asp.net mvc create pdf from view : Change page size of pdf document application control tool html azure wpf online lmcourseall19-part1119

Section 7   Page 12 of 20 
Indicator Criteria 
Direct
An indicator should measure as directly as possible what it is intended to 
measure. For example, if the outcome being measured is a reduction in teen 
smoking, then the best indicator is the number and percent of teens smoking. 
The number and percent of teens that receive cessation counseling does not 
directly measure the outcome of interest. However, sometimes we do not 
have direct measures or we are constrained by time and resources. Then, we 
have to use proxy, or less direct, measures. 
Specific
Indicators need to be stated so that anyone would understand it in the same 
way and the data that are to be collected. Example indicator: number and 
percent of farmers who adopt risk management practices in the past year. In 
this example, we do not know which risk management practices are to be 
measured, which farmers or what time period constitutes the past year. 
Useful
Indicators need to help us understand what it is we are measuring! The 
indicator should provide information that helps us understand and improve 
our programs
Practical
Costs and time involved in data collection are important considerations. 
Though difficult to estimate, the cost of collecting data for an indicator should 
not exceed the utility of the information collected. Reasonable costs, 
however, are to be expected. 
Culturally 
appropriate
Indicators must be relevant to the cultural context. What makes sense or is 
appropriate in one culture, may not be in another. Test your assumptions.
Adequate
There is no correct number or type of indicators. The number of indicators 
you choose depends upon what you are measuring, the level of information 
you need, and the resources available. Often more than one indicator is 
necessary. More than five, however, may mean that what you are measuring 
is too broad, complex or not well understood. Indicators need to express all 
possible aspects of what you are measuring: possible negative or detrimental 
aspects as well as the positive. Consider what the negative effects or spin-
offs may be and include indicators for these.  
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
191
Change page size of pdf document - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
pdf change page size; best way to compress pdf files
Change page size of pdf document - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
change paper size in pdf; change pdf page size
I
NDICATOR 
R
EVIEW 
W
ORKSHEET
Program name: 
Reviewer: 
Instructions to reviewer:  Please rate each indicator
on each criteria
using the following scale.  Write your 
rating in the space provided.  Please add comments.  Explanation of criteria is attached. 
Question to be answered:  _________________________________________________ 
Indicators:   
1 ________________________________ 
2 ________________________________ 
3 ________________________________ 
4  ________________________________ 
Criteria 
Indicator Rating 
Comments 
Direct? 
Specific? 
Useful? 
Practical? 
Culturally 
appropriate? 
Adequate?  Together the 
indicators measure the 
question 
Discuss independent reviews as a group if possible.
Rating:  1 = Good     2 = Needs improvement    3 = Unacceptable 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
192
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Insert formatted text and plain text to PDF page using .NET XDoc.PDF component in C#.NET class. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and
best online pdf compressor; pdf optimized format
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Support to change font color in PDF text box. Ability to change text size in PDF text box. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
change page size pdf; pdf compression
L
OGIC 
M
ODEL AND 
K
EY 
E
VALUATION 
Q
UESTIONS WITH 
I
NDICATORS 
-
W
ORKSHEET
S
ITUATION 
S
TATEMENT
I
NPUTS
O
UTPUTS
O
UTCOMES
A
CTIVITIES
P
ARTICIPANTS
S
HORT
M
EDIUM
L
ONG
-
TERM
Assumptions
1. 
2. 
3. 
External Factors
1. 
2. 
3. 
Key questions:
Indicators:
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
193
VB.NET Image: How to Create Visual Basic .NET Windows Image Viewer
can get a basic idea of the page layout from Apart from that, you are entitled to change the orientation You can accurately define the size and location of all
can a pdf be compressed; best pdf compression
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Using this .NET PDF annotation control, C# developers can add a sticky note to any position on PDF page.
compress pdf; change font size in pdf fillable form
Section 7   Page 12 of 20 
Example: Logic Model, key evaluation questions, indicators 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
194
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Tiff
Support conversion to PDF from other documents, keeping original document page size. Support rendering image to a PDF document page, no change for image size.
change font size pdf form reader; batch pdf compression
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
into multiple files by outputting PDF file size. Using this C#.NET PDF document splitting library and accurately disassemble multi-page PDF document into two or
change paper size in pdf document; adjust size of pdf in preview
Section 7 
Page 13 of 20  
Timing 
Scheduling Data Collection 
Another benefit of using a logic model to 
help with evaluation  
is in identifying WHEN it is appropriate to 
collect data.  
Look at your logic model and your evaluation questions, and see WHEN along the 
pathway you will want to collect data--when the program can be expected to be at the 
stage to make the desired data collection possible and meaningful. Problems in the 
past with asking questions and collecting data when programs were not ready led to 
evaluability assessment and was a precursor to logic models. For example, evaluation 
information about who is participating should be collected at each session, while data 
to answer questions about behavior change would have to be collected at some point 
after completion of the program. 
Data collection can 
occur at several 
possible points in 
time. 
Baseline (learn more about baseline data
Beginning of program--specific event/activity 
During implementation 
End of program--end of specific event/activity 
Monthly, quarterly, annually 
Follow-up: when? 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
195
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font users how to add text comments on PDF page using C# text box to PDF and edit font size and color
pdf page size dimensions; advanced pdf compressor
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
PDF document file by defined page range in VB.NET class application. Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size. Split PDF document by PDF
pdf custom paper size; pdf reduce file size
Section 7   Page 13 of 20 
Baseline Data 
What data do you need and/or want to collect BEFORE the program starts? By thinking about 
evaluation upfront in the program development process and by using a logic model, you will be able 
to identify data you need to collect for comparison purposes.  
Any evaluation question that expresses an increase, reduction, or other type of change requires a 
basis for comparison. Such information can be collected retrospectively, but usually is more 
accurate and credible if collected as baseline.  
Markers, Milestones, Benchmarks 
We use the terms markers, milestones, benchmarks interchangeably to refer to those points 
along the pathway of change--your logic model--at which you want and need to collect data to show 
progress, capture significant process achievements, or lay a "stake in the sand" for making 
comparisons and documenting trends. Consider whether there will be any critical events on the 
occurrence of which you should collect data.  
By looking at the total logic model, you can determine WHEN to collect what data to demonstrate 
progress and to have information available for program improvement and modifications.  
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
196
Section 7 
Page 14 of 20 
1. AFTER ONLY (post program) 
In this design, evaluation is done after the program is completed; for example, a postprogram survey or end-
of-session questionnaire. It is a common design but the least reliable because we do not know what things 
looked like before the program. 
2. RETROSPECTIVE (post program) 
In this design, participants are asked to recall or reflect on their situation, knowledge, attitude, behavior, etc. 
prior to the program. It is commonly used in education and outreach programs but memory can be faulty. 
3. BEFORE-AFTER (before and after program) 
Program recipients or situations are looked at before the program and then again after the program; for 
example, pre-post tests; before and after observations of behaviors. This is commonly used in educational 
program evaluation and differences between Time 1 and Time 2 are often attributed to the program. But, 
many other things can happen over the course of a program that affect the observed change other than the 
program. 
4. DURING (additional data "during" the program) 
Collecting information at multiple times during the course of a program is a way to identify the association 
between program events and outcomes. Data can be collected on program activities and services as well as 
on participant progress. This design appears not to be commonly used in community-based evaluation 
probably because of time and resources needed in data collection. 
5. TIME SERIES (multiple points before and after the program) 
Time series involve a series of measurements at intervals before the program begins and after it ends. It 
strengthens the simple before-after design by documenting pre and post patterns and stability of the change. 
Ensure that other external factors didn't coincide with the program and influence the observed change. 
6. CASE STUDY 
A case study design uses multiple sources of information and multiple methods to provide an in-depth and 
comprehensive understanding of the program. Its strength lies in its comprehensiveness and exploration of 
reasons for observed effects.  
To strengthen above designs use comparisons (people, groups, sites) 
All of the above, one-group designs can be strengthened by adding a comparison--another group(s), individual(s) 
or site(s). Comparison groups refer to groups that are not selected at random but are from the same population. 
(When they are selected at random, they are called control groups.) The purpose of a comparison group is to add 
assurance that the program (the intervention) caused the observed effects, not something else. It is essential that 
the comparison be very similar to the program group.  
Consider the following possiblities as comparisons: 
Between program participants (individuals, groups, organizations) and nonparticipants  
Between different groups of individuals or participants experiencing different levels of program intensity  
Between locales where the program operates and sites without program intervention (e.g., streambed 
restoration, community revitalization)  
Evaluation Designs  
As we think about when to collect data, we are reminded of the 
research design that will help us to eliminate plausible rival 
explanations.  
Consider the following designs as you further refine your evaluation 
plan. 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
197
Section 7 
Page 15 of 20 
Data Collection 
Once we have defined our 
questions and identified 
indicators, we turn to data 
collection.  
Many excellent 
resources are 
available for help with 
this important aspect 
of evaluation. Learn 
more
Sources of information: 
Existing information: 
Program documents  
Existing databases  
Agency records  
Research reports  
Etc.  
People: 
Participants/nonparticipants  
Key informants  
Partners  
Staff  
Policy makers  
Etc.  
Pictorial records and observations: 
Photographs  
Videotapes  
Maps  
Observation 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
198
Section 7   Page 15 of 20 
Data Collection Resources 
Sources of evaluation information:  
http://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/resources/pdf/Tipsheet11.pdf
Methods for collecting evaluation information: 
http://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/resources/pdf/Tipsheet8.pdf
Other links relevant for data collection: 
For collecting data and methods  
http://learningstore.uwex.edu/pdf/G3658-04.pdf
For questionnaire design 
http://learningstore.uwex.edu/pdf/G3658-2.pdf
For direct observation 
http://learningstore.uwex.edu/pdf/G3658-5.PDF
For surveys  
http://learningstore.uwex.edu/pdf/G3658-10.PDF
http://www.tfn.net/~polland/qbook.html
For end-of-session questionnaires 
http://learningstore.uwex.edu/pdf/G3658-11.PDF
For focus groups 
http://www11.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/edd/v_report.a?p_site=EDD&sub=ETKFG
For quasi-experimental designs 
http://www11.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/edd/v_report.a?p_site=EDD&sub=QEE
For evaluating collaborative 
http://learningstore.uwex.edu/pdf/G3658-8.PDF
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
199
Section 7 
Page 16 of 20 
Methods of data collection
Survey 
Mail (surface, 
electronic)  
Telephone  
On-site  
Interview 
Structured/unstructured 
Case study  
Observation  
Portfolio reviews  
Tests  
Journals  
Etc.  
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
200
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested