asp.net mvc display pdf : Change font size pdf software control cloud windows web page winforms class MathType5WinManual11-part1436

Chapter 8:  Advanced Formatting 
105
Try Define Spacing 
If you find that you are 
doing a lot of nudging, 
you should consider 
changing one or two of 
MathType’s built-in 
formatting dimensions 
using the Define 
Spacing command on 
the Format menu. See 
“Redefining Formatting 
Rules” later in this 
chapter. 
Use the Toolbar 
If there is a particular 
expression which you 
find you are nudging 
consistently, drag it to 
the toolbar. Then, 
whenever you need to 
insert it into an equation, 
just click on it in the 
toolbar. 
Fences 
In mathematical 
typesetting terminology, 
“fences” is a collective 
term used to refer to 
enclosing characters like 
parentheses, brackets, 
and braces. By 
extension, MathType 
refers to templates 
involving these 
characters as “fence 
templates”. 
Nudge commands have many uses. By moving one character on top of another, 
you can form overstrikes and other special combinations of characters, such as 
or 
÷
%
You can also use Nudge commands to improve upon MathType’s built-in 
kerning capability: for example, in an expression like L
t
the superscript may 
look better if you move it further into the gap in the L.  
The Nudge commands can be especially useful when applied to symbols such as 
brackets and embellishments that are parts of templates. Recall that there is a 
special technique for selecting symbols of this type: hold down the C
TRL
key and 
click on the symbol with the vertical arrow pointer. Sometimes you may wish to 
nudge an embellishment to place it at the same height as some other one nearby. 
Although you can “undo” nudging, you can also return nudged items to their 
original, un-nudged positions by using the Reset Nudge command on the 
Format menu. The Reset Nudge command can be used at any time — it is not 
necessary to choose it immediately after nudging. Prior to choosing the Reset 
Nudge command, you must select the nudged items you want to reset. Selecting 
items that were previously nudged usually requires keyboard techniques. Use 
the T
AB
key to cycle the insertion point until it lands in the appropriate slot, and 
then hold the S
HIFT 
key down while moving the insertion point with the arrow 
keys to select the desired items. 
Fence Alignment 
MathType’s fence alignment feature allows you to easily adjust the alignment of 
items within fences (brackets, parentheses, braces, etc.). 
In most technical publishing, fences are centered with respect to the math axis 
(the height where the horizontal strokes of minus signs and addition signs are 
located) both inside and outside of the fence. This doesn’t always look exactly 
the way you want it, though. For example, the case below: 
3
A B
M
P
R
H
Q
+
+
The numerator in the above expression is much taller than the denominator, 
resulting in a large white gap at the bottom of the expression. To get rid of that 
gap, you will want to change the fence alignment setting of the brace template. 
Place your cursor somewhere inside of the brace or select the entire template, 
and choose the Fence Alignment command from the Format menu.  
Change font size pdf - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
pdf markup text size; pdf text box font size
Change font size pdf - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
change font size pdf form; change paper size in pdf document
MathType User Manual 
Using the same example, there are three possible settings for fence alignment: 
3
A B
M
P R
H
Q
+
+
or   
3
A B
M
P R
H
Q
+
+
or   
3
A
B
M
H
P R
Q
+
+
Changing Alignment 
You can also change 
alignment by placing the 
insertion point inside the 
fence template, and 
typing C
TRL
-S
HIFT
-A. 
Use this keyboard 
shortcut to rotate among 
all three options, 
stopping on the one that 
looks best. 
Use the Toolbar 
Drag characters that you 
expect to use a lot onto 
the toolbar. Once on the 
toolbar, you can insert a 
character by just clicking 
on it. 
Notice the positions of the math axis outside of the braces, the math axis inside 
of the braces, and the center of the brace character itself. Each choice has its own 
advantages and disadvantages, and the correct selection will most likely depend 
on the expression inside the braces and its relationship with the rest of your 
equation. 
You can also choose the fence alignment setting that will be used for new fence 
templates using the Fence Alignment command. Remember, no matter which 
fence alignment setting a template starts out with, you can still change it later on 
a template-by-template basis. 
Changing the Font of Individual Characters 
The fonts used in equations are generally based on MathType’s system of styles, 
but you can also assign any font available on your computer to specific 
characters in an equation. For example, you may want to incorporate characters 
such as the M or X from Euclid Fraktur into your equations. Or, you may have 
some font containing technical symbols used occasionally in your documents. 
You can incorporate special fonts into your equations by using the User 1 and 
User 2 styles, or the Other command on the Style menu. Assigning the font to 
then access the font by choosing the corresponding style from the Style menu, 
perhaps via a keyboard shortcut. The User 1 and User 2 styles are described 
further in Chapter 7. 
The Other command on the Style menu allows you to assign any font to selected 
(or subsequently typed) characters. When you choose the command, a dialog box 
appears with a list of available fonts. You simply select the desired font and then 
choose the OK button. For example, suppose you wanted to insert the ! 
character from the Wingdings font. This character corresponds to the v keystroke 
in this font (see the next paragraph). So, to insert the character, you would type a 
v and select it, then choose Other from the Style menu and select Wingdings. 
The Insert Symbol command on the Edit menu can help you determine the 
keystrokes corresponding to characters in a given font. The Insert Symbol dialog 
displays a table of all the characters in a specified font. When you click on a 
character, the corresponding keystroke is indicated in the lower right-hand 
corner of the window. Some of the keystrokes are of the form “A
LT
+0123” with 
various numbers in the place of 0123. This means that to insert the character, you 
106
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
adjust size of pdf file; change font size in pdf
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color. Abilities to draw markups on PDF document or stamp on PDF file.
adjust size of pdf; adjusting page size in pdf
Chapter 8:  Advanced Formatting 
hold down the A
LT
key and enter the numbers one at a time from the numeric 
keypad, then release the A
LT
key.  
Changing the Size of Individual Characters 
You can change the size of most of the characters in an equation to any size you 
want. The Other, Smaller, and Larger commands on the Size menu can be 
applied to selected characters or to characters you type subsequently. The Other 
command displays a dialog box which allows you to enter any point size. The 
Smaller and Larger commands change the size of selected or subsequently-typed 
characters by one Smaller/Larger Increment (this increment is specified in the 
Define Sizes dialog box). If you want to resize a summation sign, embellishment, 
or some other symbol that is part of a template, remember that there is a special 
method for selecting these characters: hold down the C
TRL
key and click on the 
symbol with the vertical pointer, as shown below. Keyboard shortcuts for the 
Smaller and Larger commands are C
TRL
+< (Smaller) and C
TRL
+> (Larger). 
Remember that these are shifted characters, so you’ll actually need to type 
C
TRL
+S
HIFT
+> and C
TRL
+S
HIFT
+< respectively.     
You cannot assign a specific typesize to expanding brackets and braces or 
expanding integrals; the sizes of these characters can only be changed using the 
Smaller and Larger commands. 
If you have changed the size of a character with the Other, Smaller or Larger 
commands, you can revert to the character’s default size by using the Reset 
command on the Size menu. This disables the explicit size and makes the 
character’s size controlled by the settings in the Define Sizes dialog. 
Choosing Fonts for Math Documents 
Choosing which fonts to use in your documents is largely a matter of personal 
taste, but there are some general guidelines that you might want to follow. 
Serifs vs. Sans Serif 
For writing technical documents, fonts having serifs (small horizontal strokes at 
the tops and bottoms of characters) are usually preferred to those that do not. 
Among the well-known fonts, Times, Bookman, and New Century Schoolbook 
all have serifs. The Arial and Helvetica fonts do not have serifs, so they’re 
referred to as sans serif fonts (“sans serif” is just French for “without serifs”).  
107
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
pdf file size; reader shrink pdf
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links
pdf change font size in textbox; change page size of pdf document
MathType User Manual 
A Font’s x-height 
relative to their point size. This is referred to as the font’s x-height. It turns out 
that the Symbol font’s lowercase characters are about 10% taller than those in the 
Times font, but are roughly the same height as those in the Bookman font. For 
this reason, some people may think that σx + τz (Symbol and Bookman) looks 
better than σx + τz (Symbol and Times). The Euclid and Euclid Symbol fonts 
supplied with MathType also solve this problem, since they are specifically 
designed to match in x-height and overall appearance: 
σx + τz.
Use the Euclid Fonts for a 
T
E
X
Computer Modern Look 
Using Euclid Fonts 
To use the Euclid fonts 
in your equations, use 
the Define Styles 
command, click Simple, 
choose Euclid as the 
“Primary font” and 
“Euclid Symbol and 
Euclid Extra” for “Greek 
and math fonts”. 
The 
T
E
X
system was created by Donald Knuth in the late 1970’s to typeset math 
books. It is a powerful, but very hard to use, tool that produces high-quality 
printed output. T
E
X and 
AT
E
X
L
systems typically use a family of fonts called 
Computer Modern, and some people like the distinctive appearance these 
produce. 
MathType comes with a family of fonts called Euclid, consisting of 16 individual 
fonts with 6 different character sets, that have the Computer Modern look. These 
fonts contain the characters used in the T
E
X typesetting system, but they are 
arranged in each font to work optimally with MathType and other Windows 
applications. Appendix A contains charts that display every character in the 
Euclid family of fonts. 
To help duplicate the look of 
T
E
X
, MathType also comes with an equation 
preference file called TeXLook.eqp. This preference file sets up MathType to use 
the Euclid fonts, and also contains spacing settings that match T
E
X’s spacing. 
This file is located in the Preferences folder inside your MathType folder. 
Fonts as Sources of Additional Symbols 
You may need to use special mathematical symbols that are not available within 
MathType. Vast numbers of fonts are available for Windows, but only a few of 
them contain any useful mathematical symbols. The best way to examine fonts 
for suitable characters is to use the Insert Symbol command on MathType’s Edit 
menu. 
The Insert Symbol command allows you to view all the fonts installed on your 
computer. You can choose Font in the “View by” list if you think you know 
which font might have the symbol you’re looking for, or choose Description in 
the “View by” list to search for the character based on word(s) in its description. 
Tutorial 13 in Chapter 4 and the following section contain more information 
about this command. 
108
The MathType Web site, www.dessci.com, may contain information on other 
mathematical fonts, the characters they contain, and where they can be obtained. 
Generate Barcodes in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
Select "Generate" to process barcode generation; Change Barcode Properties. Select "Font" to choose human-readable text font style, color, size and effects;
advanced pdf compressor; pdf edit text size
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C#.NET class. Support to change font size in PDF form. Able to delete form fields from adobe PDF file.
pdf page size dimensions; best pdf compression tool
Chapter 8:  Advanced Formatting 
MathType's Font and Character Knowledge 
MathType has a built-in database containing a considerable amount of 
knowledge on fonts and the characters they contain. For each font, this 
knowledge consists of:  
• A list of the characters it contains. 
• Its PostScript font name, used for generating EPS files. 
For each character, which may be a member of several fonts, this knowledge 
consists of:  
• Its description (“Less-than or equal”, for example). 
• Its usual role in mathematical equations (“variable” or “relational operator”, 
for example). 
• The preferred MathType style to use when inserted into an equation. 
Unicode and MTCode 
Unicode Web Site 
To find out more about 
Unicode, the Unicode 
Consortium’s Web site 
at www.unicode.org is a 
good place to start. 
MTCode or Unicode? 
You may see the 
MTCode value for 
characters in several 
places in MathType. 
However, the value will 
be labelled, if at all, by 
“Unicode”. This is 
because Unicode is the 
more familiar term. 
Those in the know will 
remember that 
“MTCode” would be a 
more accurate label. 
A key component in MathType’s representation of its font and character 
knowledge is its use of Unicode. Unicode is a system that assigns an integer 
value to every character used in the written languages of the world, plus many 
characters that are in use in mathematics and other technical disciplines. 
The bad news on Unicode is that it doesn’t come very close to having 
assignments for all the characters in use in math and science. The good news is 
that the Unicode Standard provides a Private Use Area — a range of values that 
can be used by companies like Design Science to assign as they see fit. We have 
extended Unicode by adding all the “missing” math and science characters and 
have named it MTCode. MTCode is a superset of Unicode that MathType uses 
internally to represent all the characters that are used in its equations. 
Some examples may help to make the MTCode idea more concrete. Here are the 
MTCode values for a few characters: 
Character 
MTCode value 
0x0041 
€ (the new Euro currency symbol) 
0x20AC 
 
0x2191 
0xE932 
A few things to note about these examples: 
• The values are shown in hexadecimal (base-16) notation. This is customary in 
the Unicode world. 
• The value for A is the same as its value in ASCII, a standard that has been in 
use for many years to represent characters in computers. 
109
VB.NET Image: Visual Basic .NET Guide to Draw Text on Image in .
Please note that you can change some of the example, you can adjust the text font, font size, font type (regular LoadImage) Dim DrawFont As New Font("Arial", 16
can a pdf file be compressed; pdf change font size
C# Image: Use C# Class to Insert Callout Annotation on Images
Easy to set annotation filled font property individually Support adjusting callout annotation size parameter in an easy way; C# demo code to change the filled
change font size in pdf text box; acrobat compress pdf
MathType User Manual 
• The first three examples are part of Unicode — the last is part of MathType’s 
extension to Unicode, MTCode. 
Font Encodings 
Many fonts on your computer share the same arrangement of characters. For 
example, in your word processor when you press the “A” key you get the first 
letter of the Latin alphabet whether your current font is Arial or Times New 
Roman. Similarly, hitting the same key when the current font is Symbol or Euclid 
Symbol will give you a Greek alpha. The concept of “font encoding” is used to 
capture these relationships. Another common term that means the same thing is 
“character set”. 
In MathType, a font encoding is a named table of MTCode values, one for each 
position in the fonts that share the encoding. You can see the encoding 
MathType has assigned to each font on your computer by using the Insert 
Symbol command on the Edit menu. 
The Insert Symbol Dialog 
MTCode Values 
If you want to see 
MTCode values 
displayed in the status 
bar as you pass the 
mouse pointer over 
characters in the 
toolbar, choose the 
Workspace Preferences 
command on the 
Preferences menu and 
check “Show character 
and template codes in 
the status bar”. 
Using the Insert Symbol dialog, you can browse all the fonts available on your 
computer. This is also the best place to see MathType’s font and character 
knowledge. 
Once you select a font in the “View by” section at the top of the dialog, you can 
see the font’s encoding. For the character selected in the grid, you can also see its 
110
Chapter 8:  Advanced Formatting 
Unicode (MTCode) value, position in the font, the keystroke (if any) that can be 
used to type it, and its description. 
Tutorial 13 in Chapter 4 shows how to use this dialog, and additional 
information is also contained in MathType’s online help. 
Extending MathType's Font and Character Knowledge 
Although MathType contains most math characters in MTCode and has 
encodings for most fonts that are useful in math and science, it will always be 
incomplete as mathematicians invent new characters and notations and font 
designers create new fonts. For this reason, we have designed MathType to be 
easily extended to handle new characters, fonts, and font encodings. However, 
the details on how to do this are beyond the scope of this manual. You can find 
this information on our Web site, www.dessci.com, in a document called 
“Extending MathType's Font and Character Knowledge”. 
Tabs 
MathType’s tabs work roughly the same as those found in most popular word 
processing applications. You choose the type of tab you want by clicking its 
button on the Ruler. There are five tab stop types to choose from: 
Left tab   
Center tab    
Right tab   
Relational tab 
Decimal tab   
Click one of the five buttons to choose the tab stop type, and then click in the 
area below the Ruler scale to set the position of the tab stop.  
Each slot in an equation has its own tab stops. If you press E
NTER
within a slot or 
at the end of a line, you create a pile. The same tab stops apply to every line in 
the pile. The Ruler shows only the tab stops belonging to the current slot or pile 
(the one containing the selection or insertion point). To remove a tab stop, drag it 
downwards away from the Ruler. To change the location of an existing tab stop, 
just drag it along the Ruler. The small inverted T marks on the Ruler are default 
tab stops. 
Effects of Tab Characters 
Pressing C
TRL
+T
AB
will insert a tab character into your equation. If you just press 
the T
AB
key, this moves the insertion point, so to enter tab characters you must 
111
MathType User Manual 
hold down the C
TRL
key. Tab characters inserted in this way divide the items in a 
line into several groups, called tab groups. Each group is bordered by a tab 
character at each end, except the last group in the line, which has a tab to its left 
and extends to the end of the line. The formatting of each of these tab groups is 
controlled by the corresponding tab stop: the first tab stop controls the first 
group, the second tab stop controls the second group, and so on. Specifically, 
MathType moves the entire tab group horizontally until some reference position 
within it is aligned directly below the corresponding tab stop. The reference 
position that’s used is determined by the type of tab stop. For example, if the tab 
stop is a left tab, then the left end of the tab group is used as the reference 
position, and is therefore aligned with the tab stop. For other types of tab stops, 
reference positions are determined as follows: 
Type of Tab Stop 
Reference Position in Tab Group 
Left 
Left end of group 
Right 
Right end of group 
Center 
Center of group 
Decimal 
First decimal point in group (or left end) 
Relational 
First relational operator in group (or left end) 
The decimal point character will be either a period or a comma, depending on 
your Regional settings in the Windows Control Panel. Relational operators 
include equals signs, inequality signs like <, >, , ≺, ", and other similar 
symbols, such as 
Alignment Symbols 
The 
symbol on the 
palette is an alignment symbol. If you place an 
alignment symbol within a tab group, then it is automatically used as the 
reference position for that group, regardless of what type of tab stop you used. In 
other words, alignment symbols override all other reference positions. Note that 
this symbol only appears in the equation in the MathType window. It will not 
appear when printed or in other applications. 
Tabs and Alignment 
See the Tutorial 
Tutorial 11 in Chapter
illustrates the use of 
tabs. 
In MathType’s Format menu, you will see five alignment commands that closely 
parallel the five tab stop types described above. In some cases, you may be able 
to use these commands to obtain the formatting you want instead of using tabs. 
For example, if you simply want to align two equations at their equal signs, you 
should use the “Align at =” command, rather than a relational tab stop. You 
should not try to use a combination of tab stops and alignment commands to 
format the same line. As in a word processor, the two formatting mechanisms 
interact with each other in rather unpredictable ways, and you are not likely to 
get the results you want. Tabs of any of the five types will only work predictably 
in lines that are left-aligned. 
112
Appendix A:  Font Charts 
Appendix A 
Font Charts 
MathType’s Fonts 
The following table lists MathType’s fonts. We’ve also listed Symbol although 
this font is installed as part of Microsoft Windows, not MathType: 
Name 
Style 
Encoding 
PostScript name 
Symbol 
plain 
Symbol 
Symbol 
MT Extra 
plain 
MTExtra 
MT-Extra 
Euclid Symbol 
plain 
Symbol 
EuclidSymbol 
italic 
EuclidSymbol-Italic 
bold 
EuclidSymbol-Bold 
bold-italic 
EuclidSymbol-BoldItalic 
Euclid 
plain 
WinANSI 
Euclid 
italic 
Euclid-Italic 
bold 
Euclid-Bold 
bold-italic 
Euclid-BoldItalic 
Euclid Extra 
plain 
MTExtra 
EuclidExtra 
bold 
EuclidExtra-Bold 
Euclid Fraktur 
plain 
EuclidFraktur 
EuclidFraktur 
bold 
EuclidFraktur-Bold 
Euclid Math One plain 
EuclidMath1 
EuclidMathOne 
bold 
EuclidMathOne-Bold 
Euclid Math Two plain 
EuclidMath2 
EuclidMathTwo 
bold 
EuclidMathTwo-Bold 
Encoding is the name MathType gives to the particular arrangement of 
characters in the font. Euclid Symbol and Symbol have the same encoding, as do 
MT Extra and Euclid Extra. PostScript name is only significant when working 
with Encapsulated PostScript files or other PostScript environments. 
113
MathType User Manual 
Symbol, plain 
Encoding: Symbol 
PostScript name: Symbol 
0
0
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
A
A
B
B
C
C
D
D
E
E
F
F
0
0
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
A
A
B
B
C
C
D
D
E
E
F
F
R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R
R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R
! ∀ ∀ # # ∃ ∃ % % & & ∋ ∋ ( ( ) ) ∗ ∗ + + , , − − . . /
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 9 : : ; < < = > ?
≅ Α Α Β Β Χ Χ ∆ ∆ Ε Φ Φ Γ Γ Η Η Ι Ι ϑ ϑ Κ Κ Λ Λ Μ Μ Ν Ν Ο
Π Θ Θ Ρ Ρ Σ Σ Τ Υ Υ ς ς Ω Ω Ξ Ξ Ψ Ψ Ζ Ζ [ [ ∴ ∴ ] ] ⊥ ⊥ _
 α α β β χ δ δ ε ε φ φ γ γ η η ι ι ϕ ϕ κ κ λ µ µ ν ν ο
π θ θ ρ ρ σ σ τ τ υ υ ϖ ϖ ω ω ξ ξ ψ ψ ζ ζ { | | } } ∼ ∼ R
R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R
R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R
R ϒ ′ ′ ≤ ≤ ⁄ ⁄ ∞ ∞ ƒ ƒ ♣ ♣ ♦ ♥ ♥ ♠ ♠ ↔←↑ ↑ →↓
° ± ± ″ ″ ≥ ≥ × ∝ ∝ ∂ ∂ • • ÷ ÷ ≠ ≡ ≡ ≈ ≈ …  ↵
ℵ ℑ ℑ ℜ ℜ ℘⊗ ⊗ ⊕ ∅ ∅ ∩ ∩ ∪ ⊃ ⊇ ⊇ ⊄ ⊂ ⊆ ∈ ∉
∠ ∇ ∇      ∏ ∏ √ √ ⋅ ⋅ ¬ ¬ ∧ ∧ ∨ ∨ ⇔⇐⇑ ⇒⇓
◊ 〈 〈     ∑ ∑              
R 〉 〉 ∫ ∫ ⌠ ⌠  ⌡              R
114
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested