion of the program (or a phase of the program). They are asked 
largely for the purpose of deciding whether to continue, extend, or terminate a program.  
Examples of summative evaluation questions 
• 
To what extent did communication problems decline as a result of the cross-cultural 
training program?  
• 
Do participants shop differently as a result of their participation in the program? 
How?  
• 
Given the results, was the program worth the costs?  
Formative and summative are not synonymous with process and outcome. Formative and process 
occur during the program's early stages and focus on improving the program; summative and 
outcome focus on what happens to participants/community/environment at the conclusion of the 
program or program phase. However, formative and summative relate to intentions--to collect 
data for ongoing program improvement or for decisions about program continuation or termination. 
Process and outcomes refer to the phase of the program being studied. You might ask formative 
or summative questions at any phase of a program's development cycle. 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
175
Section 7 
Page 8 of 20 
Clarifying the Evaluation Question(s)
As you think about the questions that your 
evaluation will answer, you may need to break 
larger questions into subquestions. The point 
is to be as clear as possible about what you 
REALLY want to know so that you can better 
collect the information needed. 
We often see evaluation questions that are broad and vague. When asked, these 
questions yield broad and vague responses that are difficult to interpret and of little use 
for program decision making. It is worth your time and effort NOW to bring clarity to your 
evaluation question(s). 
Let's consider "Get Checking" - a program aimed at high school students who lack basic 
financial literacy (budgeting, saving, borrowing and investing) with an emphasis on 
increasing skill in money management using a savings and checking account. An 
example of a broad evaluation question might be: Did teens benefit from attending the 
"Get Checking" program? What might be some possible sub-questions that would 
provide more focus to this question? What might you really want to know? 
Take a few minutes and write some possible "sub-questions" here: 
View some 
suggested 
sub
-
questions
If desired, print this page (by pressing Ctrl and P).
In the end, your evaluation may not actually include or cover all the sub-questions, but 
having thought about them, you can prioritize your information needs. 
Are the Questions Appropriate?
Can the questions be answered given the program?
Are the questions key, of high priority, practical?
Are the questions understandable?
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
176
Section 7   Page 8 of 20 
Broad Question: Did teens benefit from attending the "Get Checking" program? 
Possible Sub-Questions: 
• 
To what extent did participating teens increase their knowledge about how to open and 
manage a savings and checking account?  
• 
How many participating teens actually opened an account at a participating financial 
institution?  
• 
Which participating teens showed greater change in knowledge and behavior?  
• 
Did teens who started the program complete the program?  
• 
Did participating teens benefit in other ways?  
• 
Did anything negative or unexpected result for participants or program staff or others?  
Can the questions be answered given the program? 
To determine what questions are appropriate based on the program is one of the main reasons for 
doing a logic model. By describing what the program is, the logic model helps determine what is 
appropriate to evaluate. For example, it may be inappropriate to ask if smokers in the county quit 
smoking when the program was focused only on building awareness and knowledge of local 
tobacco policies. Or, it would be inappropriate to survey all business owners about changes 
resulting from a program when the program was targeted to businesses employing fifty or fewer 
individuals. 
Are the questions key, of high priority, practical? 
As we've said before, you can't and don't need to evaluate everything. In most cases, it will be 
necessary to prioritize the evaluation questions. Try to distinguish between what you need to know 
and what might merely be nice to know. What are the key, most important questions?  
Consider time, resources, and the availability of assistance needed to answer the questions. As 
appropriate, bring stakeholders together and negotiate a practical set of questions. Remember, it is 
better to answer a few questions thoroughly and well. 
Given the current interest in and demand for outcomes, often our evaluation questions focus on 
outcomes. Remember, however, that to attribute your program or your role to outcomes you also 
need to ask questions about the process that contributed to those outcomes. 
Are the questions understandable? 
Finally, ensure that your evaluation question(s) are understandable. Avoid the use of jargon or 
vague words that can have multiple meaning. Always define key terms so that everyone 
understands the meaning.  
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
177
Section 7 
Page 9 of 20  
How Will You Know It? -The 
Indicators 
An indicator is...  
...the evidence or information  
...that represents the phenomenon 
you are asking about. 
For 
example: 
Indicator of fire = 
smoke 
Indicator of academic achievement = good 
grades
Indicators help you know something. They define the data that will be 
collected. They can be seen (observed), heard (participant response), read 
(agency records), felt (climate of meeting), touched, or smelled. It is the 
evidence that indicates what you wish to know--that answers your 
questions. 
For each aspect you want to measure, ask yourself these 
questions. Invite others to provide their perspectives. 
What would it look like? 
How would we know it? 
If I were a visitor, what would I see, hear, read that would tell 
me this "thing" exists;  
what would answer my question?  
Let's 
Practice! 
What is an indicator 
of…
View possible  
answer:
high blood pressure?
?
crop stress due to 
drought?
?
a clean neighborhood?
?
a popular movie?
?
good appliances for 
the home?
?
a good carpenter?
?
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
178
Section 7   Page 9 of 20 
Possible indicator of high blood pressure:  
blood pressure reading greater than 140 over 90 
Possible indicator of crop stress due to drought: 
curled leaves 
Possible indicator of a clean neighborhood: 
absence of litter on streets 
Possible indicator of a popular movie: 
high box office receipts 
Possible indicator of good appliances for the home: 
good consumer report 
Possible indicator of a good carpenter: 
quality craftmanship 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
179
Section 7 
Page 10 of 20 
Logic Models and 
Indicators 
Sample Logic Models 
Showing Indicators  
Farmer education program
Parent education program
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
180
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested