Section 1 
Page 9 of 20 
Full Logic Model Framework
Let's now look at a complete logic model. This framework includes six main components. 
Over the next few pages of this module we'll look at each of these components in more detail. 
Listen to an audio description of this logic model
Audio transcript
We suggest you print a copy of the full logic model and use it for reference as we 
discuss the components. 
Printable Full Logic Model 
Program development at the University of Wisconsin-Extension uses this logic model 
framework. To see the UW-Extension Program Development Model, follow this link: 
http://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/progdev/
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
21
Pdf change font size - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
reader pdf reduce file size; pdf paper size
Pdf change font size - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
pdf text box font size; change paper size in pdf
Section 1   Page 9 of 20 
Audio Transcript 
Now we have a complete logic model. We have been building over the last few screens from a 
simple input - output - outcome graphic to a more complete logic model: one that includes the major 
components of good educational and outreach program development. You will notice that this 
model includes six components. First the situation - the environment in which a problem or an 
issue exists from whence priorities are set to direct the programmatic response. You notice inputs - 
outputs and outcomes on this model that we have talked about previously. Then there are two 
additional components: assumptions and external factors. Over the course of the next few slides, 
we will look at each of these components in more detail. These six components make up the 
complete logic model that we use in planning, implementation, evaluation and communications. 
We invite you to print this logic model. Many of us have laminated it and keep it handy as we work 
with community groups, teach, or do our own program development and evaluation.  
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
22
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
best way to compress pdf files; apple compress pdf
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color. Abilities to draw markups on PDF document or stamp on PDF file.
best online pdf compressor; pdf optimized format
Logic Model 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
23
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
pdf form change font size; best way to compress pdf
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links
optimize scanned pdf; change font size in pdf comment box
Section 1 
Page 10 of 20 
Components of Logic Models
Situation 
The situation is the foundation for logic model development. The problem or issue that 
the program is to address sits within a setting or situation--a complex of sociopolitical, 
environmental, and economic conditions. If you incorrectly understand the situation and 
misdiagnose the problem, everything that follows is likely to be wrong. 
Take time to understand the situation and carefully define the problem. This may be the 
most important step. As you do so, consider the following questions: 
1. What is the problem/issue?  
2. Why is this a problem? (What causes the problem?)  
3. For whom (individual, household, group, community, society in general) does this 
problem exist?  
4. Who has a stake in the problem? (Who cares whether it is resolved or not?)  
5. What do we know about the problem/issue/people that are involved? What 
research, experience do we have? What do existing research and experience say?
Create a succinct but thorough statement that answers the above questions. This 
statement is the foundation of your logic model.
Example situation statements
Practice writing a situation statement
Often the situation statement is appended to the logic model, as text. We think it is 
important, however, to include a few words on the far left side of the logic model. These 
words should capture the core of the originating situation. What is the problem/issue? 
The situation sets the foundation for everything that follows and is what we return to in 
order to see if we are making a difference. Too often we design and implement programs 
without fully considering and understanding the situation. The better we understand the 
situation and analyze the problem fully, the easier our logic model development will be.
Traps to avoid
Questions to ask during problem analysis 
Help with problem analysis
Help with understanding your situation
Situations are not static
Recognizing assets
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
24
Generate Barcodes in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
Change Barcode Properties. Select "Font" to choose human-readable text font style, color, size RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & Decode JBIG 2 Files;
adjust file size of pdf; change font size in fillable pdf
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C#.NET class. Support to change font size in PDF form. Able to delete form fields from adobe PDF file.
adjust pdf page size; change font size pdf document
Section 1   Page 10 of 20 
Example Situation Statements 
Situation Statement 1:  
Solid waste issues in Smart County have been a topic of heated debate for many years. In the face 
of a changing solid waste marketplace, which has seen a high level of privatization over the past 
five years, tonnages delivered to the Smart County Landfill have declined significantly. This has 
resulted in lower revenues for the Solid Waste enterprise fund. The county's solid waste 
management board is responsible for solid waste management in the county. The Board has been 
unable to evaluate options and opportunities, make decisions and implement actions related to the 
future of solid waste management in the county. The Board has requested assistance in developing 
its leadership and decision making process to address the solid waste issues of Smart County. 
Situation Statement 2:  
Model County Tobacco-Free Coalition is increasingly concerned about the unhealthy work 
environments for county youth. A recent Chamber of Commerce study showed 75% of county youth 
with part-time and summer jobs work in the service industry, mainly in restaurants where youth 
workers are exposed to cigarette smoke. Ten percent of the county's restaurants (non-bars) and 
75% of fast-food establishments are voluntarily smoke-free. Research suggests that smoking bans 
and restrictions in public places not only reduce environmental tobacco smoke exposure but also 
are associated with lower youth smoking rates and delayed onset of smoking.  
Situation Statement 3:  
Children of divorce face many challenges and stresses that are often unrecognized by their parents. 
Parents are often too engrossed in their own emotional needs to address the needs of their children 
during a divorce. Other children become victims of bitter contention between their mother and 
father. Because of these difficulties, the Bold County Circuit Court System mandates that parents in 
the process of divorcing attend a course on how to deal with their children during and after the 
divorce procedures.  
Situation Statement 4:  
Earth County in Western State has a variety of soil types and topography that affect soil erosion 
and farming practices. Half of the county's 400,000 acres is cropped, much of it in areas of rolling 
hills and light, sandy soils. These fine grain sands are carried easily away by wind or water action. 
Farmers can lose up to an average of 3 tons of soil annually due to runoff. This runoff leads to 
sedimentation, the accumulation of particles in a water body, which is one of the biggest 
contributors to the degradation of surface water in Earth County, according to a recent Department 
of Natural Resources survey. Two farming practices, buffer strips and conservation tillage, are 
effective in conserving soil and reducing the amount of sediment that runs off the land and into local 
waters. 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
25
VB.NET Image: Visual Basic .NET Guide to Draw Text on Image in .
Please note that you can change some of the LoadImage) Dim DrawFont As New Font("Arial", 16 provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change page size of pdf document; pdf compress
C# Image: Use C# Class to Insert Callout Annotation on Images
including GIF, PNG, BMP, JPEG, TIFF, PDF & Word projects; Easy to set annotation filled font property individually an easy way; C# demo code to change the filled
reader compress pdf; pdf markup text size
Section 1   Page 10 of 20 
P
RACTICE 
W
RITING A 
S
ITUATION 
S
TATEMENT
1. What is the problem/issue? 
2. Why is this a problem? (What causes the problem?) 
3. For whom (individual, household, group, community, society in general) does this problem 
exist? 
4. Who has a stake in the problem? (Who cares whether it is resolved or not?) 
5. What do we know about the problem/issue/people that are involved? What research, experience 
do we have? What do existing research and experience say? 
• Try keeping your situation statement to 500 words or less.   
• Avoid jargon and acronyms.   
• Avoid stating “the need.” 
• Avoid including what you/your agency does or will provide. 
• Ask others to review for clarity.  See if they can restate the problem/issue to be addressed. 
Enter Situation Statement here: 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
26
Section 1   Page 10 of 20 
Traps to avoid  
1. Avoid the trap of assuming that you know what causes the problem. Often the result is that we 
analyze "symptoms" rather than get to the root cause of problems.  
2. In addition, avoid the trap of defining the problem as a need for a program/service; for example, 
"communities need leadership training"; "teens need employment training"; "agency staff need to 
learn about outcome measurement." This practice results in circular reasoning: provision of the 
program/service rather than delving into whether the program/service made a difference.  
Questions to ask during problem analysis: 
1. What is the problem?  
2. Why is this a problem? (What causes the problem?)  
3. For whom (individual, household, group, community, society in general) does this problem exist?  
4. Who is involved in the problem?  
5. Who has a stake in the problem? (Who cares whether it is resolved or not?)  
6. What do existing research and experience say? What do we know about the problem?  
Help with problem analysis - Follow these steps to get to the root cause of the problem: 
1. State the issue or problem. Example: 
• Too many kids are obese.  
• Farming dependent communities are experiencing population 
loss.  
• Youth are poorly equipped to enter the job market.  
• Communities are experiencing conflicts over agricultural land 
development and farmland preservation.  
2. Ask "Why?" 
Example:  
"Why are so many kids 
obese?" 
Answer:  
• Because they eat fatty foods.  
• Because they get little exercise.  
• Because they…  
3. For each answer, ask,  
"But, why?"  
Continue until the "But, 
why?" questions have been 
answered 
Example:  
But, why do they eat fatty 
foods? . 
Answer:  
• Because they like the taste.  
• Because they are available in the home/at school.  
• Because they haven't tried alternatives.  
• Because…  
But, why do they like the taste? Because…  
But, why are they available in the home/at school? Because…  
But, why haven't they tried alternatives… Because…  
But, why do they get little exercise? Because… 
4. For each answer, look at 
WHO is involved - who is 
part of the problem and its 
resolution? 
Engage others to help define and clarify situations and problems that 
form the foundation of your logic model development. 
Help with understanding your situation 
Many Web resources can help with situational analysis. For example, look at the University of Kansas 
Community toolbox at: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/ 
Situations are not static 
As we know, situations do not stay the same. We create a logic model based on an understanding of an 
originating situation. We expect our programmatic response to make a difference in that situation. Program 
success is often measured according to the extent to which we ameliorate that situation. Yet, situations 
change, from either natural and external causes or interactions with the program. We need to stay attuned to 
the changing situation and modify our logic models accordingly. 
Recognizing assets 
Identifying assets is an important part of situational analysis. Valued assets exist within all situations--whether 
the situation be a community, county, or organization. By recognizing assets, we confirm capabilities, build 
upon strengths, and empower. Think about existing assets that can be mobilized to support your work. 
For help in identifying, mapping, and mobilizing community assets use this resource: “Identifying, Mapping 
and Mobilizing Our Assets.” (a copy follows) 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
27
ties within your county.   They can be used to generate a quick general picture of your
prioritize where more in-depth asset identification will be useful.
Assets of Individuals—A Preliminary Assessment Tool
are four basic steps in mapping assets of individuals:
members and/or your programming goals.
Identify assets of these groups in a general way.
Consider how these assets link to your program goals.
endedquestions?   Decide on the method of asset identification, e.g. survey, inter-
views, group session, etc.
that hint at some of their assets.  You may identify additional categories.   After considering
Prepared by Boyd Rossing, Professor, Interdisciplinary Studies, School of Human Ecology, University of
Wisconsin-Madison, 2000
Identifying, Mapping and Mobilizing
Our Assets
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
28
Culture, Tradition & History
Experience & Skills
Peer Groups
Economic Resources
Time
Other ________________
YOUTH
What are the types of
assets youth typically
possess?
What assets do youth in
our situation possess?
(What assets should we
try to develop in our
youth?)
Do we need more in-
depth assessment of
youth assets?  If so,
how could we do
this
?
What assets could we
link to our programming
goals?
Ideas, Creativity & Energy
Connection to Place
Dreams & Desires
Peer Group Relationships
Family Relationships
Credibility as Teachers of
other Youth
Time
Other ________________
SENIOR CITIZENS
What assets do senior
citizens in our situation
possess?
What assets could we
link to our programming
goals?
Do we need more
in-depth assess-
ment of senior
citizen assets?  If
so, how could we
do this?
What are the types of
assets senior citizens
typically possess?
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
29
PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES (AND ABILITIES)
What assets do persons
with disabilities in our
situation possess?
What assets could we
link to our programming
goals?
Do we need more
in-depth assess-
ment of assets?  If
so, which disability
groups?  How could
we do this?
Skills
Hospitality
Compassion
Friendship
Resilience & Happiness
Inspiration
Other ________________
What are the types of
assets persons with
disabilities typically
possess?
ETHNIC GROUPS
What assets could we
link to our programming
goals?
Do we need more
in-depth assess-
ment of assets of
ethnic groups?  If
so, which ethnic
groups? How could
we do this?
Tradition & History
Perspectives on
Community
Situations
Cultural Customs & Pride
Relations within Group
Credibility within Group
Resilience
Other ________________
What are the types of
assets persons of ethnic
groups typically possess?
What assets do persons
of ethnic groups in our
situation possess?
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
30
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested