asp.net mvc display pdf : Change page size pdf SDK Library API wpf asp.net azure sharepoint Manual4-HowToGenerateSchoolIncome3-part1402

SCHOOL IN A BOX 
- 31 - 
7. ADDING VALUE & MAXIMIZING 
PROFITS  
The objective of this chapter is to provide you with some effective strategies 
for increasing the income generated by your school business.   
When you have finished reading this chapter you will know: 
4. How ‘adding value’ can be used to improve school business income 
5. How ‘cutting out the middleman’ and introducing ‘economies of scale’ can 
increase profits 
6. How developing new products and targeting niche markets can offer 
attractive income generating opportunities 
Earlier in this manual we made the point that if making money was easy, we’d all be rich.  
It isn’t, it’s hard. That’s part of the reason why poverty is so prevalent in the world. It’s also 
the reason why there’s such a need for financially Self-Sufficient Schools.  
Making money might be hard, but at least if your teacher knows how to do it, there’s a 
much better chance they might be able to teach you how to do it too! 
Teachers at a Self-Sufficient School have a credibility which teachers at regular schools 
don’t have. Their students know that they not only have the knowledge to help them pass 
exams – but the knowledge and experience needed to teach them how to make money. 
Back in Chapter 2 we looked at the basic principles of generating income in schools, focusing 
mostly on the types of businesses that a school would find easy to establish. 
In this chapter we’re going to focus on making the businesses that the school sets up as 
profitable as possible by look at adding and capturing value with our products. 
ADDING VALUE 
WHY BOTHER ABOUT ADDING VALUE? 
Change page size pdf - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
pdf file size; change paper size in pdf document
Change page size pdf - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
pdf optimized format; advanced pdf compressor online
Manual 4 – How To Generate School Income 
- 32 - 
In today’s economy, characterized by globalization and stiff competition, it is very difficult 
for rural entrepreneurs who focus only on producing basic goods to earn an income that 
allows them a decent standard of living.  
If it’s hard for an individual entrepreneur to make money in this way, it can be even harder 
for a school to do so. This is because the educational requirements of using a school 
businesses for learning activities will often reduce their efficiency.  
Basic goods, e.g. staple food crops such as wheat, rice, maize or cassava, normally sell at a 
relatively low price, and with a relatively low profit margin. This means, for example, that if 
you want to get rich as a wheat farmer you need to produce a huge volume of wheat very 
efficiently. 
But if you’re a school starting off with only a modest amount of land you’re never going to 
be able to produce in these huge volumes. And if you can’t compete on the same terms as 
your rivals, you will fail. 
The good news is that when they leave school, the students that you’re teaching aren’t 
likely to be able to produce in such huge volumes either - so you’ll actually be doing them a 
favor if you can teach them something they do have a chance of taking up when they leave 
school. 
As the chapter on basic principles suggests, one option to get round this problem is to 
produce higher margin products. With higher margins you can produce smaller quantities 
for sale and still make a reasonable profit – for example, the profit from one acre of tomato 
plants will be many times more than for one acre of maize.  
This is one strategy for increasing the income your school can generate, and it is certainly 
worth pursuing. When your students graduate and return to their families’ two acre farms, 
they will live much better if they know how to plant one acre with tomatoes and how to 
successfully market this crop. 
Nonetheless, it will take a very large number of acres of tomato plants to pay for all the 
costs of running your school! Unless the margins are very good indeed, sticking to higher 
margin products alone is probably not a good enough solution. 
If you’re serious about running a school which is 100% financially sustainable without 
relying on fees or outside support you need to consider adding value 
WHAT IS ADDED VALUE? 
Added value is the extra value which is imparted to the product at each stage of the 
production & development process, and which is ultimately reflected in the sales price.  
That sounds a little complicated, but it’s actually quite easy to understand with a real-life 
example.  
VB.NET Image: How to Create Visual Basic .NET Windows Image Viewer
can get a basic idea of the page layout from Apart from that, you are entitled to change the orientation You can accurately define the size and location of all
.pdf printing in thumbnail size; adjust pdf size preview
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Insert formatted text and plain text to PDF page using .NET XDoc.PDF component in C#.NET class. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and
pdf change font size; pdf page size dimensions
SCHOOL IN A BOX 
- 33 - 
Imagine you take some basic product, say a few potatoes, and turn them into another 
product, say some potato chips - then the difference between the sales price of the potato 
chips and the cost of the potatoes (along with other ingredients) is the added value. 
In the above example added value is the result of processing which one of the most obvious 
ways of creating a new product, but not the only one. Other ways of adding value, however, 
typically focus more on creating the perception that the product is new, through the use of 
marketing strategies such as improved packaging and ‘branding’.  
For small rural businesses including those run by schools, adding value to their basic 
products can be a highly effective strategy for increasing income.  There are many ways of 
adding value to the school’s products and to the school itself.  
Various types of value-added foodstuffs can be made from agricultural products, from those 
requiring simple preparation -  such as drying, preserving or cooking; to others needing 
more industrial processing – such as cheese-making or canned vegetables; to hand-crafted 
items requiring skilled employees – such as decorated cakes.   
Prepared foods are a simple and very profitable example of added value.  Something as 
simple as a sandwich should sell for at least 4 times what its ingredients costs by 
themselves. 
It’s worth remembering that in the context of a school, when value is added to a product, 
we not only are generating more income but also sending a powerful message to our 
students about how they can make money for themselves too – as well as providing them 
the knowledge and training that will allow them to put this into practice! 
HOW TO ADD VALUE 
How many times have we heard that the solution to the problems or the road to ensuring 
the success of small and medium-sized businesses, regardless of the sector in which they 
operate, is to add value to the products and services offered to the client? 
Sales Price of 
Potato Chips 
$3 
Cost of Potatoes etc. 
$1 
Added 
Value 
$2 
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Tiff
Support conversion to PDF from other documents, keeping original document page size. Support rendering image to a PDF document page, no change for image size.
best pdf compressor; reader shrink pdf
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font users how to add text comments on PDF page using C# text box to PDF and edit font size and color
reduce pdf file size; can a pdf be compressed
Manual 4 – How To Generate School Income 
- 34 - 
What is not mentioned, however, is that adding value normally requires:  
Investment 
Innovation 
Adding value is not doing what is already 
being done and trying to charge a little 
more for the same thing.  
Nor is it about trying to improve the 
quality of an existing product or service to 
better serve regular clients. 
Much less is it about increasing 
distribution or promotion of the company, 
product or service. 
To truly say that value is being added, there must be a positive transformation of either 
the product, the quality of the product or service, or the perception of the product / 
service being offered.   
A company that hopes to differentiate itself by adding value to its products or services must 
first and foremost understand the market for its ‘new’ product / service - and above all what 
characteristics for this products or services are the most important for the client at the 
moment of deciding whether to make a purchase. 
In order to acquire this knowledge about buyers it is fundamental to be very familiar with 
clients and potential customers; their habits and their values.  This makes it difficult to add 
value if we do not interact frequently with clients, any pay attention to what they reveal 
about their true needs, desires and anxieties. Only by truly knowing what the customer 
wants is it possible to create a product which they will pay more for – the ultimate goal of 
adding value. 
As a starting point it is vital to know who the client is. The sheer number of possible 
markets and market segments make it impossible to satisfy the needs of everyone possible 
customer.  For this reason, you need to know what segment/s of the market you can best 
serve, and target them closely.  
There is some wisdom in the saying, “don’t bite off more than you can chew.”  If you spread 
yourself too thinly by trying to serve more segments of the market than you are really 
capable of you will fail; it is better to serve just one segment where you believe you will be 
able to consistently outperform your competition.  
A common mistake is to do what you consider best, without consulting the market and what 
your customers want. This is unlikely to be successful - and very likely to lose your school 
money! 
C# PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.
public override Bitmap ConvertToImage(Size targetSize). Description: Convert the PDF page to bitmap with specified size. Parameters:
adjust size of pdf in preview; adjust pdf size
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
set as 1, then the two output PDF files will contains the first page and the explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by output PDF file size.
pdf edit text size; acrobat compress pdf
SCHOOL IN A BOX 
- 35 - 
INNOVATION 
Innovation does not necessarily depend on advanced, expensive or complicated technology. 
The most important thing is always that the client recognizes this innovation as added value 
– and is prepared to pay for it!  
Ways in which you may be able to add value to the products of your school include the 
following: 
Organic production: 
There is a growing demand for organic products, which generally have a higher market price 
than conventionally grown products.  
At an agricultural school there are also other important reasons for considering organic 
production: caring for the environment and minimal dependence on external resources, 
which in turn contributes to the school’s self-sufficiency and offers an interesting tool for 
learning. 
Combined restaurant & retail shop:  
Since the ‘90s  supermarkets have offered “new products” in the form of prepared foods, 
both to sit and eat in food-court areas or to take home.    
This is a very interesting example for an agricultural school that generally produces 
unprocessed raw material and could learn about the market and apply creativity to obtain 
greater income for its products. 
These large businesses have two competitive advantages that they have learned to take 
advantage of: they have the raw material to make food for a lower price than someone with 
a small or medium-sized business would purchase at and they have a market: a guaranteed 
flow of people coming to their shop.  
Putting these advantages together, they offer the public high-quality prepared food to eat 
on the spot or to take away, at a good price. 
Additionally, clients that go there to eat often end up buying something as well, and likewise 
those who go to shop may find it convenient to pick up something prepared or to eat there.  
In either case a drink may also be added to the sale. 
Your school might not be able to do this on the same scale as the supermarkets, but the 
same principle can be successfully applied. 
We believe that having its own retail outlet 
is something most schools should aspire to 
(for reasons outlined in the next section).  
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Separate source PDF document file by defined page range in VB.NET class application. Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size.
pdf custom paper size; pdf font size change
Create Thumbnail Winforms | Online Tutorials
change "Width" & "Height" to set your thumbnail size; items in thumbnail; Click "Swap" to change two items Multi-page Tiff Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF
reader compress pdf; best way to compress pdf
Manual 4 – How To Generate School Income 
- 36 - 
Where schools can achieve this ambition, combing a regular store with a 
restaurant/café/eaterie selling prepared foods made from school products, a simple 
value-added activity, should be a natural next step.   
MAXIMIZING PROFITS 
STRATEGIES FOR MAXIMISING INCOME GENERATION 
Entrepreneurship is about seeing the opportunities that exist to make money, and 
employing all your skills and resources to exploit them. 
A school that wants to generate income has two choices: 
i) 
to produce standard goods better than everyone else 
ii) 
to serve unmet or under-met needs with new products and services.  
Within each choice there will be several tried-and-tested strategies for maximizing income 
generation which build on the basic economics of business outlined in Chapter 2. 
New Products & Unmet / Under-Met Needs 
When competition is high, as is often the case with standard agricultural products, profit 
margins are likely to be low. Unless you can be a better producer than your competitors – 
with higher yields and lower costs – it may be difficult to generate useful income for your 
school from these products. 
When competition is low, as with new products, profit margins are likely to be much higher.  
A new product does not have to be entirely new - in fact it is probably better if it’s not! - but 
rather one that is not widely available locally. 
Any successful new product should fulfill an unmet or under-met need. Unless this is the 
case, demand will be weak, and the product will not generate much income – hence the 
importance of proper market research. 
The Value Chain: Capturing vs. Adding Value 
There are a lot of stages involved before a product is sold to the final customer. Where each 
stage is undertaken by someone new, they too will have to make a profit on their part of the 
chain.  
A simple example might be a tomato farmer, who sells to a stall-holder, who sells to the 
public. The farmer and the stall-holder each have to make a profit for it to be worth their 
while. If the farmer could sell directly to the public without incurring too many additional 
costs, he might be able to ‘capture’ more of the value of his product, and therefore 
generate more income this way. 
SCHOOL IN A BOX 
- 37 - 
Capturing value in this way is a distinct business strategy from adding value - which we have 
already covered at some length. It is about ‘how’ you sell vs. ‘what’ you sell. Compare the 
above example with a tomato farmer who chose to sun-dry his tomatoes, thereby turning 
them into a new product would be adding value to them. ‘What’ is being sold has changed 
in this case. 
As ever, your choices will depend heavily on the local operating environment. However, in 
most cases schools will find it a useful strategy to try and capture more of the value of 
their produce by selling it through a school-run outlet.  
Obviously, combining both approach and selling ‘value added’ products as directly as 
possibly to the final customer offers the best of both worlds. 
Economies of Scale & the Division of Labor 
Normally the more you can produce of one product the lower your costs will be. This is 
known as economies of scale.  
There are very good reasons for a school to sell many products - principally so that students 
can learn as wide a variety of skills as possible.  
However, where a school has a particular advantage in a certain activity, it may find it can 
generate much more income by focusing on this particular product, and producing it on a 
much larger scale. 
Another option for lowering production costs is to use the people you have as efficiently as 
possible.  
An example might be constructing a beehive, 
where we assume there are three steps 
involved are cutting the wood, nailing the 
pieces together, & painting the finished hive. If 
we have three workers, each worker could do 
all three steps themselves. 
However if each worker focused on just one 
step of the process, it is likely they could 
produce more hives in a day – increasing 
production, lowering the per hive cost, increasing the profit margin, increasing the income 
generated! 
This is known as the division of labor. The difference it can make is particularly noticeable 
the more steps there are in production. 
In Summary: By increasing the scale of production and having workers specialize on a 
small number of steps in the production process, schools can take important steps towards 
maximizing the profits they generate. 
Manual 4 – How To Generate School Income 
- 38 - 
8. HOW TO PREPARE A BUSINESS PLAN  
The objective of this chapter is to provide you an overview
3
of how to prepare 
a business plan for a business unit or ‘company’ within your Self-Sufficient 
School.   
When you have finished reading this chapter you will know: 
1. What the purpose of a business plan is for a school ‘company’ 
2. How to structure such a business plan 
3. What areas should be covered within the business plan for a school 
‘company’ 
Creating a business plan is a necessary requirement for the creation or development of a 
business.  
The business plan is the “navigation chart” which orients the company’s decision-making, 
and is presented to financial institutions and other entities or people that could support the 
enterprise. 
Here are some questions that should be properly clarified in the business plan:  
What is the business? 
What product or service is being offered? 
What profile should the company’s staff have? 
What characterizes potential clients? 
Who are your competitors? 
Who will your suppliers be and under what conditions will you negotiate with them? 
How will your product or service differ from that of the competition? 
How will you price your product or service? 
What distribution and marketing strategies will you apply? 
3
Manual 8 – How to Prepare a Business Plan goes into greater detail on this topic, examining it from the perspective of 
the Self-Sufficient School as a whole 
SCHOOL IN A BOX 
- 39 - 
How much does it cost to produce the good or service? 
How much financial support does it require and what sources will you go to to obtain 
that support? 
What will the sales conditions be? 
How much time do you expect it to take to recover the investment? 
What projections do you have for the company in the short, medium and long term? 
WHAT IS A BUSINESS PLAN? 
A business plan is a document that sets out the overall purpose of a business, including 
topics such as the business model, the organization chart, the source of initial investments, 
the staff that will be necessary and the method of selection, the company philosophy and 
the exit plan. 
A business plan is usually considered to be a living document in the sense that it should be 
updated continuously to reflect unforeseen changes. 
A reasonable business plan, which explains the company’s expectations of success, is 
fundamental to obtaining financing and capital partners.  
The main value of the business plan will be the creation of a written document which 
evaluates all aspects of the economic feasibility of your commercial enterprise, with a 
description and analysis of your business perspectives. 
Just as this chapter is sub-divided into the twelve most important aspects to consider when 
starting a business, your business plan can follow the same format.  In this section and in 
each of the following an outline of a business plan is included that covers each topic.  When 
they are put together, you will have a starting model for your overall plan. 
Business plans can vary considerably.  Libraries and bookstores have books dedicated to 
business plan formats.  However, this chapter is a place to start.  You can use it as a basis for 
designing a plan that is ideal for your business. 
WHY MAKE A BUSINESS PLAN? 
Your business plan will be useful in various ways.  Here are several reasons why you should 
not pass up this valuable tool: 
- First, you will define and focus your goal by making use of relevant information and 
analysis. 
Manual 4 – How To Generate School Income 
- 40 - 
- You can use it as a sales tool when entering into important relationships, including with 
creditors and investors. 
- You can use the plan to ask for opinions and advice, including from people who are in the 
commercial area that interests you, who will offer invaluable advice.  Too often, business 
owners structure things “my way” without taking advantage of expert advice, which could 
save them significant expense.  “My way” is a great idea, but in practice it can cause 
unnecessary complications. 
- A business plan may reveal omissions or weaknesses in your planning process. 
5 TIPS FOR WRITING YOUR BUSINESS PLAN 
1. Limit your long-term projections for the future (long-term being more than one 
year.)  It is better to establish short-term objectives and modify the plan as the 
business progresses.  Often long-term planning becomes irrelevant to the reality of 
the business, which may be different from the initial idea.   
2. Avoid exaggerated optimism.  Be extremely conservative when predicting 
requirements for capital, time frames, sales and profits.  Few business plans correctly 
anticipate how much money and time will be required. 
3. Don’t forget to decide what your strategy will be in the case of commercial adversity. 
4. Use simple language to explain problems.  Put the plan together in a way that is easy 
to read and understand. 
5. Don’t depend completely on the exclusivity of your business or on a patent 
invention.  Success comes to those who begin a business during a great economy, 
with great economy - and not necessarily with great inventions. 
Sample business plan for a laying hen operation (egg production): 
Executive Summary 
Product 
High-quality fresh eggs 
Market 
Retail establishments, growing demand, 
unserved market 
Competition 
Other national distributors and local 
producers.  For example, total production 
by small local producers plus local sales of 
large distributors. 
Competitive advantage 
Quality and freshness of the product 
Marketing and distribution 
Sales directly to the establishments; direct 
delivery 
Investment required 
An investment of US$6,750 is necessary to 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested