Section 1 
Page 18 of 20 
Let's Practice! Logic Model Puzzle
Non
-
Flash 
Alternative Activity
In the previous activity, you were learning the language of logic models. Let's put it all together now. Read about 
an educational program by clicking The Situation.Then, drag each program component (displayed one at a time 
in the Program Component box) to its "proper" place in the logic model framework. Click Review All 
Components to see all possible components. Once you have completed your logic model, click Check Answer 
to see how you did. You can continue working on your logic model by clicking on Return
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
51
Change page size pdf acrobat - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
change font size pdf comment box; best pdf compression tool
Change page size pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
change font size in pdf form field; pdf form change font size
Section 1   Page 18 of 20 
Logic Model Puzzle Activity 
This activity asks you to use a series of statements about a sample project to create a sample logic 
model. Each of the statements is listed below.  For each statement decide where on the logic model 
it should go from this list: 
Input 
Output: activities 
Output: participation 
Outcome: short 
Outcome: medium 
Outcome: long 
Assumption  
External factors 
Situation: Reading to young children helps them develop a love of reading, along with an 
enthusiasm for learning. Yet, children from low-income families often lack access to books that are 
necessary to stimulate cognitive development and learning readiness.  
Program components: 
Grant of $5000 
Children's interest in books increases 
Preschool children 
Volunteers 
Produce quarterly newsletter 
Literacy of preschool children increases 
Provide books to preschool children 
Staff 
Train reading volunteers 
Children take care of their books 
Volunteers read to children weekly 
Books will not be destroyed 
Books are culture- and age-appropriate 
Children spend time with their books 
Volunteers are available 
Children learn how to take care of books 
Children learn that reading is fun 
Parents of preschool children 
Children demonstrate the desire to read 
Governor's wife starts literacy campaign 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
52
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS a callout annoation on the first page of a obj As New RectangleAnnotation() ' set annotation size obj.X
change font size in pdf comment box; pdf compress
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
or image (such as business's logo) on any desired PDF page. Via our PDF Watermark Creator, users are capable of to customize the text font style, size and color
adjust pdf size preview; best compression pdf
Section 1   Page 18 of 20 
Here are the answers to this activity: 
The inputs for this sample logic model are: 
• 
the grant of $500  
• 
volunteers  
• 
staff.  
Now, let's review the outputs for this sample.  
The activities are 
• 
producing a quarterly newsletter  
• 
providing books to preschool children  
• 
training reading volunteers  
• 
volunteers reading to children weekly.  
The participation outputs in the project include:  
• 
preschool children  
• 
parents of preschool children.  
Short-term outcomes for this sample project are:  
• 
an increase in children's interest in books  
• 
children learning how to take care of books  
• 
children learning that reading is fun.  
Medium-term outcomes are:  
• 
children taking care of their books  
• 
spending more time with their books  
• 
demonstrating a desire to read.  
The long-term outcome for this project is:  
• 
literacy of preschool children increases.  
Assumptions that play a role in this project are: 
• 
the books will not be destroyed  
• 
the books are culture- and age-appropriate  
• 
volunteers are available.  
An external factor that could influence this project is: 
• 
the Governor's wife starts a literacy campaign. 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
53
Section 1 
Page 18 of 20 
Let's Practice! Logic Model Puzzle
Non
-
Flash 
Alternative Activity
In the previous activity, you were learning the language of logic models. Let's put it all together now. Read about 
an educational program by clicking The Situation.Then, drag each program component (displayed one at a time 
in the Program Component box) to its "proper" place in the logic model framework. Click Review All 
Components to see all possible components. Once you have completed your logic model, click Check Answer 
to see how you did. You can continue working on your logic model by clicking on Return
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
54
Section 1 
Page 19 of 20 
Why Use the Logic Model? 
Why should you use the logic model? How will it help you? 
The logic model: 
Brings detail to broad goals; helps in planning, evaluation, 
implementation, and communications. 
Helps to identify gaps in our program logic and clarifies 
assumptions so success may be more likely.  
Builds understanding and promotes consensus about what the 
program is and how it will work--builds buy-in and teamwork. 
Makes underlying beliefs explicit. 
Helps to clarify what is appropriate to evaluate, and when, so that 
evaluation resources are used wisely. 
Summarizes complex programs to communicate with stakeholders, 
funders, audiences. 
Enables effective competition for resources. (Many funders request 
logic models in their grant requests.)
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
55
Section 1 
Page 20 of 20 
Section Summary
Think of the logic model as your "road map."  
What would happen if you ventured off on a 
trip without a map? Would you ever get to 
your final destination? Even if you did, how 
much time would you have spent in trying to 
find your way, when mapping your journey 
would have given you direction from the 
beginning?  
Logic models... 
provide a graphic description of a program 
(process, event, community initiative). 
show the relationship of program inputs and outputs 
to expected results. 
make explicit the underlying theory of a program. 
are made up of six components: situation, inputs, 
outputs, outcomes, assumptions, external factors. 
are useful for developing understanding, improving 
programming, clarifying outcomes, focusing 
evaluation, and communicating to stakeholders. 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
56
Section 2 
Page 1 of 19 
More about Outcomes 
Section Overview
Listen to description of this section
Audio transcript
Section Goal
On completion of this section, you will understand outcomes 
more fully and see how they are an integral part of a logic model. 
More specifically you will: 
1. Be able to differentiate between outputs and outcomes.  
2. Recognize that outcomes fall along a continuum from 
shorter- to longer-term to form an "outcome chain" that is 
the backbone of the logic model.  
3. Know that outcomes may focus on the individual, group 
(family), agency, systems, or community.  
4. Understand the importance of involving others in identifying 
outcomes.  
5. Know the criteria for assessing outcomes.  
6. Be able to write an outcome statement.
Section Outline
The section outline will help you track your progress through this 
section. 
Printable outline
Outline with links to each page in this section
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
57
Section 2   Page 1 of 19 
Audio Transcript 
Welcome to Section 2 of our course on logic models "More about Outcomes."  
This section focuses on outcomes. Needing to measure outcomes or plan programs to achieve 
outcomes is probably one reason why many of you have come to this course.  
Outcomes are an important part of our education and outreach programs. We are being held 
accountable for outcomes, not just for doing "good work". It is this focus on outcomes that has 
fueled the current popularity of logic models. Logic models help us focus on outcomes and build 
programs to achieve outcomes.  
After completing this section you will have a better understanding of outcomes and be able to 
identify meaningful outcomes for your education and outreach programs. More specifically, you will 
be fully equipped to differentiate between outputs and outcomes. You will recognize, as we stated 
in the first section, that outcomes fall along a continuum over time, from short to longer term 
changes. You will know that outcomes may focus on the individual, a group or family, on an agency 
or systems or the community as a whole. You will understand the importance of involving others in 
identifying outcomes rather than doing it all by yourself. You will know that outcomes must be 
important, meaningful, realistic and reasonable. You will gain practice in writing an outcome 
statement and understand the meaning of intended outcomes.  
This section is really about helping you better understand outcomes. Aspects of measuring 
outcomes or evaluating outcomes will be discussed in section 7. Please take a moment to look at 
the section outline and see what will be covered. We encourage you to take advantage of all the 
additional links and other information that are embedded in the main screens. Enjoy!  
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
58
Section 2 – More About Outcomes 
Print a copy of this outline to track your progress through this section. 
Outline 
Page # 
Completed? 
Section Overview 
More about Outcomes 
So What? 
Outputs vs. Outcomes 
4, 5 
Focus of Outcomes 
Identifying Outcomes 
Let’s Practice! Who Chooses Outcomes? 
Chain of Outcomes 
Intermediary Outcomes 
10 
Let’s Practice! Constructing an “Outcome Chain” 
11 
Determining Where to Stop 
12 
Outcome Criteria 
13 
Outcome Statements 
14 
Let’s Practice!  Writing Outcome Statements 
15 
Targets for Outcomes  
16 
Unintended Outcomes 
17 
Considerations When Defining Outcomes 
18 
Section Summary 
19 
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
59
Section 2 
Page 2 of 19 
More about Outcomes
Because outcomes - results - are central to the logic model (and the 
major reason why many are interested in logic models), let's spend more 
time understanding outcomes.  
Outcomes are the results or effects of our work. They are the changes 
that occur or the difference that is made for individuals, groups, families, 
households, organizations, or communities during or after the program. 
Outcomes relate to changes in behavior, norms, decision making, 
knowledge, attitudes, capacities, motivations, skills, conditions, or other 
expected results of our programs. 
For example, suppose a nutrition education program has nutrition 
educators providing information and counseling to families in their 
homes and at meal sites. Outcomes for this program might include 
participants change their shopping and eating practices to include fruits 
and vegetables in their daily diet. In a smoking cessation program, the 
outcome of interest might be participants stop smoking. 
Program 
Outcome 
Biosecurity on 
livestock farms
Recommended infectious animal disease 
prevention practices are implemented 
Youth employment 
counseling 
Youth are gainfully employed 
Tobacco control 
The number of smoke-free homes increases
Neighborhood 
policing
Crime is reduced 
Feeling of safety is increased 
Community 
gardening
Families increase vegetables in diet 
Community cohesion improves 
Leadership 
education
Local units of government improve ability to 
make and implement effective public policy 
decisions
Enhancing Program Performance with Logic Models, University of Wisconsin-Extension, Feb. 2003
60
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested