asp.net mvc display pdf : Reader shrink pdf application Library utility azure asp.net wpf visual studio MathType5WinManual2-part1439

Chapter 3:  Basic Concepts 
to delete the selection. Pressing the E
NTER
key will start a new line below the 
original line. Immediately after typing, you can choose the Undo Typing 
command on the Edit menu to erase everything that you typed since the last 
non-typing operation. 
Why the Spacebar Doesn’t Work 
The S
PACE
key usually has no effect, since MathType performs spacing of 
mathematical equations automatically. Professional-quality mathematical 
formatting involves six different space widths, none of which is the same width 
as the space character in most fonts, so it would be undesirable to insert the 
standard space character into your equations. Many people find this a bit 
confusing at first, but you will get used to it quickly. However, sometimes you 
might want to insert a non-mathematical phrase into your equations and, here, 
the standard space is exactly what you want. To do this, just change the current 
style to Text and start typing. See Tutorial 4 in Chapter 4 for details. 
Sometimes you may find it necessary to override MathType’s automatic spacing. 
There are C
TRL
(Control) key shortcuts for entering various widths of space; for 
instance, C
TRL
+S
PACE
inserts a thin space. See Tutorial 6 in Chapter 4 for more 
information. 
Inserting Symbols 
Keyboard Shortcuts 
MathType also provides 
keyboard shortcuts for 
inserting almost all 
symbols on the palettes. 
These are shown in the 
Status Bar when the 
mouse is over each 
symbol. You can also 
assign your own 
keyboard shortcut to any 
symbol. See Tutorial 16 
in Chapter 4 for more 
information. 
To insert a symbol, you click on it in one of the bars, or choose it from one of the 
Symbol Palettes, as shown in the picture below. The Symbol Palettes work like 
standard Windows menus — just press or click the left mouse button to display 
the palette’s contents, then choose the desired symbol. The symbol will be 
inserted immediately to the right of the insertion point or, if something is 
selected, the symbol will replace it. 
15
Reader shrink pdf - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
change file size of pdf document; change font size in fillable pdf
Reader shrink pdf - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
change page size pdf acrobat; pdf font size change
MathType User Manual 
Inserting Templates 
Keyboard Shortcuts 
MathType also provides 
keyboard shortcuts for 
inserting almost all 
templates. These are 
shown in the Status Bar 
when the mouse is over 
each template. You can 
also assign your own 
keyboard shortcut to any 
template. See 
Tutorial 16 in Chapter 4 
for more information. 
Equation Structure 
To better understand the 
structure of your 
equation, cycle the 
insertion point through 
the slots, and watch how 
its size and shape 
changes. Alternatively, 
use the Show Nesting 
command on the View 
menu. See Tutorial 1 in 
Chapter 4 for an 
example. 
To insert a template, you click on it in one of the bars, or choose it from one of 
the Template Palettes. The Template Palettes work like standard Windows 
menus — just press or click the left mouse button to display the palette’s 
contents, then choose the desired template. The template will be inserted 
immediately to the right of the insertion point or, if something is selected, the 
template will “wrap” itself around it. 
A template is a formatted collection of symbols and empty slots. You build 
expressions by inserting templates and then filling in their slots. You can insert 
templates into the slots of other templates, so complex hierarchical formulas can 
be built up in a natural way. Slots are “intelligent” in the sense that they control 
the properties of any characters inserted into them. For example, any text that 
you insert into the upper limit slot in a summation template is automatically 
reduced in size and is centered above the summation sign.  
Placing the Insertion Point 
You can place the insertion point within the text in any slot by positioning the 
mouse pointer over the desired position, and clicking, just like in a word 
processor. Pressing the T
AB
key or the I
NSERT
key will move the insertion point to 
the end of the next slot in the equation. Therefore, by repeatedly pressing the T
AB
or I
NSERT
key, you can make the insertion point cycle through every slot in the 
equation. (Since the T
AB
key is used to cycle the insertion point, you may be 
wondering how to enter tab characters. This is done with C
TRL
+T
AB
.) 
If you hold down the S
HIFT 
key while pressing the T
AB
key, the insertion point 
will move around the equation in the reverse direction. You can also move the 
insertion point by using the arrow keys; this is described in more detail in the 
following section. 
You can tell which slot contains the insertion point from its size and shape. The 
horizontal line of the insertion point runs along the bottom edge of the slot, and 
the vertical line of the insertion point runs from the top to the bottom of the slot. 
If you’ve turned on nesting with the Show Nesting command, you can tell which 
slot contains the insertion point by its background color. 
16
VB.NET Image: Image Scaling SDK to Scale Picture / Photo
licenses; Allow VB.NET programmers to enlarge & shrink source image file while maintain original image width to height ratio; Scaled
change pdf page size; reduce pdf file size
VB.NET TIFF: How to Convert TIFF to GIF Using VB.NET TIFF to GIF
VB.NET, please change the function code "ImageFormat.Gif" to "ImageFormat.Jpeg/Pdf". Welch - a simple form of file compressing) compression to shrink file size
reader compress pdf; change font size in pdf form
Chapter 3:  Basic Concepts 
The equations in the first row below show four different insertion point 
positions, and the four pictures in the second row show the result of typing an m 
into the expression in each case: 
Moving the Insertion Point 
As described previously, you can use the T
AB
key to move the insertion point 
through all of an equation’s slots. Holding down the S
HIFT
key moves the 
moving the insertion point more precisely. 
The rules for using the arrow keys are somewhat tedious to describe (and to 
read, no doubt) — it’s easier to experiment with a couple of equations to 
understand the behavior. Here’s a quick guide to how they work. 
Roughly speaking, pressing the L
EFT 
A
RROW
key moves the insertion point one 
character to the left, and R
IGHT 
A
RROW
moves one character to the right. If the 
next character is a template, the insertion point moves into the template’s first 
slot. If there are no more characters in a template slot to move over, the insertion 
point will move out of the template. 
If you hold down the C
TRL
+S
HIFT
key combination while pressing the arrow 
keys, the insertion point will move over templates; it will not move into a 
template’s first slot. 
The U
A
RROW
and D
OWN 
A
RROW
keys move the insertion point up and down 
between lines or template slots. The up and down directions are generally 
determined by the physical location of each slot, but when templates are nested 
within templates, the template hierarchy may take precedence, and not every 
slot may be passed through. 
The H
OME
key moves the insertion point to the beginning of the current slot, the 
E
ND
key moves it to the end. The P
AGE 
U
P
and P
AGE 
D
OWN
keys scroll the 
MathType window up and down respectively, but do not actually move the 
insertion point. 
17
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
image resizing method is extremely easy and developers can shrink or reduce dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
change font size in fillable pdf form; pdf change page size
VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert PowerPoint to BMP Image with VB PPT
If you convert PowerPoint to BMP image, it can help you shrink the file size files just like our other document converters, such as VB.NET PDF Converter, Excel
optimize scanned pdf; 300 dpi pdf file size
MathType User Manual 
Selecting Items in an Equation 
Selecting Entire Slots 
You can select an entire 
slot by double-clicking 
anywhere in the slot. 
This is analogous to the 
way many word 
processors allow you to 
select a word by double-
clicking on it. 
Aligning Lines in Piles 
You can align the lines 
in a pile in various ways 
using the commands on 
the Format menu. 
As usual in Windows applications, you have to select the items that you want to 
operate upon before you choose the command that is to be applied to them. In 
MathType, the selected part of the equation will be affected by a subsequent 
editing command such as Cut, Copy, or Nudge. To select part of an equation, 
you position the mouse pointer over one end of the items to be selected, and then 
press and hold down the left mouse button while dragging the pointer over the 
equation. The selected items will be highlighted.  
Selecting with the Arrow Keys 
You can make a selection (or extend a previous selection) by holding down the 
S
HIFT 
key and pressing the L
EFT 
A
RROW
or R
IGHT 
A
RROW
key. Pressing the arrow 
key moves the insertion point through your equation, in the usual way, and 
holding down the S
HIFT 
key will cause it to select all the items it passes through. 
Selecting Embellishments and Parts of Templates   
Holding down the C
TRL
key allows you to select a character embellishment, such 
as a “hat” or overbar, or an item that is part of a template (as opposed to an item 
within one of the slots in a template), such as the 
Σ
in the picture below. If you 
hold down the C
TRL 
key, then the mouse pointer changes from an angled arrow 
into a vertical one. You can then select the template component by clicking on it 
with the vertical pointer. This is useful if you want to change the size of a 
summation sign or nudge a prime to a new position, for example. 
The E
NTER
Key 
Pressing the E
NTER
(↵) key will create a new line with a single empty slot 
immediately beneath the slot containing the insertion point. A series of lines 
created in this way, one above another, is called a pile. You can use piles to 
represent matrices and column vectors, if you prefer them to MathType’s built-in 
matrices. Pressing the B
ACKSPACE
key with the insertion point at the beginning of 
a line will join it back to the line above. 
18
Chapter 3:  Basic Concepts 
Keyboard Shortcuts 
Watch the Status Bar 
When the mouse is over 
a symbol or template in 
the Toolbar, the Status 
Bar shows its keyboard 
shortcut. You can list all 
shortcuts by using the 
Customize Keyboard 
command or by looking 
in the online help. See 
Tutorial 16 in Chapter 4 
for more information. 
You can execute almost all MathType operations directly from the keyboard by 
entering keystrokes while holding down the C
TRL 
(Control) key. For example, 
you can insert a fraction template using C
TRL
+F, i.e. by typing an F while holding 
down the C
TRL 
key. Shortcuts of this sort are useful for advanced users, 
especially expert touch-typists who like to keep their hands on the keyboard. 
Some shortcuts require you to type two keystroke combinations consecutively. 
For example, C
TRL
+S
HIFT
+I, 2 is a shortcut that inserts a double integral 
template. To type this, you must first type C
TRL
+S
HIFT
+I by pressing all three 
keys at the same time, release them, then type a 2. 
In this manual, when a shortcut must be entered with the S
HIFT
key held down, 
the S
HIFT
key will always be mentioned explicitly (as in the example above). 
Many of MathType’s shortcuts use non-alphabetic characters; they’ve been 
chosen for their mnemonic value. For example, typing C
TRL
+{ inserts the 
template. In some cases, to generate the mnemonic character you must also hold 
down S
HIFT
. When documenting these kinds of shortcuts in this manual (and in 
MathType itself) we do not explicitly state that the S
HIFT
key needs to be held 
down. However, when you enter the shortcut you need to be aware of this. So, 
for example, the shortcut for inserting a 
template is written as C
TRL
+{, not 
C
TRL
+S
HIFT
+[ or C
TRL
+S
HIFT
+{. 
19
MathType User Manual 
20
Chapter 4:  Tutorials 
Chapter 4 
Tutorials 
Before You Start 
This chapter contains several tutorial examples of using MathType. We provide 
step-by-step instructions for each example, so you should find it easy to work 
through them. Each tutorial should take you no more than 10 minutes, and they 
are by far the best way to learn MathType. Before you start, however, there are a 
few things to bear in mind. 
First, recall that you can find symbols and templates either in the palettes at the 
very top of the MathType window, or in the bars lower down. You have to pull 
down the palettes to find the items you need, but you can just click on the ones 
in the bars. For the most part, the tutorials will require very common symbols 
and templates that we placed in the bars for you before we shipped MathType. 
Tutorial 5. 
Undo and Redo  
You can also correct 
mistakes by using the 
Undo command on 
MathType’s Edit menu. 
In MathType 5 you can 
Undo and Redo an 
unlimited number of 
times. 
Also, you do not have to worry about making mistakes. If you type something 
wrong, or choose the wrong symbol from one of the palettes, you can correct 
your mistake by pressing the B
ACKSPACE
key. 
Fonts and the Appearance of Your Equations 
The tutorials will often tell you that “your equation should now look like this.” 
In fact, the appearance of your equation will be determined by the fonts you are 
using, so you shouldn’t take this statement too literally. MathType’s default fonts 
are Times New Roman, Symbol and MT Extra. These fonts will probably be 
acceptable, at least for the purposes of working through the tutorial, and we 
recommend that you stick with them until you’ve gained some experience 
working with MathType. 
For the time being, please do not change fonts by using the Other command on 
the Style menu — as you’ll see in Tutorial 8, there’s a much better way of doing 
this in MathType, and we don’t want you to get into any bad habits. 
Some Final Advice 
In the first few tutorial examples, we’re going to assume that you’re using 
MathType along with Microsoft Word to create a document. MathType works 
with a wide variety of word processing, publishing, Web editing and graphics 
programs, but Word is by far its most common companion. If you want to work 
through the tutorials using some other word processing application, it should be 
easy to adapt the instructions that follow. Also, detailed instructions for using 
MathType with other applications are available in Chapter 5. 
21
MathType User Manual 
In the tutorials, we’ll often tell you to type certain characters into your equations. 
The characters you have to type will be shown in bold type. 
Tutorial 1: Fractions and Square Roots 
In our first tutorial, we will create the equation 
2
3
16
sin
tan
y
x c
µ
=
− ±
x 
This is a very simple equation, but you’ll learn about fractions and square root 
templates, and we’ll explore the properties of the insertion point, and illustrate 
MathType’s function recognition and automatic spacing capabilities. 
To create the equation, just follow the steps listed below. Remember that the 
characters you have to type into the equation are shown in bold type
1. 
Open a new Word document, and type a few lines of text, just to make the 
situation a bit more realistic. 
Word Toolbar 
You can insert a display 
equation using the 
button on Word’s 
MathType toolbar. You 
can see what each 
toolbar button does by 
holding the mouse 
pointer over the button 
for a couple of seconds. 
A tooltip will appear 
containing the name of 
the button’s command. 
2. 
Now we’re ready to insert a MathType equation. If you installed MathType 
correctly, there should be a MathType menu towards the right-hand end of the 
Word menu bar, as shown below. 
From the MathType menu choose the Insert Display Equation command. This 
will open a MathType window, ready for you to start creating the equation. If for 
some reason neither the MathType menu nor the MathType toolbar is available 
in Word, use Word’s Insert Object command (choose Object on the Insert menu), 
and choose MathType 5.0 Equation from the list of object types displayed. See 
Chapter 5 to learn about other ways to insert an equation, either in Word or 
other applications. 
3. 
In the MathType window, type y=. You don’t have to type a space between 
the y and the =, because MathType takes care of the spacing automatically. To 
help you break the habit of typing spaces, the spacebar is disabled most of the 
22
Chapter 4:  Tutorials 
time in MathType, so pressing it will have no effect (other than producing an 
annoying beep!). Chapter 7 discusses where and how you should enter spaces in 
MathType, but you won’t have to do this very often. 
Also, notice that the y has been made italic, but the = sign has not. Mathematical 
variables are almost always printed in italics, so this is the default in MathType. 
You can change this by redefining the Variable style using the Define command 
on MathType’s Style menu. See Chapter 7 for details. 
4. 
Now we need to enter a square root sign. To do this, click on the
icon in 
the Small Bar. The 
template’s home is in the 
palette, but we’ve also 
moved it into the Small Bar to make it easier for you to find. Your equation 
should now look like this: 
The characters in the equation might be larger than you expect, but this is just a 
result of the viewing scale you’re using. You can use the commands on the View 
menu to change the viewing scale to anything between 25% and 800%. The 
blinking insertion point should be in the slot under the square root sign, 
indicating that whatever you enter next will appear there. 
Fraction Template 
As you hold the mouse 
pointer over the palette 
items their name is 
displayed in the status 
bar at the bottom of the 
MathType window. This 
will help you make sure 
you pick the correct 
template. 
5. 
Next, we enter a fraction template. To do this, go to the 
palette and 
choose the 
template — it’s the one on the right in the top row. This template 
produces reduced-size fractions, sometimes known as “case” fractions in the 
typesetting world. Case fractions are generally used to save space when the 
numerator and denominator of the fraction are just plain numbers. Be careful not 
to choose the larger 
template — this would create a full-size fraction, which 
would be too big for this situation. Notice how MathType automatically expands 
the size of the square root sign to accommodate the fraction. Your equation 
should now look like this: 
The insertion point should be in the numerator (upper) slot of the fraction 
template. 
6. 
To enter the numerator of the fraction, just type 3
7. 
the fraction. You can do this by pressing the T
AB
key or by clicking inside the 
denominator slot in your equation. 
8. 
Enter the denominator by typing 16
9. 
Next we need to add the
sin
x
outside of the square root sign, and to do this 
we have to get the insertion point into the correct position in the hierarchy of 
slots that make up the equation. If you repeatedly press the T
AB
key, you can 
23
MathType User Manual 
make the insertion point cycle through all the slots in the formula. If you hold 
down the S
HIFT
key while you do this, the insertion point will cycle through the 
slots in the reverse direction. Try this out to see how it works. Three of the 
positions that the insertion point will assume during the course of this cycling 
what’s happening a little better: 
If you use the Show Nesting command on the View menu, you can get an even 
better picture of the hierarchical arrangement of slots in your equation: 
We have to decide which of these insertion point positions is the right one for 
adding the
sin
x. The position on the left is clearly wrong — we don’t want the 
sin
x
to go in the denominator of the fraction. In the position shown in the center, 
the insertion point is in the main slot under the square root sign, so if we type in 
sin
x
the result will be the following formula: 
This is not what we want either. The insertion point position shown on the far 
right is the correct one; the insertion point is outside the square root, which is 
where we want the sin
x
to go. 
Functions 
You can customize the 
list of functions that 
MathType automatically 
recognizes. Tutorial 4 
contains an example. 
10. 
Keep pressing the Tab key until the insertion point arrives in the correct 
position, and then type in the letters sinx. Type slowly, so that you can watch 
what happens. When you initially type them, the s and the i will be italic, 
because MathType assumes that they are variables. However, as soon as you 
type the n, MathType recognizes that sin is an abbreviation for the sine function. 
Following standard typesetting rules, MathType uses plain Roman (non-italic) 
format for the sin, and inserts a thin space (one sixth of an em) between the sin 
and the x. 
24
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested