asp.net mvc display pdf : Change font size in pdf text box Library application component .net html azure mvc mas-economics-brief-31-part1410

International Trade Administration 
The Impact of Exporting on the Stability of U.S. Manufacturing Industries 
4.  Analysis of 85 Manufacturing Industries in the U.S. 
Manufacturing Sector 
While the two company case studies provide a measure of the reduction in the normalized 
volatility of total revenues that results from adding non-U.S. sales to U.S. sales, they do not 
specifically quantify the contribution of exports from the United States.  However, using 
industry-level data, we can focus the comparisons of normalized volatilities on the shipments of 
U.S. production to the United States and foreign markets.  The industry-level analysis also has 
the advantage that it covers the entire U.S. manufacturing sector, and so it significantly expands 
the breadth of the analysis. 
We analyze publicly available four-digit NAICS industry data on the value of shipments 
from the ASM for 2000-2001, 2003-2006, and 2008 and from the Economic Census for 2002 
and 2007.  At this level of disaggregation, there are 85 industries in the U.S. manufacturing 
sector.  The ASM is based on a subset of the population of establishments in the Economic 
Census.  It includes approximately 55,000 manufacturing establishments, with 10,000 large 
establishments selected with certainty and another 45,000 other establishments selected with 
probability proportional to establishment size.  To be included in the ASM, a manufacturing 
establishment must have one or more paid employees or leased employees engaged in activities 
that are classified in NAICS industries 31 through 33. 
In order to calculate the domestic shipments of the U.S. industries, we supplement the 
ASM data with statistics on the free alongside ship value of U.S. domestic exports from the U.S. 
ITC’s Trade Dataweb.
8
We calculate the U.S. shipments of each industry in each year as the 
difference between its total value of shipments and its domestic exports.  Across the 85 
industries, the ratio of exports to total shipments in 2008 ranged from 0.6% to 71.7%, with a 
simple average of 19.1%. 
Using these data, we estimate the contribution of exporting to the normalized volatility of 
the total value of shipments of the U.S. manufacturing industries.  Before we report the volatility 
8
U.S. domestic exports are produced in the United States.  By definition, they include goods from U.S. Foreign 
Trade Zones that have been enhanced in value.  They do not include re-exports.  The U.S. International Trade 
Commission defines the free alongside ship value as “the value of exports at the U.S. port, based on the transaction 
price, including inland freight, insurance, and other charges.  The value excludes the cost of loading the merchandise 
aboard the carrier and also excludes any further costs.” 
Change font size in pdf text box - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
reduce pdf file size; best way to compress pdf file
Change font size in pdf text box - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
can pdf files be compressed; best way to compress pdf files
Manufacturing and Services Economics Brief No. 3 
6 The Impact of Exporting on the Stability of U.S. Manufacturing Industries
comparisons for all 85 industries, we will go through a detailed example for a single industry, the 
Medical Equipment and Supplies Manufacturing industry (NAICS 3391).  In 2008, this industry 
had U.S. shipments of $64.09 billion, and total shipments of $84.03 billion (Table 3).   
Table 3: Example of NAICS Industry 3391 (Medical Equipment and Supplies) 
Revenues in Billions of 2008 U.S. Dollars 
Source: Annual Survey of Manufactures 2000-2001, 2003-2006, 2008; Economic Census 2002, 2007; ITC Trade 
Dataweb. 
The difference between these two numbers is the industry’s exports.  Between 2000 and 
2008, the standard deviation of unpredictable component of the industry’s U.S. shipments was 
$1.78 billion, and the standard deviation of the unpredictable component of its total shipments 
was $1.84 billion.  Although the standard deviation was greater for the U.S. industry’s total 
shipments than for its U.S. shipments, the percentage increase in the standard deviation from 
Year 
U.S. Shipments 
Only 
Total Shipments 
U.S. Share 
2000 
54.36 
66.00 
82.36% 
2001 
56.51 
69.13 
81.74% 
2002 
59.86 
72.74 
82.29% 
2003 
61.45 
75.69 
81.19% 
2004 
59.60 
74.86 
79.62% 
2005 
63.77 
80.52 
79.20% 
2006 
65.00 
82.46 
78.83% 
2007 
61.45 
79.81 
77.00% 
2008 
64.04 
84.03 
76.21% 
Ratio of Standard Deviation 
to 2008 Value 
0.029 
0.021 
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Support to change font color in PDF text box. Ability to change text size in PDF text box. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
change page size of pdf document; adjust size of pdf file
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
pdf page size dimensions; change page size pdf acrobat
International Trade Administration 
The Impact of Exporting on the Stability of U.S. Manufacturing Industries 
expanding the market (3.37%, or 1.84/1.78-1) was smaller than the percentage increase in the 
2008 value of shipments (43.12%, or 69.17/48.33-1).  It follows that the normalized volatility of 
the industry’s total shipments (2.1%) is less than the normalized volatility of the industry’s U.S. 
shipments (2.9%).  We conclude from this comparison that exporting reduced the volatility of the 
industry’s total shipments.
9
The normalized volatility comparisons for the Medical Equipment and Supplies industry 
are representative of the results for the 85 manufacturing industries as a whole (The results for 
each of the industries are reported in a table in the Technical Appendix.).  For 21 of the 85 
industries, both the normalized volatility and the standard deviation of the industries’ total 
shipments were smaller than their counterparts for the industries’ U.S. shipments.  The smaller 
standard deviations for these industries indicate that exports were a particularly good hedge 
against fluctuations in demand in the U.S. market.
10
For an additional 40 of the 85, the 
normalized volatility measure was lower for total shipments than for U.S. shipments (but the 
standard deviation was not), which indicates that exporting reduced the volatility of the 
shipments of these additional industries relative to their 2008 values.   
Among the 85 industries, the Leather & Hide Tanning & Finishing, Audio & Video 
Equipment, Apparel Accessories & Other Apparel, Communications Equipments and Engine & 
Turbine & Power Transmission Equipment industries experienced the largest percentage 
reductions in the normalized volatility of their total shipments as a result of their exports.
11
In 
general, industries with higher export shares experienced larger reductions in the normalized 
volatility of their total shipments.   
As a sensitivity analysis, we recalculated the normalized volatilities using the mean value 
of shipments between 2000 and 2008 in the denominator rather than the 2008 value of 
shipments.  The results are similar.  For 21 of the 85 industries, both the normalized volatility 
and the standard deviation of the industries’ total shipments were smaller than their counterparts 
for the industries’ U.S. shipments.  For an additional 33 of the 85, the normalized volatility 
measure was lower for total shipments than for U.S. shipments (but the standard deviation was 
9
In the Technical Appendix, we identify the technical assumptions that underlie this economic interpretation. 
10
Specifically, they imply that the covariances between the industries’ U.S. shipments and their exports were 
negative. 
11
The NAICS codes for these five industries are 3161, 3343, 3159, 3342 and 3336 respectively. 
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
Support to change font size in PDF form. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; List<BaseFormField
change font size pdf form; reader compress pdf
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Support to add text, text box, text field and crop marks to PDF document. Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color.
change paper size in pdf document; change font size in pdf fillable form
Manufacturing and Services Economics Brief No. 3 
8 The Impact of Exporting on the Stability of U.S. Manufacturing Industries
not), which indicates that exporting reduced the volatility of the shipments of these additional 
industries relative to their 2008 values.   
Finally, we also examined whether the results are different when we focus the analysis on 
exports to OECD member countries.  We defined a U.S. industry’s OECD shipments as the sum 
of its U.S. shipments and its exports to other OECD countries.  Of the 85 industries, there are 55 
industries for which exports to all countries reduced the normalized volatility of their shipments 
and exports to other OECD countries also reduced the normalized volatility.  There are six 
industries for which total exports reduced the normalized volatility, but exports to other OECD 
countries did not.  There are two industries for which exports to other OECD countries reduced 
the normalized volatility of their shipments, but total exports did not.   
5.  Conclusions 
Both the company case studies and the industry-level analysis of the U.S. manufacturing 
sector indicate that non-U.S. sales, including exports from the United States, reduce the 
normalized volatility of the value of total shipments of U.S. manufacturers.  The value of 
shipments is a measure of U.S. manufacturers’ revenues and not their profits, so the reduction in 
the volatility of shipments does not necessarily imply a reduction in the volatility of the 
companies’ profits.  However, the two are closely connected as long as costs are a steady share 
of revenues.   
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
pdf custom paper size; change font size in pdf form
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Save text font, color, size and location changes to Other robust text processing features, like delete and remove PDF text, add PDF text box and field.
pdf compress; best pdf compression
International Trade Administration 
The Impact of Exporting on the Stability of U.S. Manufacturing Industries 
References 
Bacchetta, Philippe and Eric van Wincoop (2000): “Does Exchange Rate Stability Increase 
Trade and Welfare?”  American Economic Review 90(5): 1093-1109. 
Bahmani-Oskooee, Mohsen and Scott W. Hegerty (2009): “The Effects of Exchange-Rate 
Volatility on Commodity Trade between the United States and Mexico.”  Southern 
Economic Journal 75(4): 1019-1044. 
Dixit, Avinash K. and Robert S. Pindyck (1994): Investment under Uncertainty.  Princeton, N.J.: 
Princeton University Press. 
Ekanayake, E.M., John R. Ledgerwood, and Sabrina D’Souza (2010): “The Real Exchange Rate 
Volatility and U.S. Exports: An Empirical Investigation.”  International Journal of 
Business and Finance Research 4(1): 23-35. 
Helpman, Elhanan and Paul Krugman (1985): Market Structure and Foreign Trade.  Cambridge, 
Massachusetts: MIT Press. 
Koray, Faik and William D. Lastrapes (2001): “Real Exchange Rate Volatility and U.S. Bilateral 
Trade: A VAR Approach.”  Review of Economics and Statistics, 708-712. 
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links
change font size in pdf form field; pdf file compression
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Functionality to remove text format by modifying text font, size, color, etc. Other PDF edit functionalities, like add PDF text, add PDF text box and field.
adjust file size of pdf; change font size pdf fillable form
Manufacturing and Services Economics Brief No. 3 
10 The Impact of Exporting on the Stability of U.S. Manufacturing Industries
<Page intentionally left blank> 
International Trade Administration 
The Impact of Exporting on the Stability of U.S. Manufacturing Industries 11 
Technical Appendix   
This appendix provides further details on some of the more technical aspects of the 
analysis in the paper. 
Adjustments to the shipments data to remove predictable trends 
In this analysis, we are measuring the unpredictable variation in the shipments series.  We 
are not trying to measure all time series variation in the shipments series, which would include 
variation in shipments over time due to a deterministic linear trend in the series.  For each of the 
series, we estimated industry-specific means and linear trends for the 2000-2008 sample using 
Ordinary Least Squares.  These simple regression models indicate that there is a positive trend in 
each series that is statistically significant at the 1% level.  On this basis, we conclude that the 
expected values of the variables are not fixed over time.  We calculated the unpredictable 
component of each of the shipments series as the residuals of its linear trend model.   
Next we calculate the standard deviation, which is the square root of the variance.  The 
general definition of variance is that it is the average squared difference between a variable and 
its expected value.  If the expected value happens to be constant over time, then this is the 
average squared difference between the variable and its time-invariant mean.  For these 
shipments series, however, the expected value is not time-invariant.  It increases over time 
according to the linear trend models.  In each year, the actual value of the variable differs from 
the expected value due to unpredictable variation.  When we de-trend the shipment series by 
subtracting the expected value from the actual value, we are isolating the unpredictable variation, 
which has mean zero by construction over the 2000-2008 sample period.  The de-trending does 
not require an economic theory about the determinants of the trends or assumptions about 
whether the trends are the same for U.S. shipments and total shipments or across industries. 
We measure the normalized volatility of the shipments data as the ratio of the standard 
deviation of the residuals to the most recent value of the shipments variable, which is the value in 
2008.  As a sensitivity analysis, we re-calculate the ratio using the average value for shipments 
between 2000 and 2008 as the denominator.  
Manufacturing and Services Economics Brief No. 3 
12 The Impact of Exporting on the Stability of U.S. Manufacturing Industries
Our measure of normalized volatility is similar to the conventional coefficient of 
variation statistic.  However, the coefficient of variation is based on the standard deviation of the 
original series, not the standard deviation of the unpredictable components of the series.  We 
modify the coefficient of variation statistic to address the predictable trends in the shipment 
series. 
Economic Interpretation of the Comparison of Normalized Volatilities 
For industries in which the normalized volatility of total shipments was lower than the 
normalized volatility of U.S. shipments, we infer that exporting reduces the volatility of the 
industry’s total shipments.  This interpretation is based on a counterfactual comparison with 
specific assumptions.  We are assuming that the volatility of the industry’s U.S. shipments would 
be the same in the absence of exports (a hypothetical scenario) as it is with exports (the actual, 
observed outcome).  This is implied by a more technical assumption – that the U.S. industry’s 
marginal cost of production is separable between shipments to the different geographic markets.  
As long as prices are set based on the U.S. manufacturers’ marginal costs, exporting will only 
affect the value of shipments to the U.S. market if it affects the marginal cost of supplying the 
U.S. market.  If marginal costs are separable between the destination markets, then exporting will 
not affect the value of shipments to the U.S. market, even if there are fixed costs of production 
that are shared across the destination markets or fixed costs of accessing export markets. 
This technical assumption is consistent with the most common economic models of 
international trade.  It holds if production costs exhibit constant returns to scale, as in the 
classical Heckscher-Ohlin and Ricardian models of international trade, and the industry is not 
large enough to have a significant impact on factor prices.  It also holds for models with 
increasing returns to scale and imperfect competition, as long as there are constant marginal 
costs, as is the case in Helpman and Krugman (1985) and many related models of international 
trade.   
International Trade Administration 
The Impact of Exporting on the Stability of U.S. Manufacturing Industries 13 
Relation to the Economics Literature 
Most of the economics literature that relates volatility to international trade focuses on a 
single source of uncertainty, exchange rate volatility.  Examples of this literature include 
Bacchetta and van Wincoop (2000), Koray and Lastrapes (2001), Bahmani-Oskooee and Hegerty 
(2009), and Ekanayake et al. (2010).  In contrast, the comparison of normalized volatilities in 
this paper avoids disentangling the contributions of different sources of uncertainty that are 
associated with exporting, like fluctuations in aggregate demand in the foreign country, shipping 
costs, and exchange rates.  We demonstrate in this paper that it is not necessary to quantify the 
separate contribution of each source of volatility in order to determine whether exporting 
reduced the volatility of an industry’s total shipments. 
Manufacturing and Services Economics Brief No. 3 
14 The Impact of Exporting on the Stability of U.S. Manufacturing Industries
Appendix Table: Ratio of the Standard Deviation to the Value in 2008 
NAICS 
Industry 
U.S. Shipments 
Only 
Total 
Shipments 
U.S. Share 
3111 
Animal food mfg 
0.061 
0.059 
95.34% 
3112 
Grain & oilseed milling 
0.080 
0.080 
87.55% 
3113 
Sugar & confectionery product mfg 
0.038 
0.033 
93.23% 
3114 
Fruit & vegetable preserving & 
specialty food mfg 
0.024 
0.025 
92.81% 
3115 
Dairy product mfg 
0.040 
0.042 
96.01% 
3116 
Animal  slaughtering & processing 
0.024 
0.020 
90.34% 
3117 
Seafood product preparation & 
packaging 
0.043 
0.041 
95.95% 
3118 
Bakeries & tortilla mfg 
0.015 
0.015 
97.61% 
3119 
Other food mfg 
0.023 
0.020 
92.45% 
3121 
Beverage mfg 
0.023 
0.020 
95.50% 
3122 
Tobacco mfg 
0.114 
0.117 
97.80% 
3131 
Fiber, yarn, & thread mills 
0.076 
0.061 
83.05% 
3132 
Fabric mills 
0.129 
0.075 
63.08% 
3133 
Textile & fabric finishing & fabric 
coating mills 
0.084 
0.069 
87.08% 
3141 
Textile furnishings mills 
0.128 
0.113 
90.39% 
3149 
Other textile product mills 
0.077 
0.076 
89.99% 
3151 
Apparel knitting mills 
0.209 
0.189 
87.59% 
3152 
Cut & sew apparel mfg 
0.235 
0.234 
87.23% 
3159 
Apparel accessories & other 
apparel mfg 
0.512 
0.273 
42.59% 
3161 
Leather & hide tanning & finishing 
1.002 
0.259 
28.30% 
3162 
Footwear mfg 
0.295 
0.244 
75.53% 
3169 
Other leather & allied product mfg 
0.233 
0.201 
61.78% 
3211 
Sawmills & wood preservation 
0.137 
0.127 
90.44% 
3212 
Veneer, plywood, & engineered 
wood product mfg 
0.177 
0.164 
92.57% 
3219 
Other wood product mfg 
0.089 
0.086 
97.02% 
3221 
Pulp, paper, & paperboard mills 
0.039 
0.049 
84.42% 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested