Chapter 4:  Tutorials 
45
θ
TIP 
You can also right-click 
in the Style panel of the 
Status Bar to make the 
Style menu appear. 
While working through this tutorial, you have probably noticed that each of the 
styles is also listed as a command on the Style menu. This allows you to 
explicitly assign a particular style to selected or subsequently-typed characters. 
The Other command on the Style menu can be used to assign any font available 
on your computer to selected or subsequently-typed characters. Please see 
Chapter 7 for further details. 
Tutorial 9: Equation Numbering in Microsoft Word 
This tutorial describes how to use the MathType commands for numbering 
equations in Microsoft Word documents. Although Word has its own method for 
numbering equations (captions), Word places captions above or below an item, 
not to the side, which is typically how equations are numbered. Using the 
MathType toolbar that’s added to Word, you can enter inline, display and 
numbered display equations with just one click. 
We’re going to create the following portion of a document to illustrate the 
equation numbering commands. 
We now have two basic equations: 
(1.1) 
2
2
cos
sin
1
θ
θ
+
=
(1.2) 
2
2
cos
sin
cos2
θ
θ
=
Adding these two together, we obtain 
2
1
2
cos
(1 cos2 2 )
θ=
+
θ  
(1.3) 
Subtracting (1.2) from (1.1) gives 
2
1
2
sin
(1 cos2 2 )
θ=
θ  
(1.4) 
Using (1.4) we can show thatcos
2
2
1 2sin n .
θ
θ
= −
However, we’re going to create it in a slightly unrealistic sequence, in order to 
illustrate the power and flexibility of the numbering commands. 
1.
Run Microsoft Word and create a new document. 
2.
Enter the following text: We now have two basic equations: 
3.
Click on the 
button on Word’s MathType toolbar, or choose the Insert 
Right-Numbered Display Equation command on the MathType menu. 
Pdf compression settings - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
change font size pdf form; pdf change page size
Pdf compression settings - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
pdf compressor; pdf text box font size
MathType User Manual 
4.
A dialog will appear asking if you want to create a new chapter/section 
break at the start of this document. We’ll explain the meaning of this later in the 
tutorial. For now, just click OK. 
Word Styles Used 
The line containing the 
equation is formatted 
with Word’s 
MTDisplayEquation 
style, which you can 
modify to affect all 
display equations in 
your document. 
Equation References 
• You can jump to an 
equation in your 
document quickly by 
double-clicking on any 
of its references. Then 
press S
HIFT
+F5 to jump 
back to the reference. 
• In large documents try 
splitting your window 
into two panes (search 
for split in Word’s Help). 
Insert the references in 
one pane and scroll and 
double-click on the 
equation numbers in the 
other. 
• You can place 
equation number 
references in footnotes 
and endnotes. 
5.
In the MathType window that opens, enter the following equation: 
2
2
cos
sin
1
θ
θ
+
=
then close the MathType window. In your Word document, notice that the 
equation is centered and the equation number is aligned with the right margin. 
6.
Repeat step 3 and insert the following equation into your Word document: 
2
2
cos
sin
cos2
θ
θ
=
θ
7.
Enter the following text at the start of the next line: Subtracting  
8.
Now let’s insert a reference to the second display equation. Click the 
button on the MathType toolbar or choose the Insert Equation Reference 
command on the MathType menu. The Insert Equation Reference dialog will 
appear, displaying brief instructions about inserting an equation number 
reference. Once you are familiar with the process you can click the “Don’t show 
me again” box. For now, click OK, then double-click on the equation number 
(1.2). You’ll see that the number (1.2) is inserted into your sentence. 
9.
Type from and then enter a reference to equation (1.1) using the method 
10.
Then type gives and insert the following numbered display equation: 
2
1
2
sin
(1 cos2 2 )
θ
θ
=
11.
At the start of the following line, type Using and insert a reference to 
equation (1.3). Complete the line by typing we can show that 
12.
Click the 
button on Word’s MathType toolbar, or choose the Insert Inline 
Equation command on the MathType menu, and insert the following equation: 
2
cos2
1 2sin n .
θ
θ
= −
Notice how this equation is inserted in the line of text (hence the name inline 
equation). Word also aligns the equation with the baseline of the text. Your 
document should now look like this: 
46
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
The magnification of the original PDF page size. compression, The target compression of the output tiff file to DOCX/TIFF with specified settings through options
can a pdf file be compressed; can pdf files be compressed
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
compression, The target compression of the output tiff file, it is invalid for pdf Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF with specified settings through options
pdf compression; pdf files optimized
Chapter 4:  Tutorials 
We now have two basic equations: 
(1.1) 
2
2
cos
sin
1
θ
θ
+
=
(1.2) 
2
2
cos
sin
cos2
θ
θ
=
θ
Subtracting (1.2) from (1.1) gives 
2
1
2
sin
(1 cos2 2 )
θ=
θ  
(1.3) 
Using (1.3) we can show thatcos
2
2
1 2sin n .
θ
θ
= −
Now we’ll insert another equation in the middle of this example to demonstrate 
automatic renumbering. 
13.
Place the insertion point before the word Subtracting, and enter the 
following text: Adding these two together, we obtain  
Equation Numbers 
You can insert just an 
equation number using 
the Insert Equation 
Number command. 
If Updating Is Slow 
If updating takes too 
long, uncheck “Update 
equation numbers 
automatically” in the 
Format Equation 
Numbers dialog. Then 
use the Update 
Equation Numbers 
command to manually 
update the numbers. 
Whole Document 
To change the format of 
existing equation 
numbers you must 
check the Whole 
Document checkbox. 
Otherwise you’re only 
setting the format for the 
next number(s) you 
insert. 
14.
Insert this numbered display equation: 
2
1
2
cos
(1 cos2 2 )
θ
θ
=
+
You’ll see that the new equation is numbered (1.3), and the following equation 
number and its reference have been renumbered to (1.4). Your document should 
now look like the example at the start of this tutorial. 
Whenever you insert an equation number or an equation reference, all numbers 
in the document are updated. However, if you move or delete an equation 
number, you must use the Update Equation Numbers command on the 
MathType menu to regenerate the number sequence. Also, be aware that 
deleting an equation number does not automatically delete any of its references; 
you’ll have to do this yourself. You can find them by using the Update Equation 
Numbers command, which will cause Word to display an error message in place 
of each reference. You can then delete them. 
Equation Number Formats 
You can also control the format of the equation numbers. 
15.
Choose the Format Equation Numbers command on the MathType menu 
(there’s no toolbar button for this command). Check the Whole Document 
checkbox (to change the existing numbers) and change the Enclosure option to 
<> (angle brackets). The preview shows you the result of your settings. Click OK, 
and you’ll see the equation numbers and references change to the new format. 
possible combinations. 
47
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
compression, The target compression of the output tiff file, it is invalid for pdf Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF with specified settings through options
best way to compress pdf file; change font size pdf document
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
compression, The target compression of the output tiff file, it is invalid for pdf Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF with specified settings through options
optimize scanned pdf; adjusting page size in pdf
MathType User Manual 
Chapter/Section Breaks 
Section Numbers 
If you don’t want section 
numbers included, you 
can turn them off in the 
Format Equation 
Numbers dialog.  
Show Chapter/Section 
Breaks 
You can show and hide 
chapter/section breaks 
by clicking on the 
button in Word’s toolbar. 
This shows and hides 
the MTEquationSection 
style. 
The default equation number format includes a section number and an equation 
number, e.g. (1.1). You can also include a chapter number if needed. The chapter 
and section numbers are determined by the nearest preceding Chapter/Section 
Break in your document. You insert and modify these breaks using commands 
on the MathType menu. We already inserted one at the start of this document as 
part of inserting the first equation number. Now we’ll change its value. 
16.
Choose the Modify Chapter/Section Break command on the MathType 
menu. The location of the section break will be highlighted and the Modify 
Chapter/Section Break dialog will open. Let’s assume we’re working on 
Section 2 of a book, so we want the section number to be 2 and the equation 
number to be 1. Choose the “Section number:” button and enter 2. The “Next” 
option can be useful if your document contains several sections and you want 
them numbered sequentially. (Remember that there’s no link between Word’s 
sections and MathType’s chapter/section breaks; it’s up to you to associate them 
by placing the breaks in the appropriate places in your document). Now click 
OK. The chapter/section break will be hidden, and the equation numbers in the 
document will all start with 2. 
If you’ve followed these steps your document should look something like this: 
We now have two basic equations: 
<2.1> 
2
2
cos
sin
1
θ
θ
+
=
<2.2> 
2
2
cos
sin
cos2
θ
θ
=
θ
Adding these two together, we obtain 
2
1
2
cos
(1 cos2 2 )
θ=
+
θ  
<2.3> 
Subtracting <2.2> from <2.1> gives 
2
1
2
sin
(1 cos2 2 )
θ=
θ  
<2.4> 
Using <2.4> we can show thatcos
2
2
1 2sin n .
θ
θ
= −
MathType’s equation numbering commands can also support three levels of 
numbering, e.g. chapter, section and equation numbers. You can also control the 
format of the numbers and create your own custom formats. The following 
tutorial shows you how to do this; we’ll use the document we created in this 
tutorial so don’t delete it! 
48
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
compression, The target compression of the output tiff file, it is invalid for pdf Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF with specified settings through options
advanced pdf compressor online; pdf file size
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
The magnification of the original PDF page size. compression, The target compression of the output tiff file to DOCX/TIFF with specified settings through options
change file size of pdf document; reduce pdf file size
Chapter 4:  Tutorials 
Tutorial 10: Advanced Equation Numbering in 
Microsoft Word 
The simple equation numbering example shown in the previous tutorial is 
sufficient for many documents, but sometimes you may need to create a third 
level of numbers. For example your document may require chapter, section and 
equation numbers. Or, you may find that the built-in number formats don’t 
match your needs and you’d like to create a custom number format. This tutorial 
shows you how to accomplish both tasks. 
1.
Open the document you created in the previous tutorial. 
2.
Open the Format Equation Numbers dialog by choosing the Format 
Equation Numbers command on the MathType menu. 
49
C# Create PDF from CSV to convert csv files to PDF in C#.net, ASP.
compression, The target compression of the output tiff file, it is invalid for pdf Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF with specified settings through options
pdf page size limit; change pdf page size
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
compression, The target compression of the output tiff file, it is invalid for pdf Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF with specified settings through options
adjust file size of pdf; best pdf compressor
MathType User Manual 
3.
The settings should appear as shown above. The top group of items controls 
the number format. We want to add a chapter number, so check the “Chapter 
Number” checkbox. Notice how the preview changes to <1.1.1>). 
4.
Check the “Whole document” checkbox so that the changes we make will be 
applied to existing equation numbers. Then click OK. 
You’ll notice that the document has changed, and the equation numbers now 
read <1.2.1>, <1.2.2> etc. This is because the chapter/section break at the start of 
the document sets the chapter number to 1. This was added to the document 
when we inserted the first equation number. Let’s pretend we want to set this to 
be Chapter 2. 
5.
Choose the Modify Chapter/Section Break command on the MathType 
menu, and the following dialog will open. You’ll see that the break itself has also 
been made visible in the Word document. 
6.
Change the Chapter number value to 2 and click OK. The numbers in the 
document should now read <2.2.1>, <2.2.2> etc. 
Now let’s try changing the format of the numbers more dramatically. We’ll set 
the format so that the numbers read Equation 2.2.1, Equation 2.2.2 etc. 
7.
Choose the Format Equation Numbers command on the MathType menu. 
Select the Advanced Format radio button, and enter Equation #C1.#S1.#E1 in 
the edit box. You’ll see how the Preview changes. 
8.
Check the “Whole document” checkbox, and click OK. The equation 
numbers in the document should be updated. 
You can experiment with different custom formats in this manner. The 
‘language’ used for the formats is very simple, all characters are used literally 
except for the constructs #Cx, #Sx and #Ex, where x indicates the numeric 
representation and can be one of 1,a,A,i,I. 
50
C# Create PDF from RTF to convert csv files to PDF in C#.net, ASP.
compression, The target compression of the output tiff file, it is invalid for pdf Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF with specified settings through options
change font size in fillable pdf form; pdf change font size
Chapter 4:  Tutorials 
A fast way of learning how to control the formatting is to select the Simple 
Format button, and then change the various options. The Advanced Format text 
is still visible, and it updates every time you make a change to the built-in 
formats. Full details are in the Help for this dialog. 
Tutorial 11: Setting Up a Microsoft Word Document 
When creating a Microsoft Word document containing equations there are 
several considerations you should keep in mind. You’ll probably want the body 
text to match the equations in terms of fonts and sizes, and you’ll typically want 
all equations in the document to use consistent formatting, i.e. the same font and 
size settings, as well as any other special settings you may have made in 
MathType. 
This tutorial shows you how to achieve these goals, and how to update the 
document’s equations if you decide to change your fonts and/or sizes. 
Word’s Styles 
If you’re not familiar with 
Word’s styles we urge 
you to take a few 
minutes to learn how to 
use them. In Word’s 
Help Contents, search 
for styles
Factory Settings 
Click “Factory settings” 
to reset the values. 
Equation Preferences 
The definitions of all the 
styles, sizes, and 
spacing used in an 
equation are referred to 
collectively as “equation 
preferences”. See 
Chapter 7 for more 
details. 
Although Word and MathType allow you to select text and change its font and 
size directly, we strongly recommend that you make use of styles, instead. Both 
programs use this approach because it makes modifying the look of a document 
or equation very easy. You simply change the definition of a style (e.g. from 
document or equation is immediately reformatted with the new settings.  
Let’s assume that you’re required to produce a document where the body font is 
the Word document. 
1.
In MathType, open the Define Styles dialog and set the main font to Times 
New Roman using either the Simple or Advanced pane. Make sure the “Use for 
new equations” box is checked, and click OK. 
2.
Open the Define Sizes dialog and set the Full size to 10 pt. As the other 
dimensions are by default expressed as percentages, MathType will calculate 
them for you. Again, check the “Use for new equations” option, and click OK. 
3.
Back in Word, choose the Set Equation Preferences command on the 
MathType menu. Make sure the “MathType’s ‘New Equation’ preferences” 
option is selected. This means that whenever you create a new equation using 
the commands on the MathType menu or MathType toolbar, the settings 
MathType is currently set to use for new equations are the ones that will be used. 
Click OK to close this dialog. 
preferences. If you tend to change MathType’s size and style definitions quite 
often, you may want to create a MathType preference file, and then choose this 
file in the Set Equation Preferences dialog. This will copy the file’s preferences 
into your Word document, so that no matter what changes you make to 
51
MathType User Manual 
MathType, equations created in your document will always use these 
preferences. 
4.
Now we’ll quickly create a Word style for the body of the document. Choose 
the Style command on Word’s Format menu, click New and name the new style 
“body”. You’ll probably base it on Word’s built-in normal style. Set the new 
style’s font to Times New Roman 10 pt by clicking on the Format button and 
choosing Font. Click OK to close the Font dialog. 
Line Spacing 
For a more detailed 
discussion of this issue 
see the Using MathType 
with Microsoft Word 
section of Chapter 5. 
5.
Click on the Format button again and this time choose Paragraph. In the 
dialog’s Indents and Spacing page, change the Line Spacing option to Exactly, 
and type 12 pt in the accompanying text box. This forces Word to use this value 
when spacing lines of text, and prevents Word applying extra spacing around 
lines that contain inline equations. Click OK to close the dialog. 
6.
Click OK to close the New Style dialog, and then click Apply to close the 
Style dialog. 
You’ve now configured Word and MathType to use the same font and size 
definitions, which will make equations closely match the look of the rest of the 
document. Go ahead and enter a line or two of text and insert a simple equation. 
Now let’s suppose that, as so frequently happens, you have to change the 
document’s font to Garamond. To keep this example simple we won’t change the 
point size, but you’d follow the same steps if this were the case. 
These are the changes we need to make: 
• Modify Word’s “body” style to use Garamond instead of Times New Roman. 
• Modify MathType’s styles to use Garamond instead of Times New Roman. 
• Update the existing equations in the document to use the new font. 
The first two steps are very similar to how we originally created the styles and 
added them to the Word document, so we won’t go through them in detail. The 
first step involves using Word’s Style dialog, the second step requires 
MathType’s Define Styles dialog. 
The third step involves the Format Equations command on the MathType menu. 
7.
Choose the Format Equations command, and the Format Equations dialog 
will appear. This dialog allows you to reformat the equations in your document, 
and provides you with several ways to determine the equation preferences that 
are applied. The choices are: 
• The equation preferences already stored in this document. 
• MathType’s current equation preferences for new equations. 
• The equation preferences contained in a MathType equation you’ve copied to 
the clipboard. 
52
Chapter 4:  Tutorials 
• The equation preferences contained in a MathType preference file. 
TIP 
Click Help for more 
details on the other 
options. 
Choosing Styles 
Another way to choose 
a style is to right-click in 
the Style panel of the 
status bar and select the 
style from the context 
menu that appears. 
For this example click the “MathType’s ‘New Equations’ preferences” button. 
You can click Preview to get a list of the actual preferences. 
8.
Click OK and the formatting process will start. This can take anywhere from 
a few seconds to several minutes depending on the speed of your computer and 
the number of equations in your document. The command’s progress is shown 
in Word’s status bar. When the operation has finished, check that the equations 
were updated. 
Tutorial 12: Formatting with Tabs 
In this example we show you how MathType’s system of tabs provides extra 
flexibility for formatting equations. We’re going to create the equation: 
1
9.76
when  is even
( )
14.3
when  is odd
n
x
n
c x
k
x
n
+
=
and then format it several different ways. We proceed as follows: 
1. 
Create the expression on the left-hand side of the equals sign. As you know 
by now, you can choose the 
template or press C
TRL
+L to attach the subscript 
to the c
2. 
Choose the 
template from the 
palette to insert an expanding left 
brace. You should now have the following: 
3. 
Enter the top expression in the brace, up to and including the x, and then 
press C
TRL
+T
AB
(press the T
AB
key while holding down the C
TRL
key). If you 
press the T
AB
key alone, this will move the insertion point, rather than insert a 
tab character. 
4. 
Choose the Text style from the Style menu and type in when n is even
While you’re using the Text style, the spacebar is active and you have to type 
spaces, as you would in a word processor. Choose Show All from the View 
menu, if it’s not already checked, so that you can see your tab character, which is 
displayed as a small diamond. Also, choose Ruler from the View menu if it’s not 
already checked. Your equation should look like this:  
53
MathType User Manual 
Note that the tab character causes the phrase “when n is even” to line up 
underneath the first default tab stop to the right of the x. The default tab stops 
(indicated by small inverted T’s along the Ruler scale) are positioned at half-inch 
intervals starting at the left-hand side of the current slot. Since we are currently 
within the main slot of the 
template, the half-inch intervals are measured 
from the left edge of this slot, i.e. just to the left of 
1
k
5. 
Press E
NTER
to start a new line underneath the first one, and type in its 
contents. You should switch back to the Math style to enter 14.3x, and switch 
back to Text again to type when n is odd. Insert a tab character (C
TRL
+T
AB
) after 
the x, as in the first line. This should give you: 
Again, the text phrase aligns with the first default tab stop to the right of the x
Note that you have created a two-line pile within the 
template, and that each 
pile in MathType has its own tab stops. 
Changing Styles 
Remember you can also 
use the keyboard 
shortcuts listed on the 
Style menu, or right-click 
on the Status Bar’s Style 
panel. 
6. 
Select the n in the first line and choose Math from the Style menu. This 
makes MathType interpret the n as a mathematical quantity, i.e. a variable, and 
will therefore apply the Variable style (typically italic). Do the same to the n in 
the second line. 
7. 
Place the insertion point somewhere within one of the two lines on the right-
hand side of the equation, click on the 
tab well, and then click on the Ruler at 
about the 1½ inch mark to set a left tab stop. This will remove all default tab 
stops to the left of the new tab stop. Your equation should now be aligned as 
shown below: 
If this is how we want the equation formatted, then our work is finished. 
However, there are several other options that are worth exploring. 
8. 
TRL
+T
AB
) at 
the start of each of the two lines. This will cause each line to be shifted so that its 
left-hand side aligns with the left tab stop. The text phrase in each line, since it is 
separated by another tab character, will align with the first available default tab 
stop to the right of the x
54
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested