asp.net mvc create pdf from view : Reduce pdf file size software control dll windows web page asp.net web forms making-PDF-accessible-Acrobat0-part1279

Making PDF documents accessible  
with Adobe Acrobat Pro
Date 
Version 
Author 
Status / comments 
31/01/11 
1.0 
Atalan 
Document available on www.accede.info/en/manuals/
In partnership with: 
Air Liquide – AREVA – BNP Paribas – Capgemini – LVMH – SNCF – Société Générale – 
SPIE – Thales 
With the cooperation of: 
Association des Paralysés de France (APF) – Association Valentin Haüy (AVH) – 
Coopérative AccessibilitéWeb (Québec) – Institut Nazareth et Louis Braille (Québec) – 
ParisTech – Télécom ParisTech 
Reduce pdf file size - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
pdf file size; can pdf files be compressed
Reduce pdf file size - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
change paper size in pdf; change font size in pdf comment box
Acknowledgements 
We would like to thank the following nine AcceDe partners for their commitment and confidence in us.  
For the purpose of this project, these companies got their communication agencies and teams to work 
on tagging a sample of 28 published documents. This work, carried out by each partner company on 
its own PDF documents, was essential to ensure that this guide covers all the tagging needs of 
published documents, and to validate the clarity and educational quality of the manuals.  
Atalan also wishes to thank the following organizations which contributed their organizational support 
and for their actions in increasing awareness of the AcceDe manuals and encouraging their 
circulation: Association des Paralysés de France (APF), Association Valentin Haüy (AVH), 
Coopérative AccessibilitéWeb (Québec), Institut Nazareth et Louis Braille (Québec), ParisTech et 
Télécom ParisTech. 
Special thanks to Edwin Tudsbery who translated this guide. 
Finally, Atalan would like to thank the members of the proofreading committee for their helpful and 
judicious feedback: Greg Pisocky and Matt May (Adobe), Sophie Schuermans (AnySurfer) and 
Christophe Strobbe (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven). 
Sébastien Delorme  
Sylvie Goldfain  
Atalan - AcceDe
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
easy and developers can shrink or reduce source image NET Image SDK supported image file formats, including & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf page size dimensions; pdf change page size
C# Image: Zoom Image and Document Page in C#.NET Web Viewer
jpeg), gif, bmp (bitmap), tiff / multi-page tiff, PDF, etc so you can zoom any image or file page with Out" functionality is aimed to help users reduce the size
pdf file compression; best pdf compressor online
AcceDe project – www.accede.info/en/ 
Making PDF documents accessible  
with Adobe Acrobat Pro 
Page 3 
Directed by Atalan – accede@atalan.fr 
January 2011 
Contents
1 - Introduction ...................................................................................................................................... 5
1.1 Background and objectives ............................................................................................................ 5
1.2 Who should read this guide? ......................................................................................................... 6
1.3 Required skills for learning how to tag ........................................................................................... 6
1.4 How should you use this guide and the accompanying exercise book ......................................... 6
1.4.1 Introductory note: Adobe Acrobat Pro is required ................................................................... 6
1.4.2 Organization of this guide and overview of the related exercise book .................................... 7
1.4.3 Other associated documents .................................................................................................. 7
1.5 Use licence .................................................................................................................................... 7
1.6 Contact ........................................................................................................................................... 8
1.7 Credits ............................................................................................................................................ 8
2 - Introduction to tagging .................................................................................................................... 9
2.1 What is tagging? ............................................................................................................................ 9
2.2 Main accessibility problems of a non-tagged document ................................................................ 9
3 - Getting to know Adobe Acrobat Pro ............................................................................................ 12
3.1 Content, Order and Tags navigation panels ................................................................................ 12
3.2 Document pane ............................................................................................................................ 13
3.3 TouchUp Reading Order dialog box ............................................................................................ 14
3.4 Content reflow .............................................................................................................................. 15
4 - Getting started with tagging ......................................................................................................... 16
4.1 Checking for the presence of tags in the document .................................................................... 16
4.2 Tagging techniques...................................................................................................................... 16
4.2.1 Tagging a document manually with Adobe Acrobat Pro ....................................................... 16
4.2.2 Editing existing tags .............................................................................................................. 16
4.2.3 Tagging a document automatically with Acrobat Pro ............................................................ 17
4.3 Proposed method: manual tagging .............................................................................................. 19
5 - Adding the title, document language, and tags root .................................................................. 20
5.1 Adding a document title ............................................................................................................... 20
5.2 Adding the main document language .......................................................................................... 22
5.3 Creating the tags root .................................................................................................................. 23
6 - Manually tagging a page of the document .................................................................................. 24
6.1 Important: Save your changes frequently! ................................................................................... 24
6.2 Editing the tags ............................................................................................................................ 24
6.2.1 Creating an empty tag ........................................................................................................... 24
6.2.2 Associating content with the tag (3 possible methods) ......................................................... 26
6.2.3 Finding tagged content .......................................................................................................... 34
6.2.4 Changing the tag type ........................................................................................................... 36
6.2.5 Moving a tag .......................................................................................................................... 39
6.2.6 Moving tagged content .......................................................................................................... 40
6.2.7 Providing alternate text ......................................................................................................... 40
6.2.8 Specifying a change of language .......................................................................................... 42
6.2.9 Deleting a tag ........................................................................................................................ 42
6.2.10 Marking content as an artifact (2 possible methods) .......................................................... 43
6.3 Screen actions: tagging the cover page of the exercise book ..................................................... 45
7 - Defining the reading order ............................................................................................................ 46
7.1 Why you should not use the Order panel .................................................................................... 46
7.2 Defining the reading order from the Tags panel .......................................................................... 47
7.2.1 Analysing the content and defining the reading order ........................................................... 47
7.2.2 Arranging the tags in a logical reading order ........................................................................ 47
7.2.3 Regrouping tags under “parts” .............................................................................................. 48
.NET JBIG 2 SDK | Encode & Decode JBIG 2 Images
Highly-efficient data/image compression, 2-5 times than CCITT G3, CCITT G4; Simple to reduce PDF file size using JBIG2 compression within PDF;
change paper size in pdf document; .pdf printing in thumbnail size
How to C#: Special Effects
filter will be applied to the image to reduce the noise. LinearStretch. Level the pixel between the black point and white point. Magnify. Double the image size.
.pdf printing in thumbnail size; change font size on pdf text box
AcceDe project – www.accede.info/en/ 
Making PDF documents accessible  
with Adobe Acrobat Pro 
Page 4 
Directed by Atalan – accede@atalan.fr 
January 2011 
8 - Identifying the tag type for each content item ............................................................................ 50
8.1 Introduction .................................................................................................................................. 50
8.2 Document title .............................................................................................................................. 50
8.3 Section headings ......................................................................................................................... 50
8.4 Paragraphs .................................................................................................................................. 52
8.5 Images and captions .................................................................................................................... 52
8.6 Lists and list items ........................................................................................................................ 55
8.7 Contents ....................................................................................................................................... 56
8.8 Tables .......................................................................................................................................... 57
8.8.1 Tagging rows, cells and headers .......................................................................................... 57
8.8.2 Link the headers with their corresponding cells (2 possible methods) ................................. 60
8.9 Quotes and block quotes ............................................................................................................. 66
8.10 Links ........................................................................................................................................... 67
8.11 Spans ......................................................................................................................................... 68
8.12 Footnotes ................................................................................................................................... 69
8.13 Document, parts, divisions, articles and sections ...................................................................... 70
8.14 Other tags (references, formulas, bibliography entries…) ......................................................... 71
9 - Checking the content reflow ......................................................................................................... 72
9.1 Content tab overview ................................................................................................................... 72
9.1.1 Highlight the content ............................................................................................................. 72
9.1.2 Content tab overview ............................................................................................................ 72
9.2 Placing items which do not convey information in artifacts ......................................................... 73
9.3 Content reflow .............................................................................................................................. 75
9.3.1 Checking the reflow order of a page with the Order navigation panel .................................. 75
9.3.2 Improving the reflow of a page with the Content navigation panel ....................................... 76
9.4 Using the content panel to resolve visual overlay problems ....................................................... 78
10 - Completing the document ........................................................................................................... 80
10.1 Generating bookmarks (if required) ........................................................................................... 80
10.2 Indicating the link tab order ........................................................................................................ 82
10.3 Marking the document as tagged .............................................................................................. 82
10.4 Providing an explicit title to the file (best practice) ..................................................................... 84
10.5 Defining the initial view of the document (best practice) ........................................................... 84
11 - Checking the accessibility .......................................................................................................... 85
11.1 Using the Acrobat accessibility check........................................................................................ 85
11.1.1 Overview of the accessibility full check ............................................................................... 85
11.1.2 Examples of error messages .............................................................................................. 87
11.2 Exporting the PDF in text format ................................................................................................ 88
11.3 Jaws / NVDA .............................................................................................................................. 89
11.4 PDF-Accessibility-Checker (PAC) ............................................................................................. 90
12 - Appendix ....................................................................................................................................... 91
12.1 Specific cases ............................................................................................................................ 91
12.1.1 Lines that straddle two pages ............................................................................................. 91
12.1.2 Text with shadow effects ..................................................................................................... 92
12.1.3 Other specific cases ............................................................................................................ 92
12.2 Security parameters ................................................................................................................... 92
12.3 Role maps .................................................................................................................................. 93
12.4 Character recognition in scanned documents ........................................................................... 94
12.5 List of frequently used tags ........................................................................................................ 95
VB.NET Image: Compress & Decompress Document Image; RasterEdge .
reduce Word document size according to specific requirements in VB.NET; Scanned PDF encoding and decoding: compress a large size PDF document file for easier
pdf paper size; change font size pdf document
VB.NET Image: How to Zoom Web Images in Visual Basic .NET Imaging
out" functionality allows VB developers to easily reduce the size gif, tiff and bmp) or document (PDF, multi-page you want to view your document file or image
can pdf files be compressed; pdf optimized format
AcceDe project – www.accede.info/en/ 
Making PDF documents accessible  
with Adobe Acrobat Pro 
Page 5 
Directed by Atalan – accede@atalan.fr 
January 2011 
1 - Introduction 
1.1 Background and objectives 
By default PDF documents are not accessible to certain users with disabilities. Among the users 
affected, there are, for example: 
- Blind users:  
Blind people use their computers with screen readers. These devices use software which either 
read the information displayed on the screen (with a voice synthesizer) or convert it to Braille (with 
a Braille terminal). With this type of software, it is difficult to understand the contents of a PDF file 
if it is not structured with tags. The reading order is not always logical, the information contained in 
images is not read, and the absence of a title structure makes navigating such a document long 
and complicated. 
- Partially sighted users:  
Customizing the display of a PDF document in Adobe Reader often poses difficulties. Changing 
the text or background colour in order to improve readability does not always work. For example, 
some background colours cannot be modified.  
- Users with a motor disability: 
The rigid linear navigation imposed on those who read PDF documents exclusively with the aid of 
a keyboard makes it difficult to navigate in the document. For example, the tab order of links or 
form fields is not always logical. 
The solution for making PDF documents accessible is to structure them with the appropriate tags. 
Currently, this solution is rarely implemented, specifically for the following reasons: 
- The concept of a structured or tagged document is not widely known by those who produce PDF 
files.  
- There is no good quality documentation for learning how to tag documents.   
In France, as part of their policy for people with disabilities, more and more large companies want the 
PDF documents they publish to be accessible. For this reason nine French companies came together 
to form the AcceDe project to increase the accessibility of PDF documents.  
One of the objectives of AcceDe
1
was to create educational guides and manuals for those who want to 
make their PDF documents accessible.  
The aim of this guide, “Making PDF documents accessible with Adobe Acrobat Pro”, is to 
provide all the practical information you need to learn how to tag a PDF document
2
. Currently, 
tagging requires the use of Adobe Acrobat Pro. This guide also provides the necessary 
information to check the tagging of a PDF document. 
1
The three objectives of the AcceDe project are to: 
1. Create, and freely distribute, guides and manuals for those who wish to make their PDF documents accessible. 
2. Increase awareness about PDF document accessibility and the growing interest of companies in this area among 
communication professionals. 
3. Offer an initial directory of communication professionals who are committed to and capable of producing tagged PDFs 
from the documents they create. 
2
Forms are not explained in this first version of the guide. 
View Images & Documents in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
document or image file, like Word, PDF or TIFF View Image File via ZoomIn or ZoomOut Function. This ASP to help developers to decrease and reduce current zooming
change font size in pdf form; can a pdf be compressed
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
Compact rich image editing functions into several small-size libraries that are VB.NET programmers the API to scale source image file (reduce or enlarge image
can a pdf file be compressed; pdf change page size
AcceDe project – www.accede.info/en/ 
Making PDF documents accessible  
with Adobe Acrobat Pro 
Page 6 
Directed by Atalan – accede@atalan.fr 
January 2011 
1.2 Who should read this guide? 
This guide is aimed at: 
- all those who want to learn how to tag PDF documents, 
- project managers who want to integrate tagging when creating their PDF documents
3
1.3 Required skills for learning how to tag 
Tagging does not require any technical skills (knowledge of computer languages, DTP software, etc.), 
nor an in-depth knowledge of Adobe Acrobat Pro (all the functionalities used for tagging are presented 
and described in this document).  
Tagging does however require a great deal of rigour and logic.  
While knowing the basics of HTML may speed up the tagging learning process, it is by no means 
indispensible.  
In the framework of the AcceDe project, for example, we have trained people with the following 
profiles to tag PDF documents: 
- lay-out artists / graphic designers / DTP operators, 
- HTML developers and webmasters, 
- marketing assistants, 
- project managers, 
- editors and documentation managers, 
- managers of graphic design departments, 
1.4 How should you use this guide and the accompanying 
exercise book 
1.4.1 Introductory note: Adobe Acrobat Pro is required 
All the tagging procedures described in this document require the use of Adobe Acrobat (Pro or Pro 
Extended
4
version). To use this software you need to acquire the corresponding license.  
For the descriptions of procedures, examples and screenshots, this guide is based on Adobe Acrobat 
9 Pro (version 9.3.0). 
It is also possible to use the older versions 7 and 8 of Adobe Acrobat or the new Adobe Acrobat X. 
Certain functionalities may, however, have different names or be presented differently. In this case, it 
is a good idea to use the online help supplied with the software for any difficulties (press 
F1
in 
Acrobat). 
3
By following this guide you can communicate to a third party the level of tagging you require and the procedures that need to 
be followed. In addition section “11 - Checking the accessibility” (page 86) enables project managers to carry out quality checks 
so that they can assess the quality of tagging carried out by a third party. 
4
You cannot manually tag a PDF document with the Standard version of Adobe Acrobat.
AcceDe project – www.accede.info/en/ 
Making PDF documents accessible  
with Adobe Acrobat Pro 
Page 7 
Directed by Atalan – accede@atalan.fr 
January 2011 
1.4.2 Organization of this guide and overview of the related exercise book 
Learning how to tag demands practice. This guide is illustrated with examples from a PDF document 
entitled “Exercise book”.Both a tagged and an untagged version of this exercice book are available, so 
that users of this manual can carry out the tagging procedures explained therein in Adobe Acrobat 
Pro. The two versions of this document are: 
- Untagged exercise book: untagged-exercise-book.pdf 
- Tagged exercise book: tagged-exercise-book.pdf 
These two exercise books are available on www.accede.info/en/manuals/.  
This guide includes two types of content: 
1. theoretical information,  
2. procedures for the user to perform on the untagged exercise book. 
Screen actions: 
All the procedures presented in this guide for the user to follow are displayed in a greyed inset entitled 
Screen actions”
1.4.3 Other associated documents 
This guide is part of a set of two documents: 
- Making PDF files accessible: Guidelines for the DTP creation phase  
(available on www.accede.info/en/manuals/
Making PDF documents accessible with Adobe Acrobat Pro  
(this document) 
1.5 Use licence 
This document is subject to the terms of the Creative Commons BY-NC-SA license. 
You are free to: 
- Copy, distribute, display, and perform the work 
- Make derivative works 
Under the following conditions: 
Mention of the authorship if the document is modified: 
On the cover of the document you must include the Atalan and AcceDe logos and references, 
indicate that the document has been modified, and add a link to the original work at 
www.accede.info/en/manuals/
You must specify the reuse of the document by sending an email to accede@atalan.fr including 
the link to download the modified document.  
You must not in any circumstances cite the name of the original author in a way that suggests that 
he or she endorses you or supports your use of the work.  
You must not in any circumstances cite the name of the partner companies (Air Liquide, AREVA, 
BNP Paribas, Capgemini, LVMH, SNCF, Société Générale, SPIE et Thales), or the organizations 
which have supported this initiative (Association des Paralysés de France (APF), Association 
AcceDe project – www.accede.info/en/ 
Making PDF documents accessible  
with Adobe Acrobat Pro 
Page 8 
Directed by Atalan – accede@atalan.fr 
January 2011 
Valentin Haüy (AVH), Coopérative AccessibilitéWeb, Institut Nazareth et Louis Braille, ParisTech, 
Télécom ParisTech). 
No commercial use: you may not use this work for commercial purposes.  
Share alike: if you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work 
only under a licence identical to this one.  
The Atalan and AcceDe logos and trademarks are registered and are the exclusive property of Atalan. 
1.6 Contact 
For any comment about this document, please contact Atalan, the coordinator of the AcceDe project, 
at the following email address: accede@atalan.fr
You can also find more information about the AcceDe project manuals at 
www.accede.info/en/manuals/.  
1.7 Credits 
The icons used in this document for important notes and tips were designed by www.icojoy.com and 
can be used free of charge. 
AcceDe project – www.accede.info/en/ 
Making PDF documents accessible  
with Adobe Acrobat Pro 
Page 9 
Directed by Atalan – accede@atalan.fr 
January 2011 
2 - Introduction to tagging 
2.1 What is tagging? 
Users with disabilities experience many problems with a PDF document, especially users of screen 
readers or partially sighted people. Many of these problems can be fixed by a technique which is 
called tagging (adding labels that are not visible to the readers of a document but which are used by 
suitable reading tools such as screen readers).  
Tagging involves adding semantic information called a tag to each content item of a document in order 
to specify its characteristics. So there are specific tags for defining, for example, titles, subtitles, 
paragraphs, annotations, and lists. It is also possible to tag images to add alternate text, to tag tables 
containing data in order to specify the row and column headings, etc.  
When the content of a document is identified with the help of tags, screen readers can convey the 
characteristics of the elements to users. It is possible, for example, for users of this software to 
navigate from title to title so that they can quickly access the content they require, or to navigate within 
a table containing data. 
2.2 Main accessibility problems of a non-tagged document 
Main accessibility problems  
of a non-tagged PDF 
Solutions to resolve problem 
Absence of document title  
The title of a document enables users to identify 
the document, which is especially useful, for 
example, when several documents are open. 
The title is the first information read by screen 
readers when opening the document. 
Define the title in the document properties 
Absence of language indication in the 
document 
The language is an important factor. It enables 
the voice synthesizer in screen readers to 
pronounce words with the correct accent. 
Define the main language in the document 
properties 
Absence of content structure  
Titles and, more generally, the structure of a 
document are normally identified visually on the 
page (position on the page, size, text colour…), 
but this information cannot be conveyed by 
screen readers.  
Semantic tagging 
Tagging makes it possible for screen readers to 
identify paragraphs, titles, hyperlinks, lists, and 
tables. 
Blind and partially sighted users can then 
discover the characteristics and structure of texts 
which are read, and use this information to 
navigate from item to item and get an overall 
view and a better understanding of the 
document.  
AcceDe project – www.accede.info/en/ 
Making PDF documents accessible  
with Adobe Acrobat Pro 
Page 10 
Directed by Atalan – accede@atalan.fr 
January 2011 
Main accessibility problems  
of a non-tagged PDF 
Solutions to resolve problem 
Incorrect reading order  
The reading order of different content items in a 
document is sometimes incorrect when the 
document is read with a screen reader. 
By default, screen reader software usually reads 
information from left to right and from top to 
bottom of the page. According to the documents 
and the page layout adopted (columns, insets, 
footnotes…), the visual order of different content 
items in a document does not always correspond 
to the reading order. 
Correct the reading order 
By rearranging the reading order you can choose 
the sequence tagged elements are read by 
screen reader software. 
Missing a navigation summary 
By default, it is difficult to navigate in a PDF file 
apart from scrolling from page to page. 
With screen reader software, it is not possible to 
directly go to a precise spot on the page without 
having listened to all the preceding content.  
Addition of bookmarks 
A clickable summary of the document can be 
created and displayed beside the pages. It 
means you can go directly to the main sections of 
the document using links known as bookmarks 
Adding internal links 
Links and cross-references can be directly added 
to page content so that users can navigate more 
easily between sections.  
These two solutions mean that people with 
motricity disabilities can navigate more easily in a 
PDF document solely by using the keyboard.  
Missing alternate text for graphical elements 
Graphical items such as images, pie charts, or 
illustrations cannot be interpreted by screen 
readers.  
Tagging of graphical elements 
Tagging makes it possible to associate alternate 
text with images. In this way you can 
communicate all the information conveyed in the 
images.  
The reading order of complex images such as 
line charts can also be defined.  
Missing structure in tables  
The relationships between the elements of a 
table, the column headings, the cells, the scope 
of the headings are not defined and users of 
screen readers cannot take advantage of their 
screen reader’s ability to navigate the table 
according to these relationships. 
Tagging of tables 
Tagging makes it possible to identify the heading 
cells of a table and link them with the 
corresponding table cells containing data. This 
enables users of screen readers to navigate 
within the table.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested